The Student Insurgent & Survival Center Present: Student Disorientation 2012 (University of Oregon)

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Current View

Title

The Student Insurgent & Survival Center Present: Student Disorientation 2012 (University of Oregon)

Date

2012

Place

Eugene, Oregon

Source

https://issuu.com/studentinsurgent/docs/disorientation_guide_2012_web

extracted text

Thank you for picking up this publication. Maybe you are a new or returning
student, or perhaps one of the University of Oregon's many talented faculty anGIstaff.
Welcome! No matter what your story or what brought you here, I hope you learn a lot,
challenge yourself, and have fun.
Fall is exciting. It is a season of abundance. The fruits of our labor are delicious,
as are the veggies from the garden. The yard is scattered with apples, which in a few
months will either be pie or hard cider. And as this abundance comes to us in many
forms (here's a shout-out to all the miracles that make life possib le), let us not be greedy!
The food is only as good as the people you share it with. So invite your friends over,
cook some dinner, be merry, and share your summertime stories.
We want to share with you, too. We created this publication to share our
histories, our experiences, and our lessons from within the University of Oregon and
Eugene. Here you'll find some forgotten history, or per haps a story from a new
perspective. Most of the contributing writers have been active within the community,
struggling for equality and liberation within (or without) our institutions. Of course,
there are also many more stories and exp~er[ences that are not included in this issue.
The stories told within this publication did not begin with us, nor will they end
with us. Stories of fighting for justice are centuries old, and while we are only a small
part of this history, we are here nonetheless.
Without people like us, who not only dream for a better world, but struggle for it,
the world would either be hella (more) oppressive, or really boring, and probably both.
We see another way of existe nce - one that is not tied to exploitation or capital, one
that is not based on hierarchy, racism , or sexism - one that recognizes the humanity of
each individual, while also recognizing that we canno t survive without our community.
As you read the Student Disorientation (hop efully the first of many to come), I
hope you are inspired. 1 hope you are moved to action. This is an invitation to try new
ideas, to attend a meeting or event, to plant a garden, and to always think critically of
the blessings and privileges that come with the abundance of fall.
See you in the streets,
Thomas Walker

Background Image: University of
Oregon Presidents demonstrate the
continuing legacy of patriarchy and
white supremacy

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@ Jessica
Rojas
@ Nick Scratch
@ Tho:aas Walker
@ Diana Salazar
@ Sage
@ Jed
(i) Noah De\1'itt

f.J,lfor6

@ Chad Giffin
Oates
@ Paige
Cori ch-Klei•
(i) Ci-.eron
Gillespie
@ Dandelion

"fl1eStudent Insurgent is based out of the Universityof Oregon
in Eugene. We are a radical publication that seeks to deconstruct
the existing social order and facilitate its replacementwith one
which is ecologically sound and functions on egalitarian lines,
We strive to be an open forum - somevvherethe silenced and
oppressed can express their ideas and opinions free from the
filtersof the n1ainstream media.

@ Tho:aas
Walker
@ Nisha
Burton
@Matt
Mitsch

@Slingshot
Magazine
@ Cristy
C. Road
@ Jeff
Matarrese

The Student Insurgent operates from our ,vorld headquarters in
the SurvivalCenter, EMU Suite 1. Co1neon down and check out
the Radical Reading Room, Left AlternativeMedia Project, and
our zine library.
Curious about campus issues, environmental education, or ,.,,ant
to help bring informative speakers and v1orkshopsto the UO?
Stop in the Survival Center and get involved!

Subscriptions are $15 a year by mail. TI1eInsurgent is distributed
freelyto UO students, the community, and prisoners.
- The Student Insurgent I 1228 Universityof Oregon I Eugene,OR 97403 I 541-346-3716 Istudentinsurgent@gmail.com-



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The Erb Memorial Union is the
center of day -to -day student life for
many University of Oregon students.
The EMU is where n1a11ycome to eat
lunch, lounge, do homework, and
most i1nportantly, it is wl1ere student
unions and programs are located.
The EMU is the epicenter of student
co1nmunity on ca1npus. A11yone who
has spent time in the EMU knows
that it is out -of-date and dilapidated.
It wastes huge amounts of e11ergydue
to an insufficient design, and an)7one
who has spent any time in student
unions know that student space in
the EMU is highly inadequate. A walk
down the union hall, conveniently
located in the basement, shows how
student programs
like MEChA,
BSU, APASU, NASU, and more have
space where only a few members can
squeeze into. Mujeres is literally using
a closet in the MEChA office as the ir
meeting space, and Black Women of
Achievement and the Vietnamese
Student Association are sharing a
room that is tl1e size of a closet.
From multiple
perspectives,
a
renovation of the EMU is needed.

.-

Whe11 it was announced that admi11
was pushing a renovation, it was
met with mixed reactions. People
understand the need for a renovation,
but they also understand the l1uge
financial burden that these sorts of
student -financed projects have on
students , who for the most part are
already leaving the UO with massive
debt. The contradictions run deep
on this issue, and there is no clear
dichotomy of anti/pro. What was
seen1ingly universally accepted was
that UO students needed to have a

Thestruggle for the
renovation of the EMU
started off in a way that
would come to define it.

University System to pass the
renovation regardless of the outcome
of a student referendum. When the
ASUO exec found out about this, they
pressured then -President Lariviere
to call it off. Another exan1ple of
the discon11ect between admin and
students was that the preliminary
square footage for the proposed EMU
would see the Multicultural center,
Women's Center, and all stt1dent
unions losing significant space as well
as a complete erasure of The Survival
Center! Th is was the "starting point"
even thogh Robin Holmes had
specifically said that diversity was a
priority for the project. This loss of
space was obviously unacceptab le,
and it was the begining of a fight for
guarantees that students would, at
minimun1, not lose space to the new
EMU.
The
ASUO
exec
drafted
a
Memorandun1 of Understanding (a
non-legally binding document that
is basically an official agree1nent)
and asked admin to sign it. The
memorandum's strongest point was
that student
programs
,vouldn't
lose space a11d the Student Unions
who have offices would have offices
in the new EMU. The ASUO Exec
would not allo,-v the referendum vote
to go forward without having this
guarantee. This caused controversy
and the Exec was seen as trying to
kill the project entirely, instead of its
intended purpose which was to secure
student interests (remember
that
if it had not been for the exec there
would not be a referendum in the first
place). Eventt1ally the memorandun1
was signed a11dthe referendum, after
being postponed, went ahead and
failed by a very large margin.

voice in a decision that would affect
them so dra1natically. This is why a
student referendum vote was see11
as being so vital and foundational for
this project.
The first major move on adn1in's
part to push the project forward was
to send the losing ASUO presidential
candidate to go lobby the Oregon "EMU"

Cont inued on Page 16


The Office of Multicultural Academic Success (OMAS) is a11office mea11t to address the needs of self -ide11tified
students of color in order to ensure a positive and n1eaningful experience while at the University of Oregon. Many
students call OMAS a safe space where we know we will meet academic advisors that not only provide excellent services,
they all understand the cultural aspect of being a student of color in a predo1ninantly white university. Then, students
fou11d out that OMAS was restructuring and merging with other offices to become Center for Multicultural Academic
Excellence (CMAE).
Out of confusion, lack of transparency from administration, and anger, UO Truth Coalition formed. UO Truth is
a coalition of self-identifying stude11ts of color, community n1embers, alumni and other allies. We have received support
not 011lyfrom the University con11nunity, but outside as well. We felt it necessary to form a student steering com1nittee
that will continue to meet administration and directors, as well as others that can provide us with the resources we need.
The duties of this committee are, but not limited to, play an active role in the hiring process of new CMAE staff, have
access to documents such as the budget and progran1s, be in the decisio11-making meetings that will shape this new
Center, and inform the general UO Truth members as well as all those interested about the transition process.
We are not guaranteed that this committee will actually l1ave power, as no documents will be signed from
administration. Although we are meeting with administration and directors, we cannot know for sure to the extent that
our voices will have legitimacy. UO Truth has reached out with University Senate and has attempted to gain support
fro1n them as well.
After ma11yrallies and a,,vareness, we have received many community me1nbers to tell their stories. Their names
are to be kept anonymous but their stories reveal something very alarming. We have observed culturally incompetent
individuals take on very influential leadership positions, certain individuals become victims of institutional racism/
sexism, and a very hostile environment where workers and students do not feel safe in a place that is supposed to be
supportive!
The main concern we have is the lack of transparency we are still facing. In an institution that prides itself as
being diverse and a flagship university, UO Truth is here to hold them accountable. We understand that we cannot
do this alone. This movement is beyond n1aking sure that sh1dents of color have the resources needed - it is about a
resistant community looki11g for justice in higher educatio11.
Respectfully,
UO Truth Coalition

'' At this
moment
th e university,
uni v ersity

we

do n o t c ome to wo rk f o r
the
but t o demand that
our people.''
work for
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UPDATES:
During Dead Week of Spring Term 2012, tl1e CMAE Directors emailed all the "OMAS'' students of the dates to meet with
applicants for potential CMAE staff. All of the dates were during finals week. Of course, not a lot of students were able
to attend. We should also mention that during these last couple of weeks, Administration announced our new President
(Michael Gottfredson) and the tuition increases (5.9% for residential undergraduates). There were many stude11ts
protest i11gthis, thougl1 it came in a tin1e less convenient for us and very difficult to mobilize. However, coalitions were
built to address this. CMAE has since hired three academic advisors.

_an

e Be Free

Whil e the Prison-Indu strial
by Jed
Comple x Exi sts?
The US has less than 5% of the "''orld's populat ion
but aln1ost 25% of the world's prisoners.
The US h as more th an 2.4 million peop le behind
bars, while China (with four times as many citizens)
has 1.6 1nillion people in prison.
African-Americans constitute 12.7% of the US
population but make up 48.2% of adults in prisons
and jails in the US.
I begin with these facts because I believe too n1any
people in the US are allowed to ren1ain ignor ant of
them. Although statistics in then1selves mean little,
it's facts like the three above that make me stop cold
and ask hard questions. Why does the US have a
full fourth of all peop le imprisoned in the wor ld ?
Why is Chi na's government vie,-ved as repressive
and anti -hu man rights, ,vhen US citizens are six
tim es more likely to be ilnprisoned by their own governme n t? Why are Black
men incarcerated at a rate n1ore th an six times that of white men? Questions
like these drew me to join Prison Justice Workin g Group at the University of
Oregon dur ing 20 12.
One of the first things the Prison Justice gro up did ,vas organize Abo litio n April
th rough the Survival Center. It was a month of theater, film show ings, readings,
and discuss ions focused on the prison -industrial complex. Critical Resistance
defines the prison-industrial complex (PIC) as the overlapping interests of
governn1ent and industry that use surv eillance, policmg, and imprisonn1ent as
soluti ons to eco nomi c, socia l, and political problems. One of my favorite events
during Abolition April was a van trip to the Law and Disorder Confe rence at
Portla nd State. My friends and I att end ed a panel entitl ed "To,-vards a Queer
an d Trans Prison Abolition Politic" which focused on queer, tr ans, and feminist resistance to th e PIC. I got to
1neet activist la,vyer and 1ny huge cru sh, Dean Spade! Another really aweson1e pa r t of the conference ,vas the
discussion led by PDX Copwatch abo ut the wh ite supr emac ist police system in th e US. Law and Disorder was a
really great tin1e with my friends and fellow activists hanging out in Portland, eating free vegan food, and having
aweso me crit ical discussio ns!
Next, Prison Justice held a campus dem onstr ation agains t solitar y confinemen t and the PIC on May Day outside
the EMU an1phit heate r. We const r ucted a life-size prison cell and asked passersby if prison 1nakes them feel safe.
This was a really good learning experience for 1ne about engaging ,-vith peop le about prison's role in socie ty.
Why shoul d you get mvo lved with Prison Justice? There are lots of goo d reasons! Prison is linked to every oth er
social just ice struggle that we face. Prisons operate alon g racist, sexist, classist, transphobic, homophobic, and
mcr edibly violent axes. Prisons are a tremendous force of harm and mequality. As such, there is a lot of ,-vork to
be done and a lot to talk about! You get to learn abo ut really cool and fun books with long nan1es, like Golden
Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California and Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment
and the Prison Industrial Complex. You'll also get to join an amazi ng , compass iona te, revo lutionary community .
My friends in Prison Justice really inspire me, and I'm hopeful about the many kinds of work we'll be able to do
together in the comi ng year. Join us in the fight against mass incar ceration and the prison industrial con1plex !

Formore information, please contact Jed (kejt@uoregon.edu) or Thomas Walker (,valkerthomasl2l @gmail.com).

TOUGH ON CRIME ORWASTE OF TIME?
by Jessica Rojas
A judge's role in reviewing a legal
case is to be the third party between
two representi n g lawyers: the District
Attorney (DA) and a Defending Lawyer.
For many who cannot afford good
representatio n , this means a Public
Defender, or in some circles, a "Public
Prete nder;' as these t,-vo lawyers may
actually work together in creating
a sentence. This is what mandatory
Minimun1- Sente ncing does and in
Oregon, it's called "Measure 11;· the thief
of jud icial power.
Measu re 11 is Oregon's mandatory
minimum sentencing law that allows the
state to try juveniles as adu lts (15 years
and older) with a minimum of70 mo nths
and up for certain violent crimes . Later,
Measure 61 soug ht to expand harsher
sentences for drug an d theft crimes in the
same n1anner, but did not pass the vote.
Mandatory minimum sentencing limits
a judge's sentencing power in a case to
decide what is best for the victim and the
offender as the state's laws now deter m ine
that no matter what, a minimum of a
certain amount of years (without good
time) is to be served. It does not matter
if it's an offender's first offense or an
add ition to a long record of offending.
This is where I see the flaw - if someone
l1as been offending for a while, it should be
taken into consideration, and if someone
has only a single run -in with the la,.v,they
can learn from their mistake.
Mandatory
Minimum
Sentencing,
such as Measure 11, has boosted prison
popttlations in Oregon over the last
decade significantly. The financial burden
this puts on taxpayers also threatens
funding for education. In Oregon alone,
the extra tune served has raked up a
good amount of money that we shou ld
be askmg ourselves, could this been have
spent on something better? According
to statistics frorn 2009, it cost $5,304
a month to house an inmate in state

facilities . The average stay of an ext ra 10
months (extra time served compared to
sentencing in 1990) = $50,433. Multiply
this by 2,410 inmates (released in 2009),
and this comes up to $121.5 1nillion extra
to house those incarcerated in Oregon
under mandatory minimum sentencing.
In comparison
to fundi ng K- 12
education in Oregon, the 2009 Legislature
allocated $5.75 billion in state funds for
t,.vo years endi n g June 30, 2011. This
funding is meant to cover Oregon's 197
public school districts, meaning 1,355
public schools and 561,698 students .
When we look at the math, the amount
of money our state allocates to educate
youth in order to teach them skills so they
can become responsible citizens con1es up
to abou t $10,236 for 2 years of educat ion.
Here is the issue, we can spend around
$5,000 a year educating a11d preventing
or we can spend an extra $50,000 a
year punishing people excessively, for
cr in1es that cou ld have been prevented
bad we put ou r money in the right p lace.
As the State's priorities continue to shift
towards incarceration, we even see that
the State of Oregon spends more on
Corrections (Incarceration, Probation,
and Paro le) than on Higher Educat ion.
Education is the best prevention, while
providing resources, drug treatment and
employment is ou r best bet for a healthy
future, versus the burden of funding
incarceration, wh ich may not inc lude
treatment, education and opportunity
to move beyond the status and stigma of
incarceration. lf safety is our co ncer n
then we ought to take into

acco u nt the safety of inmates, who face
dangers such as sexual assault (by guards
and fello,v inmates alike), extortion, gang
affiliation and assault.
According to an international non-profit
group, Just Detention, "near ly 75 percent
of male and 57 percent of female prisoner
rape survivors were sexually abused more
than once, and 30 percent of all survivors
endured six or more assaults" while
incarcerated in US prisons.
The Answer:
Restorative
Justice,
Prevention and Education
W hen an inmate is released, alt hough
they may be free, there are many barriers
to gain ing employment, housing, ano
building n ew positive socia l connections
due to the stigmas of being incarcerated.
If we are to truly reduce crime and create
safe commt1n ities, it begins with access
to healthy lifestyles, access to resources
that teach valuable living skills that can
prevent or reduce opportunity for crin1e.
Drug rehabilitation should always be a
first option for those convicted of drug
offenses, as well as access to employment
and education that will ensure one's
abil ity to stick with the right path. Mo$t
of all, when the crin1e is committed,
we need to env ision a way of keeping
the offender accoun table for their part.
Advocate for more Restorative Justice
Panels, which ,-vork with offenders and
victims to move forward by not focusing
simply on punishment, but a mediateo
agreement.





'


by Dandelion

The Pacific Northwest used to be home to untouched
more direct way in which we protect forests is surveying
pristine ancient forests. Although many of the forest s hax_s _,for endangered species. We survey potential timber sales
been compromised with indust ial clear cuts and logging ' areas, which includes setting lines in trees and climbing
roads, there are s~ pockets pf .old growth trees that to nests whicl1 ind.ica e the activity of certain endangered
provide vital habita \ for endangered -species like spotted species. Generally we spend 2-4 ,-veeefs in beautiful places
owls and marbled mµ;;relet ~. Using a div.ersity of tactics, you never eve~ ~ew. f Xisted,~!)B take days off to go
Cascadia Forest Defen<ilers WO.Ek Yffar ar~und to protect swimming in -:1
3 ~1<:ei'.litfela* in hoi springs.
these old growtl1 grave s,. We pressure ou~ tate officials,
Once a week~ e prov:jae tree'"cltp:1b
...,,_
tFai1iings at the Lorax
such as Ted Wheele r,and':"K!ate Bro~m, both members of the Manor, wh efe! e teac basic cJi:p skil ·sand climb safety.
State Land Board, to i h _nge log~ing prac JJ~ in Oregon Thes~ ai-njp s usually take place on Wednesdays from
and to put an end to ofl:1
ar-c utt1ng old,;g1i;>wtli. B_stween1...v-11:'"'2
depelildi.ngo,.,h:owmanype ~p.-l
~
up and ,-vhatthe
tabling at con1munity events and attending St-afe ~~ nd trai!lers scne3u ~ s ,look like. Be sure to check our website
Board meetings, th'e C D crew spena~•time in tl1e fo es~s\ ( . .forest efenset"<;>w.org)if yo are interested and
surveying for endange ,e~ species,_ and throws roe · ' wan to plu~ i Wt; also have .5,ekly meetings, Fridays at
benefit shows for outreac and legal...,
defe se fund ~ ,ij,~~ ~ o'cl csk at the gark at 7th and <2harnelton. The existence
· / , of, ncien:t-_
forests in"0 re on anti tli~ ascadia Bioregion as
I I a who le a ·.threaten e'd by unsustainable logging practices
A clear cut in the Ellio\11 tate Fores t.
,
A felled old growth tree.
~It.J"nrl~ e nee your l1~lpto defe t'fiem.

~
if
~
As the state con tin ues to destro'¼pub frc;..
forest f we~ on 1nue"'""~
to make our voices heard b}: {i lng letters , reacliin~ ~ t• "
to the con1munity, a11dsharing our concerns d ar..ing tlie~ heck l,l out onli e at www.forestdefense11ow.org
public com1ne11tportion of State Land Board meetings . "R. or- IBof up Cascadia Forest Defenders on Facebook.

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ow

N1'1IVE

roRESTS
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Making Change: Beyond the Individual ■
by Sage
It is estimated that 150-200 species
are going extinct every 24 hours,
n1ore than has ever been seen since
the dinosaurs died off. Paired with
an unusual number of regions
experiencing extreme weather,
the ecosystems of the wor ld are
undoubtedly in trouble of
collapse. Even if humans did
not cause these events, there is
little hope that we can reverse
what has been done, let alone
prevent further destruction.
We 1nust brace for the worst
as these events impact our
food and water supp lies. The
best we can do is to become
increasingly adaptable,
preserve ot1r remaining
natural resources, and find
alternatives to live by.
Learn how to grow your own
food and conserve water.
Build community and break
down walls of
individualism. Petition
businesses, institutions,
and the government for
alternatives to resources such
as coal, timber, and oil, which
depend on the destruction
of the earth's ecosystems and
water. There are many ways
to become involved in the
environmental movement
in Eugene. Just know that
it is only when people
work together that effective
changes take place. Moving
to a self-sustained intentional
community where you are
perfectly in tune ,-\l'ithnature
is great, but it doesn't do a whole lot
shutting yourself off fron1 the rest of
the world. Yes, learn to survive off the
land, but ...

The most important step we
can take right now to attain a
liveable futur e is changing the way
corporations and governments
are run.

..
We must confront systematic
environmental destruction in a
systematic way.
Whatever it Takes.
For Every Person You Know.
For Every Drop You Dri11k.

Get Involved.
UO Climate Justice League,
climatejusticeleague.org/
No Coal Eugene,
nocoaleugene.org/
Cascadia Forest Defenders,
forestdefensenow.con1/
UO Sustainability Center,
http://pages.uoregon.edu/uosc/

Sucklefrom the ·
teat of Mother
Eugene!

or the
from Eugene Home-Rule by Noah DeWitt
FRESHMAN: Excuse me, is that bike there yours?
STH-YEAR SENIOR: It is.
FRESHIE: Nice. I like that milk crate bike basket. I've been
meaning to get one of those.
STH-YEAR: Dude, you should. I ripped mine off from Market of
Choice.
FRESHIE: Word .
STH-YEAR: Fuck Market of Choice. [Spits on ground.]
FRESHIE: What? Why? TI1eir sand,viches are so dank.
STH-YEAR: Fuck 'em because they're too damn big! I know it's a
local company. I understand they carry some OG products. But its
service, its practices, its policies, its vibe- it's all just like Safeway.
Market of Choice is Babylon, know what I mean? The Man. I bet
vvhoever o,vns MOC is up in a basement full of gold right now,
swimmin'. Some Scrooge McDuck shit.
FRESHIE: Huh.
STH-YEAR: Plus, they treat dumpster divers like nutria rats.
They're exploitative capitalist wolves in an ethically raised sheep's
clothing. Red Barn, Sundance, New Frontier, Grower's Market,
Friendly Street, The Kiva-now thoseare natural foods stores.
FRESHIE: Jeez, ho,,v many hippi e grocery stores can one town
have?
STH-YEAR: He lla. Never enough really. I think that comtnun ities
should be able to directly control the production, processing and
distribution of their own food. And the many s1nall gro cers that
feed Eugene's neighborhoods are a step in that direction.
FRESHIE:Sounds great. But not everyone can afford to shop at
Sundance for everything . It's jus t not realistic.
5TH-YEAR: I think it's safe to say that we can all be doing more
to support the local food economy. You don't need to be rich to
do that. Start a garden. Volunteer at the Urban Farm -wh ich, if
you don't know, is the best class the UO offers. Dumpster dive for
bread, bage ls and produce to free up some of your food budget for
local products.
FRESHIE : If living off campus means I have to start eating out of
the trash, then I might stay in the dorms just for the meal points .
STH-YEAR: Haven't you heard of food sta1nps? Why pay almost
a G every month to split a shitty fluorescent -lit tenement with a
fratty alcoho lic cog and eat the sa1ne Sysco food every day for a
year-when you can live off campus for under 300 bucks and eat
,,veil on the government's dime! I kno"' ' what they say about the
freshman experience, how easy it is to make friends in th e dorms,

but if I could do freshman year all over again, I would fake anxiety
attacks just to get them to let me terminate 1ny dorm lease early
and move into a house somewhere away from can1pus' harsh
sterile vibes.
FRESHIE:Oh, it's not that bad. I mean, it's ni ce to able to roll out
of bed five minutes before class and still be on time.
STH-YEAR: Ha. Well, whe n you move out of the dorn1s, as we
all inevitably must do , don't let a little bike commute keep you in
the clutches of the predatory realty conglon1e rat es-you know,
Bell Realty and Property Management Concepts and all them.
They control n1ost of th e rentals in the campus area. Personally,
I love my commute: fourteen minutes of seated hovering through
crisp morning while coming up on caffeine. It sets the tone for
a great day. I recommend branching out and exploring Eugene's
neighborhoods. In1merse yourself in the local culture. Get to
kno,-v your neighbors. Find elders. Bike everywhere . Throw
potlucks. You know what I mean? Eat acid. Suckle from the teat
of Mother Eugene! Don't dilute her rank, radical nectar with
th e cold chemicals of West Coast bro cult ur e. This town and its
quirky-ass people have as n1uch to teach us as this university.
Go native, freshn1an.

by Sage
University will be a head rush of emotions, good and bad. The follo,,1ing is a very
condensed version of rny upcoming guidebook on coping with depression. Note that I
am not a medical professional and none of this is meant to be medical advice. If you or
someone you kno,-v is considering suicide, please call the National Suicide Hotline at
1-800-273-8255.There is help and hope.
According to <AllAboutDepression.com>, symptoms of depression include sadness,
anxiety, or "empty" feelings, decreased energy, fatigue, being "slo1,veddown;" loss
of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including sex; insomnia,
oversleeping, or ,vaking much earlier than usual; loss of ,veight or appetite, overeating,
or weight gain; feelings of helplessness, guilt, and worthlessness; thoughts of death
or suicide, or suicide attempts; restlessness, irritability or excessive crying; apathy;
and chronic aches and pains or physical problems that do not respond to treatinent.
It might be that you have many of these symptoms or just a fe,v when experiencing
depression. The baseline, however, is an in1pact on your ability to live a healthy and
content life. So how do you cope with depression?

Pharmaceuticals
Pharmaceutica ls ,vork best for some peop le, but you should know some things about them. First, the majority of people prescribed
pharmaceutical antidepressants only feel better from the placebo effect (Villarreal). These medicines are only effective for persons
with severe depression, and have little-to-no effect on persons suffering from mild depression (Fournier; Kirsch I). Furthermore,
even though they do ,vork for some people, scientists are still unsure as to ,vhy (Krishnan). They are often portrayed as si1nply
increasing serotonin levels, but high or lo,v serotonin has not actually been directly related to depression (Hirschfeld). Secondly,
there are other options, many of ,vhich n1aywork equally well or better, are cheaper, come with fewer side effects, and deal with
the root cause of depression . Most of the methods outlined here will ,vork with pharmaceuticals, but be sure to see a medica l
professional before mixing any sort of herbal remedy with a prescribed medicine, or going off of your medications . If you want an
alternative to pharn1aceuticals, consider seeing an herbalist, or doing further research on the suggestions below.
Nu trients
Many people ,vho experience depression are nutr itionally deficient. It might be a good idea to have your nutrient levels tested by
a healthcare professiona l. Nutrients that help with menta l wellness include fiber, a-linolenic (omega-3 fatty acid) and linoleic acid
(omega-6 fatty acid), the B vitamins including thian1in (vitamin Bl), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic
acid (vitamin BS), vitamin B6, folate (vitamin B9), and vitamin Bl2, vitamin C, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, potassium, iron,
phosphorus, selenium, and zinc. These are all i1nportant to get enough of through supplements, or preferab ly, th rough a diet of
whole foods, but I'll highlight vitamin D for those of you who haven't been to the Pacific Northwest before. Because there is so
little sunlig ht during the non -sun1mer months here, and n1ost people stay indoors, peop le get very little vitamin D. 111iscauses a
common form of depression known as Seasonal Affective Disorder. So supplement with vitan1in D pills, vitamin D droplets, or
fish oil!
Act ivities
Several activities are kno,vn to help with controlling mood and prevent depression. These include gardening, exercising, ,vriting,
meditation, mindfulness -based meditation, scheduling your day, sleeping enough, and socializing. Gardening gets you into the
sun, gives you fresh air and exercise, and exposes you to a soil bacteria that helps improve mood. Practice med itation ,vith deep
breathing to give your brain a rest from thinking. A form of active n1editation known as mindfulness is also effective. With
mindfu lness you stay present in the moment instead of elaborating on thoughts of the future or the past. 'Think of on ly ,.vhat
is right in front of you in the present of your day-to -day life. Writing ,,.,illhelp you process thoughts and understand emotions.
Schedule your day out into socializing, eating, activities, work, and sleeping to make sure you mainta in your health. Socialize
with family, friends, and peers, especially if you are feeling depressed. You might consider talking to a therapist ,vho understands
depression as ,veil. Lastly, if you can, be sure to live and ,vork within a positive environ1nent that feels safe.



S'I,11'1,I~
by Thomas Walker
-'

"Did you hear about that gang that is
coming onto campus? Yeah, they've
come here before to beat up some kids ...
but no,-vit's official. They dress up in
all blue or black, and have these shiny
badges. And they seem to think th ey're
the boss of everybody!"
In January of 2011, UO President
Lariviere held a townhall-style meeting
to discuss his bold proposition: The New
Partnership. TI1e Ne,-v Partnership was
a big step towards putting our public
university into private hands through a
new financial plan (one that would have
failed dr astically, studi es show, if it had
been implemented a few years ago), as
well as limited oversight from the State.
It would create a University board, which
would be run "democratically" - that
is, with a majority of its members being
appo inted by the administration, and
then those appointees would vote on
matters of our n1oney and educat ion.
Amongst
these
drastic
changes,
and within the blueprint of the New
Partnership, was a section that would
grant the University permission to
esta blish its own police force. This police
force would be distinct from the city, and
officers ,-vould be "accountable to the
[UO] President and/or his/h er designee:'
Fortunately, the New Partnership ha s
not been imple1nented by the State,
although the current administration h as
hinted towards pushing a similar policy.
On the other hand, the State of Oregon

has granted the University of Oregon
permission to have its ow11autono1nous
police force.

f,

-

~ ,

~

rJ

-......
-:.:.
-·~---.,As we move into this year, for the first
time in the history of the University of
Oregon, '\oVe
will have police officers (or
"university public safety officers"), who
have considerably more power than the
previous camp us security. They are here
to keep us safe ... right?
\,Vhen we recognize that the University
of Oregon is beholden to the whims of
corporations sucl1 as Nike and Russell
Athletics, and geared towards enticing the
funds of private donors (as is necessary
for the New Partnership), then it beco1nes
clear that a campus police force is the
main line of defense between students
and the right to our own ed ucation and
institutions, as we choose to define their
structure and function. They are the one's
who will keep "Free Speech" within the
"Free Speech Zone"; who will "protect" us
as we march; who will uphold the right
of freedom of assembly for Neo -Nazi s
on campus by blocking ent r y to and
arresting student activists. They are the
ones who will ensure that Uncle Phil gets
what he wishes.
The police are here to save us from
ourselves. For we are the uncontrollable
youth! But it is only we, the students,
who can challenge the status quo of social

contro l, and ,-vho can foster a nurturing
environment on campus. Sexual assault
is enden1ic on this, and many campuses
around the country. However, it is not
the police that will stop "the rapists;· for
the rapists are much n1ore likely to be
our friends and acquaintances - almost
never a random weirdo in a bush. We
must create a culture of consent in our
interaction s with our friends and intimate
partners. Campus publications must end
the distribution of apologist -date -rapepropaganda, and continue to elevate the
voices of those who have survived sexual
assault. We must support each other,
accept each others' boundaries, and learn
to love ourselves enough to home alone.
Police will not stop theft, but only
profile the "thi eves." Police will not stop
violence, but only uphold its power.
The solution to violence and greed is
within us, and ever-stronger within our
community. Let us keep each other safe
as we walk home with trusted friends, as
we ask a nearby stude nt to watch our stuff
as ,-vego pee, as we give our friends hugs
v.rhen they are sad! And let us not forget
some magical phrases ...

''J

do not consent
t o any search .''

''I will not answer any questions: '

.,

-

. ~Lbf]Ji{j®

..

WhatTo DoIf PoliceStopYouIn YourCar

'\\

,,

.."'""~ -

..
.
.
'I
.. . the
,:·
Thesesuggestions
fromtheNationa
l LawyersGuild"KnowYourRights·guidesummarize
rulestowhich
• ,1 thepolicearetheoreticallysubject.Sincethepolice, thecour1s,
andthegovernment
cananddoignorethese
1
' ruleswhentheyfeellikett,theselipsshouldbetakenwitha grainof sail Sometimes
thesetipsmayhelpyou
tateron in court,andsometimes
theywon't.Buteventhoughtheslatecan't becounted
ontofollowls own
laws,il stillmaybehelpfu
l lo knowwhattheselawsar~soyoucanshameparticular
slateagentsor dealwith
particular situations
. Alwaysuseyourbestjudgment
- ttyouaren1doinganythingwrong,theremaybe no
" reasonto beexcessively
paranoid
or escalatea potenhally
innocent
andbriefencot11ter
wllha policeofficer
whois justsaying'hi' Intoan ugly situationbyactingsuspic
iousandrefusingto say'hi' back. Thepointis lo
avoidgivinginformation
. Wedon'twantpeopleto interpretthesesuggestions
so strtlly thatthesuggestions
themselves
causeproblems.
"
Provid
ingthisinformation
isn't intendedtoscareyouintoinaclivttyormakeyouparanoid
. Thevastmajortty
•• • or radicalprojectsarelegalandproceed
withnointerference
fromthepolice. Thepolicehassleandarrest
peoplebecausetheyhopethat suchrepression
will lighten99percentof thepopulation
awayfromradical
activity
. Thekeylo socialchangeis findingthecouragetocontinueourresistance.
Wecan, andshould
, take
reasonable
precautions
while con~inuingthefightfor liberation
.

~

.

-·E

-:i,. NeverTalkto thePohce
Anythingyousaytoan FBI agentor copmaybe usedagainstyouandotherpeople- evenif the
questions
seemroutineor harmless.
Youdon'IhavetotalktoFBIagents,policeor invesllgalors·on
thestreet,if
you've beenarrested,
or ff you'reinJal.(Exception
: in 20states,youcanbe prosecuted
forrefusingtogive
, yourname
. Refusing
to giveyournameIntheother30statesmayarousesuspic
ion.)Onlya judgehasthe
>:1
authoritytoorder youto answerquestions
. Manyactivists
haverefusedto answerquestions
, evenwhen
< ordered
bya judgeor grandjury.andsubsequently
servedjail timetoavoidimplicatingothers.It is common
for
theFBIto threatentoserveyouwitha grandjurysubpoena
unlessyoutalkto them.Don'tbe intimidated
. This
is frequently
anemptythreat
, andWtheyaregoingto subpoena
you,theywiadosoanyway
. If youdoreceivea
subpoena
, calla lawyerrightaway.
;·■
Onceyou'vebeenstopped
or arrested,
don't tryto engagecopsin a dialogue
or respondlo accusations
. If
youarenervousaboutsimplyretusir.gto talk,youmayfindit easiertotell themtocontactyourlawyer.Oncea
', lawyeris involved,
thepoliceusuallybackoffbecause
they'velosttheirpowertointimidate
. Evenif youhave
• , alreadyanswered
somequestions. youcanrefuseto answerotherquestions
until youhavea lawyer
. Don'tlie
,,.,.to thepoliceor givea falsename- lyingto thepoliceis a crime.However
, thepoliceareallowedtolieto you
- don'tbelievewhattheysay.If you'vebeenarrested,
don't talk aboutanyth
ingsensilivein policecarsor jail
~ cells, anddon'ttalkto otherinmates
- youareprobably
beingrecorded
. Allof thisapplieswhetheryooJve
~ beenbustedfor a minorinfraction,
or a seriousfelony.

~J

~ What To DoAboutPoliceHarassment
OnTheStreet

If lhe policeslopyouonthestreet,ask, "AmI freeto gor If yes, walk.may.If noLyouarebeingdetained
._ butthisdoesnotnecessari
ly meanyouwillbearrested
. Ask. 'Canyouexplainwhyyouaredetaining
me?' To
· stopyou. copsmusthavespecificreasonstosuspectyouof involvement
in a specificcrime.Policeareentitled
to friskyou(palyoudown)duringa detention.
If thepolicetryto furthersearchyou,yourcar, or yourhome,say
repeatedly
thatyoudo notconsenttothesearch,butdo notphysically
resist
Youcanfightpoliceharassment
bywatch
ingthecops. Youhavea righttobe In publicandtoobserve
:;J policeactivity
. Writedownall policeoffice(snames& badgenumbers
, addresses
ofwitnesses
, thetime,date, •
placeanddetailsof theincident,etc.If stopped,
gel peopleto watchforyou.

WhatTo DoIf PoliceVisitYourHome

~----

Youdonothaveto JettheFBI or policeintoyourhomeor officeunlesstheyhavea searchor arrest
•arrantDemand
to seethewarran
t. ll mustspecifically
describetheplacetobesearched
andthethingsto be
,eized.If theydopresenta warrant
, youdonothaveto tellthemanythingotherthanyournameandaddress.
ellthepolicethatyoudonotconsentto thesearch• thiswill(theoretically)
liml themto searchonlywherethe
•arran
t authorizes
. If theofficersaskyou togivethemdocuments
, yourcomputer
, or anything
else.locklo see
if theitemis listedin thewarrantIf it s not.do notconsenttothemtakingIt. Youhavea righttoobservewhat
:heydo.Youshouldtakewritten notesofwhattheydo,theirnames
, badgenumbers
, etc.Ha·- ·~
witnesses.~•

~ . ,:.. .:,~~_
. ¥ f;;;:::;f
.
.

If youar, drivinga car, youmustshowpoliceyourlicense,regislraUon
andproof~f ilsurance
, butyoudo
nothaveto consentto a searchor answerquestions.Keepyourhandswherethepolicecanseethemand
refuseto consent(agree)to a search.Policemayseparate
passengers
anddriversfromeachotherto
question
them,butnoonehaslo answeranyquestions
.
.

WhatTo DoIf YouAreArrested

Repeatedly
tellthepolice•1don'twanttotalk untUmytawyeris preserll.'If yousufferpoliceabusewhie
detained
or arrested,
tryto remember
theofflce(sbadgenumberand/ornama.Youhavetherightto askthe
officerto Identifyhimself.Writedowneverything
as soonasyoucanandtryto findwitnesses
. If youareinjured,
seea doctorandtakepicturesoftheInjuriesassoonas possible.

Searches
at International
Borders

Yourproperty(including
dataonlaptops)canbe searched
andseizedat bordercrossings
wtthoutawarranl
Consider
backingupor notbringing
important
databeforegoingthroughcustoms
.

PoliceHassles
: WhatIf YouAreNotA Citizen?

ln mostcases.youhavetherightto a hearingwth anImmigration
judgebeforeyoucanbe deported
. If you
voluntarily
gtveupthisrightor takevoluntary
depar1ure,
youcouldbedeported
withouta heanr1:1
andyoumay
neverbe ablelo enter theUSlegallyagainor evergetlegalimmigration
status.Donottalk lo the lCE, evenon
thephone
, or signanypapersbeforetalkingto animmigration
lawyer
. Youdo nothave10revealyour
Immigration
statusto anygover11T1ent
official.If youarearrestedintheUS, youhavetherighttocallyour
consulate
or havethepoliceinformtheconsulate
ofyourarrestYourconsulmayhelpyoufinda lawyer
. You
alsohavetherightto refusehelpfromyourconsula\e.

PoliceHassles:
WhatIf YouAreUnder18YearsOld?
Don'ttalkto thepolice-minorsalsohavethe nghtto remainsient.Youdon't haveto talkto copsor school
officials
. Publicschoolstudents
havethe rightto polittally0111anize
atschoolby passingoutleaflets,holding
meetings
andpublishing
ir¥1epen
dentnewspapers
aslongastheseactivitiesdonotdisruptclasses
. Youhave
the rightto a hearingwithyourparentsandanattorneypresentbeforeyouaresuspended
or expelled.
Students
canhavetheirbackpacks
andlockerssearched
byschoolofficialswithouta warrant.Do notconsent
to anysearch,butdo notphysically
resisl

Common
SenseActivistSecurity Measures

Don'tspeculate
onor circulaterumorsaboutprotestactionsor potentially
illegalacts. Assumeyouareunder
surveillance
if youareorganizing
massdirectaction
. anything
ilegal, or evenlegalstuff.Checkoutthe
authenticity
ofanypotentially
disturbing
letter,rumor,phonecall, or otherformofcommunication
beforeacting
,onil Askthesupposed
sourceif sheor heIs responsible
. Dealopenlyandhonestlywlth
thedifferences
in our
movements
(race, gender,class, agereligion,sexualorientation
, etc.)beforethepolicecanexploitthem.Don't
trytoexposea suspected
agentor Informer
wtthoutsolidproof.Purgesbasedonmeresuspicion
onlyhelpthe
policecreatedistrustandparanoia
. It generally
worksbetterto criticizewhata disruptive
personsaysanddoes
withoutspeculating
asto why.
Peol)lewhobragabout,recklessly
propose
, orasktorunnecessary
information
aboutunde111round
groups
Of illegalactivities
area severedangerlo themovement.
Thepolicemayusedinfiltrators/provocateurs
posing
asactiviststo entrappeopleonconspiracy
charges
of planning
illegalacts. Youcanbe guiltyofconspiracy
just
!or agreeing
withoneotherpersonto commita crimeeventt younevergo throughwithit - allthatis required
1sanagreement
todo something
illegalanda single'overtact' infurtherance
of theagreement,
whichcanbe a
legalactlikegoingtoa store.It is reasonable
to besuspicious
of peopleInthescenewhopressure
us,
manipulate
us,offertogiveusmoneyor weapons
, or makeusfeellikewe aren't coolttwe don't feel
COl!1fortable
with a particular
tactic,nomatterwlYjtheydothesethings.Responsible
activistsconsidering
nsky
actionsw10
wanttorespectotherpeople'sboundaries
andlimllsandwon'twantto pressure
youintodoing
thingsy~u'renotreadyfor. Doingso is coerciveanddisrespectfu
l - hardlya goodbasisonwhichto buflda
new societyor an effective
action.
Keepin mindthatactivists
whospendall theirlimeworryingaboutsecuritymeasures
andpolice
survelllance
wlQenduptotallyisolated
andineffective
becausetheywon'tbeabletowelcomenewfolkswho
want t? Jointhes~gle. Wehaveto beawareofthepossibiilyof poilcesurveillance
whilemaintaining
our
~ oommitment
toactingopenlyandpublicly.Smashing
thesystemis goingto requiremassactionaswellas
•!.~secretivecovertactionsby a tin)'cliqueof yourtrustedfriends
· More infocontact theNational
LawyersGuild:415285-1055
or 212627-2656;readTheWarBl HomebyBrian
Glickor Agentsof Repression
byWardChurchill

We hope that you take the tim e to discover •
Eugene and see it as not just th e Univer sity and
hippies. Eugene has an a,-vesome radical and
activist scene that was tampered with during the
Green Scare, but remain s strong. Your student
ID doubles as a bus pass and Eugene is one of the
most bike -friendly cities in the US. There is really
no excuse to be limited to the Unive rsity bubbl q.
So go ahead and yank out thi s handy guide
to help you explor e Eugene!

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Historical Events:
l. Dogs, Skateboardsand "Ethnic
Cleansing;• 13th and Alder
The signs on 13th just west of campus
ban skateboards,dogs and seemingly
the people ,vho "remain:' The signs
date back to 1996when police s,veeps
arrested more than 100 transients,
hippies and homelesspeople along
13th after a few businessescomplained.
A homeless activist called the police
targeting of young and poor people
"ethnic cleansing"
2. Occupy Eugene
The local chapter of the Occupy Wall
Street n1ovementbegan in late 2011.
The group started at the Park Blocks,
went to Alton Baker,UO ca111pus
and then Washington/Jefferson
park, hosting general assembliesas
well as workshops, free clinics and a
plethora of other con1n1unitybuilding
events. They were eventuallyevicted
fron1Washington/Jeffersonpark, 5
days before Christmas. After,vards
they changed location to 7th and
Polk. In a reaction to City Council's
eviction decision, the group stated
"The Occupation will continue, with
or without cainp:' Throughout the
summer they had a ca1npin front of the
Federal Buildingand current projects
include occupyinga foreclosedhome.
They continue to offer vvorkshops,
clinics, meditation and other
community building resources, all free
of charge.
3. Vietnan1Protests, 13th and
University.Massiveprotests during the
Vietnan1War lead to the permanent
closure of 13th Avenuethrough
campus to car traffic.At one point 300
police and National Guard troops with
clubs and tear gas battled thousands
of den1onstrators.Anti-war protesters

torched the ROTC building and bo.111bed
the PLCfaculty officebuilding
4. VO Activists,15th and Agate
With the state spending billions on
prisons, the VO ranks on national lists
as a third-tier university.But Mother
Jones ranked the VO, ,vhich hosts the
huge Public Interest Environmental Law
Conferenceat the Knight La,vSchool
every year, as the nu111berone for campus
political activis1n.
5. Field Burning, Hayv,rardField
In 1974track legend Steve Prefontainewas
coughing up blood after running through
field-burning smoke at a race at Hayward
Field. Eugeneanshave fought to ban
the pollution fron1industrial grass seed
farn1ersfor three decades without success,
but fanners have agreed to not burn
during the Trials.The valley'shuge grass
industry has also made Eugene one of the
worst places in the nation for seasonal
allergies
6. Occupy the Banks
On Noven1ber17th., 2011 as part of an
International day of action, men1bers
shut down 5 banks, notably Chase, Bank
of An1e1icaand "Stu111pqua"
in Eugene.
Seventeenpeople ,vere arrested, they
stomped and sang in the police paddy
wagon belting out "Solidarityforever."
7. Ecotage,Walnut and Franklin
ln 2000 activiststorched three trucks at
the Ro1naniadealership to protest the gas
guzzlers'environ111ental in1pact.In
2001, 35 111ore
SUVs were lit up. This arson
was one of 111any
acts of environmentally
n1otivatedsabotage throughout the West,
including the burning of a Vailski lodge.
In the last year, the Bush administration
has sent a dozen activists,most from or
,vith links to Eugene,to prison for Nhat
they allegeare acts of "ecoterrorisn1'.'
1

8. Riverfrontat Risk,South of Autzen
footbridge. What a lovelypark. But the
UO says the riverfront natural area near
campus isn't a park at all but a "research
park" that the UO wants to fill \\•ith
corporate officesand parking lots.

to hjs ahna n1ater,son1efor academic
buildings but 1nostlyfor lavish sports
facilities.Critics charge the money has
allowedhin1to dictate VO decisions
around workers' rights, coach firings and
construction contracting.

13.Where is Downto,vn?Broad,vayand
9. 'AnarchistCapital of the World; Lincoln Olive
and 3rd. In 2000 Eugene l'vlayorJin1Torrey Urban renewal in the early 1970s
and the national 111edia
dubbed Eugene
destroyed n1uchof Eugene'shistoric
the "anarchistcapital of the world'.' It
downtown, leaving behind concrete
parking garagesand empty pits. Retail
"'as mostlyhype - only four of the 570
flight to n1allssubsidized by freewaysalso
protesters arrested at the WorldTrade
Organization riots in Seattle\\1ere from
helped kill downtown. Developersare
currently working with the city on plans
Eugene.But it did get a handful of local
environmentalistsa long interview on 60
to fill the pits ,vith high-rise housiI1gand
Minutes. RollingStone hyped a coffeeshop offices,but downtown still doesn't have
formerly located here as "ground zero for
much of a there there (at least during the
Eugene'sthriving anarchist population'.'
daytime hours).
14. More pepper please!
10.Beer Riots, 14th and Ferry
In April, 2012 Occupy Eugeneand
Drunk students burned furniture and signs Cascadia Forest Defendershosted a week
in the street, cha11ting"U-S-A"during riots of action called Occupy the Trees in an
involving1,800students, thrown bottles
effort to halt climate change and corporate
and clouds of tear gas in 2002. Sounds
greed by the 1 percent fro1nexcesslogging
like a scene fron1the 1978movie Anin1al
and destruction of the Earth. DuriI1g
House, filmed nearby the UO. In 2010
the KidsDay march a few 1notherswere
another ruckus broke out involving 400
pepper sprayedin front of their children.
students who ,vere tear gassed by police in Thanks EPD!
riot gear with arrest trucks.
15.l"ree Site/RoadBlockade
11.Pre'sRock, Birch and Skyline
Eugene activists take their trees seriously.
Track legend StevePrefontaine died here
ln 1995 they blockeda logging road near
when his car rolled. Prefontaine and his
Warner Creek for 11n1onthsuntil the
coach BillBo\vennan helped inspire Nike, Clinton administration called offloggiJ1g
a corporation that 111ade
billions for Phil
the area. Tree sits crop up in the oldKnight and other investors.Prefontaine
gro,vth forests around Eugenealmost
Livedin a trailer park near the railroad
every year, with protesters living high in
tracks.
the trees to keep loggersfro111
cuttiI1gthen1
down.
12.Nike Sweatshops,13th and Moss
S0111e
of the VO was built by Nike profits
16.No Trolley,5th and Willamette
from exploitingthird-,vorld Asians
Eugeneonce had an extensivesystem of
paid less than a dollar a day for grueling
electric streetcars that today would have
,vork.Nike billionaire Phil Knight has
n1ade it a top tourist attraction. But the ~
contributed an estiinated $230 1nillion
city shut dov,n the syste111
in 1927and

Ill

paved over most of the tracks in favor of an
extensive bus netv,ork, bike paths, cars and
global ,varming.
17. Tree Cathedrals, Broad,vayand
Charnelton. With eight 1nonthsof rain,
trees gro,v into green cathedrals here, and
Eugene loves them. But the city government
doesn't always.After the city clearcut
to,vering trees along 6th and 7th to speed
cars through to,vn, voters in 1984passed a
charter a1nendmentbanning such logging
for street ,videning. In 1997police sho,vered
tree sitters with dozens of cans of pepper
spray when they tried to stop a clearcut for
the BroadwayPlace develop1nent, sparking
accusations of torture from Amnesty
International.
18. 'OfficerBlov;Job;7th and oak
Courthouse. In 2004 Eugene police officer
Roger Maganawas sentenced to 94 years
for raping or sexuallyabusing more than a
dozen won1en while on duty. Lawsuitslater
revealed that the city receivednumerous
complaints about Magafia'sabuse over six
years but did nothing to stop hin1.
19. KeseySquare Broadwayand vVillan1ette.
Local author Ken Kesey,famous for a book
about insanity and for dropping acid, is
memorialized in a statue here, reading to
children. On May 30, the square was the site
of police using Tasers on an anti-pesticide
demonstrator, resultingin allegationsof
police brutality that are being investigated.
Most Eugenedemonstrations are antigovernment in nature; ironically,the Taser
victim was den1onstratingin support of a
local goverrunent ban on roadside spraying.
20. Diversity? Huh? MLK Blvdand Coburg
Eugene'sfight over whether to rename
Centennial Boulevard after Martin Luther
King drew national attention in 2003. Only
about 1 percent of Eugene's population is
black. Eugene is one of the whitest, least

diverse cities in the nation. Eugene police
are reportedly twice as likelyto stop blacks
or Latinos as whites, but the department
denies racialprofiling.
21. Whiteaker,5th and Blair
TI1isfunky neighborhood has long been a
center of Eugene's counterculture. A state
ballot 1neasureto recriminalizepossession
of sn1allamounts of pot failed by a
,vide margin throughout the city.In the
Whiteakerprecinct nine out of 10 people
voted against it.
22. Alton Baker Park RiverfrontBike trail.
Most of what's been built in the En1erald
City is "butt ugly;' as one local architect
put it. But the city's ,vaterfrontbike trail looping 12 miles through parks and across
fivebike bridges - is a popular treasure.
Eugene has t\vice as n1anybike commuters
Food!

23. Lotus Garden
VegetarianChinese food in Downtown
Eugene.Deliciousnoodles, vegetablesand
seitan.
24. Cornbread Cafe
Vegancomfort food, the cafe looks like
an old diner and hosts an entirely vegan
n1enuwith many gluten free options. The
restaurant started as a food cart in January,
2010 but had so n1uchden1and that they
decided to move to a full restaurant. The
Eugenewich and Mac unCheese are highly
recommended.
25. Pizza ResearchInstitute
Creative vegetarian and vegan pizzas,
including one with walnuts,apples and
gouda! Located in the Whiteaker,they
also feature a chef's choice pizza \\1here
the maker willjust choose ,vhatever
ingredients to put on! vVorththe trek
across town.

26. Holy Cow
Delicious,vegetarian, regional cuisine,
there's a ca1npuslocation in the EMU
featuring Pad Thai, delicious ten1peh
sandwiches,ko1nbucha,and roasted
veggies,as well as yummy treats like
cookies and brownies.Why would you
eat anY'vhereelse on campus?

11!1

night, radical fi!Jnnights, art parties,
and benefit concerts throughout the
year. Look out for flyers!The Lorax
Manner is the one that looks like a castle,
the Ca1npbellClub has a large front porch
,vith people playing music and gettin'
ro\vdyat all hours.

.a

32. Eugene Free School/BikeChurch
According to their website"The
27. Sundance Natural Foods
An adorable little 1narketon 24th near Eugene Free Schoolis dedicated to
free and decentralizededucation
Hilyard. Half price produce shelfand
without exclusivity,financial burden or
very full bulletin boards out front
about Eugene happenings. TI1estaff are authoritarianism. It exists as a network of
individuals that come together to share
friendly and helpful, the bulk bins are
stocked and their hot food is half price ideas and learn from one another. Our
belief is that this learning should occur
after 8:30pn1!
on comn1onground, wherethe sharing
of knowledge and skills is not reliant
28. The Kiva
on institutions, but springs from our
Downtown natural food and book
communities thetnselves.We ,vant to
store! Great sandwiches.
foster the types of face-to-face interactions
that will strengthen us individually and
29. Cozn1ic Pizza
Right next to Eugene Station downtown collectively,create self-reliance and
at 8th and Charnelton. Their menu has provide a vehiclefor genuine solidarity'.'
More info at:
an1azingpizzas and salads,vith lots of
http://W\\rw.latona.us/eugenefs
regional food. They also host all ages
shows featuring local talent!
33. The Survival Center
The Survival Center is your on30. WanderingGoat CoffeeCompany
campus radical resource for social and
The v\Tander
ing Goat is a cafe on 2nd
environn1entalactivists, which can mean
and Madison in the Whiteaker.They
feature sustainablygrov,n coffeebeans almost anything. The SC has a big budget
courtesy of the ASUOand host workshops,
and vegan baked goods. TI1eGoat
discussions,and events. They are an
hosts art and 1nusicevents,as well as
amazing resource for anybody who ,vants
independent filn1s.
to start a campaign,get acquainted with
Eugene'sradical community or just hang
Radical Resources
out on some couches.
31. TI1eCa1npbellClub/Lorax Manner
34. Multicultural Center/Student Unions
The Student Cooperative Association
The MCC is a community space
is an alternative living situation right
next to campus at 16th alley and Alder. for students from diverse cultural
Both houses have group dinners, people backgrounds, they host events, concerts
and discussionsand are also a meeting
are welco1neto stop by for a tour and
place for many student unions and activist
a free meal. They also host open mic
groups.

at.the.
n1vers1ty
o regon
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I moved into the Lorax Manner last spring term for a few reasons: the location is
one of the best, the rent is ridiculously cheap, and I wanted to enhance my college
experience by living in a very "Eugene way" - co -operative style .
Since I made that decision last spring, I've made a ton of new friends and I have
created lots of memories. One of the greatest things about my house is how act ive
everybody is, which makes the opportunities to get involved endless! To give you
an idea, we often throw parties to fundraise money for different community causes,
active groups like Food Not Bombs are always around - they can be found cooking
in the kitchen every Friday- and I shouldn't forget to n1ention the Ca1npbell Club
(another house which is part of the Studen t Cooperative Associatio n) is located
right across the alley. They have one of the best open mic nights in town.

D oyouhatedealing
withR A 'sandlandlords
always
telling
youwhattodo?
Good,
wedotoo.
Everything is about cooperation, thats why its called a co -op. We share ahnost
everything - from house bikes to communal meals to chores . All three houses
in the Students Cooperative Association (the Lorax Manner, Campbell Club, and
Janet Smith) operate by conse nsus, mean ing everybody has an equal voice and
everybody is their own leader. I have found the experience of consensus to be very
re,-varding, but challenging at times. However, it ensures that nobody gets left out because ,-vetake everyones opin ion seriously,
which is importa nt because I don't think you should ever feel left out ,-vhere you live!
Looking for divers ity? The student co-ops are a great place to find a diverse set of peop le living and funct ioning together 1-vho
embrace and celebra te different ways of life.
Its hard not to love being a student when you're surrou nded by people that are all so passionate about what they do. I feel that
my housemates and the co -op community continue to teach me more than my college classes ever will. If you're interested in the
co -ops, dont be shy! If you want to find out n1ore about the houses, you can stop by anyti1ne for a house tour and to pick up a11
applicat ion. Or just co me by and hang out !

Loraxed:

Describing a forest or other ecosystem that has been
save d from theft , de struction , and commodification.

~1£ ...

t.,N~~

All right, call me a counter-revolutionary,but I'm going to sit here, drink a beer, and tell you a story. Disorientation,
eh? Disoriented as you may be, you've made your decision (hopefully you made the decision), and here you are at
the University of Nike, Orygun, United Snakes of Amerikkka. When I was your age, I didn't let college get in the way of
my education; I was cutting into my thumb, trying to slice bread while high on LSD, cooking for Food Not Bombs, and
collecting commas from the counter of the student co-ops to save for Faulkner-esqueparagraphs somewhere later in my
illustrious career.
And I graduated with honors four years later, Summa Cum Waude (is that what they say)? No, it isn't. I didn't, you
caught me, I still attend the University of Oregon, and you might see me in one of your classes. What's the point, this
fucker didn't graduate, he's still stuck in the pipes, cogs, gears, take your pick - why should I listen to him?
You shouldn't. Not to me. I won't tell you to get that business degree, or that a hard science is the only way to get
a job nowadays, or that you should study something "solid" or "concrete" or "hard." I will absolutely, positively not use the
same words penile enhancement pill scams press into email accounts, to tell you what to study... but, if asked to give
a few words for incoming university students, there's a few things I would say (remember, don't listen to me, unless, of
course, you want to):
Sunset Squadr on: Yes, this one goes out to the late, great Julian, a founder of the infamous Sunset Squadron. Go out

to the V\/illamette, to the Autzen footbridge, every sunny evening you can, with as many of your friends you can round
up, maybe with some mood enhancers, a boombox (I'd recommend a Creedence tape, seriously) and get jiggy into the
darkness with your homies. Sunsets in the Pacific Northwest are special, not Don Delillo Los Angeles smog special, more
like crisp clean golden fall air special. If all college ends up being is darkness and papers in between lines of adderall,
you'll still have your memories of Sunset Squadron, unless you do too much adderall. Don't do that.
Volunteer: Wow, did this guy really tell me to volunteer? Get out. This guy right here. Yes, go, go now, go forth, "just do

it™" if you must, get out of the university once a week if you can, go somewhere where somebody, something needs you,
and do something you think is important. Plant trees. Volunteer at Sacred Heart Medical Center. Go read stories to little
kids. Warm yourself through an endlessly sky-shitting Oregon winter with a little inner fire of self-righteousness. Wait, no,
the point is, do something awesome for others. It's good for the ol' perspective, it makes homework seem easy, if you
don't you're a jackass - the reasons to volunteer are endless.
Rob A Bank With A Gang Of Poets: Nah, I know, I know, it would be beautiful, but it would probably end disastrously.

Oh, and read some Roberto Bolano, he's the bomb dot com, he's the big payback, the sheeeit. All the single peoples out
there love a literary hipster, trust me on this one.
Write ('ery day) : Trust me, it's therapeutic. You don't need a fancy journal, you don't need a nice pen (if you do, steal

them from the Duck Store just kidding ™). Just f ind a way to get some of your own thoughts onto paper. Plus, with all
the weekends you won't remember, you'll be glad you scribbled down some notes so you can forever cherish the ones
you do.
Pursue that Awesome : All right, I'm on deadline here, there's a million things to say about starting college, but instead,

I'll leave you all with this vignette:
I was waiting around in my southern California hometown. Everyone else had already started school. Max had come
home from Berkeley after just a month to spend a weekend with his folks. He was my besty, you know, BFF type shit.
Max came over to have a cup of tea. He and I shared matcha on the back porch, it's a buttery powdered green tea, the
finest out 'dere.
Max told me,

"John , just because you're about to go to college doesn't mean awesome things are going to
happen to you. You still have to do awesome things.
The key difference is in the ve rb man."
Get out there, be awesome, show the radicals some love.
Love,
Nick Scratch

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IIJ
A Half-Decade

of
-By

Out rage

Gimme r on

Since its very beginning, the University of Oregon has been
embroiled in oppression. I witnessed this oppression before I came
to the University, whil e I was here, and I see it as I leave. I atte nd ed
the Univers ity of Oregon from Fall 2006 until Spring 2012. I want
to express my understanding of ho w th is University has contin ued
to be a place of oppression as well as a n1eeting-place for a series of
mass struggles for liberation . These are the thin gs that I am aware
of; I do not pretend that my memory will cover all of th e incidents
or be able to convey their in1portance to those n1ost involved, and
those that I was involved ,,vith will be given more weight because
of how they affected me. Please read or reference this to gain an
understanding of the wider context in which you are now enteri ng
the University.

G illesp

and

St r u g g I e

ie -

Consider that there were subjects whi ch were being taught only by
White folk. Cons ider the effects of having on ly White instructors
for students of Co lor. And consider the imperialist conseque nces
of teaching Whiteness. Even today, some departments boast facu lty
of Color while having only par tial spo nsor sh ip ,-vith an Ethn ic
Studies professor, simply to boost their numbers. A more accurate
reflection ,-vould be depa rtments with tenured faculty of Color. If
th is were the measure, most departments ,-vould stiJI be receiving
"Zero Awar d s."

One student in such a depa rtment, none other th an the prestigious
Co llege of Education, began to feel uncomfortable. She looked
at her classes and noticed
" this
Univ er sit y has continued
to be th ere were no faculty of
1872
The
University
Color, no classes dedicated
a place
of oppression
as well
as a
of
Oregon
is
founded.
to
multiculturalis1n
or
meet in g -p I ace f o r a s er i es o f ma s s
Watch "The Unofficial Tour"
diversity, no conten t in
st r u g g I es f o r I i b e r at i o n ."
of the Univeristy of Oregon:
classes whi ch focused on
Link to Part one: http ://W\-vw.youtube.com/,-vatch?v= JaL383avqgU
m ulticulturalism or diversity. Nobody was talking about it, an d
th is was tota lly normal. Well, that's how White Privilege works . It
This video series takes note of gende r segregation, racist policies,
monetary do natio ns from racists, racist actions on campus, and becomes normal, regular, an d unquest ioned. She went to the Dea n
a racist environment fro1n the influence of the Ku Klux Klan on of the College of Education and ,,vas basically told "If you don't
like it here, you can go somewhere else:' Aside fro1n th e insult of
Oregon and Eugene politics. Klan n1embership included both
students and professors, and held influence over fundraising,
being told by administrators to leave rather than address problen1s
constr uctio n, and operations of the University. 'These videos of oppression, this stud ent was conscious that other students were
are somewha t choppy but they are helpful when it comes to facing the same problems, and confronted the oppressive absence
w1derstanding the priorities of the University of Oregon. This is a of these issues. She did not accept the Dean's choices; instead,
school fou nded and funded by oppression .
she chose to take the truth of the University public. She talked to
University officials and the press, and brought cr itic isn1 upon the
A few U O Histori cal Facts:
University. Local schools ann ounce d they wo uld not hire gradu ates
- Judge Deady - Author of racial exclusio n laws in the Oregon of the College of Education because they wou ld be cultura lly
Constitut ion and foun der of the Oregon Law Scho ol.
incompeten t, and the Mayor condemned th e Unive rsity. Eventuall y
- San1uel Friendly - Capitalist, Klansmen. The building bearing the Unive rsity ,-vas gett ing such a bad pub lic reputation that they
his nan1e used sexist and rac ist exclusion in its constr uction and ado pted an "inc lusion policy" and said they were plann ing to do
renovation.
this all along.
- Gerli nger Hall - funded by Eugene Klavern #3 (loca l un it of
KKK).
This incident is raises a number of questions that ,,ve shou ld ask.
Wha t historical legacies of racisn1 created the College of Education's
A Short List of Grievance s
cu rr icu lum and the makeup of th e staff? What are the conseq uences
In the years shortly preceding 1ny time at the University of Oregon,
of those legacies? Where else 1night these sa1ne legacies be found
I am aware of the following inc idents:
in the Univers ity and elsewhere? Why was the Unive rsity so
resistant to changing its policy? How did this situ ation reflect the
-Spr ing 2006 - The Zero Awards, ,-vhich were presented to Unive rsity int ersections of racism, sexism, capitalism and kyriarchy? Wha t are
departments who had no People of Color an1ong their staff. The the new faces of oppression?
award s were given by the Multicultu ral Center (MCC) and the
Oregon Students of Color Coalition ( OSCC, a part of the Oregon
Another incident took place during th e time of 1999-2000 .
Student Association) . These awards reflected the Univers ity's Protests had been gat heri ng for years against the harn1ful effects
ongoing expression of White Privilege. The Administration and of globaliza tion. This was the time of the '99 Seattle World Trade
departn1ents did not feel it necessary to inc lude People of Color; it Organization (WTO) protests. Students at the University called
was not a priority to them, and this attitude is grudgi ngly den ied for participation in the vVorker's Rights Consorti um (WRC), to
today in order to avoid accusations of racisn1.
ensure that the Unive rsity suppo rted fair labor practices only.

" our

public

Univ er sit y is beholden

Students, staft~ facu lty, and comn1un ity n1embers all joined the
effort to pressure the University into joining the consortium.
111en-University President Frohnmayer committed the University
to the WRC, ,.vhich remained true only during the school year.
As summer tern1 began , most students left campus, and under
pressure from major school donor Nike (which does not use fair
labor practices in their sweatshops), Frohnmayer reneged on his
promise and withd rew the University of Oregon from the WRC.
Frohnmayer said that the lawyers could not n1andate how producers
of Un iversity -,.vear choose to do business, but the University can
only choose n1anufacturers based on contracts.
This means that our public University is beholden to corporate
po,.ver. TI1is particular story has the implication that University
administrat ion likes to pick-and-choose which la,.vs/agreements to
follo,.v and when. Th is story raises the lesson that the University
will wait until students are away to decide things; that they will not
hesitate to lie to students in order to placate us, only to continue
their corpora te schemes once public pressure has died down. This
teaches us that the true interest of University administration is in
receiving n1oney, and they ,vill not let th is process be interrupted
by meddling students. This story raises questions such as, what are
the priorities of the University? In what ways are public institutions
accountable to public interest? How can public institutions avoid
becon1ing cults of privilege in which small groups take power
and ignore the opin ions of others? How shall large groups remain
den1ocratic and consensus-centered?
This story does not end entire ly poo rly, however . First, it is a good
sign that the University was initially pressured into accepting
participation in the WRC, and second, there have been more
recent struggles that have improved things somewhat (this will be
discussed later in regards to Russell Athl etic).
From 2004 -2006, the Federal government centered its domestic
anti-terrorism efforts on so -called "eco-terror ism" (environmental
activism, animal rights, etc). Undercove r operations and raids
against act ivists, such as the FBI's Operation Backfire, were
designed to target activist groups such as the Earth Liberation
Front and An im al Liberation Front. Some of these operat ions lead
to the arrests of activists in the Pacific Northwest , including the
Eugene area. Some homes in Eugene were subject to raids by the
FBI, secret wiretaps, and undercover surveillance. This crackdown
opened up a ne,v era of state repression, follo,ving the post -9/11
"War on Terror;' in which members of groups could face extended
prison sentences for any crirne with a "terrorism enhance1nent:' So
for instance, the charge of Arson, which might norn1al ly receive
5 years in prison, ,,vould be extended to 25 years. This period also
saw the widespread resu rgence of Grand Jury subpoenas, wh ich
den1and that anyone subpoenaed must testify or face 5 years in
prison (as opposed to one's normal 5th amendment protec tions
and th e right to remain silent).
This ,.vhole period (,¥hich we are still living in) is being referred to as
the "Green Scare." The Green Scare is so -named for its similarity to

to

cor

por

ate

power"

II

pr ior instances of the Red Scare, in which Socialists, Co1nn1unists,
and Anarchists faced rampant state repress ion. As ,.vas the case
during the Red Scares of the past, the purpose of the Green Scare is
to dissuade political dissent, to stir up fear amongst the populace ,
and to justify draconian government oppression . The Green Scare
actually refers to more than just enviro n 1nentalists now, since
social justice movements of all sorts are targeted by police and
federal agencies. Th is era is charac terized by a rnechanism of state
surveillance and selective -targeting for repression; in addition
to environmentalists, the state will also frequently target peace seekers, radical communities, and political activists of all kinds.
The imp lication here is that our survival depends upon continued
resistance to state repression.
It ,.vas in this climate that I entered the UO in the Fall of 2006 .
I came to be involved in The Student Insurgent after exploring
can1pus and seeking out a radical publication. Through the
lenses of persona l experience, editorialism , news reporting, and
philosoph ical exploration, I took a keen eye to the struggles around
campus. During n1y time here , I ca1ne to understand that Journalism
is always biased, and the n1ost I can offer is an understanding of
struggle through participa tory accompliceship. I call this Active
Journalis1n - to take an active role in struggle for n1utual liberation.
This is an important philosophy for me, because I canno t
understand a strugg le from the outside; I will not hea r the details,
nor ,.vill I FEEL the emotions of victory or loss from the outside. I
need to participate. I need to be a part of what is happening or I am
unable to meaningfully represent ,.vhat is happening.

An Accomplice's Memoirs
2006 -2007 , ASUO President is Jared Axelrod.
My first step into activism on campus ,vas the "Free Speech
Parade; ' whi ch involved street speaking, 1nusic-making, and
unrestrained expression. This program had a hearty core group
and this space appealed to a good many peop le, so1ne who spoke
many times and some on ly once, as they felt calle d to do.
This group once paraded around and stopped in the Quad between
PLC and the Schni tzer Museum of Art. We were singing "Freedom
is a Right ;' but as it turns out, freedom is ironically conditional.
On another occasion ,ve n1arched past Ger lin ger Hall and other
buildings, and on both occas ions we were escorted a,vay by DPS.
This situation caused n1e to realize two things. First, that the only
acceptable area to practice free speech was in the EMU Amphitheater .
Second, that freedom of assembly is at the discretion of the state.
While both speech and assembly are theoretically protected fro1n
stat e intervention by the "Bill of Rights;' this dusty document
doesn't actually mean much when the people telling you to stop
have metal bone -cr ushers attac hed to their hips. My first reflection
is that while the amphitheater is a great space, calling it a "free
speec h zone" means that every.vhere else on campus, free speech is
not permitted - No expression allo,.vedl (save hushed voices). The

second reflection is that the state is in tota l control. If you disagree,
you must petition the state - the very same institution which
disagrees \vith you. The Republic itself is undemocratic and not
consensual. The University is even less accountable, with appointed
posit ions to the Presidency and a handful of Vice Presidents, all
earning upwards of a hundred tho usand dollars. These university
admin istrators are, in reality, barely "public" en1ployees of a systen1
that is unconsensually ruling hundreds of millions of peop le.

Each white flag essentially meant an imrnediate family had died. It
represented a sea of death.
TI1e implications of such displays serve to remind us of the
consequences of nationa l policy, war, and militarism. It reminds
us of the real human cost of war and of US doctrines of militarism .
This raises questions like, what is the legitimacy of an educat iona l
institution which houses a ROTC office on campus? What are
the ethica l standards of an organization which accepts research
funding to develop weapons of mass or controlled destruction?
W hat role does th is educationa l facility play in the m ilitaryindustrial-complex?

Also in 2006, there was a great campaign to create the Office of
Institutional Equity and Diversity ( OIED), an initiative to recruit and
retain Faculty of Color, and to support mult icu ltural programming
in the classroon1 and on ca1npus. Students gathered support among
At the end of the school year, student government elections occur.
One candidate in the Spring election was Ty Sch\voetfern1ann,
faculty, departments and organizations, and held many meetings
with administrators. Another important element to this story is an African-American student who ran on the "X factor" ticket, a
known as the eXit Files. The eXit Files are a record of all the People platfor1n ai1ned at raising awareness about racism on ca1npus. This
of Color who have fled Eugene because they couldn't deal with the event highlights the importance of independent candidates whose
ongoing racist clin1ate (on campus and elsewhere). One person
presence can spread a powerful 1nessage, re1ninding institutions of
added to the files threatened to bring litigation against the Univers ity ongoing inequity.
for maintaining a hostile and racist working environment. The
Un iversity sett led
2007 -2008 in an out -of-court
Emily Mclain
" What role
doest
his educa t ional facility
agreement,
part
was
ASUO

play 1n the mil it ary- ind ust rial-complex?
" president. The
of \vhich was a
prornise to create
year saw a rise
an office to do what OIED \Vassupposed to do. The University had in Neo-Environmentalism, and a focus on direct action without
five years to do so. The struggle to create OIED happened four- sabotage. "Power Shift" events begin, and the environ1nental
and-a -ha lf years after that settlement. Ultimately the individual
student movement grows.
who settled threatened to bring the lawsuit against the University
again because the University had not fulfilled its obligat ion. At the
From 2007 throug h early 2009, George W. Bush was still in office.
last minute, the University quickly set up a fli1nsy program - of Bush was pushing a plan called the Western Oregon Plan Revision
{WOPR), ,-vhich would have increased logging in the Pacific
course, saying publicly that they were innovat ing a new program
and had been carefully planning it for years.
Northwest by 300% and opened up old growth forest to cutting.
This narrative presents a number of problems. First, the lack of TI1is plan was simply short-sighted destruction; it would have
initiative on behalf of the Univers ity suggests a lack of con1mitment
destroyed plant, fish, bird, and land animal species by removing
to Divers ity. Anot her concern is that the University does not or toxifying their environment, which wou ld further depress
like to confront itself looking bad and will avoid this at any cost; Oregon's economy and poison Oregon's people. WOPR was the
positive branding has been of greater concern than correcting
subject of ongoing protests, a la banner drops, a tree sit in Salem,
injustice. This situation begs the question that if the university
information caravans across the state, and loads of calls and letters.
is so resistant to supporting anti-racist programs, then to what This can1paign against WOPR continued until Oregon's Governor
extent is the Univers ity governed by rac ist polic ies? Furthermore,
Kitzhaber eventually vetoed to plan.
if the University had a serious commitment to diversity and
multiculturalism, they wou ld be ded icated to creati ng a climate on TI1emora l here is that sometimes public pressure ,-vorks - if it can
campus that encouraged people of Color to stay; they shou ld not persist for long enough and build enough popular support. But the
timber interests nearly had their way with Oregon's ,vild places!
need to fast-track professors of Co lor, but rather create a climate
where professors of Color want to stay. But before that can be This situation exemplifies how the dangerous design of the republic
achieved the University must first admit that is has a dominant
could have allowed irreversible dan1age to wild areas, ,-vhile any
racist culture on campus.
opposit ion \vould just have to "hope" for something better. For
those of us ,-vho are without deciding -po\ver in the republic, any
2006 - Iraq body count exhibit, presented by the Survival Center . attempt to influence policy is basically a disempo,ver ing process
TI1isdisplay showed a 1-to- l display of fallen US soldiers and a 6-to- in which one is left watching with absolute deference to those
l disp lay of fallen Iraqi civilians. TI1e soldiers were represented by empowered with decision -making po,-ver.
2000 red flags and the civilians represented by 100,000 white flags.
This display covered all the memorial quad and la,.vns as far as the
In 2007, environmentalism was in the air. The UO bike loan
EMU, spaced one foot fron1 each other, as far as the eye could see. program (now called the UO Bike Program) was spearheaded by

Brianna Orr. This program received supplemental funding from
the Student Government and became a fully-funded program in
2008. This highli ghts the power of student government to create
multi -th ousand dollar programs in only a few years, ,-vith sufficient
student interest. The UO student government is the most powerful
in the US, with over 13 mi!Jion do!Jars! That money is divided
amongst more than 180 total contracts, services/programs, and
organizations, without a unified approach. Combined, these
progran1s could overrun the University (not coincidentally, there is
a riot alarm in the basement of Johnson Hall to summon the national
guard at a moment's notice, and the EMU has such a strange layout
fu!J of disjoint ed levels, non -contiguous stairways, and many police
entrances because it was designed to be riotproof). The students
have tre1nendous resources at their disposal and the po,-ver of
numbers. If they can be unified, they can bring environmentalism
into being.
For not ahowing his stude nt 1.0 .
2008- The Department of Public
Safety (DPS) proposes having
tazers for their officers. Students
write letters and demand that
this not come to pass, citing
dangers of the "''eapon. DPS
holds a public hearing in which
over 75 students attended,
unanimously cha!Jenging the
tazers, along with support
from the ASUO President.
DPS ignored the students and
bought the tazers, but chose
to keep them in the station
unless they are needed ... Thus
proving the disempowering
relationship between students
and the administration , where the institution of the University of
Oregon can 1nake decisions and ignore students - even when the
decision puts students at risk. This transition raises questions about
the purpose of DPS, and about the administration's desire to ar1n a
police agency. This policy begs the question why a campus needs an
authoritarian arm, when it will call upon the local police to respond
to any ser ious incident anyway.

2008-2009 - Sam Dotters-Katz became ASUO Pres id ent after
spending $20,000 during the election season - money raised by his
fa1nily (and proof that any election can be bought).
The Oregon Student Public Interes t Research Group (OSPIRG)
worked ,-vithCampus Recycling in a campaign to create a co1npost
progran1. Unde r pressure, the Student Government funded the
compost program. Then ASUO President Dotters-Katz de-funded
OSPIRG, using his support for the compost program (a leftist
decision) to cover his conservative attack on OSPIRG.
Highlighting ilie dangers of political associat ion , OSPIRG took
decidedly liberal stances (though nothing to critically challenge
institutions of po, ,ver) and Dotters -Katz opposed their positions. So
they ,vere de-funded. This scenario raises important questions as

II

well. Ho,v much can we trust a representative government wh ich
has total power over fund allocation to distribute those funds
justly? Do decision -making execut ives inherently have too much
po,-ver and personal bias to be part of funding comn1ittees?
In 2008, there were many environmental protests whic h sought to
challenge the toxification of the local ecosystems. Challenging the
spray of pesticides along roads, in regrowth forests, and else,-vhere.
Modern pesticides can kill plants, animals and humans, and they
may also cause birth defects in hum ans and oth er animals. One
anti-pesticide march took a route all the way to the new Wayne
Morse Federa l Courthouse on Franklin Street in Eugene. The FBI
in Eugene is based out of that building, and they felt a bit threatened
by that march. Consequently, the FBI coordinated a crackdown
again st the organizers.
The organ izer of the 2008 march
held a rally on the same subject
downto,vn at Kesey square. The
FBI ordered police disruption of
the even t and the police obliged
by arresting an even t organizer
named Ian VanOrnum, t,-vo
fellow students, and an older
comn1unity organizer from rural
Lane County. Ian ,.vasa student at
ilie University of Oregon. Green
Scare tactics such as arrests,
grand jury subpoenas, and stiff
fines were applied to silence him
and fello,.v activists. The n1oral
of this story is that the Federal
Government is deeply involved
with state and local agencies
- and they will not hesitate to target you. The US is a repressive
govern1nent. As a student, you and your friends may well beco1ne
target s. The best way to resist this is with resilient communities.
With lots of different communities (including students) engag ing
in radical politica l action ,vhich challenges the state, borders,
prisons, food deserts , access , dise1npower1nent, racis1n, patriarchy,
capita lism, ableism, homop hob ia, cissexism, and kyriarchy; our
struggles can and must support each other to resist state repression.
2008 - Phil Knight offers $100 1nillion to the University to build a
new basketball arena (what would later become Matt Court). But
before that money is given, Knight orders the school to take out
$200 million in bonds (loans) from the State of Oregon. Knight
had presented the University with a conditional gift - one which
attached Knight 's name to the arena and started a shady construction
process . First, the University exercised eminent domain to seize
land near campus, then gave the land to Knight 's holding company
Championchip Properties, ,.vho hir ed an out -of-state contractor to
build the arena . This contractor was not familiar ,vith Oregon state
law and was asked to do some shady construction. A few pieces
of this came to light and were challenged, but unknown other

fl

practices undoubtedly ,vent unchallenged. The arena was built,
without fitting the motif of the rest of ca1npus and is now under
it's projected income - meaning students will have to pay for Phil's
gamble. Whoops!
The power th at one privileged man (,vhite, cisgendered, wealthy,
able bodied) can exert over a huge state agency, is a perfect example
of patriarchy. The folly and corruption of this program speaks to
the dangers of having single leaders to govern society. The 1noney
that uncle Phil has "donated" is from his sweatshops wh ich
produce Nike brand sportswea r. The arena is built on stolen land,
with blood money, extortion, graft, and corrupt practices. But "Go
Ducks!" right?
Also in 2008, the Jena Six happened (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/Jena _six). In solidarity with the Jena Six, one student by the
name of Ty organized a protest in solidarity with patches reading
"Eujena:' This protest involved music n1aking and a speak-out.
This event should remind us that solidarity must be led by the
communities who are affected by a particular oppression and that
solidarity must be willin g to offer support across lines of oppression.
2009-20 10 - Emma Kallaway,vas ASUO president.
2009 - Elliot State Forest was (and still is) being logged. The Elliot
Forest is a te1nperate rainforest in south, ,vest Oregon, which stores
20% more carbon per n1ile than other Douglas Fir forests, and is on
the verge of becon1ing old growth. This ge1n of Oregon was slated
to be cha insawed , before the last line of defense for Oregon's forests
stepped in. The Cascadia Forest Defenders (CFD) set up a road
blockade with platforms suspended in the trees, cement barrels,
and even an overturned truck. Environmentalism found a more
militant, direct action edge for so1ne stu dents in the summer and
logging v;as halted for several days in several places. The state
ulti1nately spent n1ore than $60,000 "extracting" me1nbers of CFD .
With over 20 arrests, the campaign faced a grisly reality - that the
forest was being gutted due to ti1nber sales by the state, destroying
the habitat of endangered species and a precious element of our
own ecosysten1.
This struggle highlighted the stakes of climate change - total
ecologica l destruction. As the volunteers are keen to point out,
"There is no life on a dead planet!" Their efforts are to save the wild
areas, but Oregon's timber barons ceaselessly attempt to expand
their prized lun1ber pits. The state can be called upon by corporate
interests at any time. The state is ultimately beholden to monied
power, and is more ,-villing to cut a support line that could drop a
den1onstrator to their death, rather than reckon ,-vith the effects of
environn1ental injustice.

In 2009, Social Justice was on the 1nind of those marching on
campus to ban Russell Athle tics, ,-vhich ,-vaslicensed to create UO
sportswear. Russell used non-union labor, ran sweatshops , and
closed a factory because workers had dec ided to unionize. These
protests were at n1any colleges nation,vide and the University

"The

power

upheld the decision made by Frohnmayer in 2000. The protests
were successful in dislodging Russell frorn the distributor, the
Duck Store. In the end, the national protest pressured Russell to
reopen its shuttered union factory and i1nprove labor conditions.
This has stunn ing implications of student power by creating an
effective boycott and political pressure. Even major corporations
can be brought down. This was a major way for students to sidestep
the official channels of the University and demand a different
policy. This may lay the groundwork for a later aba ndonment
of the contract's policy interpretation. This may be a way to reel
in the worst hun1an itarian violat ions of capitalism as a whole,
by demanding global labor standards and accountability. But
ulti1nately capitalism itself will need to be abolished if ,ve desire a
future without economic exploitation.
2010 - Students protest the Neo-Nazi/Holocaust denial lecture
series The Pacifica Forum. This protest grew to be several hundredstrong for months, and it sparked a debate about safety and free
speech. This ,vasn't about free speech in terms of state intervention;
it was about communities decid ing to hold each other accountable.
Where Neo-Nazis made threats and in1plied dangers, some oncampus said that if you just ignore the1n they will go a,-vay, but
the Nazis had already been operating quietly for years and ,vere
not going away. The protests were from a number of commu11ities
and identities who challenged the messed ideas of Nazis using
signs, chants, shouts, posters, songs, and all 1nanner of resistance
- in cluding stink bombs and a kiss-in. The Neo-Nazis then broke
into the LGBTQQIAA office, broke computers and spray-painted
a giant s,-vastika on th e carpe t. Ultimately the Nazis could not hold
an uninterrupted meeting at all and their nun1bers dwindled into
insignificance. They were rnoved off-campus by the University and
eventually could not sustain meetings under pressure of protests.
The implication is that having solidarity and tight connections
between con1munities allows for extensive and sustained
resistance to oppressive organizations. Another in1plication is that
communities can ho ld each other accountable in ,-vays the state
cannot and should not. The po,-ver of comn1unity wins out over
time.
We may ask, what are the implications of a University not only
tolerating, but actively defending Neo-Naz is?
2010 - Paul Shang, Dean of Students, began consolidating power
in an effort to control students. He moved all advisors of students,
directors of the Women's center, LGBTQQIAA office, ASUO,
Holden Leadership Center, and others under his direct control so that he had hiring and firing power. This power realignn1ent is
concern ing, as Paul has made it his job to stifle student activism
and dissent. I could ,vrite more but consider the following three
examples:
1) Patriarchal Tyranny: The athletic program built the Jaqua
building across from Oregon Hall. The bu ild ing is a glass cube,
which is different fron1 the brick motif of the rest of campus

o f co mmu nit y w ins o u t

over

time. "

architecture. The building is named for a man whose grandson has
allegations of sexually assaulting a UO soccer player. But to shut
that little controversy up, Shang threatened the advisors he had
recently consolidated, by warning the1n to "Remember that your
contracts are up for rene\va l every year. .."
2) Institutional Racism: During the Pacifica Forum, the Depart1nent
of Public Safety engaged in racial profiling. At one protest, two
groups of students stood up, reacting to the foru1n's racist drive l.
One group (more numerous) was mostly wh ite, ,vhile the other
(less numerous) was n1ostly African American. DPS dragged out
and charged the latter group. When Paul ,vas confronted by a group
of ,-vitnesses about this, as Dean of Students, he did nothing. He
claimed that officers had training, were skilled, and he sa,,vnothing
wrong. When confronted again , he said "the training materials are
sufficient:'
3) Racist Tyranny: Just before the football team went to the Rose
bowl in Arizona, Shang paid a visit to the Move1nent Estudiant'l
Chicano de Azatlan (MEChA). Arizona is notorious for its racist
in1perialist law, SB1070, which legitimizes and encourages racial
profil ing by police towards Latinos. Pau l went to MEChA, saying
"You're not going to be doing any protesting about this bo,-vlgame
are you? We ,-vant to help you ... " When asked if he wanted to plan
a protest, Paul's tone turned sour "Why can't you be like 'normal'
students!"
Paul Shang is a snake in the grass. Don't talk to him, and don't
expect him to do anything in your interest as a student or a human
being. His job is to silence dissent by any 1neans. Here are so1ne
of his tactics: threatening, arm-twisting, lying to your face, and
pressuring you. Shang is powerless in the Unive rsity, except in his
capacity to influence student groups through office administrators,
but don 't expect that he can help you or even that he will really
listen to you - don't ,-vaste your time even talking to him. His
consolidation of power is another example of tyranny and having
that degree of influence is dangerous for student autonomy from
the school's administration. Shang, in the above examples, tried to
cover -up sexua l assault, participated in institutional racisn1, and
tried to outright pressure students into not taking actions, while
also implying that being a "normal" student means apathy and
an alcoho l-induced sports fervor . This man has only been at the
University since 2010 and now slithers his way into student senate
meetings, tries to influence Student Government, and has lied to
ASUO Presidents about what is legal and what is not (these lies
were discovered by that president seeking externa l legal review,
available to students in the top floor of the EMU).
20 10-20 11 - Amelie Ro usseau \Vas ASUO pr esident.
2011 - OSPIRG, ,-vhich ,vas de -flu1ded in 2009 under sketchy
circumstances, was later refunded in 2011 under also -sketchy
circumstances, ,-vith neithe r instance having anything to do \Nith
the services provided by the organization. OSPIRG had been defunded since the biased 2009 hearings in which proper procedure
was violated under Sam Dotters -Katz. The group was de -funded
for having liberal politics, and they ,vere refunded with the same
politics. After OSPIRG ran a bal lot in itiative in the student election
which sho,-ved popular student support, and with the executive

branch threatening a veto of the budget package if it did not inc u e
OSPIRG, they ,vere once again approved for funding .
The only lesson fron1 this narrative is that it is good to have friends
in po,-ver, and bad to have ene1nies in power. A conservative
executive n1ay try to de -fund OSPIRG, ,-vhereas a liberal executive
1nay try to keep it empowered. This po,-ver dichotomy of good or
bad outcomes is dependent not on student ,-vill,but on the political
preferences of the governing body. That is to say that students are
be ing governed, not govern ing. This means that organizat ions facing
a conservative student government ,,.,,illhave to fight with both the
Student Government and the administration to get anything done.
These Student Government bodies can supply money, but they can
also be a source of tremendous headache. Another lesson here is
that the republic must be opposed categoricaJly, because having a
"governing body" which is not made up of all the people who are
affected means that those who are not part of this ruling body are
inherently dise1npov1ered.
2011 - United Teacher & Acade1nics began a can1paign to unionize
the faculty. Why un ion ize? Because the Adm inistration was paying
the lowest competitive ,vages a1nong ranked universities - dead
last.
Unions provide job security, and fight for better ,-vages and
condit ions. This University tried to fight them by challenging ,-vhat
the bargaining unit could be and dividing tenure from associate
professors from OAs and such. Often this University operates more
like a private corporation than a public academic space.
A lesson from this is that if the University will exploit professors,
they are damn ,veil going to exploit students. The raises in tuition
without co1nn1ensurate raises for faculty, office support and staff
,,vages, means that an administration is making off with the bacon
- feeding off the debt you will pay do,-vn later. But just because the
admin is living large, doesn't mean faculty, staff and office support
should be cheated from a fair ,-vage. Challenge the administration
and support a coalition of students, faculty, staff and office support.
Together we can end exploitation together.
2011 - The John Jaqua center for student athletes denied access to
non -athletes in the upper floors of the building. TI1ispolicy was the
subject of protest. With local and regional media present, students
held a read-in on the upper floors, used the athletics library,
computers, and the student reading area. University Spokesman
Phil Weiler announced that the building was open to all students
and community members (despite signs reading "Authorized
Personnel Only").
This protest shows that by pushing boundaries of policy through
direct action, students can gain autonomy and dignity. The building
policy raised many questions, including why the university is
building separate facilities for ath letes, ,-vhy the athletic facilities
are so different fron1 the rest of the University (glass and 1netal
buildings vs. brick buildings), and what is the meaning of creating
separate and unequal facilities? What is the consequence of
funding some students serv ices vastly more than others? What are
the consequences of valuing athletics over academics?
2011 - DPS call for the use of guns for their officers . The same


outcry as in 2008 ensued. DPS begins a transition to become
a fully-fledge d police force. The Administratio n then bought squad
cars, four -wheelers, SUVs, a bomb sniffing dog, guns, and n1ore
parking ticket meters .
This situation illustrates how a governn1ent can slide towards
totalitar ianis1n and the decision is almost impossible to reverse.
It illustrates how the idea of security is a myth , yet weapon izing
is decla red as the on ly response to a vague thr eat. Th is raises
question about the purpose of the University, its goals and mission,
and how can a police force be tied to academic pursuits? In what
ways does aut horitarian power suit the administration? What can
these weapons and force be used for? How is this process involving
militarization of ca1npus tied to racism, patriarchy, homophobia,
cissexism, transphobia, ableism, and capitalism?

of Oregon). The University eventually acquiesced to a renewed
contract after transferring him to the History department. Look
for his classes there.
This situation highlights ho,-v syste1ns of po,ver can become
tyrannical by using personal influence to bring retribution through
institutional channe ls. This also highlights how education is not
the primary focus of the University; by ignoring the pleas to retain
a fantast ic professor, the University almost lost one of its very best.
Wh ile the administrat ion claimed they planned to sign the con trac t
(they always say they' re "just abou t to do it" or "always planned
to do it"), even if you believe thetn, dangling a non-renewa l of a
contract is a pretty horrib le thing to do to any worker. The "quiet
dismissa l" remains a th reat for all facu lty unt il they are protected
by a union (and even then, protection may be difficult).

2011-2012 - Ben Ekstein was ASUO pre sident.
2012 - The Office of Multicultural Acade1nic Support (OMAS),
offered services to help en1power communities of color. The
University announced that they ,-vould merge OMAS and a
similar service for LGBTQQIA com1nu n ity and create d Cen ter for
Multicultural Academic Excellence (CMAE) . A coalition formed
to challenge this merger, calling the new program CMAE, or as
we call it, Centralized Mass Assimilation Experience. The cr itique
of CMAE is that you cannot condense needs of communities
facing oppression into one office or one service. The Universi ty
admin istration was forced to have a meeting, where the admin said
they cons ult ed students by surveying the number of peop le using
the space (someho~, they believe that counting the nu1nber of
peop le in a space qualifies as solic iting opinions or "consult ation").
The admin said they were willing to listen, then proceeded no t to.
I canno t explain all the in1plicat ions of this process. My i1npression
is that deciding for a community that their own service shou ld be
changed or removed without their consu ltation or consent is entirely
disempowering. Again, a system which creates and concentrates
powe r in itself ,-vill inherently disempower anyo ne not already part
of that concentration of power. Here, the adm inistrat ion exercises
a despotic rule over its subjects - the students . Th is power dynam ic
is affect ing studen ts of color in particular ways, and the who le
thing s1nacks of racism.

2012 - "Mandatory Repo rt ing;' a po licy devised in Paul Shang's
snake pit, is a policy n1eant to force surv ivors of sexual assault to be
pressured into telling and reliving their story. Paul thought it ,.vould
be a great idea that any university employee who hears about sexual
assault must report it (Manda tory Reporting) to DPS. Then the
police n1ust file a report and investigate . This means that whether

2012 - Ken DeBevoise, notable Political Science professor, \Vas to
be removed from teaching position by the departn1ent. DeBevoise
is renowned at the University for being one of the most difficult
teachers and likely the most inspired, using an engaging teachi ng
style which empowers the stu dents. The source of the contention
was a power feud within the Political Science department,
involving Priscil la Southwe ll as an antithetica l figure to DeBevoise.
DeBevoise's contract was not being rene,-ved, making his removal
a quiet firin g. DeBeveoise's stud ents formed a coali tion, which
emailed the PS departn1ent and centra l administration with
hundreds of supporters plead ing DeBevoise's case. For almost
nine months there was no response. 1n the last month of school,
his stude nt s formed a coa lition called "Hungry for Education;'
which threatened a hunger strike until DeBevoise's contract was
rene,-ved. DeBevoise did not ask his stud ents to do this; they
choose to support their teacher (possib ly the best at the University

" Solidarity
cannot
be
under st o o d f r o m t he t ext b o o ks
alone.
Solidarity
is felt
through
the
part
icipat
ion in
liberatory
struggle.
"
a su rvivor ,-vants to tell the ir story or not, they will be pressed
to tell if a University emp loyee finds out. Many students tried to
explain ho,-v this policy is bad for University employees who ,-vant
to address the needs of a survivor, but are instead mandated to call
an agency to try to bring retr ibut ion on anot her party invo lved in
sexual assault. This is a dumb plan, as most sexual assault happens
with somebody the survivor knows intimately or peripherally.
A policy dema nd ing that a survivor be pressured to punish the
person who they may know intimately can be very traun1atiz ing in
what is already a traumatizing situa tion. Paul Shang igno red these
critiques from students, staff, experts, and survivors th en1selves.
An admin istrato r ,-vho rules over popular opinion, expert op inion,
and common sense is a tyrannical despot. The people responsible
for implen1enting "Ma nd atory Reporting" have given widespread
critique and disapproval. Shang does not care for the humanity
of the people who are going to be forcing survivo rs to relive the ir
trauma. People shou ld not be put in a position of being forced to
cause more trauma to others . This situation highlights the danger
of hierarc hi cal rule and how one despot can ,-vreak havoc and harm
upon n1any lives. This situation speaks to the ongoing climate of
sexism and patriarchy, particular ly how a sole rnale adm ini stra tor
has ilie authority to make this decision. This policy highlights how
strong rape culture is on campus. By targeting perpetrators legally,
the administration has disavo,ved itself of trying to prevent sexual
assault or trying to build a co1n1nun ity against it. Rather, this
policy focuses on glorifying the capture of a perpetra tor, not the

process of healing and creation of safer spaces that a community
shou ld provide .
2012 - The "White Papers" (already sounds racist doesn't it?). This
document was authored by Richard "Dick" Lariviere and it was
designed to outline a plan to privatize the University. The admin
says it's not actua l privatization, as it will be a public school. The
reality of the plan is that it creates an "Oversight Board" which
will have one student, one professor, one representative from the
State Board of Higher Education, and five appointed "involved
university figures" (that's bureaucrat -speak for "private donors").
The purpose of this board is to keep the University autonomous
from the oversight of the state - much like a private institution.
The five priva te donors on the board will al\vays have a majority,
even if the students, faculty and state representatives disagree. This
essentially makes the UO a private institution.
The Wh ite Papers would continue to privilege the power dynam ic
of a central administration which would do the bidding of private
donors. The implication of this plan is essentially a who lesale
dispossession from the state of Oregon, the people of Oregon, and
it would betray 1nore than a century of donations in good faith
that the school should serve the public. Under this proposal, the
school will be totally controlled by private corporations (those
with money), and the departments, agencies, and officers will be
at the bidding of those private corporations. This plan puts the
Un iversity up for sale to the highest bidder/donor.
2012 - (Get ready for some acronyms!) The student government,
the Associated Students of the University of Oregon (ASUO),
works closely with the Oregon Student Association (OSA), which
is part of the United States Student Association (USSA). OSA,
incidentally, is do ing basically the same type of ,vork as OSPIRG.
Anyway, ASUO gives big money to OSA and supports USSA that is to say Oregon leads the \vay ,vith student innovat ion. So, at
the last major USSA conference, several students from the ASUO
attended. A handful from the University of Oregon were arrested
as part of a protest against student debt. The arres ts were in the
headquarters of Sallie Mae, a loan corporation subsidized by the
US government to provide lo>v-interest loans (except now they are
no longer low-interest and Sallie Mae has becon1e a serious loan
predator).
Having mountains of college debt means that students are indebted
to comn1it their future labor to pay off the loan corporation; this is
a condition other,vise known as indentured servitude. Those OSA
students arrested are to be co1nmended. TI1enational student loan
debt is now over $1,000,000,000,000 - that's one trillion dollars!
Loan debt that collective ly nearly every student will have to pay
(unless we all refuse). This debt is going to private hands and we as
students are being held to pay. We are forced to oblige the capitalist
system, forced to engage our own money -making endeavors to
come at anybody else's expense, all because we are being bled of
our labor hours to pay Sallie Mae.

II

Conclusions and Analysis
I graduated in 2012, after some 20-odd campaigns, incidents, and
controversies. The last fe,v years saw serious redirection towards
exploitation, with rene,ved exa1nples of kyriarchal oppression.
The University has been relocating power in a centralized form,
and are getting ready to stifle student protest and 1nove towards
pr ivatization. The unc hecked sexism and racism are firmly rooted
in the University's history and continue ra1npantly today. There
are continued legacies of sex and race segregation, lim ited access
to buildings and areas ,vhich creates an atmosphere of ableism.
TI1e direction this University has been headed is concerning, as it
becomes more authoritarian and militarized .
The University has misdirected priorities. By making our athletic
director the highest -paid public employee in the state of Oregon,
building brand new buildings for athletes while general acaden1ic
buildings are forced to defer badly-needed maintenance, and
discouraging dissent, the University contradicts its stated central
purpose as an inst itution of higher learn ing by undermining real
academic critique. The programs and policies created in recent
history serve only to cover the liability of the university against
charges of Kyriarchy. The guiding zeitgeist of the University is
one of pervasive yet subtle oppression; a qu iet racism, sexism,
homophobia, transphobia, ableism, cissexism, capitalism, and other
intersecting kyriarchies. While not everyone on campus embodies
this feeling - and some fight against it - the basic policies and
practices of the administration are rooted in 19th century social
norms. The slow passage of time and student protests are dragging
the University kicking and screa1ning into the 21st century.
2012-20 13 - Laur a Hinman is th e ASUO preside nt.
TI1e strugg le is yet un,vr itten. \!\Tith this background and
understanding of oppression , direction of power, and historical
memory, we ask that you please join the struggle for liberation.
We need allies, accomplices, and each other. Solidarity cannot be
understood from the textbooks alone. Solidarity is felt through the
participation in liberatory struggle. We must fight for each other
and for ourselves - our very lives depend on it.

"To get her
exp l oitation

we
can
together

end
."

Student Insurgent
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