UTK Disorientation Manual 2001

Item

Current View

Title

UTK Disorientation Manual 2001

Date

2001

Place

Knoxville, Tennessee

extracted text

Dr. Johnson'serection. What a biB erection £or
such a little BuY!ADBOT is proud 0£that erection
because i£ one 0£its own has an erection, it has an
erection by association.

I want the rank-and-tile workers on campus to
think about that $10 million erection. We could also
have an erection by association. Whoo-hoo. Some
0£that money could have been used to pay employeesa £air,livin8 wa8e. It could have been used to pay
£ora better medical benetits packa8e. It could have
been used £oracademics.We are receivin8 what the
rest 0£ our community receives when ADBOT has
an erection: a bi8 oran8e screw.
For many years, ADBOT has known that Tennesseewas in trouble re8ardin8 £l.mds£orhi8her education. Did it approach the University community and
say, "Join us. Let's 8et some kind 0£ tax re£orm?"
No. Tax re£ormin not in ADBOrs best sel£interest.
1£there was tax re£orm,ADBOT mi8ht be held responsible £or the tax money it receives,which is not
in its sel£interest. Also, tax re£ormmeansthat the £at
nabob ADBOT would have its salaries taxed, and
that

is

not

in

its

self

interest

either.

ADBOT devised a disin£ormation campai8n
the University would receive at least some sort
national rankin8. Obviously, i
in8 to come throU8h academicsbecauseADBOT ,
just tired the only person in 20 years who has .
£orm0£academic vision. So,it played upon the keen
instincts it developed durin8 its £rat-8l.1yyears."Partyin8 and £ootball!" it concluded.

.
"

ADBOT had a vision for 8ettin8 more
monel] without tax refornl. first, raise tuition 15
percent for in-state students (1was afraid to look
at the out-of-state increase).A person'sfirst
thou8ht is, "DANG, I need a beer." Then,
increase class sizesto over 100 students per
class.Cranl thenl into an auditorium to hear a
lecture. Thel] will turn their heads,as it is too
cramped to
turn at the
waist, and each
will think,
"DANG, I
need a beer."
Each will trl] to
chan8e to a
smaller class
section, but
there are none,
and the class is
only offered
once a year.
Each will

"i"£"'":,,,,1r"'

think, "DANG,
I need a beer."
Each student
will contemplatedroppin8
the class,but
by now
ADBOT has
instituted a
monetary
pena.lty for
droppin8
classes. The
studentwill
think,
..VANG,

l11eed

d heer!"

Do you seea plan developing? Let me help:
1. Increase education costs
2. Decrease services
3. Make classeslarger
4. Oiler lewer sections
5. Oiler classesonly once a year
6. Institute a monetan] penalty lor dropping classes.

There 1:JOUhave it: a six pack.
ADBOT has £oundthe per£ect£ormula £orturning a £our-year degree
into a six pack. Oh, I mean, a six-year ordeal. ADBOT cannot lose. It gets
money £romtuition, the dropped-class penalty and £romall the taxes paid
the beer stl.ldentsare going to consumeworrl:JinBabOl.lthow they are
to pa1.]back their student loans.
0£ course,ADBOT will tell the community that none 0£the
University's problems are its £ault. It will do anythinB to distract you £rom
seeinBthat ADBOT is a real enemy
0£the UT community.
ADBOT has even prostituted
the librarl:J.ADBOT knows that
alter you Bet your six beers you will
need to study, so it has opened the
lormer study lounge to Starbucks.
.when you draB yoursel£in to
..,
do some research you can clear your head with a $3 cup 0£co££ee.Isn't
ADBOT sensitive to students' needs?I will not mention that Starbucks is
usinBlabor £romAramark, the corporation that runs dininB servicesand
pays its workers un£air, poverty-level waBesand zero bene£its.
So, students, do what ADBOT commands.Go out and party. Drink
Ballons 0£beer; throw back those shooterswith abandon. But, keep track
much you spend so you can put IJOUlreceipts toBether, add up the
you have indulBed somuch they can add another
0£ that class you need
Your brother in the struMle,
Dave

McClure

Libra.rlJ worker "','
~

~

STARBUCKS:

HELLO
By: Renee

We have a new addition t-oUT's
corporate £amil\]: Starbucks. What is a
better place £orthis capi talist nightmare
than the stud\] lounge 0£HodgesLibranJ?
Just think, no competition and desperate students who need ca££eineto sta\]
awake and stud\]. This is an auspicious
opportunit\] to
make a £ew
bucks -$tarbuck$, that is.
Starbucks
is not \]our
£riendl\] downtown
co££ee
i
shop.
Like
McDonald'sand
Wal-Mart,
Starbucks un£airl\]
takes
business awa\]
£rom mom-and-

[
\

-1.t:

pop shops b\]
cutting comers.This is a social and environmental disaster. For one, Starbucks
uses prison labor to package its co££ee
beans (www.corpwatch.org) and pa':Js
lessthan minimum wage to these £orced
workers. Even more, it o££ersver\] poor
wages and working conditions to its Co££ee-plantation workers. Even its ca£e
workers receive minimal wages and are
intimidated and coerced out 0£ unionization.

AND
Bliss,

GOOD-BYE
S.P.E.AK.

co~president

Starbucks coffee mal:Jbe unsa£eto consume. Most Starbucks(
outlets are still usin8 milk that
comes£romdairiesthat allow cows
to be injected with Monsanto's
{the companl:Jthat brou8ht l:Jou
DDT and Agent Oran8e) controversial recombinant Bovine
Growth Hormone {rBGH),
a hormone o£ten associated
wi th
hi8her
risks £or cancer
in
humans.
rBGH
is a
power£ul dru8,
which cruelll:J
dama8es the
health 0£ddinJ
cows bl:J £orcinB them toBive
more milk. Milk £rom rBGH-injected cows is also likell:J to contain more pus, antibiotic residues
and bacteria. rBGH is banned in
evenJindustrializedcountnJ in the
world -except
the U.S.
Starbucks mal:Jbe new to
campus, but it is not welcome. It
is movin8 into communitiesallover
the world, and several 0£ these
communities are resistin8 its

"Estdhlished in 199.5, the World Trdde Orsdnizd lion
is d powerful Slokl commerce dSency. It is one of the
mdin mechdnisms of corpordte Slohdlizdlion. While its
proponents Sdl] it is bdsed on "lree trdde, in fdct, the
WTO~ rules set out d comprehensive system of COrpOrdte-!

:~

\f"'"ll
r:,:I~"

~

Q,,;
B1J Umar

SLIGIflLY

mdndSed trdde under which economic efficiency, reflected
in short-run COrpordte profits, domindtes other vdlues.
Decisions dffeclinS the economy dre to he confined to the
privdte sector, while socidl dnd environment dl costs dre
horne by the public. A Slohdl system of enforced hIe rules
is beins credted hy the WTO where corpordlions hdve dII
the rishts, Sovernments hdve dII the ohlisdtions dnd
democrdcy is left behind in the dust. "-Prom "A Citizen's
Guide to the World Trade Organization: Ever1:JthingYou
Need to Know to right for Pair Trade"

Tate

ANGRY MYSELF

AT mE ENORMOUS
WEALTH
COMPILED BY THE FILTHY RICH
mEYONLY
FUNCTION
FROM MY CONSUMPTION
WHILE I TAKE ON MORE THAN I

rt

601 James Agee Street
Behind

the

UT Law Building

TO THE

DEMISE
OF OUR MINDS
DEFINED AT OXFORD, REALIZED
BY WEBSTER, DERIVED
FROM SECULAR PYRAMID
IMAGES SMEARED OUT
OF FEAR OF mE TRUTH
NOTICE mE UPRISING OF A
COUPE

'4Ufl

,,~"

CAN
HANDLE STRESS FROM STRUGGLE
IS BUSHY LIKE A JUNGLE
WORDS I MUMBLE RUMBLE
LOUD
LIKE CONCRETE PILLARS
FALLING IN ROME ON All THE
VILLAGERS
UP RISE, PAY ATTENTION

~

~' ,

"Th e Be$t HomemadeJA~
OASD.N
Food in Tov/n For ~'eat Eaters
IIn~
and Vegetarians"
A~U
~

~

UPHOLD THE OUTCRIES AND FOLD
THESE FLAT OUT LIES
STEADY 1URNING PAGESOF TESTIMONY
SO AMAZING, PROFESSORSTEACH IT
LINE FOR LINE UNTIL STUDENTS CAN'T
ERASE IT FROM THEIR MINDS
BLIND TO THE ELEMENTS FLOATING
RIGHT IN FRONT OF OUR EYES,
QUICK TO TURN DEAF EARS ON THOSE WHO CRY
OUT AND ASK WHY?
nns 1YPE OF ROBOTIC, HYPNOTIC, CHRONIC
BEHAVIOR EXISTS ON A MYTH OF A LEVEL
PLAYINGFIELD
WITH NO SIGNS SAYING STOP,NO SIGNS SAYING YIELD
AT THE WAY MAN KILLS,
AT HE AMOUNT OF BLOOD THAT SPILLS;
SATURATED SOILS, 1URNING LIKE FOSSILFUELS
THAT OILS, DESTROY NOW,
BUILD LATER ATrITUDES RULE THE RULING CLASS,
I GUESSTHAT'S WHY THESE-ISMS ARE KICKING MY ASS.
TAKING A CRASH COURSEIN POLI-TRICKS
AND RELIGIOUS INTENT TO KEEP US ALL SPLIT
LIKE BAKED POTATOESWITH BUffER ON ONE SIDE
AND SOUR CREAM ON THE OTHER, NO WONDER
SUICIDES, MASS SUICIDES, ASSASSINATION ATTEMPTS
EXIST,
LIKE HEAT SEEKING MISSILES YOU ARE BOUND m GET HIT
RIGHT BETWEEN THE LIPS,
WHEN FOLLOWING THE WORDS OF SOMANY HYPOCRITES;
RIDICULOUS IDIOTS MOST CRITICS UPLIFT AND INSIST
MONUMENTS AND STATUESBE BUILT AND STREETSBE PAVED,
WORDS WRITTEN ABOUT HOW MUCH THEY GAVE.
OF COURSEBENEFICIARIES PRAISETHE ACTIONS OF THE BRAVE AND BOLD
WHO HAVE NO REMORSEFOR ALL THEY STOLE.
IF YOU ROB FROM THE RICH AND GIVE TO 11IEPOOR YOU A WHORE

BUT, IF YOU ROB FROM THE POOR AND GIVE TO THE RICH
YOU A HIT,
MAKING ALL KIND OF COMMENTS, AND YOU SILENCE THE CONVENfS.:
BUT EXPLOIT ITS CONTENTS ON ALL CONnNENTS
J
YOU'LL FIND THIS IN THE HOPES AND DREAMS
AND BIRrnDA Y WISHES, MASKED BY HUGS AND KISSES,
HIDDEN BY RUGS AND CLOSE D FENCES,
SNARED UP NOSES LIKE YOU SNIFFING ROSES
BUT THINGS AREN'T PEACHY
WHEN YOU DOWN BELOW WEEDS AND BRIAR PATCHES
AND OTHERS DISCUSS HOW YOU MAKE GOOD TRACTION
WHILE YOU GASPING FOR AIR
FROM ALL THE WEAR AND TEAR AND EROSION
MOVING IN SLOW MOTION
AT A HIGH RATE OF SPEED LIKE MILLISECONDS

ON A STOPW ATCH

GOT TO BE QUICK LIKE A BLOW BEING BLOCKED
OR A FOE BEING SHOT WE MAKE A HEALTHY MEAL FORA FOX
FROM LITI'LE RED RIDING HOOD TO GOLDIE LOX
TO THE OPENING OF PANDORA'S BOX
IT'S GOT TO STOP ~:

Knoxville's poetry slams are held at 8 p.m. on the third Friday of each
month at Barley's. Admission is $3; be there or be square. Open-mic
sessionswith the Knoxville Slam Poets are held at 8 p.m. on the fourth
Thursday of each month at the Platinum Lounge in the Old City.
Admission is free; be there or be a triangle.

~
r~

, J
"",.
Y.

"
r

.
-

vint4ge

cloth
qnd

evetything

t"ett"o.

,

.A livinB w68e in the Knoxville area is $9.50 per hour plus basic
benelits, providinB a lamil1Jollour with an annual income ol $19,760This is a "bare-bones" income that includes little or nothinB in the wa1Jol
amenities such as entertainment, travel or educational enrichment, but it
allows a workinBlamily to live with diBnit1J,lree ol dependence on public
subsidies such as TennCare, lood stamps and public housinB.
.0£ the 2124 hourly non-exempt {hourly) workers employed at
UT in Knoxville, the UT Department 0£Human Resourcesestimates that
816 workers {38 percent 0£the total) earn lessthan a livinB wa8e; based
on minimum hourly waBes£ortheir job classi£ications,an additiona1860
positions in the UT work£orce could sink below that level as new employees replace those who leave.
.UT's

Department

0£ Iiuman Resources estimated that the wages

0£ between 400 and 500 emplo1Jees£all below the povert1J ~uideline.
The1Jalso estimated that about 2/30£ the emplo1Jeesmakin~ povert1J
wages are women. Thus the Universit1J pa1Jsapproximatel1J one in evet1J
£our to £ive 0£ its hourl1J emplo1Jees Sopoorl1J that the1JCfUali£1J
£or various
£orms 0£ public assistance.

.Durin8 the last 25 t]ears,many workers have seentheir real
wd8es £all by as much as 20 percent. The real wd8es 0£mant] workin8
people in the United States have declined since 1975, creatin8 a 8rowin8
8ap between the economically well-oH on the one hand and wd8e earners
in the ind1.1strialand service sectors0£the economy on the other.
.Privatization
now representsan established labor polic1:Jat UT. It
is a polic1:Jthat has led to declinin8 wa8e5and disappearin8 bene£its£or
manlJ 0£the workers who provide essential services.Because the privatized workers are no lon8er le8al emplolJees0£the UniversitlJ, the UT
administration can pretend that the overall income 0£its non-exempt
emplo1:Jees
is improvin8 modestllJwhen in £act the income 0£workers who
continue to perform their work on campus has declined.

.Private contractors like
Aramark now employ university
£ood service workers across the
nation. Aramark's entire hourly
work£orce receives poverty
wages.The hi8hest hourly rate
paid to workers in the top
classi£ication,$8.00/hr,still £alls
below the £ederal poverty
8uideline £ora £amily 0££our.
.Aramark
contributes
nothing to worker medical
Iinsurance or retirement programs. I£ workers wish to join the compant]'s medical insurance plan thet]
must pat] 100 percent 01the monthIt] premium-an almost impossible
burden, given the disnlal monthIt] income Aramark's wage scale oilers.
.The policy 0£privatization at UfK has resulted in part £romthe
consistent pressure 0£private Corporations Upon both the state government
and the campus administration. The claim 0£these Corporationshas been
that they can provide the sameservicesmore cheaply and e££icientlythan
government insti tu tions.Un£ortunately, their questionalble level 0£success
in doing Sohas been to the detriment 0£campus workers, whose £aIling
wages and evaporating bene£itshave been the source 0£the money saved.
"":,

u"T CAMPUS:
ON

CUMBERLA1YD

.FREE
cant
ll.gO

522-4151

'\

A VE .-'THE

STRIp

DELIVBRYJ
iJ:JuO'u:s
Dl

cO'upOJ:Js :

!tn..1Wm/'CB!)AR

W1'n;'.s't~£anos

.C1om

!tLUPPI..PARJi.Jt,QM

eleYator doors.As studentsmoved into their apartments,
numerous sinks and bathtubs were lilth1.],which sparked complain ts lrom paren ts and students.Trashcanswere not placed in dozens ol apartments throughout the building.
The UT housing department even withheld Service Solution's pa1.]ment until someol the most llagrant ab1.lSeS
had been corrected. Someapart-(
ments had to be cleaned twice.
Aside lrom these examples ol slipshod work b1.]Service Solutions, the
net ellect ol the c'outsourcing"ol various UT departments led to
.Demoralization, c1.]nicismand alack ol trust within stall and super
visonj ranks ol state emplo1.]ees,
.A leelin8 that the Universit1.]'sdeca1.]is inevitable and ongoing,
.Students' comments that emplo1.]eesare highly stressed,
.lack
ol interest in and loyalty to the community lrom employees ol
private companies and
.lobb1.]ing by UT employees, who can also organize and vote.
When the low-quality work lrom Service Solutions is coupled with the
Gilley scandal, overemphasison athletics, dwindling state lunds and doubledigit tuition increasesit is eas1.]to seehow parents and students could begin to
place UT under a "microscope ol scrutiny and scorn." No wonder students,
laculty membersand employees have joined in an ellort to improve the University.
In conclusion, I oller a challenge to UT in Knoxville: Reversethe course
ol seli-destruction bel ore this institution is damaged beyond repair. Make UT
a c'party school" lor those who overdose on thinking, inventiveness and the
joy ol helping to lead our country into the twenty-lirst century. Instead ol
asking ourselves,"What are the limits?" let's aim to change the attitudes ol
Tennesseansso they lavor the limitless oceans ol discovery in education and
knowledge that UT could provide. ~'

II
, ,-

espresso cafe
825 Melrosc Pbce
Knoxville, TN 87916
865..
5

Fu

AA

1

"AA

~VV',:

865..088-2746

population of people of color on campus continues to make its voices heard.
The new Black Cultural Center is slated to open in March 2002 on Melrose
Avenue. This larBe facilitlJ will replace the inadequate spaceat 812 Volunteer
Boulevard. The Black Cultural ProBramminB Committee and the MinoritlJ
Student Affairs office have alsoplanned a buslJsemesterwith movie and Bame
niBhts, forums and special BuestsincludinB NAACP President Kweisi M£ume.
MinoritlJ Student Affairs also provides manlJhelp£ul proBramsfor all students,
includinB free tutorinB, book loaninB and special studlJ sessions.With all of
these opportunities and more, there is no excusefor anlJ student to remain in
the biased world that UT often seemsto represent. "',~

B1:JJakira Kaos
First Amendment Radio is a movenlent to bring Knoxville a tnJ1:J
independent, non-corporate communit1:Jradio station. It plans to £eature
news and music not £oundan1:Jwhere
else on the dial.
The group is in the process0£raising the monet) necessart)to but) a
transmitter. The next £und raiser is a bene£it show on Oct. 20 at 319 Gat)
St. The event will £eature per£ormancesbt) the activist Perrt) Redd and
the Sincere Seven, Mustard and others.
First Amendment Radio hopes to have the station on the air bt)
Thanksgiving. There is great in£ormation available, and i£ t)ou search the
Web t)ou might £ind somearticles mentioning the station. Also the
listserveht : www.£irstamendmentradio@ ahoo rou s.comisagreat
source; make sure to read the archives. I".'

~

85,000
~~

11.0 btt~

2e3'l

320 w. Church Ave.
Knoxville,
TN 37902
Telephone:
525-6055

~

~
&

o.o£a

t~

~

~fJ~
(865) e'l3-9ge9
~.~.com

T he Sept.11attack has le£t us with us £rom bein8 a nation 0£decent,
powerful emotions.In mouminB. enraBed
rational people.
and a£raid, we seek to respond in ways
Recognition
of our
that re£lectour mostcherishedvalues.We
common
humanity
Brieve £orthosewho lost their lives, those
Our
anBer,
Brie£
and lo1:Jalt1:J
who were injured, those who lost loved
to those who are su££erinB cannot ,
ones and those who experienced the
in£lictinB the same violence
I
horror 0£ this traBedy. We commit to justi£1:J
on £amilies and communities in ,
honor their suHerinB by workinB to
other
break the cycle
0£ violence.

We are
callinB lor:
Justice

I

l

There will be no peace until the
attackers are brought to justice.
But there will be no lasting
peace if violence is allowed to
masquerade as justice.

coun tries.

1£ ,Il!

,

the

U.S.

wreaks the
s a m e ,
indiscriminate
violence on
others,
the
blood 0£thosewe kill will write the
£irst paBe in the next chapter 0£
terrorism. We recoBnize that the
attackers stand £or their own
aBenda and not the principles 0£ ,

BrinBinB the
killers to justice will require a coordinated
ellort amonB nations. It will call on the
law-enlorcement capabilities ol these
nations in a persistent and lonB-term
ellort. It will require time and discipline.
The dimension ol carelull\] developed,
an1:JrecoBnized reliBion. Citizens
precisel\] locused action is the best and
£rommore than 80 nationslost their
onl\] wa\] to avoid the horrorsolunlocused,
lives in the attack. As we respond
unrestrained, ultimatel\] catastrophic
to this attack, we must remember
warlare. It is imperative that those
that we are a nation 0£people £rom
responsiblelor this vicious attack be tried
ever1:Jother nation, and that our
and lound Built\] in an appropriate court
nation is part 0£the communit1:J

ollaw belore the\] are punished.We must
the world.
not allow our responseto this attack divert

Peace at home and
abroad
There will be no peace until
the attackers are brought to
justice. But there will be no lasting
peace i£ violence is allowed to
masqueradeasjustice. I rue peace
will require the e££orts0£each 0£
us as individuals as well as the
e££orts0£the leaders 0£our nation.
We must £aceour £ear,anger and
grie£, seek to understand the
con text £or this a ttack and
examine our nation's role in the
world. We call upon our leaders to
act with disciplined resolve. We
must not allow our responseto this
attack to undermine our hope £or
a peace£Ulworld.
Integrity
We want our countr\j to be
an example to the world 0£ how
courageous, just, £air-minded
people respond to inJurlJ. To not
respond would be unthinkable.
But to respond in kind would
con£irmthe £ears0£the rest 0£the

world. We are people who value
democracy, the nIle 0£ law, respect £or
human li£eand the £reedom0£individuals.
A violent responsethat stepsoutside the
system 0£ justice does not re£lect our
values as people. We call on our leaders
to affirm the rule 0£ American and
international law, to seek to brinB the
attackers to justice under the law, to rise
above blind hatred and demonstrate our
values to the rest 0£the world We must
not allow our response to this attack
betray our £undamental values.
TheSept.ll attack destroyedhuman
lives and internationally
rec08nized
symbols 0£ our country. It wounded our
sense 0£ security and our ability to
continue our daily lives. We must not let
our response destroy our hope, our
humanity and our inte8rity. T08ether
with a community 0£ nations, we must
respond honorably. """

For more in£ormation on meetinB times and upcominB actions,
contact Shelle\] Wascom.
shelletlwascom@hotmail.com 522-1604

union
By Sandy

fights
Hicks,

UCW

for

Qualitv

services

co-chair

Tuition hikes, downsizin8 and privatization. Who bene£its£rom these
actions? UT students and emplolJeescertainllJ don't.
Students palJ hi8her tuition ever\JlJear,and lJet the qualitlJ 0£the
services thelJ receive 8oes down. How does this happen?
Downsizin8 means that bossestake someone'sjob and dump it on the
alreadlJ overworked and underpaid emplol)ees that are le£t. It is impossible
to do ever\Jthin8, especialllJ when lJOUare alreadlJ doin8 two or three jobs.
There 8oes qualitlJ service!
Privatization means hirin8 emplol)ees 0£private corporations who are
paid even less than re8ular public emplolJees.Then, emplolJeesare onllJ
allowed to perform services that are in the contract between the corporation
and UT. There 8oes qualitlJ service!
And don't £or8et,low pal) makes it hard to keep or hire qualitlJ
teachers. There 8oes qualitlJ service!
Students and emplol)ees must work t08ether to chan8e this. ~'

UT's

unaccountable,

department

B

makes

greedy
no

y NateArthur

Would you pay your doctor to sit, eat moon pies and make
dire predictions about your health
without examinin8 you? Would
you surrender your paycheck to
your employer in exchange £oran
increase in work and relocation to
a seedy, in£erior workplace?
These are unpleasant metaphors£oranunpleasa.ntrea.lityhere
at the University 0£ Tennessee.
Namely, that which pretends to be
a center £orstewardship andintellectual development increasin8ly
resembles a 8ristnrill and a businessrun £or the convenience and
proht 0£ its administrators and
shareholders. The end result is a
repulsive but necessarymedicine
the entire state 0£Tennesseemust
swallow.
Ba.sica.lly,UT isan investment
and a service,and, as 8ood youn8
American business-people, we
know that one ri8htly expects a
return on these ventures. So,what
is our return £or over ten strai8ht

years

athletic

sense


tuition

increases?

Where

is

the

. £ort he bram
. dramour
compensahon
.
£aculty has su££eredwhen pro£essors
split to
make a decent salary? Or £orthe unkind
trend 0£squeezin8too many studentsinto
one tiny classroom,so o£ten headed by
an underpaid8raduateteachin8assistant
{the exploited temporary teachers that
usherus into the colle8e experience more
o£tenthan not)?What do we 8et in return
£or the moral £ailure inherent in tellin8
hardworkin8 sta££membersthat they are
not as important as the hi8her-ups and
are deservin8 0£pa.ltry wages as we £arm
them to private corporations, raise their
parking premiums and work them like
d08s through the summer?
18et an empty, soiled £eelin8when
I'm £orcedto ima8ine that the compensationscomein the£ormo£aBur8er Kin8
in the UC; expensive parkin8 8arages to
accommodatethe car-lovin8 culture that
is, in more thought£ul colle8e communities, banned or severely curtailed; student-subsidized, overcrowded computer
la.bs;andathree-year-oldnationa.lchampionship £orthe £ootba.llteam, the 8lory
0£ which still coats us all and extends
bri8htly into the £uturet08ildour memories and resumes.

T he Knoxville Communit1j Food Cooperative Inc. (KCFC Inc.) is a
member~owned,not~for~pro£itwhole food store operatin8 in accordance with
the international principles of cooperative businesspractice:

1. Voluntary and open membership
'2.Democratic nlember control
3. Member economic participation
4. Autonomy and independence
5. Education, trainin8,and in£ormation
6. Cooperation amon8 cooperatives
7. Concern £or community
It o££ersa broad ranBe 0£products that are environmentally sound and
not produced or marketed in ways that exploit workers or consumers. It
seeks£air,mutually bene£icial relationships with suppliers
pre£erence
with local and/ or orBanic Browersand producers,sellsin bulk, promotes mini~
mal packaBinB and avoids deceptive marketinB strateBies. KCFC strives
throuBh its products and policies to provide a community in which members
can experience and learn principles 0£ economic sel£~determination, which
will encouraBeand enable them to create structures £ora locally~based sel£~
sustaining economy, thereby perpetuating connections to each other and the
sources oflife. "c

Knoxville
Community
Food Cooperative
937 N. Broadway
Knoxville,
TN 37917
[865] 525-2069
FAX [865] 525-9565
kcfc@es12er. com
Mon-Sat:

9-9,

Sunday:

noon-7

By: Caroline

of S.P.E.A.K.

Also

.Consider the environmental costs
0£any item you buy, especially take note
T raditionall1:J,there are two 0£the procluct'spackagin8 and li£espan.
wa1:Jsthe world will end: b1:Jlire
.For the products you choose to
or b1:Jice. In toda1:J'sconsumerconsume, see i£ there are ways to reuse
oriented societ1:J
a third option is
the packaBin8 and the item. Be creative!
all too possible:death b1:J
8arbage.
.Recycle all possible materials.
.Compost i£ space is available.
Accordin8 to the EPA, the
.Avoid take-out£oodanddisposavera8e American producesthree able proclucts when you can.
to £our pounds 0£8arba8e a day.
.Get involved in campus or8aniUT's Knoxville campus, a pOpU- zations such as UT's environmental orlation 0£ over 30,000 students, 8aniZdtion Students Promotin8 Environ£acuIty and staff, produces 4.5 to mental Action in Knoxville (S.P.E.AK),
60 tons 0£ 8arba8e a day £or a the Student Government Association
yearly total 0£ 16,42.5 to 21,900 (SGA) and your residence hall associatons. This is an obscene amount tion.
0£ 8arba8e!
S.P.E.A.K. has organized an improved recycling program on campus.In
the past, the SGA sponsored recycling

Waste manaBemen t is
everlJone's concern. If not prop-erllJ taken care 0£, BarbaBe
spreads disease, poisons water
sourcesand adds to air pollution
and Blobal warminB. Also, there
~ is limi ted space£orBarkBe on our
planet, and we are quickllJ runninB out 0£ room. UT is a larBe
contribu tor to the waste manaBement problem.

dumpsters.Un£ortunately,the materialsin
thesebins were £requently contaminated
with trash and £ood products, so they
were not consistently recycled. In an e££ort to change this, S.P.E.AK., in partnership with the SGA and the Physical
Plant,hasinstitutedabin-monitoring pro-

There are ways you can
combat the waste problem. The
best way is to simply reduce the
amount 0£products you consume.

Volunteers monitor the rec\]clin8
bins £rom 5 to 7 p.nl. Sunda\] throu8h
Thursda\].Bins are located behind Reese
Hall in PresidentialCourtyard and behind
Masse\]Hall, next to Greve Hall.

gram.

Products that can be reclJcled include plastic, 81ass,aluminunl, paper and
newspaper.In the luture, S.P.EAK hopes to extend the reclJclin8 pro8ram to
include all dorms and buildin8s, idealllJ with individual containers lor most
rooms.
Another EPA statistic states that one-third 0£America's garbage is
paper. This is un£ortunate; paper can be recycled, and more paper products are made 0£post-consumer recycled paper noWthan ever be£ore.UT
doesnot purchase recycled paper £orits Computer labs and copiers.
S.P.E.AK.is planning to initiate a
campaign during the £all semester
to bring post-consumer recycled
paper to UT Computer labs and
other areaswhere a massamount
0£paper is used.
This project can onl\j work
with help £romstudents and
orBanizationsacrosscampus.I£\jou
Home
of the cat's
Dozen
or \jour orBanization are interested
in participatinB in the activities
Free
Volume
X Magazine
mentioned in this article or have
We
Buy
CO"S"
OVO"S
other interests related to the
&
environment, come to S.P.EAK's
PlayStation
Games
meetinBs at 7 p.m. on Thursda\js in
Oak Ridge: 361A SouthlllinoisAve.483.2287 the UC. E-mail ~ak@utk.edu or
ssurak@utk.edu with questions.
737 Kingston Pike, Across
fromChili's,588.2287
"":,
Pigeon Forge: PigeonForgePkwy,429.4600

5034 Broadway, Across
fromMcDonald's
740.8330

KNOXVILLEFILM &

KliC

is

a

working cooperative.
VIDEO COOPERATIVE Each member is required
to donate time and skills to
T he Knoxville Filnl and make the operation 0£ the coop~
Video Cooperative encouraBes erative a success. Members are re~
people lrom the Knoxville area to quired to attend meetings,participate in
make £ilmsand videos by provid~ the routine maintenance that would be
inB equi pment, resources,contacts, required 0£ an1:Jhomeowner and to ac~
people power and technical sup~ cord their neighbors the diBnit1:Jand re~
'.It works to make locally prO-" spect that the1:Jdemand 0£themselves.
duced £ilms and videos more ac~
KliC members,who elect a Board
0£Directors to oversee management 0£
cessible to audiences in Knoxville
and beyond and to show £ilmsand the coop'smembershiprecruitment, main~
videos lor entertainment and study

tenance and $55,000 annual budget, op~
erate KliC. The members/ owners con~
in as many venues as possible.
Everyone is invited to be a trol all aspects0£the Cooperative's dail1:J
Coop member. Membership al~
lows you lree admission to all operations.
Contact:~.QrgL
Coop~sponsored£ilms and work~
~cQQQ{
shops, an occasional lree pass to
(865) 673-0998 "
ReBal Cinemas and a disco,-mton
rentinB in common equipment.
Check the £ilmlistin8in the
Metro P,~lseand look lor lree~£ilm
sponsored by the Coop

~~
~
~

i\.i

~~.\
~:\

at ~the1)ilotli~
Contact: ~
~~c~
(R65) 673-0998 ",c

~.i~i
~\
~~
.~
\( ~

~
~

,

\,~

KNOXVILLEt
COOPERATIVE

{~;\

~;
~.\\

~
,

.1'c..-~

T he Knoxville
Housin8
Cooperative (KHC) provides hi8h
housin8 to quali£ied low~
~inconle£amiliesand
individuals at below market prices.

,~~.~
,..CI..::A;.~

C991
i811

~

..~~~.~
..::..

fIj
~A;.~~

Be,.s
LAKE

~
..~'

B'f
AVE.

..-flj'
:..

-.~
flt.:.a;.~

&

KNOXVILLE,

865.522.6417

~

~.

"

.
~

Gfill
TN.

Take

charge

before

the

of

your

patriarchy

puss

does

it? Well, lJoushouldn't.EvenillJou

Women:herelJouareattheBood
01' UniversitlJ 0£ Tennessee, the acclaimed No.1 partlJ school in the nation. Yee Haw.
UT has tilled lJou in on the most
banal subjects {classes,£ootball, blah,
blah, blah). But, what has the universitlJ
done to ed1.1cate
lJou about what we realllJ care about: SEX'More importantllJ,
how lJou can take Bood care 0£lJour £avorite pet: lJour pUSSlJ?
Most 0£ 1.1S
colleBe students will have sexdurinB these
sordid lJears.Read on, so that lJou can
£eelproud to be a responsiblepet owner!
Birth control: Are lJou palJinB £or

have

insurance,

lJou're dishinB

chances

are

out money

lor

somethinB thatlJoucanBetlorlree
lrom the local health department.
The best-kept

secret at UT is a

special

branch

County

Health

the lower
Health

ol

the

Knox

Department

lloor

on

ol the Student

Clinic.

March lJourseli over to the
nearest

phone

Women's

Health

health department
Make

and

call

Branch

the
ol the

at 215-5320.

an appointment

probed and prodded

to be
at the UT

branch. Do this as soon as possible because you miBht have to
make lJour appointment

a month

in advance.
I: c
~f';"
tC,C,~ c
,0~;c~f;~

In the bowels ol the Student
Health Center, next totheX"~"C

...11

"CC;;CCC,

ralJ services, there is a
li ttle ollice lor the

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c;ccccccc";
~

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to

You

miBht

someone

run
Irom

", '",-" ct1t?f.;ic~ c °~
l'5
(
(~~cccc'...tlo"
.~("tl""
cccJi'ff;;"i one 01 your
c 1asses
i~"cc::ccc::...~.
t('Ec:ifccc,~c;,;;~:~;;:
...
"
cJcicc' " c " Y'p. c
c{f cc~",
there. This IS a Brea t thmB
; c:i;c:i,i"'
~'C?c;CccC'cCccc
';'cccc;cccC

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c ccc'"c
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to

lJou

bond

over

...So,

are

on

Ortho-Cyclen,
or
"
Ortho-Tri-Cyclen?
For FREE

you Bet a LOVEL

y physical

ex-

T he

Muslim

Association
at
UT
blessedwithacolor£ul£ilteen~';}ear

Student
has

been

ian population hasbeen livin8in diaspora
whilePalestinianswithintheoccupiedter~
ritories
have
lived
under

an

oppressive

.The main 8oal 0£the MSA

80vernn1ent.Promda';}to da';},the people

is to increase the awareness0£the
Islamic £aith amon8 the student

live-actuall';},n1erel';}exist-inharshcon~
ditions. The';}ares';}stematicall';}deprived

population.
thistoreason,
the o£sanitan:JwaterandelectriCit';}.Children
iation isPor
open
non~Mus~
have turned into common tar8ets 0£the
lims as well as Muslin1s alike.

Israeli arm';},while the';}are le£t to de£end

1.1rrentl';},
it has a diverse 8roup
0£ about 75 members.

themselveswithmerel';}rocksa8ainstbul~
lets.
Due to biased media reports, manl:J
Islam has lon8 been a misun~ Americans are completell:J unaware 0!
derstood reli8ion in the West. The theseatrocities and the !act that our coun~
MSAaims to setthe recordstrai8ht trl:Jprovides the economic ($6 billion a
and clear up n1an';}misconceptions. l:Jear),nlilitar'] and political support that
Alon8 with its weekl';}Islamicstud';} allows them to continue. And although
circles and monthl';} outdoor dis~ the state 0! Israel has o!ten been con~
pla';}s,MSA plans several enter~ demnedandcriticizedbl:Jthe international
tainment and educational activities communitl:J!or its human rights violations,
throu8hout the ';}ear. This semes~ its actions remain largell:Junobstructed.
ter it is plannin8 a lar8e cultural
In Iraq, ever since the UNSC im~
event on Muslims in China, £ea~ posed a near~total embargo on Iraq, a
turin8 a lecture, slideshowand din~ whole societl:Jis on the ver8e 0! collapse.
The sanctions were once seen as a wal:J
A neW dimension has re~ to !orce Iraqi withdrawal !rom Kuwait;
been added to the MSA: even though Iraq has withdrawn, the
An important aspect 0£ countrl:Jis still sanctioned. Although the
Islamic tradition is takin8 ac~ U.S. and U.K 8°vernments claim "noble
tion aBainst injustices throughout intentions" in imposing this embargo,
the world. The MSA has become namell:J to uproot Saddam Hussein's
involved in increasin8 the awarepower and destrol:Jhis weapon~building
ri8hts violations capabilities, Saddam's power goes
Palestine and iraq. for over
unthreatened while the innocent,
£i£t1:J
1:Jears,
an enormousPalestin-

ner.

powerless Iraqi
people

Accordin8

are

lelt

to

to

die.

I

UNICEF,

a child dies even] 10 minutes in
Iraq-4,000
to 5,000 a month. ;
These are shockin8 statistics,es- I
pecia.llyin a countn] where,in pre- j"
war times, the bi88est heal th
problem lor children was childhood obesity. Now, children are I
dyin8 lrom diarrhea. In e££orts 1
to educate the public, the MSA
will be havin8 a lecture this semester about the sanctions on
Iraq and what we, as U.S. citizens, can
do to help. It is scheduled lor Nov.1. ""

H you are interested in helpinB and
cosponsorinB our upcominB events,
please e-mail the MSA at

1£you would like more
in{onllation about our
or8anization and activi ties,
please visit our Website at
www

.msaknoxville.orB

msa@utk.edu

skateboards.

snowboards.

/

mountalnboards

:-}

1123-C CUMBERlAND AVENUE
KNOXVIUf.. nNNESSEE 31916
(865) 523-0045
FAX: 523-3366

* diSC golf

~

.

Item sets