Cambridge 2018 Disorientation Guide

Item

Current View

Title

Cambridge 2018 Disorientation Guide

Date

2018

Place

Cambridge, United Kingdom

Source

https://issuu.com/12pintspress/docs/web_issuu_final

extracted text

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS
1) everything Is not

alrigh~

despHe what they're telling you;

~ E \

<i1i

~ C.(\. ~ *(> ~{. .

2) if you think everything is not alright, you're not alone;
3) this is where you can find those of us who refuse to accept the status quo and will work to change it.

\.J

0

~

Cambridge is disconcerting, and feeling out of place or angry at it is pretty reasonable. We encourage you to dig
deeper into the problems here, below the PR-smoothed surface and glorious global rankings. You're in a situation in
which you're treated as a 'customer' for the privilege of purchasing the 'commodity' that is your education. You might
realise the role of t he colleges in housing inequalities in Cambridge. Depending on your department, you might end
up working for fossil fuel corporations, arms companies, nuclear weapons providers. You might discover more of the
ways that the University is harmful to the world outside it and the people within it.
You might even want to do something about that.
To

en
I

- ..__..

t~at en~•. the

Guide aims o introduce you to political activism i
.
' ..
us . n Camb~ld~e - beyond pohtlcs' as just political
Will provide_a sense of the possibilities for chan e h
. Y e Jt f~r, how It IS contested. We hope that the Guide
we push for it.
g t at activism entails, how this change can be achieved, and why

p~rtles. Politics for us is about power: who has it, what the

For those who have already been around for a while, we hope_ .that this hel~s you c~nnect more with other
·
It ·s intended to archive the work of organisers so that 1t s not lost am1dst the h1gh turnover of students,
campaigns. 1
· h'
and to share skills and knowledge that enable people to navigate and organise bette~ 1n t IS spac~.. .
.
It is, of course, meant to be disorienting. It is meant to disrupt the usual conversations a~~ _act1v1t1es th~t. normalise
university fees and rent, to challenge who is 'supposed' to be where and how, an~ to pohtlctse the cond1ttons_taken
for granted in the university, the city, and beyond. It is meant to open up quest1ons about what we are onented
towards, as individuals, communities, and institutions - and to encourage us to think about what we could and

E

should be oriented towards instead.

~

There are plenty of people who wrote, edited, designed, and contributed in other ways to this Guide. We are mostly
students (past and present) at Cambridge University, but we come from across the world, Global North and South,
and we've been involved in activism and campaigning, locally and internationally, in various groups - working on
democratising education, fighting climate change, opposing fascism and capitalism, pushing for decolonisation,
demilitarisation, fair housing, feminist struggles and more. We come from all over and have done all sorts and see
this guide as part of an attempt to get us all to work together.

~

From our various backgrounds, we found a moment of unity during the UCU pensions strike in Feb/ Mar 2018. Out of
this, in attempting to imagine a better university in a better world and to archive the efforts of those already working
towards it, we formed an editorial group, 12 Pints Press.

II.i

.l~

v

u

2. Letter from 12 Pints Press (eds)
4. Towards the Common University
6. Timeline of Student Activism

~

10. Zero Carbon
11.-=: Decolonisation
12. Decolonise Cambridge Network

13. Preventing PREVENT
14. Palestine Society (PaiSoc)
15. Kurdish Solidarity & KurdSoc

16. BME Campaign
17. FLY Girls of Colour
17. FUSE Queer Students of Colour

t&\

18. Women's Campaign
19. Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre,
19. Student Minds Cambridge

23. Disabled Students Campaign
24. Student Community Action

26. How to: make a placard
27. How to: go on a protest
27. Bustcard

20. LGBT+ Campaign
21. IE:: Care Work is Activist Work
22.
The Politics of Care

.).1_

tl.:

t
._



24. Cli:Act Campaign
25.
Marketisation

@

32. University & Colleges Union (UCU)
& the 2018 Pension Strikes
34. From the Archives I
c..,ridge

28. Rad Cam Map
30 . Cambridge Democracy Project
31. Cambridge Defend Education (CDE)

llc(l
36. Demilitarise Cambridge
37. Critical Theory & Pract ice (CTP)
38. Ethical Affairs (CUSU)

q,

39. Cut the Rent ~
40. Cambridge Homeless Outreach Prog ram me
40. Streetbite

fit

International Organising
42.
43. iCUSU I International Students
43. Migrant Solidarity

41. Amnesty
41. Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament

~
44. African Society (ASCU)
44. Black Cantabs

45. Momentum Society
45. McStrike I BFAWU
..
47. el::Facilitation
49. But Wait! There's More!
50. Words of Wisdom
(thanks to Footprint: the printer of our d iscontents)

46. Labour Club
47. Marxist Society

I

52. From the Arc hives II
54. Glossary

4

TOWARDS THE COMMON UNIVERSITY. ..
. h the police _ is central to
Wit
.
·
Th e university - . along
.
the domtnant economtc
·
capttahsm as
preserving
d stream of graduates.
system. Produ~in~ ;ds~=~d_Yworking from three years
d study drugs, the university
rendered comp tan
of exam pressu~es a~
conomic production and
ensures the contlnuatton of e
k
'th maximal
f
·s underta en WI
environmental destruc ton '
"Cambridge scholar!"
efficiency. While the studentb- .a
educated in the
.
they are
e1ng
_
behaves
d . the marketing
enlightenment va~ues ~s~~~~:h-le'~ teaching' is that
brochure, the reah~Y of re cor orate finance. Across
P
d t the
our studies are dtrected by
Y
f
h'ps
are create a
1
the university • pro essors
ur work for their
.
·
anting to use yo
behest of tndustnes w
f rther than the BP Institute
profits - you need look no u .
·
to understand
r the Shell Professor of Engmeenng
.
0
.
C bridge is open for busmess.
how Corporatton am

·If the university's research is shaping the future of our
II

world, then it is prioritising our future destruction. As
the summer heatwave triggered desperate warnings of
impending climate catastrophe; Cambridge University
continued to enhance techniques for oil recovery while the fields around it caught fire. This university
once educated priests, but the Economics Faculty and
Business School house today's acolytes, whose faith
in neoliberalism remains unshaken - despite the
inconvenience of the 2008 Financial Crisis. While the
crash and subsequent austerity measures have
plunged millions into dire poverty - and tripled student
fees - these disciples of high finance demand the
intensification of an economic system dependent on
accelerating climate change.
We can save the planet or save capitalism, but we
cannot save both.
Whether researching the next generation of financial
algorithms, management techniques or weapons
systems, the student is already a worker - one whose
salary has been simply been deferred for three years
tudent
while they pay for their own training. While the s_
labours to reproduce a capitalist future, thetr own
prospects are increasingly bleak. Weighed down by
• unpayable debt and extortionate rents, the student
endures their poverty - only to graduate into the same
world of bad wages and worsening living standards as
everyone else. The less imaginative Ca~~ridge
student likes to think their supposedly pnvtlege~
status exempts them from this reality. They trade thetr
political agency for passive compliance in the ~op.e
their cv is dumped slightly higher in the recrUiter s
pile.

But when it comes down to it, the rising sea levels will
not give a tuck about degree classifications.
When, as now, the crisis of capitalism transcends all
of society, narrow calls for a 'student movement' only
reinforce the notion our concerns are somehow
separate from all those who struggle for a better
world. Instead, we should consider ourselves as part
of a workers' movement, based on a shared
understanding of our relationship to capital and our
desire to transcend it. The issues which are coming to
define our generation - including debt, precarious
work, low-wages, state violence, the housing crisis,
mental health issues and discrimination - are not
specific to students, but amount to a generalised
'social crisis'.
These are the results of an economic system which
values profits over people.

tn this _
context, demanding free education without
demand_tng a free society is little more than
adv?cattng for a reading room in a prison. If we truly
destre an emancipatory, collaborative education
~entred on ad?ressing social issues as opposed to
market needs • we must build links with struggles
beyon? the university's walls. In Cambridge,
preca~tous workers have organised as part of the
McS~nke movement to demand better. wages and
worktng conditions. When badly paid, zero-hour
contract work in the service sector is commonplace
for m~ny of us, with some students working two, even •
~hree JObs to survive - why would we see this as an
tssue separate to our concerns? Let's help our friends
- and ~urselves - win better wages by helping to build
the stnkes: collect for the strike fund in the college
~ar, hand out leaflets in the town and join the picket
lines -...:he~ they form. In Montreal Square, just off Mill
Road, restdents are fighting the demolition of their
homes
and communt·ty. Th'IS vtolent
.
.
process of • •
displacement has become the norm in cities, as ~: •

...

.' " • •

attempt to offset austerity
selling land to de 1
measures by
flats Wh
th
ve ~pers for construction of luxury
of ou. f .end e housrng crisis is devastating the lives
r rren s and families and h

w en so many of us
afford to .rent, is their struggle not also ours?
go to therr meetings and ask h
.
upport th err
· resrstance
·
ow
we
can
until th · h
ta
.
.
err omes are secure.
ke Part rn the rnternational solidan·ty
movement
Kurd .rs tan, who .rn Cambrid
generous to us: let's ask the~ehhave already been
. .
ow we can help _
eth er th
. rough rarsrng fund
in dialogue with their needs. s or awareness - and act

We know a student-worker movement is possible
because it is already happening: the 2018 UCU strike
was defined by students recognising the fight of
academic staff against precarity and marketisation
was also a fight for students' working rights. Rejecting
the commodity/consumer binary set by tuition fees:
students-as-workers refused to cross picket lines;
engaged in militant demonstrations; built barricades;
occupied and shut down key administrative buildings
until demands were met. And this is just the
beginning: with more strikes planned, let's help
generalise the offensive and encourage all those
exploited at work to join the picket lines. If students'
struggles are workers' struggles, we must learn from
and support each other.

This is not to
.
say struggles f
unrmportant: if the univers 'ty
or the university are
capitalism, it can produ~e can produce the future of
Democratisation Will be a . a future beyond it too.
VItal first step in taking back
the university from c
staff and students col~arpborat~ interests: ensuring that
res
oratrvely dec·d
earch funding and . . .
' e our curricula
u
Pnontres De 1 .
'
rgent priority if w
·
co onrsation is an
marginalised voice e are. to end the erasure of
crimes and
~· ongorng complicity in colonial
contrnued facilitation of
war and

'b .

oppression through institutional research and
academic support for the military-industrial complex.
We must resist the imposition of corporate
management, whose suited agents demand high
salaries and absolute power. To do this, we must
constantly question their legitimacy: there can be no
decisions about us, without us. If education is to be
free, we must demand the university is a sanctuary for
all migrants; ending the enforcement of border
controls through attendance lists and prohibiting UK
Border Force from campus spaces. Similarly, we must
refuse to collaborate with state surveillance through
the "Prevent" programme, and reinforce demands for
#CopsotfCampus. Instead of fighting for grades like
rats in a sack, let's collaborate and learn from each
other: run collective seminars, tutor each other, tear
down class-lists and leak exam papers. Let's
challenge the competitive culture through caring for
one another, being honest about our concerns and
demanding provision for our material needs - be it
subsidised housing or free childcare. And If we are
serious about a public education, let's immediately without any hesitation - open our lectures and libraries
to all.

We call these b . f
.
Common" _
· . ne suggestrons "Cambridge ..
a vrsron for a univ .
rn
are available to everyo
ersrty whose benefits
access card N
ne, not just those with the right
· one of the
h'
overnight, and they
• se t rngs will happen
won t necessan1 b
make no mistake about it·
. y e easy, but
Solidarity is not a wor;d b t . everythrng is possible.
u a weapon • and wrth
· rt
. we
can hold even th
e most pow rf 1 . . . '
account. Even a br' f
e u rnstrtutrons to
re g1ance ov th ·
resistance and rebell'
. er e nch history of
Jon m C b .
demonstrates that wh
.
am ndge alone
together. We're sure y~:~t~ fight together, we win
let's talk: yell them
t .
ave Your own ideas so
ou m lectur
·

pamphlets, slogans or on the w es, wnte them out in
ails ...

As a

· t
socre y faced with the dual urgencies of climate catastr
.
as usual. If we wish for humanity to survfve we must rec
~phe and sacral crisis, we can no longer afford business
,
ognrse our struggle is not just b t ..
its world.
a ou turtron fees, but against

r;:::::::::::::.llll:::::::::::::::=-.=¥===---------_:c:a:p:it:a:lis:m~a:n:d_

---------'l

The future will contain what we put into it today See
h
·
you on t e streets.

planc.cambridge@gmail.com
fb.com/planC.cambridge
weareplanc.org

5
~tr,,,

~~~~

~l~.t"'~
'ICe :,j~tt~ec

'tttc:,';';:j
:'et"'':'S
r~~.t
.,·ull<~~

~lrt'b

~"''.:it"''

·1lt~$g,...
o ll<i~~o ...'C

"''.,:
~"''<i
•"''"'~~

£'ito\~~
~~'ftJ
~~

1"/f....,

~'i":
~

,.,

6
1758: Francis Williams becomes the first black
student to attend Cambridge University, but does not
appear in the university's records
"Alike the master and the slave shall see
Their neck reliv'd, the yoke unbound by thee. n
- Ode to [Governor] George Haldane
1825-1856: Cambridge University sets up a private
police force to control student behaviour
Cambridge

(A TIMELINE OF [CAMBRI~
Free University Movement is started by students
at King's College; they hold classes at the 'Arts Lab'
on Mill Road, where teaching consists of discussions,
seminars, talks and film showings with members
the public invited to participate
Rent strikes are organised, primarily at New Hall (now
Murray Edwards), assisted by CUSU
1961-62: Ban the Bomb demonstrations continue

rre Carpenter becomes the first
known to have matriculated from a Cambridg
lege (Girton)
19~7: ~omen are admitted to full membership of
unrversrty, after votes in 1887, 1897 and 1921
because special trains were laid on from
to bring thousands to vote

1964: About 50 Emmanuel students delay paying
their college bill as a protest at the cost of food
une 1965: A banner attacking American involvement
n Vietnam is suspended from the spires of King's
liege Chapel
November 1967: 300 protesters prevent the depa
the US Ambassador from Churchill College
hosting a sit-in on the road in a stand against th
Vietnam War

November 1968: Demonstration outside the
Cambridge Union against visiting speaker Enoch
Powell, and Cambridge students joined anti-Powell
protests in London
1968: Founding of the Shilling Paper, a left-wing
alternative to Varsity
Anti-apartheid protests took place throughout the
1950s. Branches of Barclays Bank were regularly
picketed due to their investment in South African
assets, which many JCRs felt were indirectly
supporting the Apartheid regime.
1916: Bertrand Russell is expelled from Trinity
College for opposition to WWI
"Behind the rulers, in whom pride has
destroyed humanity, stand the
populations, who suffer and die. n
1921: Women win the right to graduate with a full
degree, but because they are awarded diplomas
which "conferred the Title of the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts", rather than being "admitted to the Degree of
Bachelor of Arts", they are excluded from the
governing of the university

1959: Ban the Bomb rally on Midsummer Common



PEl [STUDENT] ACTIVISMI

7
June 1975: Nursery Action Group (NAG) occupy
Senate House over the refusal of the University to
provide nursery care for full time students . Although
police and proctors locked the doors, 1,600 students
managed to occupy the building by climbing in
throuah side windows

.

Students entering Senate House for NAG occupation 1975

January 1969: Occupation of a Mill Lane Lecture
room and the Grad Pad to show solidarity with the
LSE sit-in; protesters then marched to the Old
Schools and occupied the Council Room. They issued
a statement demanding local changes such as gate
hour reform and the end to University representation
on the City Council.
February 1969: 200 campaigners from the Cambridge
University South Africa Committee (CUSAC) marched
on Trinity College in objection to the Dryden Society's
planned tour of the country.

......

February 1973: Sit-ins at Lady Mitchell Hall and at the
Faculty of Economics after the rejection of
examination reforms to the economics tripos; followed
by a march of 1,500 students to Senate House, where
they handed in a petition with more than 3,000
signatures calling for the start of negotiations for
reform in all faculties

Jan 1972: Protests against the government's plans to
reform student unions; around 600 march to deliver
an anti-government petition to Shire Hall.
The biggest student demonstration yet takes place in
London: 35,000 students, including a Cambridge
contingent of 700. The pressure put on the
overnment prevented Margaret Thatcher, then
ducation Secretary, from carrying out the reforms
Speakers' Corner during the London student march
against governmental reform of student unions, 1972

May 1970: "The Garden House Riot" - actions against
the right-wing military regime in Greece (occupation of
Abbott's Travel Agency, and the picketing of a dinner
celebrating the conclusion of Greek Week which
ended in a riot when police appeared)
October 1970: Picket of over 800 students outside the
Senate House demanding reforms to the disciplinary
system at Cambridge, attracting a heavy police
presence

8
_.a._

Protest graffiti from the Kite area in the 1980's

2010: Students protest against fee increases and
EMA Cuts; Cambridge Defend Education & Critical
Theory and Practice founded
26th Nov. 2010: Cambridge students occupy Senate
House
Nov. 2011 : Protest by students against Universities
Minister, David Willetts at Lady Mitchell Hall. One
student subjected to disciplinary proceedings after
reading a poem at Willetts' speech

,campaign to save The Kite: an area now gentrified & ,
turned into the Grafton Centre - the campaign
included occupations, squats, setting up anarchist
bookshops, DIY stores and community centres
1986: "Nelson's Picket": a four-year anti-apartheid
picket in Trafalgar Square, London

10

In the late 70s students campaign against College
kitchen fixed charges
1978: CUSU pass motion to "disinvest from South
Africa" to oppose apartheid
The Kite Coordinating Committee plus Student
Community Action plan to refurbish Kite properties.
The KCC were planning gradual renewal via
community self-help, fighting the planning blight

1990: Cambridge Palestine Solidarity Campaign
founded
2003: Cambridge Students oppose the invasion of
Iraq; write a petition to the PM and set up Coalition of
Universities Against War

2014: Talk by UKIP leader Nigel Farage cancelled as
students threatened to stage a protest alongside nonstudent groups. The protest still takes place
PaiSoc picket against the Israeli ambassador, Daniel
Taub, who was speaking at the Union days after an
open letter condemning Israel's actions in Gaza was
released, signed by leading Cambridge academics

9

June 24th: Cambridge in solidarity with Greece
against austerity

Cambridge Action website launched to bring together
left struggles in the city and university

Sept 25th: "Hands Off Addenbrooke's" rally against
cuts to the NHS and privatisation

Jan 21st: Teach-in: Resist the Rise of the Right,
followed by fundraiser night in Clare Cellars

Oct 1Oth: #RefugeesWelcome demonstration

Feb 9th: #LiberateMyDegree Week: a week of talks,
discussions and action questioning how power
shapes the way academic knowledge is created,
disseminated and (de)legitimised

Oct 18th: Solidarity Vigil in response to Ankara
bombing against Kurdish activists
Nov 4th: Cambridge goes to the National Demo for
Free Education and Living Grants
Nov 14th: Demonstration for affordable homes in
Cambridge
ov 28th: Protest in Cambridge against the bombing
f Syria by the UK
Nov 30th: Protest against
Cambridge Union

Israeli apartheid

at

May: Critical Pakistan Research Cluster founded, with
a focus on decolonising research
May 13th: Cambridge students join protest at Yarl's
Wood detention centre
October 31st: Cambridge Rally for Deco Ionisation
Nov 16th: Decolonisation Assembly

Dec 1st: Students go to London for anti -bomb protest
outside parliament

20 :)

Campaign for a Community Space
Cambridge starts

in Central

Protests against Jesus College's owning of the Benin
Bronzes and calls for repatriation
First Decolonisation Assembly
Feb: CUSU LGBT+ Ml Don't Exist" Campaign started,
calling for legal recognition of non-binary gender
identities in the UK

Feb-Mar: UCU Strike against pension cuts
Students rally and occupy Old Schools I
Senate House in support
May: Occupation of Greenwich House (uni finance
and administration buildings) in support of Fossil Fuel
Divestment

April: Preventing Prevent I Students Not Suspects
group founded opposing the government's Prevent
duty

July 21st: Antifascist counter-protest against march
for Tommy Robinson in Cambridge

June 30th: UCU Strike against de facto pay cuts,
gender pay inequality and increasing casualisation of
academic jobs

July 30th: Solidarity campaign organised for
Cambridge PhD student and political activist detained
by South Sudanese government

November 19th: Students attend national demo:
United for Ed ucation

Oct: Publication of the 'Disorientation Guide' by 12
Pints Press

10

We are a climate justice group working to make the University
remove its £377 million investment in fossil fuels. This is known as
'divestment', part of a global movement that has seen funds worth
over $6 trillion do the same so far. Divestment strips fossil fuel
companies of their 'social license' to operate, shifting public opinion
to make it a pariah industry & fostering policy change.

CAMBRIDGE
ZERO §ARBON

The Zero Carbon campaign has been organising for three years, in
which time we have exhausted the democratic routes to divestment.
We've won votes in Regent House, the University's governing body,

c\

~,
~~
::.+-~0 ~O(J

0

/

t§-

(10

fc.,.'li

0

<_

-:..o{'~

Vfb.~ 2)

v

0

~0(

~

McDonnell, Diane Abbott and Caroline Lucas, and appeared in

~0"_

::00

_



~~~"'

~~

passed unanimous motions in the Undergraduate and Graduate
student unions, yet the University hasn't listened. We've gathered
thousands of signatures on petitions, had leading public intellectuals
and politicians speak out for Cambridge divestment, like John

\'&))

W}'V>~

national press countless times, yet the University hasn't listened. In
the face of such disregard for democracy, we've taken radica l direct
action, occupying the University's biggest administrative building for
an entire week, chalkspraying the Senate House, dropping a banner
at the Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race, and continuously engaging in
colourful, creative, performative, and disruptive protest.

unaccountable,/~~

The University has shown itself to be opaque, undemocratic, and
resisting mass pressure from staff, students, the public, politicians - even its own
Councillors. It is wedded to profit and big oil, and has been willing to use the most
base means of suppressing dissent, caving in to threats from BP executive Bob
Dudley, and even using police force to quell protest.
.

We believe in climate justice as urgent. necessary action. Climate change
is an existential crisis which we're swiftly running out of time to curb. The
fossil fuel industry has ravaged the Global South for decades, and climate
;hange disproportionately affects people of colour. As such, Zero Carbon
is committed to racial justice & decolonisation. Climate change ruins the
economic independence of women across the world, who have the
greatest burden of labour in natural disasters. As such, Zero Carbon is
committed to gender justice & equality. A just energy transition will
require a labour transition, and as such Zero Carbon is committed to
economic justice & workers' liberation. Fundamentally, we are committed
to democracy, and the idea that people shouldn't be controlled by
financial executives, but should be able to control their own lives and live
in dignity and freedom, in a world that is safe from climate crisis.

~

~

. __
._.

Whether you want to help us
research the University's financial
dealings, plan creative direct actions
or communicate our message in the
press and on social media - climate
change affects us all: it's our shared
future; there's a role for everyone in
our movement!

n

i....

\

~~~~{\~~ qp ~~qwl 7111~/t~/Nr.

11

DECOLON/SATION
What is the problem decolonisation is trying to tackle?
Over the last f ive centuries, colonisation brought untold destruction and harm to people around the world, for
the benefit of a few. The institution of the university has been complicit in this: academia has had an intimate
relationship with the forces of military domination and economic exploitation. Academic knowledge has been used to
justify and legitimise the foundations of colonial domination, and itself relied in part on the colonial system to operate.
Academia reinforced the colonisation of people's minds, claiming knowledge from the coloniser as superior
and pushing the colonised to believe in their supposed Inferiority. Slaveholders funded departments and wrote
political philosophies of 'freedom'. Anthropologists justified racism and taught colonial administrators how to control
colonised peoples. The histories of black, indigenous, and other people of colour were erased, rewritten, distorted,
and ignored - which was then used to justify violence against 'uncivilised' people with 'no history'. Medicine and
evolutionary theories were twisted into eugenics, duly put into practice in committing genocide against 'undesirable'
populations. Engineers turn scientific technologies into weapons used to subdue and kill people across the world.
How does this relate to what's happening in the university today?
Cambridge University, specifically, has been at the heart of the British colonial enterprise for centuries and
continues to foster these same dynamics of power and exploitation across the university. It has active and extensive
research collaborations and investments with arms manufacturers and fossil fuel companies that harm people,
especially across Africa, Asia and latin America. We often teach, all too uncritically, a curriculum centering the work
of eurocentric, white, male authors. Our curricula assume - or assert - that eurocentric analyses hold true across the
world. They neglect significant bodies of work which engage critically with these thinkers, particularly produced by
people of colour, those who are indigenous, queer, part of a diaspora. For too many marginalised students, academia
is often a hostile environment, whether because they are denied the opportunity to examine their own experiences, or
because even getting here involves being treated as a suspect through visa conditions, border policing, or Prevent
legislation.
. is not,
o\onisatlon

oec

noVJe\/ef,

..

reducible to 'diversity' or 'incluston .

What does decolonisation involve?
At a minimum, decolonisation involves a critical reflection on
what counts as knowledge, who produces it, how it is produced,
and what we use it for. The decolonisation movement aims to
identify, critique, and dismantle the ways in which the university,
historically and presently, enables colonial forms of domination. It
involves hiring academics who deal with these questions; promoting
research opportunities and funding for those that want to pursue
decolonial knowledge; ensuring such research reaches lectures and
seminars, and further into the public sphere. Decolonisation involves
asking what the role is of the university in society, shaped as it is by
histories of colonialism, and acting towards a future liberated from
this oppression and exploitation.

How can you get involved?
Practically, you might try some of the following:
• Provide/look for alternative reading lists to decanter & critique eurocentric themes & thinkers,
• Demand supervision and supervisors on subjects that your department refuses to teach,
• Ask how our knowledge is entangled in histories of colonisation, migration, and globalisation. Try starting
local: how were Cambridge graduates involved in the transatlantic slave trade? What was Churchill's role in
the Bengal Famine (and what do we commemorate with a college named after him)? What artwork and
artifacts do we have and why (e.g. the Benin Bronze in Jesus College)? What are the assumptions behind
what we're taught? Who profits from our work? Where do we look for work after we graduate?
• Work with others to look for ways to dismantle the neocolonial links between university research, the state,
and industries responsible for the arms trade, climate change, natural resource extraction, and global
impoverishment.
• Learn from and share effect ive tactics with activists through the Decolonise Cambridge Network (see
overleaf), and more widely through initiatives like Why Is My Curriculum White? at UCL, Decolonising our
Minds at SOAS, and Rhodes Must Fall in Oxford, and collaborating with university-based and wider
movements for decolonisation beyond Britain; in South Africa, Canada, the United States, Australia, the
Netherlands, Bolivia and more.

.. ---A... -

CAMBRIDGE DECOLONISATION
NETWORK
We are a collective dedicated to supporting and coordinating various decolonising efforts
under one campaign. The collective arose out of dialogue between the CUSU BME Campaign
and activists organising around causes ranging from decolonising the curriculum (through
Working Groups within faculties and departments) to decolonising university structures
(e.g. the campaign for the University to end partnerships with the arms trade).
What emerged from this dialogue was the need for a coordinated effort. There's a lot of
interest and momentum, but little agreement or clarity on what decolonisation means, or
looks like. A coordinated effort can try to define a collective vision. There's also uneven level
of engagement among the student body with decolonisation. Much of the work has so far
been concentrated in a handful of faculties and departments, whilst in others student
organisers struggle to gain enough active support to get a Working Group up and running.
We're split into three organising groups. PUBLICITY is working on bringing in new student
organisers to the movement, voicing a coherent and unifying manifesto, and ensuring all
organisers are aware of the various meetings that occur. LIAISON will be working with the
various Working Groups and other activist groups to make sure resources are being shared,
whilst INSTITUTIONAL MEMORY will be creating a platform in which these are stored to
ensure future organisers have access to what has already been done. While we're
committed to a horizontal political structure, we chose to adopt the organising strategy of
breaking up into smaller groups in order to keep track of tasks being completed, hold
organisers accountable, and ensure that the burden of labour is shared by everyone.
The Assembly is the space where the various groups gather to share their experiences and
knowledge of best practices, and set plans and targets for the year ahead. It's the body to
which we're all accountable, where decisions are made on behalf of the broader movement
as a whole, and actions delegated. There is a power of veto reserved for students of colour,
to ensure that their voices are at the forefront of our activism.
Our movement needs you. If you share in our vision of a liberated university, find us on
Facebook for information on how you can get involved, or message us!

"

I / / ..

PREVENTING PREVENT AT CAMBRIDGE .·
What is Prevent?
• Prevent is a legal duty, part of the Conservative government's counter-terror
strategy, placed on public institutions (Including this University) to monitor
individuals' behaviour and political speech for signs of 'radicalisation' or
'extremism'.
• As part of Prevent Cambridge's lecturers and admin staff have been
trained to consider mainstream political positions such as opposit,lt~~a--~--:--~
British foreign policy and support for the right of the Palestinian DeClO
self-determination as potentially nextreme", and to "risk assess and
monitor" events where they are expressed.

What's wrong with it?
rAThreatens fundamental human rights, including those to
~freedom of expression and freedom from discrimination

Q)Targets, profiles and surveils Muslims
Q)tmperils academic freedom

' ' Government. .. measures [have] negatively impacted the exercise of the rights_"""-""""
·~ ;;:;;.....&
to freedom ofassociation and freedom of peaceful assembly, and in generat
are resulting In the closing ofspace for civil society tt
-UNITED NATIONS (UN) SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR, 2016

43°/o

1/3
OF MUSLIM STUDENTS NEGATIVELY
IMPACTED BY PREVENT...

OF THESE STUDENTS FEEL UNABLE
TO EXPRESS THEIR VIEWS BECAUSE
OF PREVENT (NUS SURVEY, 2018)

' ' We are indeed bound by the Prevent duty but that doesn't stop us from
arguing vociferously that the Prevent duty is inconsistent with free
speech ff - GRAHAM VIRGO, CAMBRIDGE UNI PRO-VICE CHANCELLOR
(MAY2018)

Preventing Prevent at Cambridge is a broad-based coaJition of academics and
student campaign groups working to oppose the implementation of the duty at
Cambridge and protect our democratic rights. Get involved!

I) facebook.com/PreventingPre_vent

~;.tt~~ r:-~D!J-=--~~I?Jn ~~~

Qr~~f; WfU[U~

13

We are a student led group campaigning in solidarity with & raising awareness of the
Palestinian struggle for freedom . In the past year we have hosted discussions with figu
such as BDS co-founder Omar Barghouti, Israeli historian Han Pappe, and the rapper
lowkey. Most recently, we organised an emergency demonstration of over 200 against
Israel's massacre in Gaza, and coordinated a statement calling on the University to end
partnership with companies complici t in Israeli and Turkish war crimes.

Palestine: colonial past, colonial present
After th irty years of British colonial rule, Israel was founded in 1948 on the systematic
ethnic cleansing of over half of Palestine's indigenous population. Today, around X of
Palestinians live under military occupation in the West Bank & Gaza, where Palestinian
villages continue to be destroyed; a smaller number reside inside Israel as second-class
citizens, subject to racial discrimination by over SO laws; and over half of Palestinians live
outside Palestine as refugees. Israel's law of Return allows Jewish people anywhere in the
world to settle in histo~ic Palestine whilst denying this right to indigenous Palestinians, fo
no reason other than their ethnic origin.

Solidarity: why campaign for Palestine?
The 'international community' has failed for decades to hold Israel to accou nt, and the
support of Western states and corporations is instrumental to the continuation of its
regime of oppression- this includes our university, which maintains active links with
Israeli arms manufacturers. The European gaze tends to cast colonised peoples either as
threats or passive victims, but the Palestinian people have a rich history of anti-colonial
struggle; they are agents of their own liberation, and we must stand proudly in solidarity
with them if decolonisation is to mean anything on university campuses.

KUf</JSOC

& uO Lt bAittiY
/( IJf<. !J ISH

15
·d e Kurdistan Solidarity (CKS) is a collective of people,
C amb n g
.
rt·
· or around of Cambridge, committed to suppo 1ng
based In
1 · K d. t
It
·ve democratic and humanitarian strugg es m ur IS an.

progress1 ,

·
t
aise awareness through grassroots po 11t1ca1 ac 1on 1n
·
almS o r
"d
U .
·t K d. h
Cambridge. CKS works closely with Cambn ge mvers1 y ur IS
Society (CUKurdSoc).

of

Kurds are a native people the Middte East region with a population exceeding 40 million.
They have historically mainly inhabited the mountainous regions of Mesopotamia . Kurdistan
was divided into four parts after World War 1 and the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with
~he infamous British-French Sykes-Picot agreement, which marked the birth of nation-states
In that region. The four regions are currently occupied by Turkey, Iran. Iraq, and Syria. Over
the last century, countless Kurdish rebellions and popular uprisings have been crushed by
these states with the help of global and regional powers. During that period, the Kurds have
been subjected to numerous genocides, ethnic cleansing campaigns, forced assimilation
and displacements. Recently, in 2014, the peaceful Kurdish Yazidi community of Southern
Kurdistan (Iraqi-occupied Kurdistan) were subjected to a brutal genocide campaign by the
so-called Islamic State, where thousands were massacred and forced to flee. Thousands of
young girls were kidnapped and forced into sex slavery, whilst the whole world watched idly
and unsympathetically. The fate of most of these girls are still unknown. Most recently in
January 2018 , Turkish-backed mercenaries illegally attacked and invaded the Afrin canton of
Rojava (Syrian-occupied Kurdistan), which had been the most stable part of Syria,
untouched and protected by the local majority Kurdish community, from the civil war
ravaging Syria.

Our aim is to express our solidarity not only in words, but also in practi.ce. Bey~nd just
spreading information on the situation in Kurdistan, we als~ promote d1rect ~~tlo~ a~d
political intervention . Our campaign methods include informational events, part1c1pat1on In

protests or peaceful direct action.

~

-

17

FUSE is a network and forum for queer students of colour. It was set up as a safe
space by queer students of colour who found the experience of navigating the white
homonormativity of wider queer spaces here to be quite isolating, and wanted to
create a sense of community in order to tackle this. Like FLY, we run a public page on
Facebook where we share news stories and events, in addition to a secret group
where people can freely share their experiences and ask for advice.

fo.eebook . com f

Fuse. C"'fh br id9 e,

We are a fairly new group but are quickly expanding and have a lot of exciting stuff
planned for the year ahead (e.g. film screenings, mingle events, pre-drinks, welfare
drop-in sessions}, so do give our page a like! And if you would like to be added to the
secret group, please message our public page.

..

"Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is
self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare."Audre Lorde
'

.,
~

Somet imes Cambridge can feel like a space for an exclusive
group of people, but with the existence of FLY, we want to
reclaim this university as our own. FLY means Freedom.
Love. You. It is a network and forum for women and
non-binary people of colour at the University of Cambridge.
By people of colour, we mean BAME people (those of African,
Caribbean, Middle-Eastern and Asian ancestry). This space
meets weekly, where you can be free from judgement and
the questioning of your experiences.

to a number of
This new academic year you can look fo
Facilitator:
events, including special forums on non- binary identity, mixed-race
Rashidat
identity as well as a collaboration event with FUSE and the
Animashaun,
Women's Campaign, offering an introduction to intersectionality.
We launch a zine each year and have an online blog,
ra526@cam.ac.uk
flygirlsofcambridge.com, offering a platform specifically for women
and non-binary people of colour to try their hand at writing and
other creative art forms.
Women and non-binary people of colour often experience the devaluation of our histories, ideas and
sometimes existence due to the historic and disproportionate privileging of rich, white and male
narratives above all others in this institution. In order to combat this, we, as a space, offer a chance to
discuss our experiences, ask for advice, draw strength from each other, and widen our friendships
and networks beyond our colleges. A huge network of inspirational women and non- binary alumni
came before us, and our growing campaign presence through Decolonise and other projects, ensures
that we craft an institution for future female and nb students of colour to flourish long after us.

cu

18

~ l7J2J

"Some activist spaces you feel policed and that you're not ideologically pure enough and don't do enough
and a space where you feel/ike you can learn and make mistakes is incredibly valuable."~
-Sian Creely, Women's Campaign committee 2017-8

This university isn't just an Old Boys Club, it pretty
much invented them. This institution was not designed for women, especially not women of colour,
trans women, non-binary people, poor women, disabled women, queer women, mentally ill women, and
anyone else who does not closely resemble the kind
of person you will see in portraits in college ha lls.

The Women's Campaign has campaigned for compulsory consent workshops, organises the annual Reclaim the Night march, raises funds for important
feminist causes, such as sending people back to Ireland to vote in the Repeal the 8th referendum, and
keeps pressure on the university to change its atti-

These differences make us stronger in calling for radi-

tude to systemic sexual misconduct. Through forums

cal change to the university. The Women's Campaign

and events, we provide a community of women and

is the autonomous organisation of women and non-

non-binary people who offer each other solidarity

binary people in the university. It was set up in 1970s

and support in fighting for liberation both inside and

with a consciousness raising group, a reading group

outside of the university.

of feminist theory and a weekly meeting to plan campaigns. In 1993, a paid sabbatical women's officer
was created following the resignation of the student
officers over unpaid labour. The Women's Officer
runs the Women's Campaign as one of the six sabbatical officers at Cambridge University Students' Union (CUSU), but their mandate comes from the women and non-binary people at the university rather
than centralised policy.

through consensus-based decision making. It happens every Thursday in full term for all undergraduate and graduate women and non-binary people. This
indudes all self-identifying women and non-binary
people, anyone whose gender identity includes woman and those who feel they experience misogyny. We
are trans-inclusive and anti-racist. Alongside forum,
the Women's Campaign runs skill-sharing and consciousness-raising events throughout the year, curates a termly zine called Gender Agenda, and politi-

liD\>

our start of term social in October and forum every
Thursday. You can attend as many or as few meetings
as you feel able to. The Women's Officer for this year
is Claire Sosienski Smith: follow her on @CUSUWO,
email her at womens@cusu.cam.ac.uk, and like the
CUSU Womcam Facebook page for updates.
With love and solidarity,

Forum is where we shape the Women's Campaign

-:2\\'f organises for changes to the institution.

If you are a woman or non-binary person, come to

~

The Women's Campaign

v

. 01223 245888- HElPLI
WED+ THU SAT -4:
e

(~

-

...
20

Cambridge can be a hostile and uncomfortable place for queer students. It can also be a place for
immense personal growth, solidarity with fellow queers and a force for positive change in the world.
This institution was not made for LGBT+ people, but as a campaign, we work consistently to carve
out space for queers in Cambridge, and have some fun while we're at it.
~
As one of CUSU's autonomous campaigns, CUSU LGBT+provides support, welfare and advocacy
for students, informs t he student/staff population about LGBT+issues, and works to effect positive
change. We aim to represent Cambridge's LGBT+ community in all its diversity, with representative
off1cers for a vast array of members of our community, who make sure our programme of events
caters to everyone, and whom you can approach for specific support.

cusu

Why Gender Neutral?
Last term, CUSU LGBT+ launched the Why

LGBT+

Gender-Neutral? campaign, which aims to
make space for non-binary people within the
university. The campaign advocates some
simple policies to accommodate gender
diversity within university administration and
services, in the provision of gender-neutral
bathrooms, admin services and dress codes.

~

We've published guides on the
implementation of these policies, wh ich are
available on our website and we're in direct
contact with university staff and decisionmakers to push for change. But you can help
too! You can visit our campaign page at
facebook.com/WhyGenderNeutral and attend
next term's discussion groups to learn more

or contribute your ideas, ask your JCR or
MCR to get involved, and f1ll out the Gender
Recognition Act consultation before the
October 19th deadline, and request legal
recognition of non-binary identities -you can
find guidance for filli ng out the consultation
on our campaign page.

Queer Minds
This year we're collaborating with Student
Minds to improve services for LGBT+welfare
in the university. We'll be campaigning for
better training In LGBT+ issues among college
nurses and counsellors, writing best-practice
guidance based on student experiences,
raising awareness about what services are
already available, and trialling some studentled support for LGBT+ individuals.

~ck

out what events are on in our two Facebook groups (one public, one secret). Come to our
first _o_pen ~eeting on Oct?ber 20th. We also have a magazine, Get Rea l, which puts out regular print
ed1t1ons 1f yo~ want to g1ve your queer creative energy an out let We look forward to meeting you
and welcommg you to our commun ity, doing our best to make each day in this uni gay as heck.

21

CARE WORK IS
ACTIVIST WORK
Activist spaces are not immune to the same racisl, sexist, (dis)ableist structures that
exist in our communities. We must constantly challenge our ideas about how we
value labour within movements and who we expect to do this labour.

A
V

Doyou...





favour speakers in meetings who say things assertively rather than with
Al
substance?
Y
assume women and non-binary people know less than you do?
refuse to engage with any theory or practice from people who are not w~ite?
write off criticism as being about identity politics and/or as a distraction:?
,.J

If this sounds like your movement, then the same oppressions we come 'to activism
if" order to escape are being reproduced ~y people within those spaces.

\::]

Imagining the possibility of a radica lly different society begins with our actions. Build
in time for self and community reflection, educate yourself on caring work, feminist
anti-racist theory, and volunteer for administrative labour which is not just "photoJ
opportunity" activism.
Changing our assumptions of who does what kinds of work does not stop at askirg
more men or white people to volunteer for taking minutes. We must reconstruct our
ideas of value and importance in political spaces to include the forms of work which
have traditionally fallen on women and non-binary people, especially women and
non-binary people of colour.
Labour that prioritises emotional and physical wellbeing are the tools of
transformative justice work which enable us to take up space and organise. We must
acknowledge that our successes are built on the caring work of certain people within
our movements, making sure that those people who choose to perform this work feel
appreciated for their efforts.
r main organising

fractical Tips:
.
nts discussions outside of 'JOU
d nd share the burden
to attend other ra\hes, eve ,
• try
ople's loa a
t rghten other pe
. I
group
hat can be done o I
much as posslb e
elating topics
0
:
with
to
• encourage group m~trugg\es are interconn~~ ~ 'into organising In the Irs
• emphasise that ou:tactivist spaces that got e
beyond the group

~~~;orate

other~~~~~~oa:ducate thems~l~esa~~o~~~ple ne~d 1~ ~

place

pport
them su
and offer
ot using
.n your grouP h t 'lou are n
d ensure t a
w members I
ourself to ne
n 'lou can an .
. ccessib\e
• introduce { caring worK whe tiona\ off\oad~ng in wheelchair-a upat\ons
reciproca e \ \'f for 'lour e~o\ . ho\d meetings .et times to occ

one so e
ess1b e.
·
and QUI
.


~~~ you'uft~t~~i~e:~~ to \o~~::~~~~~!ds a~~ ~~~~:~t\vist spaces

metnln9 to tea
venues.' b h t peop\e nave
recognise ~ ~nat we a\\ nave so
• understan

.
,

22

(Or1MUHITY

RAb1CAL

The idea of self-care as "political
warfare" (Audre Lorde) is routinely
decontextualised and bastardised
by capitalism (for profit) and by
liberalism (to shift the responsibility
for care away from the structural
and towards the individual).

SELFACTIVIS

POLITICAL:.___.
1 :.$
~Care,

in traditions of Black feminism especially, is about a radical comi ng-together to
provide what society and the state withholds from us as marginalised people - healthcare,
nourishment, welfare, community, compassion. "Self' care is always at least partly
collective; our needs may differ, but none of us is genuinely 'independent'. Fostering
communities of mutual, collective care is part of what makes society (and this university)
survivable, and what keeps our organising sustainable. More than this - it's about learning
and developing practices together that reflect the values of what we're fighting for. We
have to build the world we want to live in wherever we can, on whatever scale is possible.
I'm not a robot

.

~~NOT

--

'It APOL tTl CAL

~~···
,f

ABOVT ttAD\ C~L

*

AUTO NOt'\'/

It SOt-1£TH 1t\Jt;.

-Of. PE.N b fN C£. .

ANb flA'tJICA l INT£.R.-

*

* HoNouit\NG-NEE.OS.
'louR.. OWN
(.OTH£~S'

i- tNGA (X\~&

WITH ~£IJ,.O\.l

-

0'-GAN lSE. f<.S IN Goo J)

FAITH.

*

COMfA&IS'tON Fot- \MP£flFicTION1 INC.U)J)If\.IGr 'fOolS.

9

'

It

~""' ·"'~
CA~t6S A PILle£ 11\G-. ~'t)'{,\

INl)IVtbVAL\8£(:),

[)

Q

,,

CiJ~~\

NAIL~.£Tta£0. co~foAA1CJ

A



8uu_S #-itT.

fL€S(JONSI81 LITY T~At

SHOULi)

1

(2. ....

o"'~o
~~,er ,._"(y\ s
THAT/ ~!>0~:~"t

N~OLl i!>£.tLAL

'lr UN D£ e..JTAN D\N &- .._

JIAND\ N& IN SOt..lt>Ae.rr'l
Wtn-i EACJ-i OTHE.ILS'
Ex.Pc:ILt ENC.f.S of
MA.tGrtNALISATlON.

A LUX cJ(L Y.

.

..

ge.. FALLtNCr

() tS p(Lo Po R..T I 0 N AT£L'{
uPON THOSE. 0~ t.-JHOM

IT tS TftAb\IIONALLY M~r

1

£xPE.CT£.[) ( PAf.TIC.UlAflt.Y
I
WOMeN &. PfOP'-£ or:

CoLCu~).

<r

~

23

built for us - literally (count the lifts),
figuratively (count the hours they expect
you to be working every week). You're not
alone or wrong or broken. What disables
us is a university without built-in flexibility;
without
universal
step-free
access;
without inclusive teaching formats. What
disables us is "a three-hour written exam
is the only way to assess student
attainment." What disables us is "have
this in my pidge at the faculty by 9am on
monday morning."

t ~ A .8 lf£ 0
STU I> EN TS'

D

C'A M}p A'l G-N

- AM *I* 01fABL£O J

If you're asking

-<¢>

yourself the question, then -

WHAT?~

~[ J

Campaign was founded in 2010 and
rebooted in 2015. In February 2016 we
forced a referendum that broke the record
of student voting numbers and secured us
a paid, full-time CUSU officer. There's a
committee of campaign officers elected in
Easter every year. We have Forum twice a
term, where we chat. vent, make
decisions, report, consult. eat a lot of
biscuits. We run a bunch of fab events.
We make a zine at least once a year. This
'we' is an open one. If you're disabled and
you're a student, congrats, you're one of
us (and if not,
, there's lots on that's open to
non-disabled people, so come along!).

---

- •

yes, probably. Mental health issues
count. ADHD, dyslexia, and dyspraxia
count. Chronic illnesses count. PCOS
counts. Sleep issues, like narcolepsy, I
count. Eating disorders count. IBS counts.
Anxiety counts. Depression counts.
~utis.m counts. Visual, hearing, mobility
1mpa1rments count. It all counts, if you
want it to. (Self-questioning and 1
self-diagnosis is valid as h*ck.) Come join
the party, we've got comfy sofas and
snacks.

~ -- ..:. '!!!_Lis THE 0

The CUSU Disabled Students:---:__

__

4

~ {> \~\\\\\~::..:1(..

~~

\

~

" . . ) .- -* ~ . *.
*
* lnter~ission
*
*
*

\\\~\\\

DSC Forum
Def1ant L1ves' screening

Reasonable Adjustments survey

facebook.com /

CUSUdisabledstudents

Emrys (facebook.com/cusudisabled)

A

"{

i

social groups

Welfare is Political event series

Disabled Students' Officers' training

disabled@

4'

cusu.cam.ac.uk

Focus group: disability in activism

rcAMBRIDGE STUDENT COMMUNITY ACTION I [7~
We connect students with local volunteering projects in Cambridge, including mentoring
vulnerable children, helping teach children who are having difficulty with their academic
work, and supporting vulnerable adults in the community with their daily routine.
~

If you would like to start volunteering, or to have a chat about which of our projects might be
for you, pop into our office at 17 Mill Lane.
facebook.com/cambridgesca
www.cambridgesca.org.uk

I
K going on to '
· s a lot of V4~r
V4e feel
~~hilst there I
to Cambridge.
tt tudents
d e for pos
he IP ge s ough is being o~ experience,
tnat n~t en ccess and stu~en educational
admission a . I economiC or
/
V4her e our soc~. a ht disadvantage us.
bacKgrounds mig

Set up in 2017 Cl
represent stud' t ass Act aims to
en s who ' d
one or more of th
' entify With
.

e following:

Wor~; __

1

'

/

..\.J.llg Clas
S tate
C
s
Lo-w 111. 0112p

CareL coll'le
First G eavers
Estr. e.ner."t'lo.n
a.nged
q,

/

' [j

..0

E

"'
"'
"'
()

{J

~ I cLAss Acrl

+'
()

15
()

-

Cl)
Cl)

()

Last year we began to develop and unite a
community of students from across the
university, from a buddy scheme ~atching
freshers to older students. to social
events and discussions, culminat ing in a
dinner with over 100 students from almost
every co II ege!

@

Our campaign is developing a network and
safety net of support for identifying
students. providing a space for us to
freely talk about our experiences among
othe rs who understand. We want to ensure
students don' t feel isolated or alienated
in a university that was never meant for
\
those outside of the elite in society. We ,~~ __
believe we should stand tal I, celebrate
and be proud of each of the individual '
' 1------...J
routes we have taken and challenges we
have overcome to get here.
()

/

Over this next year we wi I I continue to
make this university our space, opening up
conversat ion around issues of class, and
growing our network of students to provide
a supportive community.
If you ident ify with any of the strands of
Class Act, come and meet the committee at
the first soc ial of term in October! We
welcome students of any level of study,
staff, UK. EU and international students
from across the Univers ity,

Marketisation is the process by which the logic
of markets is imposed on an organisation. In
higher education, this has meant a concerted
attempt by successive government~ to turn
universities, which were previously (for all their
flaws)
public
institutions,
into
private
corporations competing to provide a product.
The marketised university competes to provide a
product (degrees and other qualifications) to its
customers (students).
The marketisation drive is I
b_Y changes to universities' ~rg~~y pushed along
Since the introduction f un mg model. Ever
(capped at £1000 w·th o the first tuition fees
in 1998) the propo~ionmefa~s-t~sted exceptions
that comes from gover o undlng for teaching
the amount that univer~r::;~has declined, and
fees has gone up The t k epend on student
2010, when the c~a . . s ar est change came in
to £9000 and
';bon government tripled fees
teachmgaramati~~ly ~o~e~n~ent funding for
and social science r~ n e arts, humanities
direct public supporf T~rams completely without
from students (und~r a e n~ed to extract money
~apped) is also behi~~glme where .tees are
t & the mass1ve rent
Increases of the
1as •ew yea
.
.
mcreas1ngly lucrative
k
~· and the
accommodation.
mar et m student

se~ educatio~

I~

All this affects how we
too.
leads staff and students alike into an
understanding of education that is a
commodified, skin-deep approximation of what it
could and should be. The only things that matter
about teaching or learning to the higher
education market are those things that can be
measured, whether on a balance sheet or on a
league
table.
The
transformative
and
unquantifiable role of education (and all its
radical potential) is of no interest to the
managers of the post-2010 university. Instead
what matters is 'student satisfaction' - as in,
"would you spend money here again?". The
Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), through
which the market regulator, the Office for
Students,
officially
grades
universities'
undergraduate teaching, is based mostly on
metrics with no reiation to teaching .

CONTb ·-~;:.

>C0NT 1NUtb.. ·we~n6•'
. ...

26

a

od .Q '" "

Cambridge University is in many ways protected
from the most
obvious symptoms of this --:national picture: the feudalism of our ,nogovernance structures is still strong enough to
fend off some
neoliberal onslaught. The
university's long-held wealth and sturdier
reputation
reduces
the
pressure
that
government policies can place on it, and the
collegiate structure slows the spread of financial
power through the capillaries of the institution.
Marketisation in Cambridge happens more
subtly, hidden behind the face of tradition, but it
happens all the same. We still have sky-high
debts and a mental health crisis, while some
colleges charge extortionate rents to students
who can barely afford to study here. Our
university still places its financial gain above its
ethical obligations, and we're more closely tied
up with corporations for research and funding~
than most.

~::':;.~:;~o~ ~>~
©

P ,.·uo\>oen> .,\ •••
- .~nJO
-- ,(\ 110~ a
Most of all c b 'd
response t~ ma~ ~~ g~ demonstrates that the
back to an im:r. e lsatlon must not be to hark
funded univers·~'na.ftt golden ~ge of the state~b..!!._c and un· ' y.. . e oppos1t~ of e_rivate is
have ~ever re~~er~ltles (Ca~bndge especially)
has been excl 1 een public .at all. Cambridge
of its walls (phu .ng 1and harm,~g those outside
figurative finanY~Ica
w~lls, onlln.e paywalls and
1
long time and c.1'~ bhame~s all mcluded) for a
obscure that T0 s c anglng n~tur~ should not
demand the .
o~pose market1sat1on, we must
should dema~~e~mg-up ~f the university. We
access and f
emocr~bc governance, open
demand that t~ee e.duca.bon. fo~ all. We should
resources ande U~lve.rslty d~stnbutes its wealth ,
benefit of every P e~~ge Widely ~nd for the
is uhlir.
~ne. e tr~e oppos1te of private
'
T7n
~e oppos1 e of marketisation is

_ -. .._ ..._

J

""

........

'

Keep it short and pithy! Nobody wants to read a soliloquy on your sign.
Everybody loves a pun. Or a joke. Or a Star Wars reference. Keep it witty.
Don't make it too heavy. You have to carry this thing around with you all day.
This is not a bicep workout. Make your sign out of light cardboard or
Styrofoam, and use a light pole- an old broomstick always does the trick.
Keep it simple! Glitter looks great but a shiny sign is hard to read (and
environmentally crap, unless your glitter's biodegradable). Use simple
contrasting colours. We recommend red and black.
Use big letters. And get your spacing right. You don't want lots of tiny words
squished in at the end.

-

Think about how it will look in a photo. We need photos of our fab signs; make
sure yours will pop out and be LEGIBLE. If you can't read it, don't make it.
And if you feel like being nice, put a funny picture or a nice message on the
back of your sign so that the protestors behind you get a smile on their face.
If you're so inclined, make yourself a

bo, vo~k~b~lo;c~s:h~ie:l;d~*·~~-=======~)
:

How-to eoo\<.pdt

9124 2S03NA_00_
*https://WWW

-

..

-- ...

g"d"~

"'

~

5

-

CIJ

'

--

-

-<
-o
-c:
m::r
::I Ql

...

Ql(/)
::I Cl)

C.'<

Cf!.<

5c&
- ::r
(§::
c:O

G'> (§
c:

IXJ
(")

CD'

(C



~:;
Cl)
::;)

iii<
-a>
iii' "'

a.c& ~
Cl>

~

CD

CDCD

CD
~

'8~ .
~ g
......
::I
U1 iii'
...... !l
...... !7

0)

(I)

I

~~

c: 5;
~QI
~=~
... ~

~!!1.

OOQI

::I
::I C.
CI) Ql
'0::1
't)
- ·
.., ::I

-j

G')
)>

r-

0:3"'~ Of: ~ ti g: =

)>

0 ~ ~~
0
_.cnoo
't)"'c: ='t)
Ng: .....
N
~'&- .....
O>O

~ <De:
C'~
...... a f;llll

..

=.

;a.co::J fJ~o iil~~

0

!e. g~

fJ £,cR' "'

''
t
rm'

-me.. -I =~ ;:!: ~lil..:
g:;gi

£._5
Q a.-o

=

g. o

Cl)~ 3:
::r- -~~<
CD ::1
3::::
0 < ~g!:T a.. · m
a.
co ::;) a. . a>~;$1 z

:l
CD

~ "'co

!!!. o

c:

J

0

~ 0

-oi

Cl)

Sc:§
- CI)

£z

-<
0

; i -<
Ill

~

"'"'

~

~i

-

27

·~~z s::~ l

r-t~t ~!!. coco -

c:::~ ~

S" Q:I ~

g~::~= !!~ t! 0~~
g.~%-= lC' !!!. 5' 3

C..~
~ ..... )lo
::I

ww<.ftc»

g
i' ~ ::l.ien l!t - ~ CD o
~ QO

OOU>

-~ g

~:s_3

s.

Ql

-

-e.-g

:fCD

-<C: : l =

o-ooc.ocn Oo:r'<no
.....

...,
00

c.o

00

.-N
..,.N

O 'Q CD
..,~

0 ~ ~

c

t»<D

... ::j Q'S?."S.
iii ::I<
~- ~a.(l)
...

c,oO
N .....

Cl)

~~

i]
cf!

GO! Don't let fear or laziness overwhelm you! Protesting is exc
important. So step one is to just get off the sofa and GO!
DON'T bring knives or weapons - it's a recipe for more than you bargained for,
and if you're caught with them by the cops you're in big trouble.
DON'T bring 10. The pigs don't need to know who you are.
Go with FRIENDS! Friends make protesting fun , and they keep you safe. If your
friends aren't keen, make sure someone at least knows you're going.
Always bring WATER - all that shouting and sign-carrying is thirsty work.
bars and other non-bruisable food is a good idea too.
Plan a safe route home, and leave with others! You don't want to bump into
some nasty fascists on your way home.
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS - bring the bustcard on this page with you!
Write an emergency contact number on your body. Phones get lost.
Don 't get drunk or otherwise intoxicated! At least not until after the protest.
Then feel free to get drunk. This is why you brought your friends.
Bring something (a scarf/mask) to cover your face. Big, brother is watching you.
Wear comfy shoes. Walking is hard work. Running away is hard work. Running
in h -heels is extra hard

"(§ !!tljl :::;3

s

~



s
<::;

0

?

'

::1
QI O.

'<§.
~::;)

co
0 5"
c.
CD (I)

lil~

-CD

;i ~

c

s0

m
)>

:::0
:::0

m

(/)

.....

~
s

r
'
'
'
I

South 1

1969: Anti-Apartheid march contests
Dryden theatre society performing in
segregated South Africa

CHURCH

Jan Smuts g

THE GRAND ARCADE

-2016 campaign to return
cockerel stolen from Africa
War Memorial Plate - "Boer

I

THE GRAFTON CENTRE

-

a

winner Jagadish Bose ,
Natural Sciences in 1882
1894; his portrait
bust are here

P UUCil'I;;U

MUSEUM

' '

~

"'

\I

30

CAMBRIDGE
. ' governance
The so-called 'democrat IC
system of the University of Cambridge is
broken. Political events of the past year
reveal that the University is under the
influence of a tiny minority of financial
bureaucrats and
any pretence of
democracy has been lost.
Our university sacrifices the views and
values of its members in favour of profit.
Continuing to invest in the fossil fuels industry;
cutting pensions; clinging to links with the
arms trade; maintaining insecure, underpaid
staff jobs; perpetuating structural racism ;
building sprawling urban developments for

These are not the actions of a democratic
university. They are the result of profit-hungry
decisions made by a small handful of
unelected, unaccountable financiers, who
hide behind endless committee procedures
and earn more in a month than most uni
staff do in a year.

.. high rent in the city .. .

DEMOCRACY
.I

The university has done all it can to suppress opposition. It has
overridden official democratic procedures, kept its own
councillors uninformed, ignored student and staff concerns
and even gone so far as to use police violence to suppress
protest. The university knows that if it were to make
concessions towards genuine democracy, its unjust practices
would not be allowed to continue. So upper management veils
its greed in bureaucracy.
In this knowledge, the Cambridge Democracy Project was formed. This collaborative effort
between staff and student groups aims to target university governance from both inside and
outside, as part of the wider activist project towards a just and liberated university. The
decisions Cambridge University makes affect not only its members, but all of society. It has a
responsibility to local, national, and international communities. Let's hold it to account.

ore info,
ye out for rn lved on
KeeP an eays to get invore in the
.
and w
rn rno
·de'
events,
k - and lea f thiS gur .
Face boo . the rest o
tirne rn
111 ea n

31

CAMBRIDGE
EFENr::--0 __.....,.
DUC ION

Cambridge Defend Education organis es for a just university.
We recognise that this institution is deeply implicated in structures of
inequality and oppress ion. We be l ieve in the necessity and possibi l ity of
a different kind of university - an open, truly public institution that is
structured democratically, and oriented towards the well-being of both
its members and the rest of the world, and which provides space and
support for the articulation of critica l opposition to injust ice.

We believe in the terrific capacity for collective action and imagination that (even) the
(neoliberal) university provides, and we a r e determined to build and fight for change.

Though our vision is broad, we focus on specific objectives1
We will continue organising opposit ion to the ma rketisation of higher education - the
restructuring of universities to look increasingly like revenue-maximising corporations, rather
than educational institutions prov id i ng a public good . We work towards a well-funded public
h ighe r education sector, which provides quality, debt-free education to all who seek it. This
also involves the opposition to the university's real estate expansion projects which inflate land
value while Cambr idge suffers from a chronic housing crisis.
We will campa ign in a coalition against the racist, lslamophobic PREVEN T policy and other
aspects of the racist securitisation of the university, such as the administration functioning as
surrogate border guard by helping t o create a 'host i le environment' for staff and st udents.
· In the past year we have successfully mobilised around key issues, notably running picket
support during the pensions strike, and organising a successful occupation that forced the
university to stop threatening to deduct staff pay on non strike days, as well as an
unprecedented open meeting with the Vice Chancellor.
CDE is an open and no n-hierarchical organisation .
Everyone is welcome, and anyone involved in the work has an equal
say in decision-making processes. We t ry to engage in continuous
reflection and learning to see where power dynamics su rface, and
how they can be addressed - and more gene rally how we can do
better as organisers.
We also thin k that any res i lient, hopeful po litics centres friendship,
care and joy.
Find info about ou r weekly meetings on our Facebook page, and
come to our first meeting on Sunday 7th Oct.,
~

4.30pm, .
Chetwynd Room, .
King's College

llfos·

-

0 l.J

~ b~

'/"/;'(',

~ lltvlv

~s'"r .

--.....:e-.-ll.~s
I;{f
4

Cambridge
The University and College Union (UCU) is
e largest trade union and professional association
for academic and academic-related staff working
in Further and Higher Education in the UK_: We
have nearly 1800 members in Cambridge,
and almost 120,000 nationally.

Our primary mission is to fight for and protect the rights of university staff. That means your
lecturers, tutors, librarians, IT officers, and perhaps even you! UCU membership is free for all
graduate students, international or domestic, who work in Further and Higher Education. In
fact, one of our major concerns is to defend the rights of casually employed and precarious
workers - including graduate students.
Our belief is that Further and Higher Education should be free and accessible to all, regardless
of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, or ability. We believe that good working conditions - a ,...
workplace free of discrimination, harassment, or intimidation, a liveable income, reasonable
working hours, provisions for carers and workers with special needs, and decent pensions - are ,...
crucial for making our educational institutions places of learning that work towards a better
/
future for everyone involved; for our students, staff, for the local community, and also for our ,
institutions.
Even if this does not apply to you, or if you are hesitant to join, Cambridge UCU runs many -""
events and initiatives you can take part in. This past year alone we have co-hosted talks on the __..
marketisation of Higher Education (HE}; run meetings to fight against the casualisation of
contracts; rallied against racism and xenophobia; marched with student activists to protest the
University's involvement in funding the fossil fuel industry.
We work hard to convince our employers of how important these things are. Often we succeed:
just a few months ago CUCU graduate members at the History Faculty won a victory ensuring
all graduate teaching in the faculty will be recognized as work and paid accordingly. Most of our
work, however, does not make headlines. We campaign against the 'hostile environment' that
international staff and students face in
the UK through surveillance and other restrictions; we
work for the rights of EU/EEA citizens in the UK post-Brexit. Some of our most valuable work is
casework: supporting members with problems and disputes in their workplaces, colleges or
departments. This is a vital part of navigating the complex institutional and political environment
of HE, and key to supporting some of our more Vtllnerable members.
'\(I

1/,..'-

r;: @CambridgeUCU

,-

I

\t

f

(

Ufaceboo~.com/cambridgeucu
\

[ ,

\ \

l

r

,,

\

(

I

/

'; ;--t-in_y_u-rl-.c-o_m_/_
C_U_C_U___Y<_o_
u t_u_b_e_ ,
'-

I

OUT OF ORDER
Apologies for the ineoo•·ftlienct.
We are worlang
ro 8" r bad in usc

as soon as P<>niblc

The Porter's Log @'tllf'POrlerslog M.. 16

Discussion turns to The Office For Students - which is wh11t Toope's room in the
Old Schools building is OC1oN called •ToopeAs~ mbly
'

Occupation of Old Schools during the UCU Pensions Strike 2018

Manufacturing and exporting weapons simply won't produce the conditions for peace.3 The conflict
in Syria, armed by a host of external powers including Britain, has produced one of the most painful
tragedies of mass exodus in recent memory.
This is an imperial conflict, and this is a European crisis. This is how the war comes back home.
Cambridge University and the Arms Trade
\
Cambridge University specifically is historically complicit in the industry of war. We invest in those
companies. Our staff produce research for them. Our alumni have founded and worked for them. We host
them in conferences and we invite them to our freshers' and careers fairs.

This is justified with claims that economic growth is the only thing
that matters, emphasising the need for a euphemistically named
"defence" industry to "keep us safe". The corporate custodians argue
that any challenge to their profiteering will make "us" vulnerable .
Who are we talking about?

Kurdish people have been bombarded by Turkey's BAE fighter jets; Kashmiris live under occupation
of the Indian military supplied with British military hardware; Palestinians in Occupied Territories are
attacked by British-supplied Israeli armed forces; Yemenites and Bahraini civilians are attacked by Rolls
Royce aircraft; Egyptian dissidents are suppressed by munitions and tear-gas provided by Chemring
Group. Cambridge University has worked with each of these companies, enabling acts of war and
oppression. But this isn't just something happening "out there". Many of us students in Cambridge come
from parts of the world that s
the brunt of the global arms industry.
The "us" that they try to "defend" is just a rhetorical tool, an illusion.
"We" are this university. We need to be defended from the "defence" industry.
.-~-~~.,IS~>~ ;:eT:;~$.. ?'H?,.,.,;JI~'#-#"' ~#- ~"$S,~

<

!"!he::7

G"

t kind of a university do we want?

we want a university that helps these companies profit off the death and destruction that their
"' _; prod~
re intended to ca_use? Do we want students trained to find more efficient ways of killing people ,
~cru~ e from a careers farr down the road? Do we want our academics spending time and contributing
owledge to solving problems for arms companies?
If this is something you care about, get involved with us. We need to speak, act, and exhaust the
power and privilege we have here in Cambridge: we will not enable this industry and its global destruction .

.--:::
facebook.com/demilita

:;r-d"emilitarisecambridge@gmait.com

,~

-

~

-- V

https://www. telegraph. co. uklbusi ness/boeing-u k/aerospace-boosts-british-economy/
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/summer-budget-2015-key-announcements
3 See Paul Holden , 2016. Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade. London: Zed
1

2

37

,CRITICAL
I

-

SEMINAR SERIES

,..

f

_ ..... _

.





-------- · -- ··---·'
'Theory too becomes a material force as soon as it grips the masses'- Karl Marx

Critical Theory and Practice (CTP) Is a speaker series that tries to amalgamate theory with transformatlve
political practices. Originating in 2010 as part of Cambridge Defend Education during the resistance to raised fees
-----a~d cuts: it's since become an independent collective of people who come from across the university- we reject
-----~hrerarch res between staff/students and university members/non-members.

l l
Seeing that knowledge and its production is political, yet that
stubborn tensions between theory and practice, between
thinking and doing, often raise their heads, the seminars and
teach-ins we host aim to muddy false dichotomies between
social movements and intellectual production, and make
clearer the possibilities immanent when these moments of
emancipatory politics are reunited!

1------------ll \r . .

~

Examples of such alchemy?

Theorists, writers, activists, even artists have been part of CTP events. Often they come from standpoints that are ;::::::::;.
anti-colonial, anti- racist, feminist, marxist, socialist or anarchist. Some of last year's events included seminars
with historian Vijay Prashad on the Third World as a political project in relation to the Russian Revolution, Ryan
Davey on class and state coercion in housing estates, scholar and organiser Barbara Ransby discussing black
liberation movements, teach-ins on arms trade links to university
departments, and on internationalist left allyship.
We also co-host with a variety of like-minded organisations
such as UCU, FLY, New Directions in Anti-colonial studies,
Desiring the Middle East at Pembroke and more- many of whom

:u-ma:dinthi~ ~~ ~
"0\..J

Think you might want to get involved?

CTP exists because of the passion and dedication of a handful of

iJ11

4lflllll'

I'

••

~\

,....

-"\ \1\to.

..le.\8 .,.

~ae\ "s.··
ot~
k.

rac\\cel

fOC.e~
~\"eofi~
~tct\\\ca

\

as¥- to s~neo{~al'\d?

\

\

ot out

ftOstefS d -.)
tot yc,af
~out
tef~
\..oO '"'ae\('(\as
~
\(.\'

c{\t\ca

0

·\to

'!Qoo'f...cO
' ert'a' t
~~.\ace
.,·og \1St· ·PSt\of\S a
~
.-rt1 '
. • ~ o.~
., co~
t\a"e ,,.... ( ~v·
\1\a\\·
~e a\SO ose.t\t)e ' o {act\ce@q

~ ~D ~ \
0

~

1 o'18 \ \J

(
\

have a termly meeting at the lovely Anchor Pub to discuss ideas
and what needs to get done, please contact us for information on

~ ~

71o -"

'\OUV

people, mainly grads and junior faculty but also undergrads and
non-uni members, who organise together voluntarily. We usually

this.

o

...

--

\
)

_,.
60

38

The CUSU Ethical Affairs campaign seeks to build a fai rer and more sustainable University.
\
We support t he wo rk of student campaigns, and are here to help t hose who want to start _..-

one. We hope to engage new people, bring people together and make campaigni~g spaces / /
as accessible as possible to build the mass movements that rea l change requ1res.
·

j

'\
/

Each term, we have 3 target campaigns which we will focus on. For Michaelmas 2019 these are:

We'll be wor king alongside the Living Wage campaign to ensure all Cambridge
colleges ..~tay the real living w a1e, and seek accreditation to t he Living Wage

c~

•.''"tft<J pr"
viV/tan

lrl

·V'(f~

Foundation. Despit e being some of the wealthiest institutions in the country,
poverty pay amongst the staff of Cambridge colleges is common. Given low
pay disproportionately affects women and ethnic minorities, accreditation
wou ld help address the gender and racial pay gaps as well as providing dignity
to the people whose work the University's functioning relies on.

·----------------------------If you are part of a
campaign or want t o
start one, please get in
touch- we' re here to
help ! The ca mpaign's
current officers are Alice
Gilderdale and Jake
Simms. You can find us
on Facebook
(facebook.com/ EthicaiAf
fairs) or email us at
ethicalaffairs@cusu.cam.
ac.uk

~-----------------------------

r We will be supporting Zero Carbon's
ongoing campaign to get Cambridge
University and its colleges to divest from
fossil fuels. By growing and supporting
college level campa igns, helping coordinate

We'll also be working alongside the WomCam Open Portfolio

and amplify the work of green officers and
providing guidance and templates we aim,
in particular, to promote college

Campaign on Period Poverty. Shockingly, one in ten women
in the UK struggle to afford pads or tampons,

divestment. Fossil fuel companies cause

disproportionately affecting those who are economically
disadvantaged. We will be campaigning for colleges to

global destruction with their exploit ative
practices, disproportionately affecting the

provide free sanitary products, not as a luxury but as a basic

worlds most marginalised communities.

necessity, whilst questioning the taboo surrounding this
important issue. Additionally, we will be linking t he issue of

They operate through the social license that
Universities investing in t hem helps provide,

women's rights with environmental rights- advocating
sustainable long-term solutions which allow women dignity

and thus divestment works by removing
that social license and t urning them into a
pariah industry.

and decency without costing the earth.

39

Why do students at Murray Edwards
and Girton pay almost £2,000 a term
in rent?
Why are Kitchen Fixed Charges so
uneven across colleges?

CAMBRIDGE
CUT THE RENT

We run regular
meetings and
socials on both
a college and
uni level

Why is the Cambridge Bursary the
same for all when living costa vary so
much?
Our campaigns mobi lise student power to cut
rents and scrap unfair charges.
We care about material change for students and
the impact of rent and housing on access
and higher education funding, as wel l as our
university's impact on the town.

~~~

~~.~

\

~

0

~

l

CHOP is a group of Cambridge and ARU students supporting local
homeless people and helping students to engage with the homeless
community through a combination of fundraising for local charities,
raising awareness of homelessness and outreach such as clothes
collections, soup kitchens and volunteering.

s:l ~ ~'1,


e
~

~0

~0\~

,

Come

:~

1
our

I I I I I TJ ~ l l

~~e.aker

events and take part in our outreach and

website (homelessoutreachcambridge@wordpress.com) or mailing
list (lists.cam.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/soc-chop-exec).

I

I

I

I

I

~- ' j · ({'a\\·'0 '((\
~~ ou"'-teac.'t\@~
\

You can also become a CHOP rep- help to publicise CHOP events
within your college/ARU or organise small collections and
'((\e\ess
0
fundraisers. Email our rep coordinator Yasmin Gilders · ({''ot\O~e't\
(yg321@cam.ac.uk) to find out more/apply.
c.a
~i,lllfiiii~...J.

Cambridge Streetbite was set up by a group of students who wanted to do
something to help homeless people in a practical way.
Our main activity consists of preparing food and hot drinks for people we meet
on the streets, alongside taking time to develop relationships with people
through chatting to them as food is distributed.
We wander round town in pairs or small groups, taking a thermos and some
sandwiches to offer the people we meet. The food is always gratefully received,
but the most important thing we give is simply the time for a drink and a chat.
We are based at St Columba's United Reformed Church on Downing Street

0
0

0

Shifts run in the morning, afternoon and evening every day- you can choose
which shift is best for your schedule and sign up with friends if you'd like!
~--~====~
--Volunteering with us is a small commitment that makes a tangible _change
To get involved, just visit our Facebook page and sign u~ on the online rota©

~~CAMPAiGN fO~ NU(lE~' q;;
We 're the university's branch af the national Campaign far Nuclear Disarm ament. Our vision of the future is a world w ithout nuclear weapons. so our campaign is focused on getting rid of Trident (the UK's nuclear deterrent) as well as
trying to achieve a global nuclear weapons ban.

G

DISA ~ HAHE NT

This year, we' ll hold some socials, some information evenings and events so you can find out more
about nuclear weapons and d isarmament. and hopefully host some speakers as well.
CUCNO are also going to be w orking with other campaigns in Cambridge, including the divestment
campaign, the secondary school CND campaign and the town Stop the War Coalition.

0\J

~~

~

~

~

/'

.....><

~ cl.- ~ cl.- ;t; ~~ CAHUIDHCND!! GHAILCOH _____/

41

When the first nuclear bombs were dropped on Hiroshi~a and Naga;aki
in 1945, a reported 340.000 people died as a result.

{X)

~
~
~

~ CND was fo rmed in protest of such lethal. immora l weapons when the UK ~
~

started d eveloping our own .

Theresa May did not hesitate to say that she would kill 100,000 innocent
~ people w ith a nuclear blast in 20 16. We're not happy about that and we
want to change it.

~

~

~

~

/CAHUIDGECND /

If you want to get involved, or if you have any questions about what we do, come
to our first social on Tuesday 9th October where we'll be making banners and
badges and answering all your questions about CND in the King 's Art Room. We
can' t wait to meet you!
We are the university society
For th
representing Amnesty International, /
run b e 50 th annual Cage C
.
~
a non-governmental organisation
mem6 the society th is ye amp~,gn
wit h millions of members across
ins ide ers Vol unteered to ta~ soc~ety
the world campaigning for human ../' Pa radea Wooden cage on ~· e ~h1 fts
rights .
raise a to Collect signature mg s
Warenes
s and
~
~
~ Yar/' s Wood lm s ?' a~uses at the
~
Centre.
migration Detention

~~
/

Weekly meetings are held in Caius
Bar at 5pm on Sundays. For more
info on t hese and other events t his
term, find us on Facebook or emai l. _

42

0

i•

co

~

9
Iff

1ft'

(J

0

Ir; vr

~

£t)

On March 10, 2018, a group of thirty students occupied a
section of Old Schools, the administrative heart of
Cambridge. We, as international students, participated in
the moment having walked the same track in occupying
campuses, even whole cities, in places stretching from
Hong Kong to New Delhi, Cape Town to Istanbul, Cairo to
Paris, Manchester to London.
We come into Cambridge having been called many things;
thugs, riff-raffs, juveniles, dissidents, agitators, and some,
even revolutionaries. We bring our world into Cambridge,
as this university helps make the weapons that maim our
lands and people, and fund industries that consume the
very life and nature out of them. We come into it knowing
we will be policed, monitored, and be put on the frontlines
of the fight against Theresa May's hostile environment
policy. We come into it like fish out of water. It is up to us
to leave it a better place.

dynamics of power between those who ask for solidarity,
and those who get to take it for granted. We can teach
each other the difference between philanthropy, and
genuine, mutual camaraderie.

Whatever we do or learn here has resonance beyond
Cambridge, and beyond the UK. It is us who will take it
forward, and will take it beyond. It is here and us that can
demonstrate how decolonisation is a global process. It is
here that we learn how eurocentrism and ethnocentrism
leaves no space for nuance, for understanding, for genuine
camaraderie, and for internationalist politics.

Where to start? We learn from practice, and learn how to
act in tandem, together. We find out multiple ways of
doing political work together, from each other. 'What is
political?' does not have an obvious answer. Politics don't
look the same, or feel the same, from one city to another.
But it is so very similar, and feels very familial. It requires a
lot of listening, skill sharing, relaying of different
experiences, to create a mutual understanding of how to
do activism in this university that resonates with and
inclusive of international students.
We can teach each other how and why to stand in
solidarity with a myriad of causes we stand for, here and
beyond. As international students, we have and will suffer
the brunt of rising xenophobia here in UK for the
foreseeable future, both on a bureaucratic and societal
level. We are interrogated at the border and in the
university for being (too) radical. We get interrogated in
activist spaces for not being (the right kind of) radical. We
desperately need some form of hospitality in this hostile
environment.
Solidarity requires that we listen, and are transformed by
our act of camaraderie. Solidarity means being acutely
aware of one's own orivilege in relation to people who are

Colonial modernity did not just create a hierarchy between
the west and the rest. It created borders in between. It
erased histories in common. We have to have a sense and
understanding of history, where the west did and does not·
constitute the centre of our universe, or the limits of our
imagination. We need to cross the borders in between, to
create an internationalism armed against chauvinism in all
colors. We need to recover the stories we have in
common, that testify against eurocentric or ethnocentric
history, and their fatalism. And we need more narratives,
our narratives, of global trespassers and agitators, past
and present, to create a world that Is no longer hostile to
racial, gendered, and social difference.

43

CAMBRIDGE
~/MIGRANT

"'sUPPORT

Cambridge Migrant Support is newly set up this year in
coordination with WomCam, working to support those in
detention. particularly at Yarl's Wood, and resisting the violent
enforcement of borders. We hold fundraisers for grassroots
organisations that directly support migrants, as well as workshops
& training about how detention works and how to support
detainees. We want to build relationships with similar groups, in
both Cambridge and the UK more broadly, and with
detainees/ex-detainees to strengthen the anti-borders campaign
and provide practical support to migrants. We will also continue
to attend the protests that are held at Yarl's Wood- WomCam
has organised transport for these over the past few years.

twitter. com/CamMigrantSup

~

fmgk2@cam.ac.uk

Detention in the UK is kept quiet- it's a clear example of state violence against migrants, especially
those who are also part of other oppressed groups (eg LGBT + or PoC migrants). It's racist, xenophobic
and has no valid basis.
In the UK, more than 30,000 people are detained each year and the UK is the only European country t o
have no upper time limit on detention. There are 8 detention centres in the UK, as well as some
short-term holding facilities and some migrants being held in prison under immigration powers. Yarl's
Wood is a detention centre located about an hour away from Cambridge in Bedfordshire and the vast
majority of detainees there are women.
Border controls are enforced under the guise of 'national security', however are actually implemented by
the state to help it create an image of 'otherness', allowing an idea of 'us vs them' to foster nationalism
and help the government maintain its power.

CUSU International (iCUSU} is the umbrella body for all
international societies and students at the University of
Cambridge. We serve as a hub for all international
activities in Cambridge, whilst looking out for the rights
and wellbeing of international students.

international.cusu.cam.ac.uk

International
Students'
Campaign

iCUSU aims to promote international cultures in Cambridge through events like the cultural food
fair, but it also provides a voice for international students. Right now our focus is on increased
transparency from the uni - we're currently conducting research on college inequality on issues
relevant to international students. We also want to voice international students' concerns on a
national level in order to make up for our lack of UK voting rights on issues that affect us, like fee
rises, visa issues, and the Prevent legislation.

44
ASCU intends to build links between
Africans and non-Africans in Cambridge,
creating a platform for networking and
debate on issues of Pan-African
importance, fostering research capacity
within Africa, and mentoring prospective
African students.

-· africatogether.org.u

(

'

Since 2013, ASCU has provided a community and home for African students in particular to debate, make friends,
learn, dispel stereotypes, represent our collective interests, and strengthen ties across the continent. However,
we're open to anyone interested in learning more about Africa, no matter their discipline, nationality, or student status.

t1"

~

SOME OF WHAT WE DO ...

.

~

.

.

\

Africa Together Conference, a leading platform that convenes some of Africa's best minds representing "the
diversity of the continent to construct/deconstruct narratives about our individual and collective lived experiences,
and to discuss issues of critical importance to the continent's present and future.

(
~

Africa Over Coffee, a monthly meet to discuss issues relating to Africa over a cup of coffee/tea. Topics of
discussion in the past year varied from slavery in Libya, to women's empowerment, to Zimbabwe after Mugabe.
Support for Peter, a solidarity campaign to demand the immediate safe release of Cambridge PhD student Peter
Biar Ajak, who has been detained by the South Sudanese government with no clear reason .

T HE BLACKCANTABS

111e Black Cantabs Research Society (BCRS) aims
to uncover Cambridge University's forgotten Black
students by highlighting their profiles, experiences
and achievements at Cambridge. This is a historicaL
project that illuminates the lost legacies of .Black
Cantabs, but alsQ a political project that critiques the .
fact that tbese histories were "forgotten" in the first
instance. The BCRS provides a space for past,

RESEARCH SOC IETY
.,

present, a11d futu.re Black Cantabs to find their
home ar the University of Cambridge.

lT'

I

PRESIDENT: SURER MOHAME D

l

I

H enry Louis Gates Jr.
,
I _I I
(Clare College '79)

it

Zadie Smith

Kwame Anthony Appiah
I

(Kings College '97)
Tha.ndie Newton
~ (Downing

College '95)

Dianne Abbott
(Newnham College '76)

'\?

I

(Clare College '75, '81) \
.I

45

Find us on

Facebook~:=.:===========

"Momentum Society Cambridge University"

Momentum Society, MomSoc for short, is a society for students who are
dedicated to the support. of left-wing leadership in the Labour Party.

~
~

.:J

Every term we have at least one TGM (termly general meeting); this is
where we decide on any pressing issues within the university or
nationally that we want to get involved with campaigning for/against.
Previously we have been involved in supporting the UCU strikes and
held campaign training sessions.

Roughly every fortnight MomSoc organises socials, our two favourites
being 'Nationalise Spoons' and 'Pints and Policy' (P&P). P&P is more
structured debates on issues but we end up discussing politics whatever
the setting! These events are enjoyable with or without alcohol so please
don't feel discouraged to come along.
Every term we aim to host an event on a big topic in the left-wing sphere.
Last year this included talks on Brexit and Venezuela.
Discussion

~

McDonald's UK workers are striking for the first time in
UK history, to demand a living wage of £10 an hour and
an end to youth rates, the option of guaranteed working
hours, and for their right to a union to be respected.
On International Workers' Day in 2018, staff at the
McDonald's branch in Newmarket walked out to take a
stand for justice, and were joined by supporters from
student organising groups and trade unions. Politicians
and members of the general public also came out to
voice their support.

~

~

year earlier, workers at stores in Crayford and
Cambridge walked out on the first ever McStrike in the
UK, following the footsteps of tens of thousands of fast
food workers striking across the US as part of the Fight
for $15 movement.
Solidarity with the McStrike Campaign is one way in
which students can actively work to bridge the "town and
gown" divide: Follow @fastfoodrights on Twitter/other
social media and stay connected with CDE for updates.

4~) . •t'J
·

_..

·n · · · · · :17 · · · ·

.<...? ::: ... :v. : ..

·· ····

~-

cambridge Universities' Labour Club (CULC) is a Labour Party affiliated group representing
cambridge University and Anglia Ruskin students. We campaign alongside local activists to
get Labour candidates elected who stand for the values we care about.

"'I~
If you are passionate about politics and care about national and local issues, canvassing local people
is an incredibly rewarding experience, and a great way to get involved in the city we live in. CULC
played a central role in the re-election of Daniel Zeichner as MP in 2017 and in an increased majority
for Labour on Cambridge City Council this May.

.

We are proud of our recent successes, and we can achieve a lot more with your support. Working
with CUSU, the local Labour Party and other university societies, CULC has put pressure on
Cambridge University to sign up to tHe Living Wage, and we're now working towards getting all the
colleges and ARU to do the same. For this to happen, we make use of our brilliant College
Representative System who share the group's message with their fellow college students and lobby
eir college to adopt change. Being a college rep is a great way for you to get involved with us and
stay close to your college's need's.

--

CULC has campaigned to improve Mental Health provisions in the University and we will continue to
lobby the universities and colleges for better pay, welfare provision as part of our Period Poverty
Campaign headed by our Women's Officer and more! Each term we also run a main club campaign,
which this term will be a Housing Campaign, targeting the exorbitant price of housing and
accommodation in Cambridge for both students and loca l people. Come to our Housing Campaign
steering meeting to learn more about the intricacies of this issue, meet the activists committed to
improving this.problem and offer your inputs on how to shape this campaign.
.,
CULC is not on ly about representing the Labour Party at the university level; CULC is about :
representing your needs, your opinions and your views to those responsible for making decisions in .
our university and shaping national policy for real change. If you are passionate about a political .
issue and want to be part of a group that shares your va lue, you will find that CULC is the club for .
you to campaign with! .

. There's loads of ways to get involved;
· - Come to one of our events: we have socials, speakers and discussion events
- Become a member of CULC: you'll get a badge and a membership card!
-Come to a canvassing session: you don't need to have been before, you'll get paired with an
experienced canvasser and will be provided with all the support that you need
-Become your college rep to help us coordinate our activism

'
Contact us at culcchair@gmail.com or on Facebook at Cambridge Universities' Labour Club, and
look out for our banner at campaigning events across the university.

47
The Cambridge Marxist Society is

MARXISli
STUDENT
FEDERATION

a proud member of the Marxist

we seek to

Student Federation. We fight for
overthrow
Socialism in our lif etime on an
international basis.

Lenin famously stated: 'without revolutionary theory, there can be no revolutionary movement'. In
that vein we organise regular political discussions on contemporary and historical events, to tease
out the lessons we can draw and sharpen our perspective. It is by understanding the world around us
that we hope to also change it. However, we are not just a discussion group. Beyond theoretical
discussion, we also intervene in the labour movement, participating in union action and in our local
labour movement branches. We aim also to act as a voice of organised labour within t he student
movement. It is through demonstrating and agitating against the broken status quo that we hope to
turn outwards with bold, socialist demands. If you want to rid the world of the capitalist system, there
is no solution greater than Marxism! We meet at 7.00 pm, every Wednesday in the Munby Room in
Kings. You can also find us on Facebook to find out more about the society.

capitalism
which serves

to 0 PPress,

and divide the
worKing c\ass.

FACILITATION
So you're part of a campaign that you're
passionate about, or perhaps you've just joined
one and you're excited at the prospect of changing
all those things that have made you feel so shit for
so long. You've got a group of incredible people
ready to transform the world (or at least your
corner of it). You're committed to organising in a
way that avoids replicating the oppressive
structures you're trying to fight, and you know that
material change cannot come about without
effective campaigning, but that's where all the
trouble begins. Effective campaigning means
communication and often, in our attempts at
horizontal organising, collective decision making.
And that means meetings. So, so many meetings.
And all too often, the most promising campaigns
can be ground to a halt because of an inability to
run meetings that are productive, accessible, and
uplifting rather than draining.

What's the secret? Meetings don't have to be
awful; in fact they should be exciting opportunities
for us to gather ourselves, to plan, reflect, and
participate in a collective vision of the space we're
trying to create. Unfortunately, despite all our best
intentions, activist groups are not immune to
systematic oppressions and inequalities. Activism

involves a recognition that we're all fallible and
operating within a layered system of oppressions,
whilst simultaneously always maintaining the belief
that we can break out of them . Which brings us
back to those meetings. We all work so hard to
create the space to organise, and when we do it's
often fraught - our work is difficult, the fight is long
and hard and deeply personal - and there's almost
always a seemingly endless list of discussion
points.

In non-hierarchical organising there is no set leader
or chairperson, but the role of facilitator is
commonly used to enable.the smooth running of a
meeting. Every individual in the meeting should be
actively self-facilitating, and evaluating their own
participation in the space and in relation to others but let's talk for a second about the individual who
has (hopefully) volunteered to be the nominal
facilitator for a meeting.

CONT'D C>/ERL£~F...

>

\ll TlI nTI JQ N~oNT.
~:~r~g ~~~: t~~ f:~~~~~rs P~:nnn~adb~~~;, ~~~
. . , r(A(
I
\,I


_4_s_,.,

The most important lesson I've learned in
facilitating is not just to listen to all the voices in the
room, to take note of who is speaking, for how
long, and what exactly they're saying, but also to
listen to what is not being said. Facilitation is far
more than just numbering the hands that you see
waving urgently in the air and sitting back to let
discussion commence. Facilitation means collating
ideas and enabling concrete group decisions to be
made. If done well, it can transform a meeting
space, and have a significant impact on the
actions taken when everyone leaves the meeting
room. If people feel that their opinions have been
voiced and their concerns heard, whether new or
experienced they will feel like they have a stake in
what happens next, and this is crucial in building a
movement. Facilitation is also something that
everyone can do, and everyone can do well.

have someone volunteer to take notes (not the
same person every time!). Ground rules ~n~ hand
signals should be recapped at . th~ begtnnm~ of
every meeting - we all need a remtnder once tn a
while - and this is a good opportunity for the
facilitator to initiate a 'temperature check' to gauge
the energy of the room .

Decide on what consensus will mean for your
group. Does every · decision have to be 100%
agreed on? 80%? A good facilitator will act like a
radio receiver, picking up on the different vibes in
the room and synthe§lslng Ideas to formulate a
conclusion that the group can reach consensus on.
But they are also the ultimate delegator; it's the
group:s responsibility to step up and say what they
need, · and the facilitator's to guide discussion,
encourage participation, and to have the
confidence to challenge any behaviour that
~hreatens the ground rules of the space.

I

Two heads are better than one; co-facilitation
enables you t~ swap in and out if one of you is
tired, or if a decision needs to be made that one of
you has a stake in. Crucially, one of you can
timekeep. Agree how much time should be spent
on each discussion point at the start of the
meeting; timings should include rest breaks, as
well as a final cut off point - when the time you
agreed is up, the meeting is over. Stop five minutes
beforehand to run through action points, and to
arrange the next meeting.

Good facilitation makes meetings not only
bearable, but productive; the campaign not only
functioning, but successful. But above all, listen to
yourself, and listen to others. Remember to treat
each other with compassion, because we are all
still learning; and keep in mind the joy that we are
fighting for, together.

THERE'S MORE!
auT WAIT!

inCombrld90

t the other groups
0

A teW_:. : _ . . _ . . • • •

In the city
Common Cambridge I activist group affiliated to Plan C,
"towards a city of the commons and against capital" I
www.facebook.comlcommoncambridge
Cambridge Commons I a local residents' group focused on
raising awareness of inequality in Cambridge I
www.thecambridgecommons.orgl
cambridge Action 1 a platform for anyone involved/interested in broad-based political action in Cam I
cambridgeaction17.wixsite.comlhome
cambridge Left Unity 1 a network active in movements and campaigns across the left, working to create an
alternative to the main political parties I www.facebook.comiCambridgeleftUnity
Foodcycle Cambridge 1 Community meals for vulnerable people made from surplus food I
www.foodcycle.org.ukllocation/cambridge
Jimmy's 1 s~pports the Cambridge homeless community I www.jimmyscambridge.org.uk

In Cambridge University: There are many other groups, organisations, societies and campaigns, including:
Philiminality I global, interdisciplinary philosophy I fb.comlphiliminalitycambridge
Immoral Sciences Club I for women in philosophy I fb.comlimmoralsciencesl
Ethics in Mat~ematics Society I cueims.soc.srcf.net/
Radical Archives I contact camradhistoryarchives@gmail.com
Blueprint Zine I mental health magazine I fb.comlblueprintzine
PEN I defend & promote freedom of expression, remove barriers to literature I fb.comlofficialcambridgeunipen

Cooperatives
Argyle Street Housing Cooperative 1 offering shared accommodation, opposing discrimination and
supporting democratic housing decision-making I www.ash.coop
Arjuna Wholefoods I Workers' co-operative fully and equally owned by those who work here, selling
vegetarian & vegan food I www.arjunawholefoods.co.uklabout
Ace Nursery School I Parents' coop for children aged 1+I http:llwww.ace-nursery-school.org.uk

Local Trade Unions: Beyond UCU in Cambridge Uni, there are lots of other friendly unions, including:
Unite I Unison I GMB I FBU I BFAWU

Reading Groups: there are lots - contact the person running it to join, or start your own
Theorising Race & Racism reading group I hosted at the Faculty of Education, open to
all I cpgjcam.net/reading-groupsltheorising-race-and-racism-in-educationl
Platform Capitalism Reading Group I
cpgjcam.net/reading-groupslplatform-capitalism-reading-groupl
Space, Borders, Power I cpgjcam.net/space-borders-powerl
The Intersection of Gender, Race and Disability with Philosophy of Science I
www.hps.cam.ac.uk/news-eventslseminars-reading-groupslgender-race-disability
Paper 0 - Neglects of Neoclassical Economics I Cambridge Society for Economic
\ Pluralism I www.cambridgepluralism.orglpaper-O.html
Education & Activism I info at www.cusu.co.uk I contact education@cusu.cam.ac.uk

50

WORDS OF WISDOM

lf\
\!1
(i}

<!l

·Resist the temptation of being "that

®

person" who signs up to do everything,

~

remember that it is okay to be tired,

take time off

®

(

. .

H

.J;;I..

)
The whole point of organizing is that tt ts a .
collective exercise

Don't be afraid to make mistakes accept being called out with grace )
and with an eye to learning how to be better.

co':Je from bi
I don't li
SOlidarity th g and Pertor k~ the Word " .
day life th at We build fl matlve acts
activist" b
toward
~t allows u
rom talkin
of bravado ecause Po/i .
Vision,
learnin;
than
and there .
rge stron
e our 90al
one anoth .9. It IS
IS always s 9er and mo
s. When w
er m our d
0 much
re Prepa
e Work
ay
more Work to ;ed to tackle th
o.
e

challen;~~~~

:et~~~imatelygat~h~~

~o~e

a~~~~~ha~g~ -:yooo;~

.. \0

oiJ ({\~'I

'I

ue~'{\

doubt if what you're doing is of any use

at.....,-.:.,~1

You may become cynical.

- -[
t

..

..

-

Remember that you always have something to learn both practical and theoretical.
Be open to criticism and ensure that you have a life outside of organising! Protect
those other hobbies fiercely, take breaks and step back if you are feeling
overwhelmed. Try as much as possible to know your history and to learn about the
work of activists that have come before, ,w hat they tried , what worked and what
didn't. Remember that theory without practice in a place like Cambridge is,........._........~
meaningless and be wary of the people who sit around read ing theory all day but
refuse to be involved in the practical aspects of organizing. Document everything.

___ _JhN 'I

involved!

51

see them.

Ml

not
men nve
the organising
space or et charisma blind you to their flaws. They do not have the most interesting
or radical ideas all the time. Do not let facilitation and conflict resolution become
women's work. It is work for everyone.

52 ~ '

,-~'

-

'

'

-

\

,2013

I

'

,

'

\

'

'

\

I

'
of Jree

'

educat 1 ~~ ooo,cct

'

\

'

t



,

54

Some Basics
Capitalism: socio-economic system of private ownership, exploitation and inequality
Class: group of people sharing common relations to how a society/economy is produced and organised
Marketisation: t urning something into a market for commodities. See Spotlight on Marketisation
Colonialism: domination by a group over others with military/economic/culturaVpolitical tools
Decolonisation: abolishing that", and liberating people from that domination. See Spotlight on
Decolonisation
Gender: sociocultural concept that arbitrarily divides people into (usually) two groups and tucks all of them
over in the process
Sex: gender in a lab coat - a complicated set of physical characteristics often incorrectly modelled as a
binary, w ith shitty consequences. not as simp le as they tell you in biology class
Trans(/cis): when someone's gender assigned at birth does not(/does) match their identified gender. See
CUSU LGBT+
Non-binary (NB): genders outside of the male/female binary
Sexuality: how people desire others, lots of options here
Queer: political identification working to abolish the sex/gender system
Racialisation/racism: social pract ice of sorting people into hierarchies of domination based on supposed
common characteristics
BME: 'Black and Minority Ethnic' - general UK term for people racialised as anything other than white. See
BME Campaign
Borders: imaginary lines that force people to live in certain places and prevent them from moving freely
Disability: a characteristic of a person who society has decided should be deliberately excluded and then to
that the problem lies in them, rather than in an inaccessible society
lntersectionality: forms of oppression interact in complex ways; we need to fight all oppression

. u · rsitv (CUl/uni-related
.h
Qambndgemve
.
bars should organise more w1t
ARU: Anglia Ruskin U~iver~ity. CU memUnion represents all students at CU
CUSU: Cambridge Umverslty Students
' M t s/PhD) at CU
ts grad students ( as er
GU: Graduate Union, represen
.
t ff at CU. See UCU group page
.
cu· University & Colleges Union , represents working ~ a h es UCU went on strike over these In 2018
U
·
'buf n· types of pens1on sc em •
· d wment
Defined Benefit I Defined Contn
IO .
.
y CU+colleges have the largest um en o
Endowment: Pot of money invested to make the unl mone .
.
Europe, roughly £5bn
II f
olitical or moral reasons. CU should divest from fossil fuels,
Divestment: selling assets/shares, usua Y or p
.
.
es a ainst Israeli oppression of Palestine. See
the arms trade, etc. See Zero ~arbon
BDS· Boycott Divestment and Sanctions campaign, P ~ m' mess See Spotlight on Prevent
.
'
h
nment's 'counter-terrons
.
PREVENT· Part of the Brit is gover
I h lth services to members of CU

ce provides menta ea
8 d before
1•
UCS: University Counseling
ervl
.
. b 'ldings both occupied in 201 an
.
.
Old Schools I Greenwich House: CU administrative U.l
e~elo ment project, a major financial drain
rth W t Cambridge: CU's pet major land and ho~slng.d
. p C t rpillar/BAE which are linked to the
No - es
.
.
works with corporations ~ncludlng a e
CSA: Cambridge Service Alliance
.
D militarise Cambridge
.
arms trade and illegal Israeli occupations ..see e
nd walk the streets without fear of VIolence.
Reclaim the Night: Annual march to reclaim bodily autonomy a

s ·

See WomCam

::I!~··•••••

55

Activist Practice
Direct action: collectively/individually bringing about change yourself, not waiting for others to act for you
facilitation: helping a meeting go well by ensuring everyone has balanced opportunities/ability to speak etc.
See Spotlight on Facilitation
FOI: Freedom of Information Request. Can be used w/CU and colleges. See www.whatdotheyknow.com
Memes: A replacement for decent mental health services. See also Doggos
Occupation: taking and holding physical space to force action (e.g. from uni management), build links within
a movement, run educational events, etc.
Pronouns: how you'd like to be referred to (e.g. she/he/they), usually asked for at the start of meetings
: assisting someone outside of your community on their terms
Strike (Industrial Action): workers take collective action, notably refusing to work, for political-economic

- - -

T-~:..... r~.·
.'
0

•• 1-

..

,

:~



b>~t/~~~~ ;:}t

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The people who made the 2012 UCSC Disorientation Guide (& AK) who inspired much of this.
.
The activists in Cambridge over the years who have left a path for us to follow.
The many hours that people contributing to this guide have poured In,
both to put it together, and more generally to make the university a less
shit and more caring space.
Thanks to @yeyeigomez & @esrabecan for a~ditional illustration work.
Thank you in particular to Footprint [@Footprintleeds] for printing this,
and thank you very much to Firefund [@firefundnet] for hosting the
crowdtunding so t hat we could print! (firefund.net/disorientationguide)

12 fillS

FriESS

72 PINTS PRESS was formed during the UCU pensions
strike to produce a Disorientation Guide. intent on building
student power towards a collective future. We are an
independent publishing group based in Cambridge, UK.
The name comes from a poster made during the
occupation of Senate House in March 2018 which reads:
"£9000? That's like ... twelve pints in Cambridge.•
~

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

E\

~ C. t\. ~

-

:-:6- 1,>-

*

1) everything is not alright, despite what th ey're telling yo u;
2) if you think everything Is not alright , you're not alone;
3) this is where you can find those of us who refuse to accept the stat us quo and w ill work to change it.

c,
0

"Tj

Cambridge is disconcert ing, and feeling out of place or angry at it is pretty reasonable. We encourage you to dig
deeper into the problems here, below the PR-smoothed surface and glorious global rankings. You're in a situation in
which you're treated as a 'customer' for the privilege of purchasing the 'commodity' that Is your education. You might
realise the role of the colleges in housing inequalities in Cambridge. Depending on your department, you might end
up working for fossil fuel co rporations, arms companies, nuclear weapons providers . You might discover more of the
ways that the University is harmful to the world outside it and the people within It.
You might even want to do someth ing about that.

-

--<:----

Cl')

I

_.,..

To that end the Gu'd
·

.
.'.
, e arms o introduce you to political activism i C
.
' ..
.
p~rt,es. Polrt1csfor us is about power: who has it, what the u
n amb~,d~e • beyond politics' as 1ust politica l ""-1
w,11provide a sense of the possibilities for change th t
ti~ se lt f~r, how it rs contested. We hope that the Guide l.'X
we push for it.
----..
~
a ac v sm entails, how this change can be achieved , and why

...............

-

·-

\1

For those who have already been around for a while , we hope that th is helps you ~nnect more with other
campaigns. It is Intended to archive the wo rk of organise rs so that It's not_lost amidst the high turnover of students ,
and to share skills and knowledge that enable people to navigate and organise better in this spac~-- .
.
meant to be disorienting. It is meant to disrupt the usual conversations and act1v1besthat normalise
It Is, 0 f course,
d
rr · th
d't'ons taken
university fees and rent, to challenge who Is 'supposed ' to be where and how, an . to po 1 1c1se. e con , 1 •
for granted in the university , the city , and beyond. It is meant to open up quest ions about what we are onented
towards , as individuals , communities, and institutions - and to encourage us to think about what we could and

E

u

should be oriented towards instead.

~

There are plenty of people who wrote, edited, designed , and contributed in other ways to this Guide. We are mostly
students (past and present) at Cambr idge University , but we come from across the world , Global North and South ,
and we've been involved in activ ism and campaigning, locally and Internationally, in various groups - working on
democrat ising educat ion, fighting climate change, opposing fascism and capitalism, pushing for decolonisat ion,
demilitarisation , fair housing , feminist struggles and more. We come from all over and have done all so rts and see
this guide as part of an attempt to get us all to work together.
-

-- ..... , .. !.....

From our various backgrounds, w e found a moment of unity during the UCU pensions strike in Feb/Mar 2018. Out of
this , in attempting to imagine a better university in a better wor ld and to archive the efforts of those already working
towards it, we formed an editorial group, 12 Pints Press .

We don 't have the answers, but this guide should give you a sense of some of the political history of Cambridge ,
where we're at today and what the major problems are; why acting here and now matters , and what bette r
possibilities we could create towards a collective Mure.
What we do know Is that to get there from here, we need to build studen t power.
We hope you'll find this useful, and we can contribu te towards creating a better world together.

0
.

.

---

~------

rk but it's also possible tha

communities with and in which we wo

:ve said someth ing harmful ,

:~ a\m to be accountable to eacht~::::.::
:~e a bad job - wh_ether thta::~~~i~~s:~g.
d up somewhere, or
. t or w e've 1ust go s
we've messe
ph\c design skills aren't quite ?n po1n , e here please get in touch:
because our gra . ou're unhappy with anything you se
'12PintsPress
subsequently , so if y
.
// @'12PintsPress// fb .com/
camradhistoryarch lves@gma11.com

You can help us do better

- - ......
~::::::=~----=
~



kl £ Nr C ~£.t> Tl-l 1S F'2.0M tH £.

NEw

l N Qv,

-

~Y .

I

ONTENTS
-

-

---

'1ft

,.-...

.

,,.

2. Letter from 12 Pints Press {eds)
4. Towards the Common Univers ity
6. Timeline of Student Activism

.Ja._10. Zero Carbon
11.-=:
Deco lonisat ion
12. Decolon ise Cambridge Network

13. Preventing PREVENT
14. Palest ine Soc iety (PalSo c)
15. Kurdish Solidar ity & KurdSoc

16. BME Campaign
17. FLY Girls of Colour
17. FUSE Queer Students of Colour

18. Women's Campaign
19. Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre
19. Student Minds Cambridge

23. Disabled Students Campa ign
24. Student Community Action •

..l!a_
21. -=:care
22 .

t

20 . LGBT + Campaign
Work is Activist Work
The Politics of Care

II::


24. Cl~ c;Act Campaign
25.-=: Market isation

26. How to : make a placard
27 . How to : go on a prote st
27. Bustcard

\Jj

28. Rad Cam Map
30 . Cambr idge Democracy Project
31 . Ca mbridge Defend Education (COE)

32. University & Colleges Union (UCU)
& the 2018 Pension Strikes

34. From the Arch ives I
c......;;:

,,

39. Cut the Rent ~
40. Cambridge Home less Outreach Prog ramme
40 . Streetb ite

36 . Demil itarise Cambridge
37 . Critical Theory & Practice {CTP)
38 . Ethical Affairs (CUSU)

I'

41. Amnesty
41 . Ca mpa ign for Nuclear Disarmament

ft::

@

42.
Internat ional Orga nising
43. iCUSU / International Students
43. Migrant Solidar ity

44 . Afr ican Soc iety (ASCU )
44 . Black Cantabs

45. Momentum Society
45 . McStrike / BFAWU

47 . dr:. Facilitation
49. But Wait ! There 's Morel
50 . Words of Wisdom

e

46. Labour Club
4 7. Marxist Society

'
,,

52. From the Archives II
54. Glossary

(thanks to Footprint : the printer of our d iscontents )

..

4

. .. . ..


TOWARDS THE COMMON UNIVERSITY. ..
.
ith the police • is central to
The university -. al~ng w s the dominant economic
preserving cap1~ahsm at dy stream of graduates,
tern Producing a s ea
sys
.
r t and hard-working fro m three years
rendered comp ,an
d study drugs , the university
of ex.ampressures an
·
roduction and
ensures the continuation of economic P .th maximal
f n ·s undertaken w1
environmental destruc ,o ,
"C
bridge scholar!"
efficiency. While the student - _a aemducated In the
.
they are being

behaves
sed In the marketing
enlightenment va~ues ~spou rch-led teach ing' is that
brochure, th e reality of resea
lnance Across
our studies are directed by corporate f t d . at the
Y
f
hips are crea e
the university' ~ro esso'."
e our work for their
behest of indu st nes w:~t;;'f~~~~; th~ the BP Institute

-==-•
'~

When, as now, the crisis of capitalism transcends all
of society, narrow calls for a 'student movement ' only
reinforce the notion our concerns are somehow
separate from all those who struggle for a better
world. Instead, we should conside r ourselves as part
of a workers' movement , based on a shared
understanding of our relationship to capital and our
desire to transcend it. The issues which are coming to
define our generation - Including debt. precarious
work , low-wages, state violence , the housing crisis ,
mental health issues and discr imination - are not
specific to students , but amount to a generalised
'soc ial crisis'.
These are the results of an economic system which
values profits over people .

profits - you need too
f Engineering to understand
O
r the Shell Professor
.
~ow Corporation Cambridge is open for business.
If the university's research is shaping the future of our
world , then It Is prioritising our future destruction. As
the summer heatwave triggered desperate warnings of
impending climate catastrophe; Cambridge University
continued to enhance tech niques for oil recovery while the fields around it caught fire. This university
once educated priests, but the Economics Faculty and
Business School house today 's acolytes, whose faith
in neoliberallsm remains unshaken - despite the
incon venien ce of the 2008 Financial Crisis. While the
crash and subsequent austerity measures have
plunged millions into dire poverty - and tripled student
fees - these disciples of high finance demand the
Intensification of an economic system dependent on
accelerating climate change.
We can save the planet or save capi talism, but we
cannot save both.

,n th is ~ontext, demanding free education without
demand_1
ng a free soc iety is little more than
adv~catrng for a reading roo m in a prison. If we truly
desire an emancipatory, coll aborative educat ion
~entred on ad~ressing soc ial issues as opposed to
market needs • we must build links with struggles
beyon~
the university's walls. In Cambridge ,
preca~ous workers have organised as part of the
McS~nke movement to demand better wages and
working conditions. When badly paid, zero-h our
contract work in the service sector is commonplace

Whether research ing the next generation of financial
algor ithms , management techniques or weapons
systems , the student is already a worker - one whose
salary has been simply been deferred for three years
while they pay for their own training. While the ~tudent
labo urs to reproduce a capitalist future , their own
prospects are increasingly bleak. Weighed down by
' unpayable debt and extortionate rents, the student
endures their poverty - only to graduate into the same
world of bad wages and worsening living standards as
everyone else. The less imaginat ive Ca".'~rldge
student likes to think their supposedly pnv1lege~
status exempts them from this reality. They trade their
political agency for passive compliance in the ~ope
their cv ls dumped slightly higher in the recruiter's

for m~y of us, with some students work ing two , even .•:
~hree Jobs to survive - why would we see this as an •
issue separate to our concerns? Let's help our friends ••:
- and ourselves - win better wages by help ing to build '. 1 ;
the strikes: collect for the strike fund in the college ,; :
~ar,hand out leaflets In the tow n and join the picket
fines v.;he~ they form. ln Montreal Square, just off Mill ;;{.
Road, residents are fighting the demolition of their
h~mes and community. This violent process of • •
displacement has become the norm in cities , as

1• .

r• •

pile.

'



~ir:.a~

l

·-.'-"

r:,

.....

councils attempt to offset austeri
selling land to d
ty measures by
I
flat Wh
eve ~pers for construct ion of luxury
f s.
.en the housing crisis is devastating the lives
o our friends and families and h

w en so many of u
cannot afford to rent, is their stru
s
I
Let's go to th .
.
99 e not also ours?
s
.
~,r meetings and ask how we can
upport their resistance until the· h
et's tak
·
.
,r omes are secure.
.
e part ,n the intemationaJ solidarity
th Kurdistan, who in Cambn'dg h
movement
e ave already be
so generous to us: let's ask them h
en
whether through raising fund
ow we can help . .
s or awareness
d
in dialogue with their need
- an act

s.

We know a student-worker movement is possible
because it is already happening : the 2018 UCU strike
was defined by students recogn ising the fight of
academic staff against precarity and marketisation
was also a fight for students' working rights. Rejecting
the commodity/consumer binary set by tuition fees:
students-as-workers refused to cross picket ~nes;
engaged in militant demonstrations ; built barricades;
occupied and shut down key adm inistrative build ings
until demands were met. And this is just the
beginning: with more strikes planned , let's help
generalise the offensive and encourage all those
exploited at work to join the picket lines. If students '
struggles are workers ' struggles, we must learn from
and support each other.



This ·
. is not to say stru I
unimportant· if th
.
99 es for the universrty
·
·
e university
are
capitalism , it can produce can produce the future of
Democratisation Will be a . a future beyond it too.
the university from co
vita/ .first step in taking back
staff and students COllarpob
rat~ interests: ensuring that
l'i
orabve/y dec 'd
esearch funding and
. ..
, e our curricula
urgent Priority if
pnont 1es. Decolon isation is an'
. .
we are to
d
marginalised voices
.
en the erasure of
c .
, ongoing com I' .
nmes and continued t ·1· • P ic1ty in colonial
ac1itabon of wa
r and

oppress ion through institutional
research and
academ ic support for the military- industrial complex.
We must resist the imposition of corporate
management, whose suited agents demand high
salaries and absolute power. To do this, we must
constantly quest ion their legitimacy: there can be no
decisions about us, without us. If educat ion is to be
free, we must demand the university is a sanctuary for
all migrants ; ending the enforceme nt of border
controls through attendance lists and prohibit ing UK
Border Force from campus spaces. Similarly, we must
refuse to collaborate with state surveillance through
the "Prevent" programme , and reinforce demands for
#CopsOffCampus. Instead of fighting for grades like
rats in a sack, let's collaborate and learn from each
other : run collective seminars, tutor each other, tear
down class-lists and leak exam papers. Let's
challenge the competitive culture through caring for
one another, being honest about our concerns and
demanding provision for our material needs - be it
subsidised housing or free childcare . And If we are
serious about a pub lic education, let's immediately without any hesitation - open our lectures and libraries
to all.

We ca/I thes
b .
e
nef suggest ions "C
.
Common" _ a vision f
.
ambndge lri
or a un,vers'ty h
are available to everyone t
, w ose benefits
access card N
, no Just those with the right
.
one of these th.
overnight and they
,ngs Will happen

won' t nece

make no mistake about It
~ly
be easy, but
Solidarity is not a word b . everything Is possible.
can hold even th
ut a weapon , and With it, we
e most powertur . .
account. Even a bn' f
1nst1tut1onsto
.
e 9 1ance over th •
.
resistance and rebeii·
.
e nch history of
ion ,n c b.
demonstrates that wh
am ndge alone
together. We're sure
fight together, we win
let's talk: yell them
t.
ave your own ideas so
ou ,n lecture
·
'
Pamphlets, slogans or on the w s, write them out in
alls ...

y::.I~~

As a society faced with the dual urgencies of cl/mate catastr
.
- -. .....
as usual. If we wish for humanity to survive we must rec
?Phe and soc,al crisis, we can no longer afford business
,
ogn,se our struggle is not ju t b
..

r:.:::~::::i.11:::::::::::::z-=ii::::
=:--·------ -=ca:
p:
i:
ta/:is
:m~
a:n:
dits World.
The Mure will conta in what we put into it today

·

see

s a out tuition fees, but against

--

h
you on t e streets.

planc.cambridge@gmail .com
fb.com/planC.cambridge
weareplanc .org

5
~I

~':

~

':::.
.-..'a
"'~

"'SI
!I:,."

f}:

~.
...,,~&
,';:~

i~:
t.s~
•~

~
I'll
..,,
,.:,~

~
,.,

6

IATIMELINE OF][CAMBRIC

1758: Francis Williams becomes the first black
student to attend Cambridge University , but does not
appear in the university 's records
"Alike the master and the slave shalf see
Their neck reliv 'd, the yoke unbound by thee. n
- Ode to [Governor] George Haldane

1825-1856: Cambridge University sets up a private
police force to control student behaviour
1869: Women first admitted to study in Cambridge
{but couldn't raduate

-------------

1945: Gloria Claire Carpenter becomes the first blac
woman known to have matriculated from a Cambridg
college (Girton)
1947: Women are admitted to full membership of th
university, after votes in 1887, 1897 and 1921 were
defeated because special trains were laid on from
London to bring thousands to vote

~

\-

he Free University Movement is started by students
at King's College ; they hold classes at the 'Arts Lab'
on Mill Road, where teaching consists of discussions ,
seminars, talks and film showings with members of
the public invited to participate
Rent strikes are organised, primarily at New Hall (now
Murray Edwards), assisted by CUSU
1961-62: Ban the Bomb demonstrations continue
1964: About 50 Emmanuel students delay paying
their college bill as a protest at the cost of food
June 1965: A banner attacking American involvement
in Vietnam is suspended from the spires of King's
College Chapel
November 1967: 300 protesters prevent the departure
of the US Ambassador from Churchi ll College b
hosting a sit-in on the road in a stand against th
Vietnam War

November
1968: Demonstration
outside the
Cambridge Union against visiting speaker Enoch
Powell, and Cambridge students joined anti-Powell
protests in London

,_t

r:,ewnham students carrying the Cambridge Alumnae
suffrape banner .-•
·,

1968: Founding of the Shilling Paper, a left-wing
alternative to Varsity

.,,

Anti-apartheid protests took place throughout the
1950s. Branches of Barclays Bank were regularly
picketed due to their investment in South African
assets , which many JCRs felt were indirectly
supporting the Apartheid regime.
1916: Bertrand Russell is expelled from Trinity
College for opposition to WWI
"Behind the rulers, in whom pride has
destroyed humanity , stand the patient
populat ions, who suffer and die."

1921: Women win the right to graduate with a full
degree, but because they are awarded diplomas
which "conferred the Title of the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts" , rather than being "admitted to the Degree of
Bachelor of Arts" , they are excluded from the
governing of the university

1959: Ban the Bomb rally on Midsummer Common



fEJ[STUD~

ACTIVISM

I

7
June 1975: Nursery Action Group (NAG) occupy
Senate House over the refusal of the University to
provide nursery care for full time students . Although
police and proctors locked the doors , 1,600 students
rnanaged to occupy the building by climbing in
throuah side windows

..., Studentsentering Senate House for NAG occupation 1975 1

January 1969: Occupation of a Mill Lane Lecture
room and the Grad Pad to show solidar ity with the
LSE sit-in; protesters then marched to the Old
Schools and occupied the Council Room . They issued
a statement demanding local changes such as gate
hour reform and the end to University representation
on the City Council.
February 1969: 200 campaigners from the Cambridge
University South Africa Committee (CUSAC) marched
on Trinity College in objection to the Dryden Society 's
planned tour of the country.

:ur IUi!§tC)&L

a



February 1973: Sit-ins at Lady Mitchell Hall and at the
Faculty of Economics after the rejection of
examination reforms to the economics tripos ; followed
by a march of 1,500 students to Senate House , where
they handed in a petition with more than 3,000
signatures calling for the start of negotiations for
reform in all facult ies

Jan 1972: Protests against the government's plans to
reform student unions; around 600 march to deliver
an anti-government petition to Shire Hall.
The biggest student demonstration yet takes place in
London : 35,000 students, including a Cambridge
contingent of 700. The pressure put on the
overnment prevented Margaret Thatcher, then
ducation Secretary , from carrying out the reforms
Speakers' Corn

.

May 1970: "The Garden House Riot" - actions against
the right-wing military regime in Greece (occupation of
Abbott 's Travel Agency , and the picket ing of a dinner
celebrating the conclusion of Greek Week which
ended in a riot when police appeared)
October 1970: Picket of over 800 students outs ide the
Senate House demanding reforms to the disciplinary
system at Cambridge , attracting a heavy police
presence

8
2010: Students protest against fee increases and
EMA Cuts; Cambridge Defend Education & Critical
Theory and Practice founded

Protest graffiti from the Kile area In the 1980 's

26 th Nov. 2010: Cambridge students occupy Senate
House
Nov. 2011 : Protest by students against Universities
Minister, David Willetts at Lady Mitchell Hall. One
student subjected to disciplinary proceed ings after
reading a poem at Willetts ' speech

',Campaign to save The Kite: an area now gentrified &
turned into the Grafton Centre - the campaign
included occupations , squats , setting up anarchist
bookshops, DIY stores and community centres
1986: "Nelson 's Picker : a four-year anti-apartheid
picket in Trafalgar Square , London
s campaign ,


,,
~

Off &2&s
-:
II' , l .,,,._
Banners hung from inside the 2010 occµpalion of
Senate House

In the late 70s students campaign against College
kitchen fixed charges
1978: CUSU pass motion to "disinvest from South
Africa" to oppose apartheid
The Kite Coordinating Committee plus Student
Commun ity Action plan to refurbish Kite properties .
The KCC were plann ing gradual renewal via
community self-help , fighting the planning blight

Campaign

2014: Talk by UKIP leader Nigel Farage cancelled as
students threatened to stage a protest alongside nonstudent groups . The protest still takes place

2003 : Cambridge Students oppose the invasion of
Iraq; write a petition to the PM and set up Coalition of
Universities Against War

PalSoc picket against the Israeli ambassador, Daniel
Taub, who was speaking at the Union days after an
open letter condemning Israel's actions in Gaza was
released, signed by leading Cambridge academics

1990: Cambridge
founded

Palestine

Solidarity

9

June 24th : Cambridge
against austerity

in solidarity

with

Greece

Cambridge Action website launched to bring together
left struggles in the city and university

Sept 25th : "Hands Off Addenbrooke's" rally against
cuts to the NHS and privatisation

Jan 21st: Teach- in: Resist the Rise of the Right ,
followed by fundra iser night in Clare Cellars

Oct 10th: #Refugees Welcome demonstration

Feb 9th : #LiberateMyDegree Week : a week of talks ,

Oct 18th: Solidarity Vigil in response
bombing against Kurdish activists

discussions and action questioning how power
shapes the way academic knowledge is created,

to Ankara

disseminated and (de)legitimised
Nov 4th: Cambridge goes to the National Demo for
Free Education and Living Grants

May: Critical Pakistan Research Cluster founded, with
a focus on decolonis ing research

Nov 14th: Demonstration for affordable homes in
Cambridge
ov 28th : Protest in Cambridge against the bombing
f Syria by the UK
Nov 30th : Protest
Cambridge Union

against

Israel i

apartheid

at

May 13th: Cambridge students join protest at Yarl 's
Wood detention centre
October 31st: Cambridge Rally for Decolonisation
Nov 16th: Decolon isation Assembly

Dec 1st: Students go to London for anti -bomb protest
outside parliament



Old Schools Occupation,March 2018

Campaign for a
Cambridge starts

Community

Space

in

Central

Protests against Jesus College 's owning of the Benin
Bronzes and calls for repatriation
First Decolonisation Assembly
Feb: CUSU LGBT + ·1 Don't Exisr Campaign started ,
calling for legal recognition of non-binary gender
identities in the UK

Feb-Mar: UCU Strike against pension cuts
Students rally and occupy
Senate House in support

Old Schools /

May: Occupation of Greenwich House (uni finance
and administration buildings) in support of Fossil Fuel
Divestment

April : Preventing Prevent / Students Not Suspects
group founded opposing the government 's Prevent
duty

July 21st: Antifascist counter-protest against march
for Tommy Robinson in Cambridge

June 30th: UCU Strike against de facto pay cuts ,
gender pay inequality and increasing casualisation of
academic jobs

July 30th : Solidar ity campaign organised for
Cambridge PhD student and political activist detained
by South Sudanese government

November 19th : Students attend
United for Education

Oct : Publication of the 'Disorientation Guide' by 12
Pints Press

national demo :

l
10

We are a climate justice group working

to make the Univ ersity

remove its £377 million investment in fossil fuels . This is known as
'divestment ', part of a global movement that has seen funds worth
over $6 trillion do the same so far. Divestment

CAMBRIDGE
ZEROCRBON
soc1m

strips fossil fuel

companies of their 'socia l lice nse' to operate , shifting public opinion

to make it a pariah industry & fostering policy change.

The Zero Carbon campaign has been organ ising for three years, in
which time we have exhausted the democratic routes to divestment.
We 've won votes in Regent House, the University's govern ing body,
passed unan imous motions in the Undergraduate

and Graduate

student unions, yet the University hasn't listened. We've gathered
thousands of signatures on petitions, had leading public intellectuals
and politicians speak out for Cambridge divestment, like John
McDonnell , Diane Abbott and Caroline Lucas , and appeared in
national press countless times , yet the University hasn't listened . In
the face of such disregard for democracy, we've taken radical direct
. act ion, occupying the University's

i ~"'
\t))

an entire week, chalkspraying
at the Oxford-Cambridge

biggest administrative

building for

the Senate House, dropping a banner

Boat Race, and continuously

engaging in

colourful, creative, performative , and disruptive protest.

/// V/__
The University has shown itself to be opaque, undemocratic, and unaccountable,
resisting mass pressure from staff, students, the public, politicians - even its own
Councillors. It is wedded to profit and big oil, and has been willing to use the most
base means of suppressing dissent, caving in to threat s from BP executive Bob
Dudley, and even using police force to quell protest.
~

~

. .,.....

.

We believe in climate justice as urgent, necessary action. Climate change
is an existent ial crisis which we 're swiftly running out of time to curb. The
.fossil fuel industry has ravaged the Global South for decades, and climate
; hange disproportionately affects people of colour . As such, Zero Carbon
is committed to racial just ice & decolonisation. Climate change ruins the
economic independence of women across the wo r ld, who have the
greatest burden of labour in natural disasters . As such, Zero Carbon is
committ ed to gender justice & equality. A just energy transition w ill
require a labour transition , and as such Zero Carbon is committed to
economic j ustice & workers' liberation. Fundamentally , we are committed
to democracy, and the idea that people shouldn't be controlled by
financial executives, but should be able to contro l their own lives and live
in dignity and freedom, in a world tha t is safe from climate crisis.

·v@

Whether you want to help us
research the University's financial
dealings, plan creative direct actions
or communicate our message in the
press and on social media - climate
change affects us all: It's our shared
future ; there's a role for everyone in
our movement!

n

11

DECOLONISATION
What is the problem de colonisation is trying to ta ckle?
Over the last five centuries , colonisation brought untold destruction and harm to people around the world, for
the benefit of a few. The institution of the university has been complicit In this: academia has had an intimate
relationship with the forces of military dom ination and economic exploitation . Academic knowledge has been used to
justify and legitimise the foundations of colonial dominat ion, and itself relied in part on the colonial system to operate.
Academia reinforced the colonisation of people's minds, claiming knowledge from the coloniser as superior
and pushing the colonised to believe in their supposed Inferiority. Slaveholders funded departments and wrote
political philosophies of 'freedom'. Anthropologists justified racism and taught colonial administrators how to control
colon ised peoples . The histories of black, indigenous, and other people of colour were erased, rewritten, distorted,
and ignored - which was then used to justify violence against 'uncivilised' people with 'no history'. Medicine and
evolutionary theories were twisted into eugenics, duly put into practice in committing genocide against 'undesirable'
populations. Engineers tum scientific technologies into weapons used to subdue and kill people across the world.
How does this relate to what's happening in the university today?
Cambridge University, specifically, has been at the heart of the British colonial enterprise for centuries and
continues to foster these same dynamics of power and exploitat ion across the university. It has active and extensive
research collaborations and investments with arms manufacturers and fossil fuel companies that harm people,
especially across Africa, Asia and Latin America . We often teach, all too uncritically, a curriculum centering the work
of eurocentric , white , male authors. Our curricula assume - or assert - that eurocentric analyses hold true across the
world. They neglect significant bodies of work which engage critically with these thinkers, particularly produced by
people of colour, those who are indigenous, queer, part of a diaspora. For too many marginalised students, academia
is often a hostile environment , whether because they are denied the opportunity to examine their own experiences, or
because even getting here involves being treated as a suspect through visa conditions, border polic ing, or Prevent
legislation.

·s no\,

· at\Of' I

nowe"er ,

oeco\on1s
,.
. •
reducible to 'diversity' or ,nclus1on .

---

What does decolonisation involve?
At a minimum, decolonisation involves a critical reflection on
what counts as knowledge, who produces it, how it is produced,
and what we use it for. The decolonisation movement aims to
identify, critique, and dismantle the ways in which the university,
historically and presently, enables colonial forms of domination. It
involves hiring academics who deal with these questions; promoting
research opportunities and funding for those that want to pursue
decolonial knowledge; ensuring such research reaches lectures and
seminars, and further into the public sphere. Decolonisation involves
asking what the role ls of the university in society, shaped as it is by
histories of colonialism, and acting towards a future liberated from
this oppression and exploitation.

How can yo u get invo lved?
Practically, you might try some of the following :
Provide/look for alternative reading lists to decenter & critique eurocentric themes & thinkers,
Demand supervis ion and supervisors on subjects that your department refuses to teach,
Ask how our knowledge is entangled in histories of colonisation, migration, and globalisation. Try starting
local : how were Cambridge graduates involved in the transatlantic slave trade? What was Churchill's role in
the Bengal Famine (and what do we commemorate with a college named after him)? What artwork and
artifacts do we have and why (e.g. the Benin Bronze in Jesus College)? What are the assumptions behind
what we're taught? Who profits from our work? Where do we look for work after we graduate?
Work with others to look for ways to dismantle the neocolonial links between university research, the state,
and industries responsible for the arms trade, climate change, natural resource extraction, and global
impoverishment.
• Learn from and share effective tactics with activists through the Decolonise Cambridge Network (see
overleaf), and more widely through Initiatives like Why Is My Curriculum White? at UCL, Decolonising our
Minds at SOAS, and Rhodes Must Fall in Oxford , and collaborating with university-based and wider
movements for decolonisation beyond Britain; in South Africa, Canada, the United States, Australia, the
Netherlands, Bolivia and more.







••

'B&lt. ...
I ~CAD IT
IN. T11E

lEL!

HEUNtVtRSITY
is the


MA_£R

• -

A

..

r

CAMBRIDGEDECOLONISATION
~===::::::::::::--, , NETWORK.r_;,
,__We are a collective dedicated to supporting and coordinating various decolonising efforts
under one campaign . The collective arose out of d ialogue between the CUSU BME Campaign
and activists organising around causes ranging from decolonising the curriculum (through
Working Groups within faculties and departments) to decolonising university structures
(e.g . the campaign for the University to end partnerships with the arms trade).
What emerged from this dialogue was the need for a coordinated effort. There's a lot of
interest and momentum, but little agreement or clarity on what decolonisation means , or
looks like. A coordinated effort can try to define a collective vision . There's also uneven level
of engagement among the student body with decolonisation . Much of the work has so far
been concentrated in a handful of faculties and departments, whilst in others student
organisers struggle to gain enough active support to get a Working Group up and running .
We're split into three organising groups. PUBLICITY is working on bringing in new student
organisers to the movement, voicing a coherent and unifying manifesto , and ensuring all
organisers are aware of the various meetings that occur. LIAISON will be working with the
various Working Groups and other activist groups to make sure resources are being shared,
whilst INSTITUTI ONAL MEMORY will be creating a platform in which these are stored to
ensure future organisers have access to what has already been done . While we're
committed to a horizontal political structure, we chose to adopt the organising strategy of
breaking up into smaller groups in order to keep track of tasks being completed , hold
organisers accountable, and ensure that the burden of labour is shared by everyone .
The Assembly is the space where the various groups gather to share the ir experiences and
knowledge of best practices, and set plans and targets for the year ahead . It 's the body to
which we're all accountable, where decisions are made on behalf of the broader movement
as a whole, and actions delegated . There is a power of veto reserved for students of colour ,
to ensure that their voices are at the forefront of our activism.
Our movement needs you. If you share in our vision of a liberated university , find us on
Facebook for information on how you can get involved, or message us!







""
PREVENTING
I









PREVENT AT CAMBRIDGE

What is Prevent?
• Prevent is a legal duty, part of the Conservative government's counter-terror
strategy, placed on public institutions (Including this University) to monitor
individuals' behaviour and political speech for signs of 'radicalisation' or
'extremism'.
• As part of Prevent Cambridge'slecturersand admln staff have been
trained to considermainstreampoUtlcalpositionssuchas opposi
Britishforeign policy and support for the right of the Palestinianp
self-determinationas potentially"extreme", and to "risk assessand
monitor" events where they are expressed.

What's wrong with it?


/)\ Threatens fundamental human rights , including those to
~freedom
of expression and freedom from discrimination

(2)Targets,

profiles and surveils Muslims

(2) 1mperils academic freedom

''




Government... measures[have}negativelyimpacted the exerciseof the rights ----· ,.,;;.-tc
to freedom of association and freedom of peacefulassembly,and in general

• ••
are resultingin the closingofspace forcivilsociety ,,
- UNITED NATIONS {UN) SPECIALRAPPORTEUR,2016


OF MUSLIM STUDENTS NEGATIVELY
IMPA .CTED BY PREVENT. ..

''

OF THESE STUDENTS FEEL UNABLE
TO EXPRESS THEIR VIEWS BECAUSE
OF PREVENT (NUS SURVEY , 2018)

We areIndeed bound by the Prevent duty but that doesn't stop us from
arguing vociferously that the Preventduty IsInconsistentwith free
speech ''
. GRAHAMVIRGO, CAMBRIDGEUNI PRO-VICECHANCELLOR
(MAY2018 )

PreventingPrevent at Cambridgeis a broad-based coalition of academicsand
student campaign groups working to oppose the implementationof the duty at
Cambridge and protect our democratic rights. Get involved!

CJfacebook.com/PreventingPrevent
~

~R/:.)~~~...,,.._~rEllnnf\



14

CAMBRIDGEUNIVERSITYPALESTINE
SOCIETY
We are a student led group campaigning in solidarity with & raising awareness of the
Palestinian struggle for freedom. In the past year we have hosted discussions with figu
such as BOSco-f ounder Omar Barghouti, Israeli historian flan Pappe, and the rapper
Lowkey. Most recently, we organi sed an emergency demonstration of over 200 against
Israel's massacre in Gaza, and coordinated a statement calling on the University to end
partner ship with companies complicit in Israeli and Turkish war crimes .

>'EAR

AND

Palestine: colonial past, colonialpresent
After thirty years of British colonial rule, Israel was founded in 1948 on the systematic
ethnic cleansing of over half of Palestine's indigenous population . Today, around ¼ of
Palestinians live under military occupation in the West Sank & Gaza, where Palestinian
villages continue to be destroyed ; a smaller number reside inside Israel as second-class
citizens, subJect to racial discrimination by over SOlaws; and over half of Palestinians live
outside Palestine as refugees. Israel's Law of Return allows Jewish people anywhere in the
world to settle in histo(ic Palestine whilst denying this right to indigenous Palestinians, for
no reason other than their ethnic origin .

/\f\/VV\/\f\../\..1
'\'
@ mai\.com
L... cambridgepa\soc g
I'.._
1V

,--.i

@ C.\l
I

facebo k
o .com/pa/cambridge

Solidarity: why campaign for Palestine?
The 'in t ernational commun ity' has failed for decades to hold Israel to account, and the
support of Western states and corporations is instrumenta l to the continuation of its
regime of oppression· th is Includes our university, which main tains active links with
Israeli arms manufacturers. The European gaze tends to cast colonised peoples either as
threats or passive victlms , but the Palestinian people have a rich history of anti-colonial
struggle; they are agents or their O\vn liberation, and we must stand proudly in solidarity
with them if decolonisation is to mean anything on university campuses.



15

I<.IJl<./J
If H
~O I.I bAR.ITY

Cambridge Kurdistan Solidarity (CKS) is a c.ollective of peo~le,
b
d ·n or around of Cambridge, committed to supporting
p:i:res~ive, democrat ic and humanitarian struggles .i~ Kurdistan ..It
· s t raise awareness through grassroots pohllcal action 1n
aim o
.d
U .
·t K d" h
Cambridge . CKS works closely with Cambn ge n1vers1y ur 1s
Society (CUKurdSoc).

Kurds are a native people of the Middle East region with a population exceeding 40 million.
They have historically mainly inhabited the mountainous regions of Mesopotam ia. Kurdistan
Was divided into four parts after World War I and the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with
the infamous British-French Sykes-Picot agreement, which marked the birth of nation-states
in that region. The four regions are currently occupied by Turkey , Iran, Iraq, and Syria. Over
lhe last century , countless Kurdish rebellions and popular uprisings have been crushed by
these states with the help of global and regional powers. During that period , the Kurds have
been subjected to numerous genocides , ethnic cleansing campaigns, forced assimilation
and displacements. Recently, in 2014, the peaceful Kurdish Yazidi community of Southern
Kurdistan (Iraqi-occupied Kurdistan) were subjected to a brutal genocide campalgn by the
so-called Islamic State, where thousands were massacred and forced to flee. Thousands of
young girls were kidnapped and forced into sex slavery, whilst the whole world watched idly
and unsympathetically. The fate of most of these girls are still unknown. Most recently in
Ja~uary 2018, Turkish-backed mercenaries illegally attacked and invaded the Afrin canton of
RoJava (Syrian-occupied Kurdistan), which had been the most stable part of Syria,
untouched and protected by the local majority Kurdish community, from the civil war
ravaging Syria .

Our aim is to express our solidarity not only in words , but also In practi_ce. Bey~nd Just
spreading Information on the situation in Kurdistan, _we als~ promote dtrect ~~tto~ a~d
political intervention . our campaign methods include 1nformattonal events, part1c1pation1n
protests or peaceful direct action.

16

Find us on Facebook and other social media! We'// be sharing information on
there about our events, including ming/es and pane/ discussions.

.....

17

FUSE is a network and forum for queer students of colour . It was set up as a safe
space by queer students of colour who found the experience of navigating the white
homonormativity of wider queer spaces here to be quite isolating , and wanted to
create a sense of community in order to tackle this. Like FLY,we run a public page on
Facebook where we share news stories and events , in addition to a secret group
where people can freely share their experiences and ask for advice .

fo.eebook. c:om /
fvse.c°'™l,,-idge.
We are a fairly new group but are quickly expanding and have a lot of exciting stuff
plannedfor the year ahead (e.g. film screenings, mingle events,pre-drinks, welfare
drop-in sessions),so do give our page a like!And if you wouldlike to be addedto the
secret group,please messageour publicpage.

Facebook: FLY Cambridg e
Twitter : @CambridgeFLY

"Caring for
myself ,s not self-indulgence,
it is
self- preservation, and that is an act of political warfare." Audre Lorde
Sometimes Cambridge can f eel like a space for an exclusive
group of people, but with the existence of FLY, we want to
reclaim this university as our own. FLY means Freedom .
Love. You. It is a network and forum for women and
non - binary people of colour at the University of Cambridge.
By people of co lour, we mean BAME peop le (those of African,
Caribbean, Middle-Eastern and Asian ancestry). Th is space
meets wee kly, whe re you can be free from judgement and
the questioning of your experiences.
Email: flygirls ofcamb ridge@gma il.com

This new academic year you can look forward to a number of
Facilitator:
events, including special for ums on non-bi nary ident ity, mixed-race
Rashidat
identity as wel l as a collabo ratio n event with FUSE and the
Anim ashaun,
Women's Campaign, off ering an introduction to int ersectiona lity.
We launch a zine each year and have an online blog, ras 26 @cam.ac.uk
flygir lsofcambridge.com. offering a platform specifically for women
and non-binary peop le of colour to try the ir hand at writing and..M.
other creative art forms.
~-~
Women and non-binary people of colour often exper ience the devaluat ion of our histories, ideas and
sometimes existence due to the historic and disproportionate privileging of rich, whi t e and male
narratives above all others in this institution. In order t o combat this, we, as a space, offer a chance to
discuss ou r experiences, ask for advice. draw strength from each other, and widen our friendships
and networks beyond our colleges. A huge networ k of inspirational women and non-binary alum ni
came before us. and our growing campaign presence through Decolon ise and other projects , ensures
t hat we craft an institution for future female and nb students of colour to flour ish long after us.

18

"Some activist spaces you f eel policed and that you're not ideologically pure enough and don't do enough
and a space where you feel like you can learn and make mistakes is incredibly valuable." ~
- Sian Cree/y, Women's Campaign committee 2017-8

This university isn't just an Old Boys Club, it pretty
much invented them. This institution

was not de-

signed for women, especially not women of colour,
trans women, non-binary people, poor women, disabled women, queer women, mentally il l women, and
anyone else who does not closely resemble the kind
of person you will see in portraits in college halls.

The Women's Campaign has campaigned for compulsory consent w orkshops, organises the annua l Reclaim the Night march, raises funds for important
feminist causes, such as sending people back to Ireland to vote in the Repeal the 8th referendum, and
keeps pressure on the university to change its atti-

These differences make us stronger in calling for radi-

tude to systemic sexual misconduct . Through forums

cal change to the university. The Women's Campaign

and events, we provide a community of women and

is t he autonomous organisation of women and non-

non-binary people who offer each other solidarity

binary people in the university . It was set up in 1970s

and support in fighting for liberation both inside and

with a consciousness raising group, a reading group

outside of the university.

of feminist theory and a weekly meeting to plan campaigns. In 1993, a paid sabbatical women's officer
was created following the resignation of the student
officers over unpaid labour. The Women's Officer
runs the Women's Campaign as one of the six sabbatical officers at Cambridge University Students' Union (CUSU), but their mandate comes from the women and non-binary people at the university rather
than cent ralised policy.

through consensus-based decision making. It happens every Thursday in full term for all undergraduate and graduate women and non-binary peop le. This
includes all self-identify ing women and non-binary
people, anyone whose gender identity includes woman and those who feel they experience misogyny. We
are trans-inclus ive and anti-racist. Alongside forum,
the Women's Campaign runs skill-sharing and conthe year, cu-

rates a t ermly zine called Gender Agenda, and politi -

-:-a\\'/organises for changes to the institution.

r1LJ~

our start of term social in October and forum every
Thursday. You can attend as many or as few meetings
as you feel able to . The Women's Officer for this year
is Claire Sosienski Smith: follow her on @CUSUWO,
email her at w omens @cusu.cam .ac.uk, and like the
CUSUWomcam Facebook page for updates.
With love and solidarity,

Forum is where we shape the Women's Campaign

sciousness-raising events throughout

If you are a woman or non -binary person, come to

The Women's Campaign

01223
245888-H
ELP
LI
__.....

19

Cambr idge Rape Crisis Centre

·

na igO
fit can'\ion·Pro
Run
r:
t,,'tC
) is an
t t1tinds .
C,OM
d cambrid9~ lS \. cnarit'J stud~nr 11\enta\. nea\th
~ en t t1t1n s . h nat1ona . tor bet e
d co\.\eges
\...."'---'-J'--"-/'-._J'-.....-"',,,
stud
affi\.iated wit we campaign
niversit'J an e we run
groUP
tud ent s.
e on the u
a\. cnan9 .
entire\'Jt : )'"sputtin9 pre s :~;re and createy::r to p\.atforr: ndin9
ppor
J
dent we
h ut the
a s urro
:~ pr\oritise !:.tu paigns tnroU9 Kodown th e sti9 : advice abou t
ware ness cam nd nelP brea .-ntormation an nere to find
a d nt voices a
\,so snare ,
iversitY , w
stu e
a\\h . we a
ea\th at un
mental h e
ur menta\. h
There are so
managin9 yo ore .
many ways to get
involved , from
P ort . and"'
suP
stu dent w riting
CAMPAIGNING
to Liking o ur
page for updates
'.'\?
- join our
<e,.~ ,___
community
no w!

. 11•11d.run'f
oc+Co.M

,-j

5

.

<e,.'1





20

Cambridge can be a hostile and uncomfortable place for queer students. It can also be a place for
immense personal growth, solidarity with fellow queers and a force for positive change in the world.
This institution was not made for LGBT+ people, but as a campaign, we work consistently to carve
out space for queers in Cambridge, and have some fun while we're at it.
As one of cusu·s autonomous campaigns, CUSULGBT+ provides support, welfare and advocacy
for students, informs the student/staff population about LGBT+ issues, and works to effect positive
change. We aim to representCambridge'sLGBT+ community in all its diversity,with representative
officers for a vast array of members of our community, who make sure our programme of events
caters to everyone, and whom you can approach for specific support.

c____
usu
+

WhyGenderNeutral?
Last term, CUSULGBT+ launched the Why
Gender-Neutral?campaign, which aims to
make space for non-binarypeople within the
university. The campaign advocates some
simple policies to accommodate gender
diversity within university administration and
services, in the provision of gender-neutral
bathrooms, admin services and dress codes.

-~I
LG-8TCUSU
? i ir ~

~

We'vepublished guides on the
implementation of these policies, which are
available on our website and we're in direct
contact with university staff and decision·
makers to push fo r change. But you can help
too! You can visit our campaign page at
facebook.com/WhyGenderNeutral and attend
next term's discussion groups to learn more

or contribute your ideas, ask your JCR or
MCRto get involved, and fill out the Gender
Recognition Act consultation before the
October 19th deadline, and request legal
recognition of non-binary identities - you can
find guidance for filling out the consultation
on our campaign page.

QueerMinds
This year we're collaborating with Student
Minds to improve services for LGBT+ welfare
in the university. We'll be campaigning for
better training In LGBT+ Issues among college
nurses and counsellors,writing best-practice
guidance based on student experiences,
raising awareness about what services are
already available, and tr ialling some studentled support for LGBT+ individuals.

Check out wh_atevents are on in our two Facebook groups (one public, one secret). come to our
first _o_pen '.'"eet1ng
on October 20th. We also have a magazine, Get Real, which puts out regular print
ed1t1onsif yo~ want to give your queer creative energy an outlet. We look forward to meeting you
and welcoming you to our community, doing our best to make each day in this uni gay as heck.

21

CARE WORK IS

.,

ACTIVIST WORK

Activist spaces are not immune to the same raci$t, sex ist, {dls)ableist structures that
exist in our communities. We must constantly challenge our ideas about how we
value labour w ithin movements and who we expect to do this labour.
Do you ...





favour speakers in meetings who say things assertively rather than with
Ai
substance?
)(
assume women and non-binary people know less than you do?
refuse to engage with any theory or practice from people who are not w~ite?
wr ite off criticism as being about identity politics and/or as a distraction?

If th is sounds like your movement , then the same oppressions we come to act ivism
ir, order to escape are being reproduced by people within those spaces.
Imagining the poss ibility of a radically different society begins with our act ions . Build
in time for self and community reflection , educate yourself on caring work , femini st
anti-racist theory , and volunteer for administrative labour which is not just "photoopportunity ~ activism .
Changing our assumpt ions of who does what kinds of work does not stop at askipg
more men or white people to volunteer for taking minutes. We must reconstruct our
ideas of value and importance in political spaces to include the forms of work which
have traditionally fallen on women and non-binary people , espec ially wo men and
non-binary people of colour.
Labour that prioritises emotional and physical wellbeing are the tools of
transformative justice work which enable us to take up space and organise. We must
acknowledge that our successes are built on the caring work of certain people within
our movements , making sure that those people who choose to perform this work feel
appreciated for their efforts.
main organising

r· ·
tside of your
Jra ctical 1ps.
ts discussions ou
• try to attend other rallies , even '
's load and share the burden
oup
r hten other people .
gr what can be done to ,g
s much as possible
elating topics
: ~~~aborate with other;~~~:foaeducate thems~\~esa~~o:~~p\e ne~d to l~o~
• encourage group m~trugg\es are interconn~~ ~ into organising ,n the rs
• emphasise that ourfactivist spaces that got e
beyond the group s
place

pport
them SU
and otter
ot using
·n your group h t you are n
members ,
d ensure \ a
urse\f to new
you can an .
.
essib\e
• intr?duce
carin9 worK wh~~t iona\ offioad~ngs in wnee\cna1r-a:c~pations
• rec1proca o\e\y for your e 'b\e: no\d meet1n9dnuie\ times to o
meone s
ccess1
• gs an ..,
.•
• :aKe you'ut~t~~i:'e:Ks to \o~~::~~~~eeds
t~ i~i:~tivist spaces
venues _.b h t people ha"e
meth1ng to \ea
• recognise ~ ~hatwe a\\ nave so
• understan

{eo

a~~

22

(Or1t1UWITY~

RAbl CAL
SELF-

The idea of self-care as "political
warfareff (Audre Lorde} is routinely
decontextualised and bastardised
by capitalism {for profit} and by
liberalism {to shift the responsibility
for care away from the structural
and towards the individual }.

ACTIYI~

POLITICAL:---..I

~
are , in traditions of Black feminism especia lly, is about a radical coming-together to
_,, ' provide what society and the state withholds from us as marginalised people - healthcare ,
nourishment , welfare, community , compassion . "Self ' care is always at least partly
·
co llective; our needs may differ , but none of us is genuinely 'independent'. Fostering
communities of mutual, collective care is part of what makes society (and th is university)
surv ivable , and what keeps our organ ising sustainable . More than this - it's about learning
and developing practices together that reflect the values of what we're fighting for. We
have to build the world we want to live in wherever we can, on whatever scale is possible.
I 'm notarobot


~NOT.

~

,f

ABOVT

.,, APOLl ii

...

,. so1-1£
TH'

I}f.(>£,,.Jt) fN CE..•

* HoNoutt,N~

'ioufl. OWN

1t UNO£UTAND\N
&- "
JrANt>l N & IN SOLi bAt.l"T'I

Wll1-i EACH OTHE. /U '
€,x()t.(l, ENCf.S of

\>~,~ ,..~~ s

A LI.SAnol'\J



'-' A

9

fl€8,00NS1~1L1TY

SHOULi)

£N GA~l~&

COMfASo'1CN Fol- ,MP£(l F€CTION1 INC.t-\Jt>IN& 'foutr.

0
;:~

~,~
,.~
\,f ,,

TAG-.

,

,.t-E-

TI-IA-T

gE. FALLIN{;.

b,s pfl0P ol!.T1of\JAT£LY

·

W 1TH FELLOW
OlGAN1SE.fJ..SIN Goot>
FAITH .

AT/ ~t.

NA~cT,o£D
• co~PoAArE,
NtiOL, iSe.tl..AL 8ou_S M1T.

UPON

*

o'-'E~ '-o

t INt>,v , b u A L \ oE C) ,

~ OTH£.e..S' NfE.()S.

i-

.,

"'1.- "TH
CAUl-. le.S A P/llCt_

A~ 12.Al>ICA
L 1NT£.R.-

MA~lN

CAL .

• A LUXVIZ-Y.
,'LA[)\CJ>,L.AUTONO~'t

..

THOSE. OF W HOM

IT 1S T(tA.t'>\ilONALLY M~,
D

Q

ExPECTe...D
( PAeT1c.u<.ARl.Y
WOMeN &. PfOPU.
Col.OUR.) .

OF'

\

·

~

23

1

1v\)~\\\.\~'\
- -This university was not
---

,

,

built for us - literally (count the lifts).
figuratively (count the hours they expect
you to be working every week). You're not
alone or wrong or broken. What disables
us is a university without built- in flexib ility;
without
universal
step-free
access;
without inclusive teac hing formats. What
disables us is "a three -ho ur written exam
is the only way to assess stu dent
attainment." What disables us is "have
this in my pidge at the faculty by 9am on
monday morning."

l)l~A8L£D
STU
I) ENT
g1
e, AMP A I Q-N

4M*J*
DJf1B[{
OJ

If you're asking
yourself the question, then

Campaign was founded in 2010 and
rebooted in 2015. In February 20 16 we
forced a referendum that broke the record
of student voting numbers and secured us
a paid, full-time CUSU officer. There's a
committee of campaign officers elected in
Easter every year. We have Forum twice a
t erm , where we chat, vent, make
decisions, report, consult, eat a lot of
biscuits. We run a bunch of fab events.
We make a zine at least once a year. Th is
'we' is an open one. If you're disabled and
you're a student, congrats, you're one of
us (and if not,
,, there's lots on that's open to
non -disabled people, so come along!).

_ •

issues

yes, probably. Mental health
count. ADHD, dyslexia, and dyspraxia
count. Chronic illnesses count. PCOS
counts. Sleep issues, like narcolepsy, I
count. Eating disorders count. IBS counts.
Anxiety
counts . Depression counts.
~uti~m counts . Visual, hearing, mobility
1mpa1rments count. ft all counts, if you
want
it to. (Self-quest ioning
and
self-diagnosis is valid as h*ck.) Come join
the party, we've got comfy sofas and
snacks.

4"

,}
I

~•

~\\\\i ...
\~

" ,,, *
*
*
*
*
*

_.

DSC Forum
Defiant Lives screening

Reasonable Adjustments survey

facebook.com /

CUSUdisab ledstudents

Emrys (facebook .com/ cusudisabled)

Intermission social groups

Welfare is Political event series

Disabled Students' Officers' training

)..,

4

disabfed@cusu
~ <}
.cam.ac.uk

Focus group: disability in activism

24

::::::::::::::====::;::::::===============================

CAMBRIDGE
STUDENT
COMMUNITY
ACTION

--=-....:-----_---_-__ ______________

__

____

_ ________

__J

'----i

We connect students with local volunteering projects in Cambridge, including mentoring
vulnerable children , helping teach children who are having difficulty with their academic
work, and supporting vulnerable adults in the community with their daily routine.
If you ,vould like to start volunteering, or to have a chat about which of our projects might be
for you. pop into our office at 17Mill Lane.
facebook .co m/ca mbridgesca
www.cambridgesca.org.uk
-<

'-•



y




~%'*

~

•t
;t
lf,
1'-i)

,

,;

[If

••
• • •••••
••• •

-

. a \ot of wor g e feel
'tini Ist there , s to cambridge. w t- et students
. done for pos
neIP g
ough is beIng
experience,
that n~t enccess and stu~ent educationaI
admissiona . I economicor
/
whereour soci_aht disadvantageus.
bac\t.grounds
m1g

r:::--:.:_
__

/

Wor.kin
gc1t:>~

St atec
~s
Low 112ol'llp
Caz·e L collle
F'irstG ealrers

e11erat·
Sstr,
2012
a12ged

/

[::=:1>

0

It. oing on to

Set up in 2017 Cl
represent stud~ntsass A?t aims to
one or more of th who 'dent i fy with
e fol lowing:

I

'•

1
+-'

{J

0

tlJ
Cl)
Cl)

g,
tlJ

-

CLASSACT

.

i
...

@

Q)

l>O

Our campaignis developinga networkand
safety net of support for identifying
students. providing a space for us to
freely talk about our experiences among
others who understand. Wewant to ensure
students don' t feel isolated or alienated
in a university that was never meantfor
those outside of the elite in society. We
believe we should stand tal I. celebrate '
and be proud of each of the individual '
routes we have taken and chaI lenges we
have overcometo get here.

"C

~

1

!

0

+-'

:::,

0
tlJ

~

0

0

~-...

I

_.--..._

/

/

Last year we began to develop and unite a
c011TI1unity
of students from across the
university, froma buddy scheme~atching
freshers to older students, to social
events and discussions. culminating in a
dinner with over 100 students from almost
every co11ege!
Overthis next year wewi I I continue to
makethis university our space, openingup
conversation around issues of class. and
growingour networkof students to provide
a supportive corrmunity
.

5

tlJ

-r-.-/~

I

Cl)

Cl)
Cl)

\

'\.

--

..:.::
0
0

..0

Q)

0

tlJ
.....

If you identify with any of the strands of
Class Act. comeand meet the conmittee at
the first social of term in October! We
welcomestudents of any level of study,
staff. UK.EUand international students
from across the University,

Marketisation is the process by which the logic
of markets is imposed on an organisation . In
higher education , this has meant a concerted
attempt by successive government& to turn
universities, which were previously (for all their
flaws)
public
institutions ,
into
private
corporations competing to provide a product.
The marketised university competes to provide a
product (degrees and other qualificat ions) to its
customers (students) .

The marketisation drive is 1
b_
y changes to universities ' rg~(Y pushed along
since the lntroductio
f un ing model. Ever
0 th
(capped at £1000 w·t~
e first tuition fees
in 1998) the propo~ionmifa7s-:sted exceptions
that comes from ov
un ng for teaching
the amount that ; . ern_
"_lent has declined, and
fees has gone up ~~~si:,e: depend on student
2010, when the . . . s ar est change came in
to £9000 and coaf;tion government tripled fees
teaching 11ramati:a~ly ~~~e~~ent funding for
and social science '
e arts, humanities
• direct public supporir~~rams completely without
from students (und~
e n~ed to extract money
~PPed ) is also ;e~i~~gime where _fees are
increases of the I t & the massive rent
.
.
as ,ew years
d
1ncreas1ngly lucrative
. , an
the
accommodation.
market in student

f

To keep their funding, universities now n_eed to
attract students who are willing to pay their fees,
and who see their education as delivering 'value
for money'. To do this they must create
marketing departments with large budgets,
focus increasingly on graduate careers and
earnings , and build shiny glass buildin~to gr~ce
the covers of prospectuses. (Speculat!ve cap!tal
expenditure is easier now that pubhc_ fu~d1ng
has been replaced by fee income, which 1s an
asset you can borrow against} . Those that
succeed will expand, perhaps take over oth_er
institutions, and branch out with satelhte
campuses elsewhere in the UK and overseas .
Others that do less well in the market will have
to cut costs and downs ize; some will even go
bust. This 'market exit' is to be seen as evid~nce
that
the
system
is
working ,
since
underperformers are being weeded out and
replaced by more efficient providers (the impact
on local areas or current students left aside).

r - -r;
11!
~

I

-

-

-

he:::

:.;is Tihe Porter's log ~''1

For
b
most acade i
ecome targets Wh':'cs, these metr·
wo:k and damage :ih dominate their i~! have
t~ehver.Working condi: teaching they're a~iday
re e board too, Withsta ons_have suffered acre to
. Peated attempts t Qnat1ngpay for a d
oss
;ncreasing casua/isaf o slash Pension ecade,
r----.....2~/ he biggest unive,:~~ for ~cademics ,!ad~nd
8 Non-acad . , es stnke in d
ing
~universities
em,c staff have
ecades in
-~
caterln
outso_
urce cleanin suffer,ed too, as
-'-Cl..,.
externa~• and administrative
9, maintenance
. - - corporations.
Work to cost-cutting'

,__

-

,-

-

-

OOPeretorts that
te,~ug M..i, 16 - L....- . - answe, is in a pamph/ t ~tJmed howto tocld
•- _
e ava,/ab/eat H ff.
e marketisat;
e etsforon/y£11.99 i:; andthathis
- _ _
OOpeAss~b
I

"!':fl"

---? /3

All this affects how we se; educatio~ too. I~
leads staff and students alike into an
understanding of education
that is a
commodified, skin-deep approximation of what it
could and should be. The only things that matter
about teaching or learning to the higher
education market are those things that can be
measured, whether on a balance sheet or on a
league
table.
The
transformative
and
unquantifiable role of education (and all its
radical potential) is of no interest to the
managers of the post-2010 university . Instead
what matters is 'student satisfaction ' - as in,
"would you spend money here again?". The
Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), through
which the market regulator , the Office for
Students ,
officially
grades
universities'
undergraduate teaching , is based mostly on
metrics with no reiation to teaching .

..

l

- -- - ,,_, '
......

f

CONTb
- :>

26

► CONTlNUtb.


Cambridge University is in many ways protected
from the most
obvious symptoms of this
national picture: the feudalism of our \no ·
governance structures is still strong enough to
fend off some
neoliberal onslaught. The
university's long-held wealth and sturdier
reputation
reduces the
pressure that
government policies can place on it, and the , .
collegiate structure slows the spread of financial
power through the capillaries of the institution.
Marketisation in Cambridge happens more
subtly, hidden behind the face of tradition, but it
happens all the same. We still have sky-high
debts and a mental health crisis, while some
colleges charge extortionate rents to students
who can barely afford to study here. Our
university still places its financial gain above its
ethical obligations, and we're more closely tied
up with corporations for research and fundingti
than most.
- ..

'
• Q

\\. A

/

,.,.s,ua"a M8N
a,sod aQ \\\ oa6t>\lQUleo
00

,.._.uo\\oe a\.\\ 8 as 0.1.

- - ,n
Most of all ca b ·
response t~ ma~ ~~dg~ demonstrates that the
back to an ima r. e isa ,on must not be to hark
funded unfve .~nai golden ~ge of the stateQublic and u~~, · . _he oppos,t~ of envate is
have ~ever re ,~er~it,es (Ca~bndge especially)
has been exci8
eenciubllc _at all. Cambridge
of its walls (ph~s'_ng
Ian I harm,~g those outside
figurative financi ,~a w~ Is, onhn_e paywalls and
long time and
b;rne~s all included) for a
obscure that To' s c ang,ng n~tur7 should not
demand the· 0 o~pose markehsa!lon, we must
should deman~e~ing-up ~f the university. We
access and fr
emocr~tic governance, open
demand that thee e_duc~hon. fo'. all. We should
st
resources ande un,v~_rs,ty d~ nbutes its wealth,
benefit of every pre~~ge widely ~nd for the
is
•c
one. e t":'e opposite of private
d' f>Y9'
~.,,f9 )IJ~ !!)Je opposite of marketisation is
erocraf isat,on.- -

--

-



•i\\l ~

-1~l 0

""i

J
-t

I

~ \:: \ ~~~~~,~,:..:..~--

--_;•--•





""AKE
A
HOWTO'!' .
IVED

Want to be featured on the front page of the Daily Mail with your kill
banner? Here are our tips on how to make a splash with your sign~r

4

-

,

-



Keep it short and pithy! Nobody wants to read a solilo quy on your sign.
Everybody loves a pun. Or a joke. Or a Star Wars reference. Keep it witty.
Don't make it too heavy. You have to carry this thing around with you all day.
This is not a bicep workout. Mak e your sign out of light cardboard or
Styrofoam, and use a light pole - an old broomstick always does the trick.
Keep it simple! Glitter look s great but a shiny sign is hard to read (and
environmentally cra p, unless your glitter's biodegradable). Use simple
contrasting colours. We recommend red and black.
Use big letters. And get your spacing right. You don't want lots of tiny words

I

__ ____.., 27
...,

I

'
t'

'
'

a

a

a

-

-

-

Want to go on a protest? Feeling a bit unsure about how? Foll~w
our Protest Basics to make your protesting fun, safe and effective.

GO! Don't let fear or laziness overwhelm you! Protest ing is exciting and
important . So step one is to just get off the sofa and GO!
DON'T bring knives or weapons - it's a recipe for more than you bargained for,
and if you're caught with them by the cops you're in big trouble.
DON'T bring ID. The pigs don 't need to know who you are.
Go with FRIENDS! Friends make protesting fun, and they keep you safe. If your
friends aren't keen , make sure someone at least knows you 're go ing .
Always bring WATER - all that shouting and sign-carrying is thirsty work . Cereal
bars and other non-bruisable food is a good idea too .
Plan a safe route home , and leave with others! You don 't want to bump into
some nasty fascists o n your way home.
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS - bring the bustcard on th is page with you!
Write an emergency contact number on your bod y. Phones get lost.
Don't get drunk or otherwise intoxicate d! At least not unt il after the protest.
Then feel free to get drunk . This is why you brought your friends.
Bring something (a scarf/mask) to cove r yo ur face. Big,brother is wat ching you.
Wear comfy shoes. Walk ing is hard work . Running away is hard work. Running

~ 11.-i!l!l"!l..-il!~!!!ll!!!'WI
•1[1111 f
l C}
Ir-·
& /3 &:"",, g ~ o
ll ll~C~v/J ol~',,-J-sfi-s&ifj1i-8~i1£§§~
.~~~'oJ
-.._I.,
(1'
<'
,s...,i:~1101:;~~
.. ;>.~"'.,'fi .. fi~"~v
'';r-/
~ I I
~
~ 2 a 'J2bo F:: i,., ~ 0 ::: ~ '5 !i p ~ ~ ~ ;:! t; lf-B'E f

away in hi h-heels is extra hard work .

'

oc::;:.(,'

,,/QI

Q ()

~P,

t I

U

I

'ff'
I

l,,\ r,

N

1 \

:,.'-

.,

...

(I)

.a
E
(I)
E

~

~

f

5-f 5i [J/>
\

~

CAMBRIDGE UNION
Many fasc1s1s 1nvrted to speak - and met
with protests. Oswald Mosely {1960),
Enoch Powell {1968), David Willets
(2011). Jacob Rees-Mogg (2018)

,,

Benin

brc

CNO graffiti opposite Sainsbury's

•_s:·JOH:.:!

"

••

TRINITY COLLEGE

If!
1916: Bertrand Russell dismissed for
opposition to IN'N1

War'

t - -;:::,I.

j

COLLEGE

Archive of letters and papers detailing
slave trade
,...
'f I

..-•

South,

I

\
\

\

...

SIDNEY S . TRAVEL A

1970s: former Abbott's Travel
occupied by students protestinc
Greece's military dictator;

'\
Jan Smuts g

THE GRAND ARCADE

THEFITZWfL
l

COLLEGE

1..Wiil
ronzes - 2016 campaign lo retum
nze cockerel stolen from Africa
frican War Memorial Plate - "Boer
= colonial war to expand empire

GENCJES
gency
links to
ip

I

J

5

, THE GRAFTON CENTRE

,,.~ - .

s ~---

~ HRIST's PIECES _,,

/ /~

Q, 1r--

______

~

. I

... 1111

----I

COLLEGEj

tt .,,,

rize W1nnerJagadish Bose ,
Natural Sciences in 1882

...

THE KITE
Gentrification; squatting 1980s

duated 1894; his portrait
bust are here

'

M MUSEUM

I

f

DECOLONISE CAMBRIDGE TOUR

I

I

.,
'
' .,

'

30

The so-called 'democratic ' governance
system of the University of Cambridge is
broken. Political events of the past year
reveal that the University is under the
influence of a tiny minority of financial
bureaucrats
and
any
pretence
of
democracy has been lost.
Our university sacrifices the views and
values of its members in favour of profit.
Continuing to invest in the fossil fuels industry;
cutting pensions; clinging to links with the
arms trade; maintaining insecure, underpaid
staff jobs; perpetuating structu ral racism;
building sprawli ng urban developments for



These are not the actions of a democratic
university. They are the result of profit-hungry
decisions made by a small handful of
unelected , unaccountable financiers , who
hide behind endless committee procedu res
and earn more in a month than most uni
staff do in a year.

high rent in the city ...

OIS'ms5F~'
.

DlVESK

~

OtNOCRThe university has done all it can to suppress opposition. It has
BAILJfFS

overridden official democratic procedures , kept its own
councillors uninformed, ignored student and staff concerns
and even gone so far as to use police v iolence to suppress
protest . The university knows that if it were to make
concessions towards genuine democracy, its unjust practices
would not be allowed to continue. So upper management veils

DRAGGING

our

5Tl1D00S

its greed in bureaucracy.

In this knowledge, the Cambridge Democracy Project was formed. This collaborative effort
between staff and student groups aims to target university governance from both inside and
outside, as part of the wider activist project towards a just and liberated university. The
decisions Cambridge University makes affect not only its members, but all of society. It has a
responsibility to local , national , and international communities. Let's hold it to account .

ore info,
eye out for_rn 1vedon
l(eeP an
to get invo ·nthe
.
nd ways
n rnore I . I
events, a k - and 1ear f this guide.
f aceboo . the rest o
tirne ,n
n
rnea

31
Cambridge
Defend Education organises
for a just university .
We recognise
tha t this inst i tution i s deep l y implicated
in structures
of
inequa l ity and oppression . We be l ieve in the necess ity and possib il ity of
a different
kind of university - an open, tr uly public institution
that is
structured
democratical
ly, and or i en t ed towards the we ll -being of both
i ts members and the rest of the world , and which provides space and
suppo rt for the articulation
of critical opposit i on to injustice.
We bel i eve in the terrific
capacity
for collective
action and imag i nation t hat {even ) the
(neol i beral) un ivers i ty prov i des , and we are determ i ned to bu i ld and fight for change.

Though our vision is broad , we focus on specific objectives ,
We will continue organ i sing opposit io n to the morketisotion
of h i gher educat i on - the
restructur i ng of univers it ies t o look increasi ngly l ike revenue - maximising
corporat i ons , rather
than educational
inst it utions provid i ng a public good. We work towards a well-funded
public
higher education
sector, wh i ch provides quality , debt-free
education
to al l who seek it. Th i s
also i nvolves the opposition
to the university ' s real estate expa nsi on pro j ects wh i ch in f late land
value while Cambr idge suf f e r s from a chron i c housing cr i sis.
We w i ll campa i gn i n a coa li tion aga i nst the racist, lslamophob i c PREVEN T pol icy and othe r
as pects of the racist secur it i sot i on of the university , such as the admin i stration functioning
as
surrogate
border guard by helping to create a 'hostile environment'
for staff and students.
In t he post yea r we have successful l y mob i l i sed around key issues, notably running picket
suppor t dur i ng the pensions strike , and organising
a success f ul occupat i on that forced the
univers it y to stop thre atening to deduct sta ff pay on non st rike days, as wel l as an
unprecedented
open meeting with the V i ce Chancellor .

..

CDE is an open and non - hierarchical
organisation.
Everyone is we lcome, and anyone involved in the work has an equal
say in decision - making processes . We try to eng a ge in con t inuous
reflec t ion and learning to see where powe r dynamics surface, and
how they con be addressed
- and more generally
how we con do
better as organisers.
We also t h ink tha t any res il i ent , hopefu l politics centres friendship,
c a re and joy.
Find i nfo about o ur week ly meetings o n our Focebook page, and
come to our f i rst mee ti ng on Sunday 7th Oct .,
4 .30pm ,
Chetwynd
Room , .
CZ!lll8
U,t
King 's College

0111CIAJ.
PIC
KET

Os
e

ou~

sr,,,,.
llSiryf

"r1,,,('~

lltviv~
..,

·

li/[)G

)EFENfl

Cambridge
The University and College Union (UCU) is
the largest trade union and professional association

-





for academic and academic-related staff working
in Further and Higher Education in the UK. We
have nearly 1800 members in Cambridge ,

-·------and almost 120,000 nationally .



..

.i

Our primary mission is to fight for and protect the rights of university staff. That means your
lecturers , tutors, librarians , IT officers, and perhap s even you! UCU membersh ip is free tor all
graduate students, internationa l or domestic, who work in Further and Higher Education. In
fact , one of our major concerns is to defend the rights of casually employed and precarious
workers • including graduate students.
Our belief is that Further and Higher Education should be free and accessible to all , regardless
of gender , race/ethnicity, sexuality , or ability . We believe that good working conditions - a
workplace free of discrimination , harassment , or intimidation , a liveable income, reasonable
work ing hours, provisions for carers and work ers with special needs, and decent pensions • are ,,,.
crucial for making our educational institutions places of learning that work towards a better
future for everyone involved; for our students , staff, for the local community, and also for our ,
institutions .
Even if this does not apply to you , or if you are hesitant to join , Cambridge UCU runs many
events and initiatives you can take part in. This past year alone we have co-hosted talks on the
,,.
marketisation of Higher Education (HE) ; run meetings to fight against the casualisation of
contracts: rallied against racism and xenophobia ; marched with student activ ists to protest the
University 's involvement in funding the fossil fuel industry.
We work hard to convince our employers of how important these things are . Often we succeed:
just a few months ago CUCU graduate members at the History Faculty won a victory ensuring
all graduate teaching in the faculty will be recognized as work and paid accordingly . Most of our

work . however , does not make headlines . We campaign aga inst the 'host ile environment' that
inte rnational staff and students face in
the UK through surveillance and other restrict ions ; we
work for the rights of EU/EEA citizens in the UK post-Brexit. Some of our most valuable work is
casework : supporting members with problems and disputes in their workplaces , colleges or
departments . This is a vital part of navigatin g the complex institutional and political environment
of HE, and key to supporting some of our more vulnerable members .

I

--

I

-----:.1
@Cambr ldgeUCU

\I

I

,,,,l

...t------ --------'~
facebook .com/cambridgeucu

\It

(

I

tinyurl.com/CUCU-Youtube

/

-

.,

..

___

Cambridge
University
& Colleges
Union
(CUCU)

33

f\(~A

,✓(f !-- ---:'
~:frt
- ---- -

--

...-,

- {!/J/ilJ,fii'

>t;;::>

LJ1

-----~
f.lfl

1@@l.SLAJ..l
~~

-

institutions. Our members are involved in a range of social, environmental , and political
campaigns locally and globally - there 's a good chance you know more than one union member
already. Rest assured that this means we need you, too!
I

'

-

admin@ucu.cam .ac.uk


I



'

,--------------

I

1

I

I

"

ucu .cam .ac.uk/index .php/events/

-

,- ,---~,:
- -~.---- .---:-.~,--

OUT OF ORDER


I

l\polog,~ for I.be111..,.,,~t.
\\, ~ "'"On<lftfl
fO~
.(
'-d.inutc
"SlOOD.upossil)k

\/ICE

j

I
i
~


!'f'>log ~ 16
seenaroundeambrid9e
'neport
t thcll rm hardlyIINef

The Porter's Log
loope: 1 llm or:,wSO uansparen

• 1oape~bly

...,...,



35

SOLIDARITY
~f ~st
'v/000
\)'"
Yf\RtS
_,_____
_" (...
c:.

V



g immigration detention during UCU

The Porter'sLog ho'!)Or ,,Jog M, 16
Discussionwms to TheOfficeForStudents - whichIswhat Toope's room in the

OldSchoolsbuilding,s rv::JNcalled

100?"1

.ml ,.

Occupation of Old Schools during the UCU Pensions Strike 2018

'

v.

The UK and the Arms Trade
✓ -r ✓\J V v ✓A "',',:rv: "
" ·~~
ff"
,_]"~~ ~
'7r/2,.,.,,/71'
In the age of Brexit and the UK's shifting economic strategy, there I an emphasis on being a leader
in the "knowledge economy" and having a "globally competi tive service sector" ,1 notably by "protect ing
defence spending". 2 Univers ities like Cambridge are key "stakeholders" in producing the knowledge and
skills for the "defence industry" to function . Unfortunately , what this means - behind the corporate
doublespeak - is that British companies will be exporting violence across the world , assisted by the
government, and abetted by our universities. The murky world of the "defence " sector is the corrupt and
violent world of the international arms trade .
Manufactu ring and exporting weapons simply won 't produce the conditions for peace .3 The conflict
in Syria, armed by a host of externa l powers including Britain , has produced one of the most painful
tragedies of mass exodus in recent memory.
This is an imperial conflict , and this is a European crisis. This is how the war comes back home.
Cambridg e University and the Arms Trade
\
Cambridge University specifica lly is historica lly complicit in the industry of war. We invest in those
companies . Our staff produce research for them. Our alumni have founded and worked for them . We host
them in conferences and we invite them to our freshers ' and careers fairs.

I

ITAl~l~il:

This is justified with claims that economic growth is the only thing

I~11)CiI:

that matters, emphasising the need for a euphemistically named

BO

"defence" industry to "keep us safe". The corporate custodians argue

COTT

DI

ES T
G I T A TE

that any challenge to their profitee ring will make "us" vulnerable .

Who are we talk ing about?
Kurdish people have been bombarded by Turkey's BAE fighter jets ; Kashmiris live under occupation
of the Indian military supplied with British military hardware; Palestinians in Occupied Territories are
attacked by British-supplied Israeli armed forces ; Yemenites and Bahraini civilians are attacked by Rolls
Royce aircraft ; Egyptian dissiden ts are suppressed by munitions and tear-gas provided by Chemring
Group. Cambridge University has worked with each of these companies, enab ling acts of war and
oppression. But this isn't just something happening "out there". Many of us students in Cambridge come
from parts of the world that s
the brunt of the global arms industry.
The "us" that they try to "defend " is just a rhetorical tool, an illusion.
"We" are this university. We need to be defended from the "defence" industry.
~•"'7.A

,_$1' -,,~

p,,,,,,,.f.;.>~=~~J?~~-;e,1,,;,,,,,.

.-..c

flCs-

~ -e

P tt.. :+ a cv-

t kind of a university do we want ?
,u., we want a university that helps these companies profit off the death and destruction that their
prod~
re intended to ca_use?Do we want students trained to find more efficient ways of killing people ,
¥c:u lfe from a caree:s fair down the road? Do we want our academics spending time and contributing
t eir
wledge to solving problems for arms companies?

¥'

If this is something you care about, get involved with us . We need to speak, act , and exhaust the
power and privilege we have here in Cambridge : we will not enable this industry and its globa l destruction.

ok.com/demilitarisecambridge

I



demilitarisecambridge@gmail.com



https ://www.telegraph .eo.uk/business/boeing-uk/aerospaoe-boos ts-british-economy /
2 https ://www.gov.uk/governmenUnews/summer-budget-2015-key-announcements
3 See Paul Holden, 2016. Indefensible : Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade. London : Zed
1

..

37

-

.,~"
, ..

'

.•t

(.;

.

~

'

-

SEMINARSERIES

....- - ..
'
- ----··-- ··--• •

,

• •I

'Theory too becomes a material force as soon as it grips the masses ' - Karl Marx

Critical Theory and Practice (CTP) is a speakerseries that tries to amalgamate theory with transformatlve
political practices. Originating in 2010 as part of Cambridge Defend Education during the resistance to raised fees
___
__

'

-and cuts , it's since become an independen t collective of people who come from across the university - we reject
__.hierarch ies between staff/students and un iversity members/non-members .

l l
Seeing that knowledge and its production is po lit ical, yet that
stubborn tensions between theory and practice , between
thinking and doing , often raise the ir heads , the sem inars and
teach - ins we host aim to muddy false dichotomies bet ween
social movements and intellectual production, and ma ke
clearer t he possibilities immanent when t hese mo men t s of
emanci patory polit ics are reunit ed!

? ...

J!.ll;J

Examplesof suchalchemy?

Theorists, write rs, activis t s, even artis ts have been part of CTP events. Often they come from stan dpoints that are -.;::::;.
anti-colonial , anti - racist , feminist, marxist, socialist or anarchist . Some of last year's events inc luded seminars

-

with historian Vijay Prashad on the Third World as a political project in relation to the Russian Revolution , Ryan
Davey on class and state coercion in housing estates , scholar and organ iser Barbar a Ransby disc ussing black
liberat ion movements , teach - ins on arms trade links to university

~

departments , and on internat ional ist left allyship.

"' ~

~

-

\

\

and what needs to get done , please contact us for information on

·- ~ ~ ~ \
C

-

ca\\"eo


~\ tO
, . e('(\& \.

\ISt•

r,l(ltl1fli-~

\

·o(\Sa

~ues.xcol'(\
0

\
)

#

have a t ermly meeting at the lovely Anchor Pub to discuss ideas

o

((\Jcfl\\
'r,Oo
'f-•cl'
\&c8

<'l~ c\\c;el

"a"e rfi "" @<l"'a' ·
v4e a\SO nsd't,e' (act\ce
~ to su 0 f'/8 nt\9
& o\lf
asc<
~\ne
..c. o,
\\\C,a
{>'Jc,te, d ..,

\

people , mainly grads and junior faculty but also undergrads and
non -uni members , who organise together voluntarily. We usually

~~\



foGe

~

CTP exists because of the passion and dedication of a handful of

~

O



\t\to,

bO°~
:

W

Think you might want to get involved?

this .



7
"9\e
e~-"\
• e\ \19\O
\ us-•·
'1°q 01 c0f'\9C

such as UCU, FLY, New Direct ions in Anti-colonial stud ies,
{
Desiring the Middle East at Pembroke and more - many of whom

r~

_;r

v

O

We also co -hos t with a variety of like-minded organisat ions

you may find in this guide!

7}

0

o\l'-{of ef'1' e,af
\,oO'f. \((\as "
,>.\c.~ae
d

7



F

38

The CUSUEthical Affairs campaignseeksto build a fairer and more sustainable University.
We support the work of student campaigns, and are here to help those who want to start -'
one. We hope to engage new people, bring people together and make campaigning spaces //
as accessible as possible to build the mass movements that real change requires.
·

I

--

'"\,
/
/

Each term, we have 3 target campaigns which we will focus on. For M ichaelmas 2019 these are:

We'll be working alongside the Living Wage campaign to ensure all Cambridge

]

colleges ,pay the real living wage, and seek accreditation to the Living Wage
'

Foundat ion . Despite being some of the wealthiest institut ions in the country,

poverty pay amongst the staff of Cambridge colleges is common. Given low
pay disproportionately

affects women and ethnic minor it ies, accreditation

would help addressthe gender and racial pay gaps as well as providing dignity
to the people who se work the University's functioning relies on .

·-----------'

---

••

If you are part of a
'
campaign or want to
start one, please get in

touch - we' re here to
help! The campaign's
current officers are Alice
Gilderdale and Jake
Simms. You can find us
on Facebook
(facebook.com/EthicalAf
fairs) or email us at
ethicalaffairs@cusu.cam.
ac.uk
I
I

''
'
·
'
I
I


.. ,
:---:'-"'----

WllfSAND
'100
S'Jl(S Ill

~DIVEST NOW

'

~

:
:I
I
I

! f We ~ill

be sup~orting Zero Carbon 's
ongoing campaign to get Cambridge



University and Its colleges to divest f ro m

'
------------------------------·'

fossil fuels. By growing and supporting
college level campaigns, helping coordinate
and amp lify t he work of green officers and

We'll also be working alongside the WomCam Open Portf olio
campa ign on Period Poverty. Shockingly , one in ten women

providing guidance and templates we aim ,
in part icular, to promo te college

in the UK struggle to afford pads or tampons ,

divestment. Fossil fuel companies cause

disproportionately

global destruction w ith the ir exploitative

affecting those who are econom ically

disadvantaged. We w ill be campaigning for colleges to

practices , disproportionately affecting the

providefree sanitary products, not as a luxury but as a basic

worlds most marginalised communities.

necessity, whilst quest io ning the taboo surrounding th is

They operate through the social license that

important Issue. Additionally, we will be linking the issue of

Universities investing in them helps provide,

women's rights w it h environmental rights• advocating

and thu s divestment works by removing

sustainable long-term solutions which allow women dignity
and decency w ithout costing the earth.

l

that social license and turn ing them into a
pariah industry.

39

Why do student s at Murray Edward s
and G irton pay almost £2,000 a term
in rent?
Why are Kitchen Fixed Charges
uneven across colleges?

CAMBRIDGE
CUTTHERENT

We run regular
meeti n gs and
socia l s on both
a college

and

un i le v e l

ao

Why is the Cambridge Bursary the
same for all when living coats vary ao
much?
Our campaigns mobi li se student power to cut
rents and scrap unfa ir cha rges .
We care about mater ial c hange for students and
the Impact of rent and hous i ng on access
and higher educat ion funding , as well as our
university 's i mpact on the town .

~I\

/

( 40

"-

~

CHOP is a group of Cambridge and ARU students supporting local
homeless peop le and helping students to engage with the homeless
community through a combinat ion of fund raising for local charities,

l

0

i

ra ising awareness of homelessness and outreach
collect ions, soup kitchens and volunteering .

.~, 'e~·
. ~o\~
14.
,t-

\

- - OJe
.1 tc,.O
. __

o"'"· _____,=-=---~

such as clothes

\

I

1

I \

\

I \

-1

l

-----

Come ~~ our ~~e_akerevents and take part in our outreach and
fundr _a,s1ng act1v1t1eslYou can keep_up to ciate via our Facebook page,
website (homelessoutreachcambndge@wordpress.com)
or mai ling
list (lists.cam.ac .uk/mailman/listinfo/soc-chop -exec).

1

\

\

I

1.

I

You can also become a CHOP rep - help to publ icise CHOP events
within your college/ ARU or organise small collections and
fundraisers . Email our rep coordinator
Yasmin Gilders
(yg321@cam .ac.uk) to find out more/apply.

\

___,_.,,..

\

c.ot'<'
9,t'<'a''· .--___.

ou\teac.\\~

''

t:,

.---.
t'<'e\e.S
0
t'<''ot\O'i.e\\1

c.a
I

\

, -.._~

1
rr---

1



\

\

Cambridge Streetbite was set up by a group of students who wanted to do
som~tbing to help homeless people in a practical way.
Our main activity consists of preparing food and hot drinks for peop le we meet
on the streets, alongside taking time to develop relationships with people
through chatting to them as food is distributed .

'7

We wander roun d town in pairs or small groups, taking a thermos an d some
sandwiches to offer the people we meet The food is always gratefully received,
but the most important thing we give is simply the time for a drink and a chat.
We are based at St Columba's United Reformed Church on Downing Street

0

Shifts run in the morning, afternoon and evening every day - you can choose
which shift is best for your schedule and sign up with friends if you'd like!
Volunteering with us is a smaU commitment that make s a tangible _chang e
To get involved, just visit our Facebook page and sign up on the online rota ©

41

We're the university's branch of the notional Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Our vision of the future is a world without nuclear weapons. so our campaign is focused on ge tting rid of Trident (the UK's nuc lear deterrent) as well as
trying to ach ieve a global nuclear weapons ban.
Thisyear, we'll hold some socia ls, some info rmation evenings and events so you can find out more
about nuclear weapons and disarmament, and hopefully host some speakers as well.

0\

CUCND are also going to be working with other campa igns in Cambridge, including the divestment
campaign , the second ary school CND campaign and the town Stop the War Coal ition.

~

~

----

,,,.....

,,,.,,,.--·

J...., ~ J...., d:J~~

,

/

,...,...

/

CAN~~
IOGfCNO@
GHAll.COH
_..............

,....- When the first nuc lear bombs were d ropped on Hiroshima and Naga;aki
in 1945. a reported 340.000 peop le died as a result.
/

CND was formed in protest of such lethal. immoral weapons when the UK
started deve loping our own.

...............

~
~

W

✓---~

,,,.,,-

/

,,,.,,,.

Theresa Moy did not hesitate to soy that she wou ld kill 100,000 innocent
_..............
people wi th a nuclear b last in 2016. We're not happy abou t that and we
want to change it.

~

~

(J

~

01o
rrcNO/

D

/(AHDI\

11[

/

,...,....

?Fuvv-·
~

/

If you want to get involved, or if you have any questions about what we do, come
to our first socia l on Tuesday 9th October where we' II be making banners and
badges and answering all your questions about CND in the King's Art Room. We
can 't wait to meet you!
...............
/
~

t,:-

-

__,,
........

We are the university soc iety
For
~
representing Amnesty International , ,...,,,run b e SOth annual Cage C
. /"
th
a non-governmental organisation
memJ
e society this ye amp~rgn
with millions of members across
insid ers volunteered to ta~ soc!ety ,.......✓
/ the world campaigning for human / Para: a Wooden cage on ~ . e shrfts
,,-rights .
raise e to COiiect signatur rng 's
awarenes
es and
~
,,_../
~ Yarl 's Wood lm~~f a~uses at the
. .
Centr e.
grat,on Detention
_,,.,,,
We spend our time organ1s1ng
...,,_..
_,,.,,,/ campaigns and speakers ' eve.nts ~
,, /
_,,.,,,/~ to raise awareness about so~'.al
_..............
,- and human rights issues , writing
,, ,...w eekly meetings are held in Caiu s
letters to foreign governments
Bar at 5pm on Sunday s. For more
nd
_ about human rights abuses , a
info on these and oth er events this
fundraislng for charities thro~gh
term , find us on Facebook or email. _
events such as our long-running
Jamn esty open mlc .

42

I

INTERNATIONAL .~

~ -W...:
-ORGANISING

f.,

i

11[1

On March 10, 2018, a group of thirty students occupied a
section of Old Schools, the administrative heart of
Cambridge. We, as International students, participated In
the moment having walked the same track In occupying
campuses, even whole cities, In places stretching from
Hong Kong to New Delhi, Cape Town to Istanbul, Calro to
Paris, Manchester to London.
We come into Cambridge having been called many things;
thugs, riff-rafts, juveniles, dissidents, agitators, and some,
even revolutionaries. We bring our world Into Cambridge,
as this university helps make the weapons that maim our
lands and people, and fund industries that consume the
very life and nature out of them. We come into it knowing
we will be policed, monitored, and be put on the frontlines
of the fight against Theresa May's hostile environment
policy. We come into It like fish out of water. It is up to us
to leave It a better place.

oppressed and hurt by the same colonial, capitalist
modemtty in ways that are not the same. Solidartty means
that you are affected by experiences that are not your
own, by people who are not of your movement, of your
gender, of your class, of your age, of your ability, and
more. We can teach one another how to be attuned to the
dynamics of power between those who ask for solidarity,
and those who get to take it for granted. We can teach
each other the difference between philanthropy, and
genuine, mutual camaraderie.

Whatever we do or learn here has resonance beyond
Cambridge, and beyond the UK. It Is us who will take it
forward, and will take tt beyond. It Is here and us that can
demonstrate how decolonisation is a global process. It is
here that we learn how eurocentrism and ethnocentrism
leaves no space for nuance, for understanding, for genuine
camaraderie, and for internationalist politics.

Where to start? We learn from practice, and learn how to
act in tandem, together. We find out multiple ways of
doing political work together, from each other. 'What is
political?' does not have an obvious answer. Politics don't
look the same, or feel the same, from one city to another.
But it is so very similar, and feels very familial. It requires a
lot of listening, skill sharing, relaying of different
experiences, to create a mutual understanding of how to
do activism in this university that resonates with and
Inclusive of International students.
We can teach each other how and why to stand In
solidarity with a myriad of causes we stand for, here and
beyond. As International students, we have and will suffer
the brunt of rising xenophobia here in UK for the
foreseeable future, both on a bureaucratic and societal
level. We are interrogated at the border and in the
university for being (too) radical. We get Interrogated In
activist spaces for not being (the right kind of) radical. We
desperately need some form of hospitaltty In this hostile
environment.
Solidarity requires that we listen, and are transformed by
our act of camaraderie. Solidarity means being acutely
aware of one's own orivilege In relation to people who are
l

I



,,, ,_

Colonial modernity did not just create a hierarchy between
the west and the rest. It created borders in between. It
erased histories In common. We have to have a sense and
understanding of history, where the west did and does not·
constitute the centre of our universe, or the limits of our
imagination. We need to cross the borders in between, to
create an Internationalism armed against chauvinism in all
colors. We need to recover the stories we have In
common, that testify against eurocentric or ethnocentric
history, and their fatalism. And we need more narratives,
our narratives, of global trespassers and agitators, past
and present, to create a world that Is no longer hostile to
r::iclal, gendered, and social difference.
I

\

43

CAMBRIDGE
MIGRANT
SUPPORT

Cambridge M igra nt Support is newly set up this year in
coordination w ith WomCam , work ing to support those in
detention , part icular ly at Ya rl' s Wood , and resisting the vio lent
enforcement of bord er s. We hold fundra isers for grassroots
organisat ions that di rect ly support m igrants , as well as workshops
& training about how detent ion works and how to sup port
detainees . W e want to build relat ionsh ips with similar groups , in
both Cambr idge and the UK more broadly, and wi th
detainees/ex-detainees to strengthe n the ant i-borders campaig n
and provide pract ical support to migrants . We will also cont inue
to attend the protests that are held at Yarl's Wood - W omCam
has organised transport for these ove r the past few years.

,

facebook .com/ CamMigranrSup
twitter .com/ CamMigrantSup

fmCiJ
k2@cam
,ac,uk


Detention in the UK is ke pt qu iet · it's a clear examp le of state violence against migrants, especia lly
thos e who are also part of other opp ressed groups (eg LGBT + or PoC migrants). It's racist , xenophob ic
and has no valid basis .
In the UK, more than 30 ,000 people are deta ined each year and the UK is the only European country to
have no upper time lim it on de ten t ion . There are 8 detent ion centres in the UK, as well as some
short-term hold ing facilities and some migrants being held in prison under immi grat ion powers. Yarl's
W ood is a detent ion centre loc ated about an hour away from Cambridge in Bedfordsh ire and the vast
majority of detainees there are women .
Border controls are enforced under the guise of 'national security', however are actually implemented by
the state to help it create an image of 'otherness ', allowing an idea of 'us vs the m' to foster nationa lism
and help the governmen t maintain its power .

----------------------------■

I

2

CUSU International (iCUSU) is the umbrella body for all
international soci eties and students at the University of
Cambridge. We serve as a hub for all international
activities in Cambridge , whilst looking out for the rights
and wellbeing of international stu dents.
international-cha ir@cusu.cam.ac .uk

fa cebook .com / iCUSU
intemat ional .cusu.cam .ac.uk

International
Students'
Campaign

'
iCUSU aims to promote international cultures In Cambridge through events like the cultural food
fair, but it also provides a voice for international students. Right now our focus is on inc reased
transparency from the uni • we 're currently conducting research on college inequality on issues
'
relevant to international students. We also want to voice
international students' concerns on a
national level in order to make up for our lack of UK voting rights on issues that affect us, like fee
rises, visa issues, and the Prevent legislation .




44
ASCU intends to build links between
Africans and non-Africans in Cambridge,
creating a platform for networking and
debate on issues of Pan-African
importance, fostering research capacity
within Africa, and mentoring prospective
African students.

ascu@c usu.cam .ac.uk / ascu .president @gmail.com
facebook .com/groups/africansoci etycambridgeuni
-·africatogethe r.org.uk/

<\

Since 2013, ASCU has provided a community and home for African students in particular to debate, make friends,
learn, dispel stereotypes, represent our collective interests, and strengthen ties across the continent. However,
we're open to anyone interested in learning more about Africa, no matter their discipline, nationality, or student status.
'--..J,-

~ SO ME OF WHAT WE DO... ~

\

~

_

\

Africa Together Conference , a leading platform that convenes some of Africa's best minds representing 'the

diversity of the continent to construcUdeconstruct narratives about our individual and collective lived experiences, ~
and to discuss issues of critical importance to the continent's present and future.
l



Africa Over Coffee , a monthly meet to discuss issues relating to Africa over a cup of coffee/tea. Topics of

discussion in the past year varied from slavery in Libya, to women's empowerment, to Zimbabwe after Mugabe.
Support for Peter, a solidarity campaign to demand the Immediate safe release of Cambridge PhD student Peter

Biar Ajak, who has been detained by the South Sudanese government with no clear reason.
'

THE BLACKCANTA BS

'.Id
::i
.

80

u•
.'"'

....
(Cl

i,

@)
rJ>

~



clI
(C

('5



E
('$

u•

::i
::i

"'
u

@
rJ>

.a
~

u
~
u

E
('5

.t:,

~

~

('5

-...
t1

RESEARCH SOCIETY

u



PRESIDEN T : SURER MOHANlED

0

u
u

.0

'fhe Black Cantabs Research Society (BCRS) aims
to uncover (:ambridge University's forgot ten Black
stu dents by highlighting thei r profi les, experie nces

and achievc1nenrs at Can1bridge. This is a h istorical
project that illun1inates the lost legacies o f Black

Cantabs, but als<>.
a politicnl project thnt critiques the .
fact that these histories were "forgotten" in the fir.st
instnnce. 'fhe BCRS provides a space for past,
present, and future Black Cant:ibs to find their
ho1ne at the 'University of Camb ridge .
. --------,
, ,-----,-1 -;,- - ,-...
@o urblac kcantab s
blackcan tab s .com 1

H enr y Lou is Ga tes J r.

'

K,vame Anthony Appiah

(Clar e College '79)

(Kings College '97)
Diu1u1e Abbo tt

t

. (D o~ning College '95)

(Ne\vnham College '76)

(Clure College '7~, '~1) \

~

·1
1

45

Find us on Facebook:
"Momentum Society Cambridge University' '
I

Momentum Society, MomSoc for short , is a society for students who are
dedicated to the support of left-wing leadership in the Labour Party.

E

·Ill->

-

·-t>
c(

Every term we have at least one TGM (termly general meeting); this is
where we decide on any pressing issues within the university or
nationally that we want to get involved with campaigning for/against.
Previously we have been involved in supporting the UCU strikes and
held campaign training sessions.

Roughly every fortnigh t MomSoc organises socials , our two favourites
being 'National ise Spoons ' and 'Pints and Policy' (P&P) . P&P is more
structured debates on issues but we end up discussing politics whatever
the setting! These events are enjoyable with or without alcohol so please
don't feel discouraged to come along.

(/)

0

(")


-

Ill
Ill

Eve~y term we aim to host an event on a big topic in the left-wing sphere.
Last year this included talks on Brexit and Venezuela.
Discussion

'-..::::. McDonald's UK workers are striking for the first time in
UK history, to demand a living wage of £10 an hour and
an end to youth rates , the option of guaranteed working
hours , and for their right to a union to be respected.
On International Workers' Day in 2018 , staff at the
McDonald 's branch in Newmarket walked out to take a
stand for justice , and were joined by supporters from
student organising groups and trade unions . Politicians
and members of the general public also came out to
voice their support .

A year earlier, workers at stores in Crayford and
Cambridge walked out on the first ever McStrike in the
UK, following the footsteps of tens of thousands of fast
food workers striking across the US as part of the Fight
for $15 movement.
Solidarity with the McStrike Campaign is one way in
which students can actively work to bridge the "town and
gown " divide : Follow @fastfoodrights on Twitter/other
social media and stay connected with COE for updates.

46










Cambridge Universit ies' Labour Club (CULC) is a Labour Party affil iated group repres e nting
Cambridge University and Anglia Ruskin students. We campaign alongside local activ ists to
get Labour ca ndidates elected who stand for the values we care about .

.

.

~(~

If you are passionate about politics and care about national and local issues, canvassing local people
is an incredibly rewarding experience, and a great way to get involved in the city we live in. CULC
played a central role in the re-election of Daniel Zeichner as MP in 2017 and in an increased majority
for labour on Cambridge City Council this May.






. . . .




We are proud of our recent successes, and we can achieve a lot more with your support. Working
with CUSU,the local Labour Party and other university societies, CULC has put pressure on
Cambridge University to sign up to ttie Living Wage, and we're now working towards getting all the
colleges and ARU to do the same. For this to happen, we make use of our brilliant College
Representative System who share the group's message with their fellow college students and lobby
their college to adopt change . Being a college rep is a great way for you to get involved with us and
stay close to your college's needs.
. . . . . . .


. . .



. . .

. . . . .

.

'

.

. . . .

.

. .

.



CULChas campaigned to im pr ove Mental Health provisions in the University and we will continue to
lobby the universities and colleges for better pay, welfare provision as part of our Period Poverty
Campaign headed by our Women 's Officer and more! Each term we also run a main club campaign,
which this term will be a Hous ing Campaign, targeting the exorbitant price of housing and
accommodation in Cambridge for both students and local people. Come to our Housing Campaign
steering meeting to learn more about the intricacies of this issue, meet the activists committed to
improv ing this problem and offer your in puts on how to shape this campaign.













CULCis not only about representing the Labour Party at the university level; CULC is about
representing your needs, your opinions and your views to those responsible for making decisions in .
our university and shaping national policy for real change. If you are passionate about a political .
issue and want to be part of a group that shares your value, you will find that CULC is the club for .
you to campaign with!

. . .
.

.

There's loads of ways to get invol ved;
- Come to one of our events: we have socials, speakers and discussion events
- Become a member of CULC:you'll get a badge and a membership card!
- Come to a canvassing session: you don't need to have been before, you'll get paired with an
experienced canvasser and will be provided with all the support that you need
- Become your college rep to help us coordinate our activism

. .



. .

'
Contact us at culcchair@gmail .com or on Facebook at Cambridge
Un iversities ' Labour Club, and
look out for our banner at campaigning events across the university.







47
The Cambridge Marxist Society is
a proud member of the Marxist

STUDEN

we seek to

Student Federation . We fight for
overthrow
Socialism in our lifetime on an
international

basis.

Lenin famously stated: 'without revolutionary theory, there can be no revolutionary movement'. In
t hat vein we organise regular polit ical discussionson contemporary and historical events, to tease
out the lessons we can draw and sharpen our perspective. It is by understanding the world around us
that we hope to also change it. However, we are not just a discussion group. Beyond theoretical
discussion, we also intervene in the labour movement, participating in union action and in our local
labour movement branches. We aim also to act as a voice of organised labour within the student
movement. It is through demonstrating and agitating against the broken status quo that we hope to
turn outwards with bold, socialist demands.If you want to rid the world of the capitalist system, there
is no solution greater than Marxism! We meet at 7.00 pm, every Wednesdayin the Munby Room in
Kings.You can also find us on Facebookto find out more about the society.

capitalism
wh ich serves

to oppress

'

expl oit

and divide the
working class .

'

IN..
So you're part of a campa ign that you're
pass ionate about, or perhaps you've just joined
one and you 're exc ited at the prospect of changing
all those things th at have made you feel so shit for
so long . You've got a group of incredible people
ready to transform the world (or at least your
co rner of it). You're committed to organ ising in a
way that avoids replicating
the oppressive
structures you 're trying to fight , and you know that
material change cannot come about without
effective campaigning , but that 's where all the
trouble beg ins. Effect ive campaigning means
communicat ion and often , in our attempts at
horizontal organising, collective decision making.
And that means meetings . So, so many meetings.
And all too ofte n, the most prom ising campai gns
can be ground to a halt because of an inability to
run meetings that are productive , accessible, and
uplifting rather than draining.

What's the secret? Meetings do n't have to be
awful; In fact they should be excit ing opportun ities
for us to gather ourselves , to plan, reflect , and
part icipate in a collective vision of the spac e we 're
trying to create. Unfortunately, despite all our best
intentions, activist groups are not immune to
systematic oppress ions and inequalit ies. Activism

FACILITATION

involves a recognition that we 're all fallible and
operating with in a layered system of oppressions,
whi lst simul taneously always maintaining t he belief
that we can break out of them . Which brings us
back to those meetings. We all work so hard to
create the space to organise , and when we do it's
often fraught - our work is difficult , the fight is long
and hard and deeply perso nal - and there 's almost
always a seem ingly endless list of discussion
points .

In non-hierarchical organising there is no set leader
or chairperson, but the role of fac ilitator is
commonly used to enable the smooth running of a
meeti ng. Every individual in the meeting should be
actively self-facilitating, and evaluating thei r own
partic ipation in the space and in relat ion to others but let's talk for a second about the individual who
has (hopefully ) volunteered to be the nominal
facilitator for a meeting .



48

-'>
The most important lesson I've learned in
facilitating is not just to listen to all the voices in the
room, to take note of who is speaking, for how
long, and what exactly they're saying, but also to
listen to what is not being said. Facilitation is far
more than just numbering the hands that you see
waving urgently in the air and sitting back to let
discussion commence . Facilitat ion means collating
ideas and enabling concrete group decisions to be
made. If done well, it can transform a meeting
space, and have a significant impact on the
actions taken when everyone leaves the meeting
room. If people feel that their opinions have been
voiced and their concerns heard, whether new or
experienced they will feel like they have a stake in
what happens next, and this is crucial in building a
movement. Facilitation is also something that
everyone can do, and everyone can do well.

Always have an agenda planned before the
meeting that the facilitators can read oyer, and
• have someone volunteer to take notes (not the
same person every time!). Ground rules and hand
signals should be recapped at the beginning of
every meeting - we all need a reminder once in a
while - and this is a good opportunity for the
facilitator to initiate a 'temperature check' to gauge
the energy of the room.

Decide on what consensus will mean for your
group . Does every decision have to be 100%
agreed on? 80%? A good facilitator will act like a
radio receiver, picking up on the different vibes in
the room and synthellsing ideas to formulate a
conclusion that the group can reach consensus on.
But they are also the ultimate delegator; it's the
group 's responsibility to step up and say what they
need , · and the facil itator 's to guide discussion ,
encourage participation, and to have the
confidence to challenge any behaviour that
~hreatens the ground rules of the space.


1

Two heads are better than one; co-facilitation
enables you to swap in and out if one of you is
tired, or if a decision needs to be made that one of
you has a stake in. Crucially, one of you can
timekeep. Agree how much time should be spent
on each discussion point at the start of the
meeting; timings should include rest breaks, as
well as a final cut off point - when the time you
agreed is up, the meeting is over. Stop five minutes
beforehand to run through action points, and to
arrange the next meeting.

Good facilitation makes meetings not only
bearable, but productive; the campaign not only
functioning , but successful. But above all, listen to
yourself, and listen to others. Remember to treat
each other with compassion, because we are all
still learning; and keep In mind the joy that we are
fighting for, togethe r.

49

au
Afe

·n Cambridge

f the oth er groups ,

0_
W
:_:_

__..

In the city
common Cambridge / act ivist group affiliated to Plan C,
''towards a city of the commons and against capital" /
www .facebook .com/commoncambridge
Cambridge Common s/ a local residents ' group focused on
raising awareness of inequality in Cambridge /
www.thecambridgecommons.o rg/
Cambridge Act ion / a platform for anyone involved/interested in broad-based political action in Cam /
cambridgeaction17 .wixsite.com/home
Cambridge Left Unity / a network act ive in movements and campaigns across the left , work ing to create an
alternative to the main polit ical parties/ www.facebook .com/Camb ridgeLeftUnity
foodcyc le Cambr idge / Commun ity meals for vulnerable people made from surplus food /
www.foodcycle .org .uk/location/cambridge
Jimmy 's / su_pports the Cambridge homeless community/ www .Jimmyscambridge.org .uk

In Cambridge University : There are many other groups , organisat ions , societies and campaigns , including:
Philiminality / global, interdisciplinary philosophy/ fb.com/phllimlnalitycambridge
Immoral Sciences Club / for women in philosophy / fb.com/immora lsciences/
Ethics in Mathem atics Society / cueims .soc.srcf .net/
Rad ical Archives / contact camradhistoryarchives@gma il.com
Blueprint Z ino / mental health magazine / fb.com/blueprintzine
PEN / defend & promote freedom of expression , remove barr iers to literature / fb .com/ officialcambr idg eunipen

Cooperatives
Argyle Stre et Housing Cooperative / offering shared accommodat ion , opposing discrim ination and
supporting democratic housing dec ision -making/ www .ash.coop
Arju na Wholefoods / Workers' co-o perative fully and equally owned by those who work here, selling
vegetarian & vegan food / www.arjunawholefoods .co.uk/about
Ace Nursery School / Parent s' coop for children aged 1+ / http ://www .ace-nursery-school.org .uk

Loca l Trade Unions : Beyond UCU in Cambridge Uni, there are lots of other friendly unions, includin g :
Unite / Unison / GMB / FBU / BFAWU

Reading Groups: there are lots - contact the person running it to join, or sta rt your own
Theorising Race & Racism reading group / hosted at the Faculty of Education, open to
all / cpgjcam .net/reading-groups/theorising-race-and - racism-in-educat ion/
Platform Capitalism Read ing Group /
cpgjcam .net/reading-groups/platform-cap ltalism-reading -g roup/
Space , Borders , Power / cpgjcam .net/space-borders -power/
The Inter sect ion of Gender, Race and Disab ility with Philosophy of Scienc e /
www.hps.cam .ac.uk/news-events/seminars-reading-groups/gender-race-disability
Paper O - Neglect s of Neocl assica l Economics / Cambridge Soc iety tor Economi c

, Pluralism/ www.cambridgep luralism.org/paper-O .html
Educa tion & Act ivis m / info at www .cusu .co.uk / contact education@cusu.cam.ac.uk

,....
, ..

50

WORDS OF WISDOM
Resist the temptation of being "that
person " who signs up to do everything,

(j

remember that it is okay to be tired ,

The whole point of organizing Is that tt ,s a .
(
collect,ve exercise )
Don't be afraid to make mistakes -

*

accept being called out with grace J

and with an eye to learning how to be better .

•a

...,,

.

'" \0
'oe~''.

Q\> ((\~i

i

doubt if what you're doing is of any use at all You may become cynical.

-- - - '

t>

-

-

.. -

Remember that you always have something to learn both practical and theoretica l.
Be open to criticism and ensure that you have a life outside of organising! Protect
those other hobbies fiercely, take breaks and step back if you are feeling
overwhelmed. Try as much as possible to know your history and to learn about the
work of activists that have come before, .what they tried, what worked and what
didn 't. Remember that theory without practice in a place like Cambridge isi::;;:~~ZJ
meaningless and be wary of the people who sit around read ing theory all day but
refuse to be involved in the practical aspects of organizing . Document everything .

.
d b . get involved!
My first advice woul .;,e
;;..
·.... ~

51

Don't worry if you feel like you don't know

eating, het . Pie inf Sayin 1. P 1cator
rue/~/ Part
th~m out if~ h, t~ new fa n1s1ngor activ •
f being the fri organising be hey re unsure ce, encouragin isrn, then be th
verybod . iendJy face
cause the
or Shy are . g them to
e one to
verybod: ~~he group is ::,onJy _on ctrt:~~ to build th! 1;dnesses, bif ~e ?ack to a
t eopJe takes as though lhe~orn,ng and ac Peo~fe - try yovement. Don 'ter re a/so a
on tasks e~ .1rPresence . cept1ngof n
our best to
et the rote
en I( the ~ . e IS V~fued and ~w PeopJe. Marake sure that
ed, a ~ they have a ~;ure that
v.,-._4
ve Patienc
~eto Play·
e ith them. ,

t,'ng

a

f

recognise when you are
over-exert ·
L;k~~~ ~ing

Remember that you do not organise just to win. You organise because the
oppressive conditions of the institution require an urgent respon~. Sometime
'""'
s- i"'"i
t ''·'·
might feel that like that response is not adequa e or successfu but it is important to
you do it anyway. Sometimes you will not win ancfthat is okay, see yourself as part
o continuous cycle o people who have been doing resistance work in Cambridge for
a long time. Clear the ath for others and bring them in, give them the tools you wish ""·"you had when
started ettin involved in student activism. Be kind to the people
you organise with and be sensitive to the fact that they will make mistakes and
disappoint you in various ways.

Yourself

ou

,

J



I

oon't \et tne
accusation of "divisiveness"



stop you from naming problems
Whenand w ere you

Do not et men invent themse ves as e oug
of the organising
space_or l~t charisma b!ind you to their flaws. They do not have the most interesting
or radical ideas all the time. Do not let facilitation and conflict resolution become
women's work. It is work for everyone.

-

...2013
\
'

'

\

Reclaim the Night rally wfth Anglia Ruskin Students' Union and u,
_r_v,om
...cam, 2013.

I

\

I

I

I

I

I

,,

\

'

--

I

....

'


""°



P. s;,.,ee , wn<h ,<1oas
~nd '10pos 101 t,oo edocHIO~ c:an t:e e(pjo,J)C.
ac:1100Cllal>ncd
Corr c 10 ct,u11enooto show SUl>llOf"611dsotK111111y
10 leam and to fe,,ct, There will be Ire• tea
lmd a.,o O&'WIC<
..«•ShOOs.
Sl)ea•ets 11110Ckse"9$10t\ lhe da~ 18 a buo·-oP'aied

"'-...no

tor tho no uonal domons11n11onon 181h NO\lefflber"' ..-1

of 11eeeOJ<'.atfQf1.

-

\

'

-

I

.-

I

t

ca1

ethin ,n
.. -. -.:;;~Y~e~Origlns ot

I

.
'

'

20,a
' .

s

1

nar o

c.,.
,..,.
~
~
-,-~.:===~::_
-,.,, I.CIIIStr,; 8
1

.

'

-

'
f

dish Solidarity Demonstrat ion against Turkey invading Afrin,
Cambridge May 2018. Photo : Cam Kurdish Solidarity

'

\

'

\



'

,

54

LEFT-XICON : AN ACTIVIST GLOSSARY

Capitalism : soc io-econom ic system of private ownersh ip , exp loitation and inequal ity
Class : group of people sharing common relations to how a soc iety/ economy is produced and organ ised
Marketisation : turning so mething into a market for commodities . See Spotlight on Marketisation

Colonialism : dom ination by a group over others with military / econom ic/cultura l/po litical too ls
Decolonisation : abo lishing that ", and liberati ng people from that dom ination . See Spotlight on

Decolonisation
Gender : sociocultural concept that arbitrarily d ivides peop le into (usual ly) two groups and fucks all of them
over in the process
Sex : gender in a lab coat - a complicated set of physical characteristics often incorrectly modelled as a
binary , w ith shitty consequences . not as simple as they tell you in biology class
Trans( / c is) : whe n someone 's gender ass igned at birth does not (/does ) match the ir ident ified gender. See

CUSULGBT+
Non-binary (NB): genders outside of the male/female binary
Sexuality : how peop le des ire others , lots of opt ions here
Queer : polit ical ident ification working t o abo lish the sex/gender system
Racialisat ion/racism : soc ial pract ice of sort ing peop le into hierarch ies of dom inat ion based on supposed
common characterist ics
BME : 'Black and Minor ity Ethnic' - general UK term for people racialised as anything ot her than wh ite. See

BME campaign
Borders : imaginary lines that force peop le to live in certa in places and prevent them from moving free ly
Disability : a characterist ic of a person who soc iety has dec ided should be deliberately excluded and then t old
that the prob lem lies in them , rather than in an inaccess ible society
lntersectionality: forms of oppress ion interact in comp lex ways ; we need to fight all oppress ion

.
u

·tv 'C'1)/uni-related
9ambndgen1ve~1
l'7¼
members

.
RU
r,
should organise more with

ARU : Anglia Ruskin University . CU
U .
presents all students at CU
t.c:...::
cusu· Cambridge University Students n1on, re
rs/PhD' at CU
·
.
ts grad students (Maste
,
GU: Graduate Union , represen
. staff at CU. See UCU group page
,
UCU : University & Colleges Union , represents working .
h mes UCU went on strike over these in 201 ~
Defined Benefit / Defined Contribution : types of p~ns1on scC~ +coi 1eges have the largest uni endowme nt ,n
Endowment : Pot of money invested to make the uni money .
Europe , roughly £5bn
II f po litical or mora l reaso ns. CU should divest from foss il fuels ,
D. stment : selling assets/sha res , usua Y or
ive
s z Carbon
the arms trade , etc . ee ero
. st Israeli opp ression of Pales t·ine. See Pa/Soc.--.,
BDS · Boycott Divestment and Sanct ions campaign. etsp a~sam1~
mess See Spotlight on Prevent
·

nment 's 'counter- erron
·
PREVENT : Part of the Brit ish gov~r
.
enta l hea lth servic es to members of CU
UCS : University Counselling Serv ice prov 1d~s.m . b lldings both occupied in 20 18 and befo.re
,
Old Schools / Greenwich House : CU adm1n1strat1ve u.
e~elo ment project , a major financ ial drai n
North-West Cambridge : CU's pet major l~nd and hot~s1nsg·1
~cludl:g Caterp illar/BAE wh ich are linked to the
. All.
e works with corpora ion
CSA : Cambridge Service
ianc
.
militarise Cambridge
.
arms trade and illegal Israeli occupations . .see De
d walk the streets w ithout fear of v iolence .
Rec laim the Night : Annua l march to reclaim bodi ly autono my an
SeeWomCam

55

ActivistPractice
Direct action : collect ively/indiv idually bringing about change yourself , not waiting for others to act for you
Facilitati on: helping a meeting go well by ensuring everyone has balanced opportunities/ability
See Spotffght on Facilitat ion

to speak etc .

FOi : Freedom of Informat ion Request. Can be used w/CU and colleges. See www.whatdotheyknow.com
M eme s: A replacement for decent menta l health serv ices . See also Doggos

Occupat ion : taking and hold ing physical space to force action (e.g. from uni management ), build links with in
a movement , run educat ional events, etc .
Pro noun s: how you'd like to be referred to (e.g. she/he/they ), usual ly asked for at the start of meet ings
Soli darity : assisting someone outs ide of your commun ity on their terms
Strike (Industrial A ct ion): workers take collect ive act ion, notab ly refusing to work , for politica l-econom ic

ends
Zine : qu ick , cheap, paper pub licat ion for popular politica Vcreat ive expression

.....
_-~
-..:-..""""
_---=-=--_-_
.....
-.,;,---..
_
:=-==---

There are loads of other terms ou .
But it 's dangerous to go alone ! ~ak~~h~ come across on your journey

s. https://tinyurf.com/camg/ossary

---

-

- - P. _,,,
,...._
,...,
~4

- SHU'l
·IT

f"::,.
...

~l

[~

~~-~

K .

V



..

..;.;;.:.
.,..l:.

'

~

-~

~ DIV(STNOW~~ :::J
,

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The people who made the 2012 UCSC Disorientat ion Guide (&AK) who insp ired much of this .
The activists in Cambridge over the years who have left a path for us to follow .
.
The many hours that people contribut ing to this guide have poured 1n,
both to put it together, and more generally to make the university a less
shit and more caring space .
Thanks to @yeyelgomez & @esrabecan for apditional illustrat ion work .
Thank you in particular to Footpr int [@FootprintLeeds] for printing this ,
and thank you very much to Firetund (@firefundnet] for host ing the
crowdtu ndlng so that we could print! (firefund .net/disorientationguide)


12 flNJS

f'~ESS
12PINTSPRESSwas formed duringthe UCUpensions
strike to producea DisorientationGuide.intent on building
studentpower towardsa collectivefuture. Weare an
Independentpublishinggroupbased in Cambridge,UK.
Thenamecomesfrom a poster madeduringthe
occupationof SenateHouseIn March2018 whichreads:
"£9000?That's /Ike... twelvepints in Cambridge.•

Item sets