Barnard//Columbia Disorientation Guide 2018

Item

Current View

Title

Barnard//Columbia Disorientation Guide 2018

Date

2018

Place

New York, NY

Source

https://issuu.com/disguide/docs/dis_guide_2018_web

extracted text

cover design by Abu Nara

you can find us online at facebook.com/cubcdisguide and on Issuu.com, or email us at
disguide2016@gmail.com! xoxo

ZINE FAQs
FAQs
AQs
content warning:

Some of the pages in this zine discuss different forms of violence,
including racism, institutional violence, police violence, sexual
assault & violence, coercion, and transphobia.
What is a zine?

A zine is a self-published magazine, meaning its creation and publication

We invite are
youcompletely
to take care
of yourself
as you
thinkit.about
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by the person
or read
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ZINE FAQs

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puts out a zine, so come to meetings and contribute!
How do people
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zines?

(We have oreos!)
just
Jenna Freedman.
associate zines with riot grrrls in the 1990s, but zines have been and are a
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or to
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Zines, NYC, Barnard/Columbia, and YOU

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third floor of Milstein and an awesome

zine librarian named Jenna Freedman.

join barnard zine club

website: zines.barnard.edu
each semester and puts out a zine, so come
to meetings
and contribute!
email:
barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
(We have oreos!)
twitter/instagram: @barnardzineclub

join barnard zine club
join barnard
zine club
website: zines.barnard.edu

feminist zine fest
website:
zines.barnard.edu
email:
barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
website:
feministzinefestnyc.wordpress.com
email:twitter/instagram:
barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
@barnardzineclub
twitter/instagram: @barnardzineclub

Land Acknowledgement
The 2018 Disorientation Guide was
compiled and made on stolen indigenous
land, specifically Lenape land on Turtle
Island. Barnard and Columbia occupies
stolen Lenape land and we would like to
recognize the violent occupation of stolen
indigenous land and the violent use of stolen
labor to build these institutions.
We want to acknowledge the ongoing
violence towards indigenous people as well
as their ongoing resistance.
We sincerely invite you, the reader, to take a
few moments right now to reflect on what it
means to be occupying stolen indigenous
land, especially if you’re a settler/visitor and
not indigenous to this land. We hope you
reflect on the fact that this is just an
acknowledgement and take seriously in
exploring next steps to take to further
actively decolonize this place.

All settlers, including recent arrivants, have a
responsibility to consider what it means to acknowledge
the history and legacy of colonialism.









What are some of the privileges settlers enjoy today
because of colonialism?
How can individuals develop relationships with
peoples whose territory they are living on in the
contemporary North American geopolitical
landscape?
What are you, or your organization, doing beyond
acknowledging the territory where you live, work,
or hold your events?
What might you be doing that perpetuates settler
colonial futurity rather than considering alternative
ways forward for North America?
Do you have an understanding of the on-going
violence and the trauma that is part of the structure
of colonialism?
-

Adapted from Allison Jones for Native-Land.ca

Learn more about land acknowledgements, next steps to
actively decolonize, and resources at
native-land.ca/territory-acknowledgement/
Read about the Lenape plaque on campus from the Native
American Council at Columbia:
https://tinyurl.com/honorlenape


 

1
9
2
2

6

In the early 1920’s many
Ivy League schools began
instituting “unofficial
quotas” to limit admitance
of Jewish students.
Columbia’s was the most
severe and slashed the
Jewish population from
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 with
particular discrimination
against Sephardic and
Eastern European Jews.
Quotas like these
remained at Yale, for
example, until the 1960’s.


 

1
9
8
5

In 1985, the SAS won their
fight for divestment from
South African Apartheid.
Barnard and Columbia both
divested their respective
endowments from
corporations doing business
in South Africa, including
IBM, CBS, General
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Honeywell, and the
Washington Post.

The Manhattanville project has displaced many
Harlem residents and businesses while creating
7shiny new complexes for Columbia schools.

WHICH PARTS OF THESE MISSIONS MATTER TO YOU?
BARNARD COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT
Barnard College aims to provide the highest quality liberal arts education to
promising and high-achieving young women, offering the unparalleled advantages of
an outstanding residential college in partnership with a major research university.
With a dedicated faculty of scholars distinguished in their respective fields, Barnard
is a community of accessible teachers and engaged students who participate
together in intellectual risk-taking and discovery. Barnard students develop the
intellectual resources to take advantage of opportunities as new fields, new ideas,
and new technologies emerge. They graduate prepared to lead lives that are
professionally satisfying and successful, personally fulfilling, and enriched by love of
learning.
As a college for women, Barnard embraces its responsibility to address issues of
gender in all of their complexity and urgency, and to help students achieve the
personal strength that will enable them to meet the challenges they will encounter
throughout their lives. Located in the cosmopolitan urban environment of New York
City, and committed to diversity in its student body, faculty and staff, Barnard
prepares its graduates to flourish in different cultural surroundings in an
increasingly inter-connected world.
The Barnard community thrives on high expectations. By setting rigorous academic
standards and giving students the support they need to meet those standards,
Barnard enables them to discover their own capabilities. Living and learning in this
unique environment, Barnard students become agile, resilient, responsible, and
creative, prepared to lead and serve their society.

COLUMBIA COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT
A Lifetime of Learning, a World of Opportunity

At Columbia College, a uniquely designed Core Curriculum of philosophy, history,
politics, literature, art, music, science and writing provides every student with a
comprehensive and truly transformational understanding of modern civilization. The
distinctively personal and highly interactive seminar format of the Core courses
develops the essential ability for engagement in an increasingly diverse and rapidly
changing world. Regardless of ensuing life choices, the Core Curriculum forms the
foundation for a lifetime of continued learning.
Columbia students also have the exclusive opportunity to enhance their chosen
studies through the unparalleled energy, vitality and multicultural variety of New
York City. No other college in America offers students the integration of the highest
level of educational excellence in a community with an incomparable offering of
professional, career and life experiences.
There is no more effective and dynamic preparation for the future than studying at
Columbia College in the heart of the world’s most cosmopolitan city.

some ways to get yr $$$$’s worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Columbia. it’s expensive to
live in New York, and it’s expensive to go to these schools! here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be careful) and bring Tupperware, or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils, salt and pepper, napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNI)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federal Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don’t know why)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to museums! new york archaelogical repository! state parks!)
• free department and student life retreats
• there’s free paper in the printers*
• there’s a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks! go
• you can get textbooks at the library : ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends; professors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven’t
• there are free classes and teach-ins if you look (book-making! social justice!)
• there’s sometimes free department / club swag beyond t-shirts!
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you’re on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it’s cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard mailroom if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build community! love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on “ethical stealing” (even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others; consider that there’s not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

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demands
Replace
racist
statues
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names
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Replace
racist
statues
and
names
campus
with
people
of
color
who
campus with people of color who
resisted
oppression.
resisted
oppression.
Decolonize
thethe
curricula
by by
centralizing
Decolonize
curricula
centralizing
and
privileging
thethe
voices
and
and
privileging
voices
and
knowledge
of of
marginalized
people.
knowledge
marginalized
people.
Stop
gentrifying
Harlem.
Stop
gentrifying
Harlem.
Provide
free
tuition
forfor
Indigenous
and
Provide
free
tuition
Indigenous
and
Black
students,
especially
those
from
Black students, especially those
from
thethe
Lenni
Lenape
diaspora
and
Harlem
Lenni
Lenape
diaspora
and
Harlem
communities.
communities.
Repeal
university
rules
that
silence
and
Repeal
university
rules
that
silence
and
oppress
students.
oppress
students.
Allocate
financial
and
legal
resources
in in
Allocate
financial
and
legal
resources
defense
of
all
marginalized
identities.
defense of all marginalized identities.
Recognize
Indigenous
Peoples’
Day.
Recognize
Indigenous
Peoples’
Day.

D
DEECC
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II
O
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THIS

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UNIVERS

UNIVER

Empower
university
workers
by by
Empower
university
workers
bargaining
living
wages,
full
benefits,
bargaining living wages, full
benefits,
and
workplace
protections
in
their
and workplace protections in
their
union
contracts.
union
contracts.
white
supremacy,
settler
Divest
from
white
supremacy,
settler
Divest
from
colonialism,
military
occupation
and
colonialism,
military
occupation
and
fossil
fuels.
fossil
fuels.
Reconstitute
thethe
Board
of of
Trustees
with
Reconstitute
Board
Trustees
with
community
representatives
instead
of of
community representatives instead
1%ers.
1%ers.

We
Wedemand
demandliberation!
liberation!
For For
more
information
on our
more
information
on our
demands
or toorcontact
us: us:
demands
to contact

LiberationCoalition
LiberationCoalition
liberationcoalition@gmail.com
liberationcoalition@gmail.com

WHIT
WHI
SUPREM
SUPRE

COL
IZE

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ITE
EMACY

Why this map?
Columbia University was built on the backs
of Black and Indigenous people. It was their
blood, sweat, and tears that laid the bricks and
concrete, and who provided rich white men
the time to ponder curricula. Throughout its
history, Columbia has faced resistance to its
complicity in racist violence and real gains have
been won—such as the establishment of the
Manhattan House and the Malcolm X Lounge.
We hope this map continues to grow and
contributes to current and future struggles to
hold the institution accountable to the people
that it has marginalized throughout its history.

Definition of
key terms
■ “Decolonization” The repatriation of
Indigenous and Black life, land, values,
language and knowledge. The recognition of
European-American settler colonialism and
the marginalization of Indigenous and Black
people. [Linda T. Smith, Margaret Kovach]
■ “Anti-Black Racism” Intentional and
unintentional systematic oppression of
Black people rooted in slavery that is utilized
to preserve a global anti-Black system
that exists across political, economic, and
cultural domains. [PROP Committee of CUSSW]
■ “Settler Colonialism” The genocide,
forced removal and replacement of
Indigenous populations with a settler society
(such as Europeans moving to the Western
Hemisphere) that develops a distinct identity
and sovereignty on the occupied land.
[Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz]
■ “ white Supremacy” A political, economic,
and cultural hierarchy designed to control
access to resources (such as housing,
education, and health care) and reinforce
white superiority and domination over people
whose physical appearance and cultural
practices are different than those found
in white Europe. [Frances Ansley, Iris Marion
Young]

R

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R

A

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HAVEMEYER HALL
(opened 1898)

Named for Frederick Christian Havemeyer, Class of 1825
Funded by Theodore Havemeyer, Class of 1868

Columbia is awash in money derived from
the slave trade. Slave merchants provided
the initial funds for Columbia’s endowment,
which now stands at $10 billion, and have
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that students use today, including Havemeyer
Hall. The Havemeyers were one of nine slave
merchant families who founded Columbia,
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labor in the sugar industry until slavery was
abolished in Cuba in 1886, just 10 years
EHIRUHWKH\ÀQDQFHG+DYHPH\HU+DOO:H
demand Columbia acknowledge its complicity
in slavery by changing the name of this hall
and providing free tuition to descendants of
the encaptured people forced to build this
University.
ɵ columbiaandslavery.columbia.edu

THOMAS JEFFERSON STATUE
(installed 1914)

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with Columbia University

Thomas Jefferson is universally known
for his role in crafting the Declaration of
Independence. Less often discussed is his
commentary devaluing black beings, and
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encaptured people forced into slave labor
at Monticello mansion. Jefferson’s wavering
presence in conversations on slavery directly
UHODWHVWRKLVRZQEHQHÀWIURPVODYHODERU
In place of Columbia’s Jefferson statue,
we demand the university erect statues of
individuals such as Harriet Tubman, Sojourner
Truth, or Ida B. Wells; Black women who
dedicated their lives to the struggle against
slave owners like Jefferson. Students of the
past have protested the statue due to its
symbolic violence, and those protests should
be met with change.
ɵ medium.com/@MADatCU/mobilized-african-diasporamad-statement-to-columbia-university-6859db2cf614
ɵ npr.org/2012/03/11/148305319/life-at-jeffersonsmonticello-as-his-slaves-saw-it

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UMBIA

BUTLER LIBRARY
(opened 1934)

Named for Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia
University, 1902-1945

Nicholas Murray Butler was a President of
Columbia University and an open supporter of
fascism. He remained friends with Mussolini
until the US joined WWII, and in 1933, invited
Hans Luther, Nazi Germany’s ambassador, to
speak at Columbia, stating Luther represented
“an emissary from a friendly people”. Butler
suggested that admitted students take
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socially unappealing Jews smart enough
to have passed the [university’s] entrance
examination”. Unfortunately, the library’s
name is symbolically apt for a university like
Columbia. The core curriculum is almost
completely white and male—a state of affairs
Hitler would have been proud of. Not only do
we demand the library’s name be changed
but the core curriculum be decolonized.
ɵ magazine.columbia.edu/reviews/spring-2010/hear-no-evil

LENNI LENAPE PLAQUE
(installed 2016)

First recognition of Columbia’s occupation of Indigenous land.

The Lenni Lenape people have a history on
this land that extends over 10,000 years.
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was with the Lenni Lenape, which promised
statehood in exchange for allyship in the
Revolutionary War. Despite this promise,
settler colonialists continued to occupy Lenni
Lenape land, committing acts of genocide
and forced migration. Today, the Lenni Lenape
and the Nanticoke run a sovereign tribal
government. In 2016, the Native American
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recognition of the Lenape land that Columbia
occupies. Naming the land and the people
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would mean the repatriation of Indigenous life
and land for the Lenni Lenape diaspora and
for all Indigenous peoples, tribes, and Nations.

ɵ
ɵ
ɵ
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delawarenation.com/about-us/
delawaretribe.org/home-page/about-the-tribe/
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BARNUMBIA SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Being a student with a disability means you will have to work harder than most (if not all) of your classmates. This
is not because of any fault of your own, but the institutions of power you will be relying on. These institutions,
Barnard and Columbia, as well as the city of New York, were not built for you and that makes every step you take a
challenge. This guide aims to make this process easier by identifying a few key actions upon your arrival on
campus. Know that you will have these tools and the help of other students to get past these hurdles.

Barnard’s Services:
Office of Disability Services
If you are a student living with disabilities you should register with ODS now, even if you have not previously
needed accommodations, rather than wait until you might need their services because it takes time and
documentation to be approved for services. Documentation from doctors and therapists of your disability is
required. 3-4 people in ODS take care of over 500 students on campus.
Accommodations:
Academic: ODS can provide academic accommodations to help you in the classroom including extra time on
tests and extra excused absences. You will need to meet with your professor to ‘prove’ your disability.
Residential Life: ODS can provide housing accommodations to make life easier on campus such as a dorm
with AC, a single, a building with wheelchair access, or having a service animal with you on campus. Res Life
has more control than ODS in housing accommodations and this process can be frustrating.
Furman Counseling Services
If you are living with mental health issues you should register with Furman. The intake process can be taxing
as you must share details of your mental health history to determine whether you need long term or short term
counseling. The office will give you referrals but there is also a network of students to offer therapist
recommendations.
Student Services:
Barnard Network for Students with Disabilities
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects you to other students dealing with
similar issues on campus. This is a place to ask for support, ask for recommendations, be part of a greater
community of people that want to help or just vent.
Barnard Pay It Forward
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects students who need someone to help
run errands for them by connecting them to students who are willing to help. This is for anyone who that needs
something from the store but can’, not just students with disabilities (medication, groceries etc.).
Campus and the greater city of New York
- Access to Barnard resources is often blocked by economic access to get a prescription for accommodations
or receive long-term mental healthcare. The Student Health Advisory Committee has collected off-campus
resources for low-income folks and identity based resources that can be found on their FB page.
- Both campus and New York City may be difficult for students with mobility disabilities. Barnard and Columbia
have very old buildings and elevators (especially Milbank and Hamilton). There are tunnels under Columbia
that provide access to parts of Columbia for wheelchair users.
- NYC’s public transportation system is in violation of the American Disability Act (ADA) in that its subway
system is not accessible to people with mobility disabilities. The 1 line subway stop on 116th and Broadway
does not have an elevator (96th Street has an elevator).
Community Advice
-It is important to advocate for yourself but also important to be able to ask for help from a friend, faculty
member, or member disability advocacy community. Molree Williams-Lendor, the director of Title IX and Equity
and the overseer of ODS, is an incredible resource and good person to meet with.
- School may knock you down; it is okay if you don’t have the strength to get up again. Some students find the
need to take a lighter academic load or to take a semester or year off.
-You are not weak for taking time to work on your own health; you are strong for prioritizing yourself. You are
attending a school that does not fully accommodate you and that takes a toll. You may have a different college
experience but that doesn’t mean it won’t be a good one. When the administration does not provide the
support you need, remember you have a community ready to back you up. There an entire community here
excited for you to join us.

ACCESS SUGGESTIONS FOR MOBILIZATIONS
By Sins Invalid - Disability Justice performance project by QTPOC artists
In support of our current collective uprising, we offer these suggestions for making sure that your actions/
marches/ mobilizations include as many of us as possible. This work is ideally done from a deeper political
commitment to disability justice, or at minimum a critique of ableism and an understanding of consent; otherwise
paternalism and abuse can masquerade as “access support.”
• Always have a Disability Point Person. Announce them from the mic; have them wear an armband for
visibility. Their skills should include a disability justice framework, problem solving, and good listening.
• Announce that the event will be fragrance free; ask people who are heavily scented to self-segregate.
• Generally speaking, written text offers an additional mode of communication.
• To support accessibility for folks that are DHoH / for those who can’t hear the mic
 have an ASL interpreter at the mic
 use slips of paper to communicate the nuts and bolts of logistics (possibly with chants, to
communicate destinations, the National Lawyers Guild’s #, etc.)
 have ASL interpreters in the crowd
• Organize push wheelchairs in advance for people who may need them; announce their availability from the
mic
• Organize low stimulation spaces near the main gathering space (e.g. a room, or tent); announce from the
mic
• Organize childcare and changing stations; announce from the mic
• Organize multilingual translation services; announce from the mic
• Have the tactical team spread throughout mobilizations (e.g. the four quadrants)
• Rent walkie-talkies. More information = better access. Be mindful that police escalation needs to be
communicated with participants in a calm manner, and will impact some more than others.
• Provide chairs (folding chairs, mobile bleachers, etc.) for rallies / gatherings where people can expect to be
standing for 20 min or more. Announce their location from the mic and explain that they are for people
with disabilities, elders, and others who cannot stand for a length of time.












At a march:
Do a march route run-through with mobility in mind – possibly seated in a wheelchair or in an abandoned
shopping cart (e. g. looking for grids, grassy areas, hills, holes, etc.)
Invite people with disabilities if they would like to set the pace of the march by being at the front
Give an auditory description of the march route beforehand
Make an announcement before the march regarding the destination and distance of the route, so that folks
can choose to meet the march there.
DO NOT “direct” folks with mobility impairments to where you think they should be; you can offer
respectful suggestions; no one should be hurried along – ideally the slowest pace should set the pace of the
march; no one should touch people or their mobility devices without their consent.
Organize a car or van to drive elders and people with disabilities from the beginning to the end of the
march. Provide seating at the destination.
Have distinct tactical and safety teams
Police liaisons should be communicating with police that there are participants with disabilities (and elders,
pregnant folks, etc) and that the march intends to respect that pace.
Be aware that cops will often target folks with disabilities as perceived “weak links”; cops target folks at the
end of actions as energy dissipates.

Access Suggestions For Public Events: http://sinsinvalid.org/blog/access-suggestions-for-a-public-event

by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney

THE HARLEM RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014, the
day when police burst
through residents’
doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later, parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
entering their homes
without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. “ The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage,” one parent said
after the raids. “That's not a good feeling, that you're using me to get a promotion.” 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day, police arrested over 40 people.
The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia’s Morningside campus, and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD’s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
students heard from their own administration:
safety. An email went out the day after the
raids informing students that it would “make
our city and community safer.” The reality,
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there, and that services, not
incarceration, are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What’s more, it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build
a new campus across the street from their
homes, the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tayshanna “Chicken” Murphy, a nationally
ranked high school basketball player, was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities, and employment training to young residents of Grant and

48

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattanville and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporation—
the group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister’s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren’t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don’t provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same, and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison, NYCHA will take away their homes. What’s
more, the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people, arresting 88 in one day.
As students, we can’t accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities, police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses, it is in the University’s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and, in the case of Grant and Manhattanville, been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
“development” that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia’s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University’s outright support for the raids, coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant, sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood, but it is not here
for you.

49

What you can expect this year from Q:
• facilitated discussions about topics related to being LGBTQ
(religion! dating! race! media!)
• movie nights & watch parties (POSE? Queer Eye? Stick It?)
• crafts and other de-stressing activities
• FOOD! and gay swag (fanny packs?!)
• events like the above ^^ that will be closed spaces for
people of color

contact us!

facebook: barnardQ
email:
clubqbarnard@gmail.com
co-presidents: anai
(atf2113@barnard.edu),
gaby (gf2330@barnard.edu

@ Barnard
What’s up with Q?

• we are Barnard’s club for LGBTQ students
• we had a brief hiatus, and now we are coming back
with renewed values

• we are committed to being an inclusive group and
centering the most marginalized voices in the
LGBTQ community, especially people of color

other possibly
helpful campus info:

Can’t-miss radical conference on campus!

!!!!trusted and supportive administrator alert!!!
Jessica Cannon, director of the Well Woman
program is a true angel descended from heaven as
well as a trusted advocate and co-conspirator for
marginalized students on campus. If you have any
health-, stress-, relationship- related concern (or just
want to make an adult friend!) Jessica is the best.
She has walk-in office hours m-f 1-4pm in cozy 119
reid hall (around corner from brooks elevators).
Also check out peer educator office hours sun, tues,
weds, thurs 7-9pm (POC-only on Tuesdays!)

look out for the Barnard Center for Research on
Women’s annual Scholar and Feminist
Conference in the spring semester (and other
events throughout the year!) the BCRW is really
radical and brings amazing activists and scholars
together every spring to share their knowledge

Proud Colors* Statement of
Purpose

As Queers of Color, we are forced to straddle a history of division. Historically speaking,
the struggle for racial equality has been heterosexist in its vision, and the queer liberation movement has been predominantly Euro-centric in its scope. As people who struggle with our own
questions of identity, we are also burdened by the need to find a tenuous balance between groups
that have traditionally displayed open hostility towards each other, framing their struggles as
entirely separate, completely independent missions.
We reject such a view. A historical perspective shows that the highly complex processes that constructed the identities of people of color as the villified. Other also resulted in an often unspoken
consequence: heterosexism. Men of color have been constructed as maniacal sexual perverts,
women of color as exotic sexual objects, white women as passive sexual victims, and white men
as virile sexual protectors.
While the creation of racialized gender stereotypes are obvious, what is not so obvious is the
normalization of sexuality along lines of race and gender. From this normalization results compulsory heterosexuality, and its flip-side, homophobia. During the period of European imperialism that heralded the beginning of modern racism, the considerable number of institutions
and cultural practices of same-sex sexual behavior in colonialized societies were destroyed by an
imposed compulsory heterosexuality.
Clearly the roots of racism and heterosexism are not independent, but rather intimately connected. Any recognition of racism must necessarily recognize sexism and homophobia at the same
time. Any liberation movement that does not do so denies the complexity of its oppression, and
is doomed to failure in its struggle against the oppression as a result.
But current conventional wisdom insists that the struggles against various oppressions must not
be combined. As a result, Queers of Color are often marginalized within groups that are already
marginalized. We are forced to fight racism and homophobia in society at large, as well as racism within the queer community, and homophobia within communities of color. We must face a
constant onslaught of multiple oppressions, coming from all directions at once. What is lacking,
and blatantly so, is a safe space in the University community where Queers of Color are marginalized no further, and are free to discuss and address issues and concerns that are unique to our
situation.
But at the same time, we also recognize the importance of linking oppressions. From our perspective, we see, on a day to day basis, the intersections of racism and homophobia,
as well as their connections with sexism, classism, and other forms of discrimination. We also
recognize the importance of collective action and struggle, and are committed to such strategies
in combating and destroying institutionalized racism and heterosexism, as well as other forms of
oppression.
As a result, Queers of Color is committed to an organization that does not discriminate on any
basis, especially race and sexual preference. We welcome anyone and everyone who is committed
to addressing issues and concerns that affect many people, but Queers of Color in particular. We
claim unity with all organizations that are committed to fighting racism and homophobia. And
we look forward to the day when society is truly and totally egalitarian.
In the tradition of the Combahee River Collective, and in the footsteps of Queers of Color like
James Baldwin and Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga and Jewel Gomez, and Nick Deocampo, we
rightfully claim our place.
- April 17, 1995
*Proud Colors was started as Queers of Color

ii

COLUMBIA QUEER ALLIANCE
founded April 19, 1967
by Stephen Donaldson 
as Student Homophile League
first recognized queer collegiate organization in U.S.

our work
anti-racist
anti-colonial
anti-capitalist
gender liberatory
prison abolitionist
decolonial

past events
Trans Day of Remembrance
Coming Out Muslim
Black Excellence Tour
Israeli Apartheid Week
Community Dinners
Film Screenings

ongoing collaborations with...
Students for Justice in Palestine/Apartheid Divest
Proud Colors
Muslim Students Association
No Red Tape and 24/7 Columbia
Graduate Workers of Columbia
Barnard Center for Research on Women

We strive to support and empower queer/trans
Asian/Asian-American students while collaborating
with queer/poc organizations to create a community
and safer space for queer students of color.

Like our FB page to stay updated on
meetings and events or look out for our
beautiful flyers created on Microsoft Paint or
reach us at qanda.columbia@gmail.com
We host weekly community
meetings/study breaks with
chocopies, other snacks, and board
games to build the QTAPI
community on campus.
We also have social and political events such as: Queer
Asian Film Fest, Asian LGB-Tea Time with NYU, and Queer
Southeast Asian Panel as well as other collaborative
events with organizations on and off campus.
Some QTAPI resources in NYC: API Rainbow Parents of
PFLAG NYC, Q-WAVE, NQAPIA

News * Arts * Sports * Jazz * Classical * New Music * Latin

89.9 WKCR FM-NY is Columbia University’s student-run,
non-commercial radio station. Let’s break it down.
*Student-run: As a student-run station, WKCR prides itself
on being a space for all students to learn about radio programming. Absolutely no radio experience or musical *expertise* necessary.
*Non-Commercial: WKCR has a long history of playing music
and talk radio that is not dictated by what is commercially viable. WKCR has a reputation for alternative programming such as: Studio A, our literary show showcasing queer
writers and writers of color; Live Constructions, featuring experimental, in-studio live sets; The Musician’s Show,
inviting local jazz artists to discuss their music and influences, as well as Offbeat our hip hop show that emerged
in the 1990s, the first to broadcast MCs like Tupac, Biggie,
Wu-Tang CLan, Nas, Jay Z, and the Fugees. (For more information on all our shows visit wkcr.org!)
How to get involved!
1. Stop by and say hi at our table at the Activities Fair!
2. Come to the fall interest meeting on Sunday, Suptember
9th (exact time and location TBA) to learn more about our
departments and find a show you want to shadow weekly.
3. Expect an email from our lovely intern coordinators Bruce
and Rachel, who will be a guide and resource you can count
on.
4. Begin interning! Learn alongside a fellow programmer
about everything from music history to audio engineering.

The African Show * Middle Eastern Influences * Sounds of C

* Hip Hop * Blues * Funk & Soul * Gospel* Indian Classical *
WKCR is open and broadcasting 24/7!
Our station is a sweet little club house and haven for music lovers located on the corner of 114th and Broadway.
WKCR also has hella resources that YOU SHOULD USE!
Such as:
*A library of 30,000 records and CDs that you can borrow
and use for your radio shows or listen to at home.
*Three, sound-proof studios great for recording interviews
or coming in to do your homework as you listen to music on
our studio monitors.
*An insulated room with amps, mics, a piano and a drum kit!
Come jam with friends or invite an artist to play a set and
we will help you put it on the airwaves!
*Zoom-recorders and lots of other audio equiptment you can
use to make field recordings or record interviews.
*Airwaves! We are a recognized radio station in the tristate area and in the world. Use our platform to connect
with your favorite local musicians; go to shows for free
and interview and record a band you admire.
*A community of music-lovers to learn from and alongside!

***ALSO! *** This fall we will be having a FESTIVAL from
October 11th-October 13th celebrating Latinx Heritage in
NYC. If you are a self-identifying Latinx student interested in guest DJing email jr3629@barnard.edu!

China * Urbano Latinx * Som de Brazil * Caribe Latino*




www.wbar.org
wbar@barnard.edu

In 1993, a group of women at Barnard applied for a rock
show at Columbia’s radio station, WKCR. When they were rejected,
they decided to create an alternative. WBAR first went on the
air on April 1, 1993.
WBAR is a student-run, non-commercial, freeform, online
radio station. In addition to our programming, we do ticket
giveaways, host various music-related events on campus, and hold
two live concerts a year, one in the fall and one in the spring.
WBAR offers freedom and creativity to DJs and listeners who
seek a less structured form of radio expression. DJs are free to
create their own show concepts and playlists for a weekly 2hour-long slot.
WBAR is also a resource for any student and activist groups
who might need audio equipment (such as microphones or a PA) for
events. These can be signed out through a contract form if you
send us an email (listed above).

Keep an eye out for upcoming announcements about our
general interest meeting and call for FALL 2018 season
applications!

Barnard Contingent FacultyUAW Local 2110 (BCF-UAW) is

the newest labor union on the Barnard/
Columbia campus. We unionized in
Spring 2015 to fight the worsening
exploitation of contingent (i.e., nontenure-track) faculty at Barnard. The
BC administration fought us at every
step, bringing in expensive unionbusting
lawyers to stall, demean, and defeat
our efforts. But with the support

of Barnard students and alums—and by setting
a deadline to go on strike—we won. In Spring 2017

we signed a contract with wage minimums among the highest in
the country and many improvements to our benefits and working
conditions. We’re still a far way, though, from equity among all of
Barnard’s faculty, and BCF-UAW continues to fight for fairness. Our
parent union, UAW Local 2110 also represents BC support staff, CU
support staff, CU grad workers (GWC), and CU postdocs (CPW).

Local 2110 has been fighting for and winning pay
equity, gender equity, and economic justice for
Barnard & Columbia workers for over 40 years.
3 KEY STRUGGLES TO PAY ATTENTION TO THIS YEAR:

• GWC-UAW: Forcing the Bollinger administration to respect the overwhelming
democratic will of Columbia grad workers and start bargaining a contract.
• BCF-UAW: Demanding Barnard stop cheating unionized First-Year Seminar faculty
of their FYS stipend that the highly-paid non-union faculty still receive.
• CPW-UAW: Supporting Columbia postdocs (CPW) as they hold an election for
federal recognition of their union.

facebook.com/bcfuaw • twitter.com/bcfuaw • instagram.com/bcfuaw

 
We are a grassroots organization working to end   
sexual + domestic violence in our campus communities because   
we envision a world free of violence + oppression.  
 
We  recognize   that   sexual   violence   is  a  manifestation   of 
systemic   gender   oppression   which   cannot   be  separated   from   all  
other   forms   of  oppression.   ​Therefore,  the  fight  to end  sexual 
+ domestic violence cannot  be won without eradicating all other 
forms  of  oppression  including   but   not   limited   to   racism,  
classism, ableism, colonialism, homophobia, + transphobia.   
 
We  seek   to  foster   transparency   around   issues   of 
sexual   violence   because   ​we  believe  that  a  bottom 
up  approach  to   building  power  is  the  only  way  to 
achieve justice.  
 
Our current campaign demands  ​more ​support, 
accessibility, accountability, funding, + 
enforcement ​(SAAFE) to ensure that Columbia  
University is an inclusive educational  
environment where survivors can thrive,  
regardless of their identity (including but not  
limited to race, sex, gender, sexual orientation,  
socioeconomic status, immigration status, +  
religion).  
 
 
A  major   demand   of  our   campaign   is  for  the  creation  of a 
rape crisis center that is physically open 24/7 ​+ staffed 
with  professional  advocates  trained  in  cultural 
competency​.  We  believe   that   these   changes   will   improve  
the   quality   of  resources   for   all   survivors,   especially  
for   survivors   whose   experiences   don’t   match   traditional  
narratives and who come from marginalized communities.  
 
 
 
 
 
Want to get involved?​ Sign up for our listserv @  ​http://noredtapecu.org/new­page/ 
or email  ​noredtapecu@gmail.com​! Our weekly meetings are on Sundays from 7PM­8PM.   
 
Go to ​www.NoRedTapeCU.org​ to learn more about our work + for info on resources. 
 

As many students who identify as first generation
and/or low-income may agree, Columbia University
does not always offer the appropriate safe spaces or
platforms for students to talk about issues that pertain
to them. In order to raise awareness about class issues,
build a first generation and/or low-income community
that transcends all barriers, foster an open and
respectful campus environment, engage in a crossclass dialogue, advocate on behalf of the community,
lead service projects pertaining to these issues and
empower first generation low-income students at
Columbia, we are looking to start a conversation
amongst students about what our community needs.
Entitled FLIP, we look to create safe spaces to discuss
issues relevant to our community in order to combat the
stigmas we might face, promote discussion of
socioeconomic class and education access, and
advocate for resources.

SHAREMEALS
FLiP introduced ShareMeals to
campus in 2016 ShareMeals is
an app designed to connect
those in need of swipes to
those who have too many. It is
available on both iOS and
Android platforms, please
download and help combat
food insecurity on campus.

FLIP LENDING LIBRARY
FLiP maintains a lending library
at Barnard library and on the 4th
floor of Milstein Library at Butler
that is available to all FLI
students on campus.

FLiP works to combat a number
of issues facing the FLI
community on campus today,
including food insecurity, financial
uncertainty, and general
unawareness of FLI issues within
the student community, faculty,
and administration.

G-BODY MEETINGS
FLiP has bi-monthly general
body meetings designed to
promote community building
and provide a necessary outlet
for grievances on campus.

FOOD PANTRY
FLIP was a key player in the
creation of Columbia's Food
Pantry. Designed to combat the
struggle of food insecurity on
campus, it is open to all from 4
-7pm in 582 Lerner Hall.

@FLIPCOLUMBIA

1968 and Its Afterlives

On April 23, 1968, hundreds of students and faculty began an occupation of five
campus buildings. Black students from the Student Afro-American Society led the
demonstration with an organized and deliberate occupation of Hamilton Hall.
Students from ASA and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), collaborating
with Harlem organizers including the Young Lords and Weather Underground,
called for the termination of weapons research for the Vietnam War and an end to
construction of a gym ("Gym Crow") in Morningside Park. On April 30, the
administration called the police and over 700 violent arrests were made, injuring
many protestors and "triggering a campus-wide strike that shut down the
university" (CU Archives). During this time, Black and brown woman students did
the crucial work of keeping organizers fed and cared for, as seen in the photo of
the Hamilton Hall food pantry and medical supply stock below.

For more information:
bit.ly/CU1968
columbia1968.com
Twitter: @1968CU
BCRW Digital Feminist Archives: "1968 and Its Afterlives"
Democracy Now: "How Black Students Helped Lead the 1968 Columbia U. Strike..."
NYTimes: "The Missing History of the Columbia ’68 Protests"
Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

1968 and Its Afterlives

On April 25, 2018, members of the Liberation Coalition led a tour titled Decolonize
This University and marched through Butler Library demanding an end to
gentrification in Harlem, decolonization of the university, divestment from settler
colonialism and military occupation, and other forms of reparations. An
organization founded last October after a series of white supremacist speakers
were invited to Columbia, the Liberation Coalition seeks futurity in the alliance
between Black and brown Columbia University students and Harlem residents. In
the midst of the graduate workers’ strike which began on April 24 and shortly after
the end of a five-day student occupation of the Lerner piano lounge in demand of
24/7 healthcare services and divestment from systems of policing, the
organization occupied the main stairwell of the library for nearly an hour. Within
minutes, administrators arrived on scene and threatened to call the police. The
University’s recently growing reliance on the NYPD in response to student-ofcolor organizing was also seen on December 4, 2014, when over two hundred
students of color performed a die-in at the annual tree lighting ceremony on
College Walk of Columbia University, after a Staten Island grand jury failed to
indict the police officer who murdered Eric Garner. The die-in followed a Black
Students Organization performance of “Strange Fruit” and calls for radical selflove. Several police vans arrived on College Walk within minutes of students
rallying around the Intercultural Resource Center.
Fifty years later, these events at the University demonstrate the perpetual nature
of student exploitation and feelings of tension, unsafety, and anger. However,
such events also point to the ways that political organizing is a practice of futurity,
of envisioning the possibilities of a better and more just world.

Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

 

 

Columbia University Black Students’ Organization (BSO) 
  
Our Mission: Concerned with the recognition and understanding of the diverse needs of 
the African American community, the Black Student Organization prides itself on being a 
group that provides, support, discussion and solutions to the Columbia and greater NYC 
communities. Offering a support system to underclassmen, and addressing social and 
political issues, we are a community of strong voices and people. 
Meeting: Thursday 9-11, 106 Hartley Hall 
bso@columbia.edu  

MUJERES
Founded in the late 1990's, MUJERES
is the only femme-led Latinx club on Barnard and 
Columbia's campus. 
We take pride in our growing community and the work 
we do to take up space and make our voices heard.
This year we are looking forward to welcoming
 new members and increasing out impact outside of campus. 

Welcome

Chicanx Class
of 2022!

Our mission is to:
Celebrate, empower, and highlight intersectionality and diversity in all its forms,
especially as it pertains to Latinidad and Chicanidad. We aim to provide our membership
with a safe and engaging environment in order to fulfill their educational goals, promote
their cultural consciousness, and help them become active in serving the needs of their
community.

BEING CHICANX @ CU
● Find home in the city. Support Mexican
businesses and bring yourself comfort! We have created a
google map with places for food and fun g​ oo.gl/s23evD
● Knowledge is Power! Check out classes at the
Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (CSER)
● Find community on campus.

@chicanxcaucus on FB and IG
chicanxcaucus@gmail.com

UndoCU

The Undocumented Students Initiative (we prefer UndoCU) is the first undocumented student group at
Columbia University, and our main objective is to protect and dignify the humanity of every undocumented
person. Following the 2016 election, UndoCU, with cooperation of Movimiento Cosecha, staged a walk-out in
demand that undocumented students be protected and Undocu has since then become a prominent activist
group on campus.
We not only question the broken immigration system that produces the conditions of our collective subjectivity,
but we critique the white supremacist settler colonial structure that is its root. Therefore, UndoCU is an
intersectional movement that prioritizes solidarity with marginalized communities and the destruction of white
supremacy.
Our accomplishments so far:
● Keeping administration accountable for its promises of sanctuary to undocumented students
● Secured summer housing for at-risk students
● Expanded financial support for undocumented students
● Educated the campus community at numerous speaking events
● Featured on the Columbia Spectator, Mic.com, Democracy Now!, and—regrettably—Fox News.
Our present priorities include sustaining these accomplishments, supporting the undocumented campus
community at-large, and supporting city-wide and national efforts to overhaul immigration legislation.
Why should you join UndoCU?
● If you are undocumented, because we love you and you matter.
● If you are an American citizen, because this political system considers you human above all of us, and
an informed political education requires a rooted understanding of this construction.
● If you are neither, because we believe in your humanity as much as most Americans don’t believe in
ours.
Despite common pro-immigrant narratives, we have intersectional leadership and make sure that
non-white, non-cisgender, and non-heterosexual identities are surely prioritized here.
CONTACT: undocumentedstudentsinitative@gmail.com

Manhattan House
Manhattan House is an on-campus residence where Indigenous students and allies maintain their
communal identities, host events, and relieve the pressures of university and city life. The house
was founded in 2012 as a Special Interest Community by a group of Native American Council
members already living together who wanted to secure a home for Indigenous Columbia students
for years to come. As the only physical space on campus dedicated to Indigenous students,
Manhattan House is a hub of social life and a refuge from the prejudice, misunderstanding, and
homesickness that Indigenous students often experience.
Retaining Manhattan House as an Indigenous student space has proved challenging since its
founding. Before housing was switched to a flat rate, the financial inaccessibility of the building
in which it was housed hindered students' ability to live there. During the first five years, the
community was subject to "resolutions" such as assigning non-Indigenous and non-allied transfer
students to the space at random without notifying the House or the transfer placements in order
to retain the dorm. This resulted in the Manhattan House community enduring racist speech,
manipulation, cultural insensitivity, and the need to expend undue emotional labor to mediate
external conflicts in our own home.
In 2017, Manhattan House moved to River Hall. The new dorm is not without its challenges, but
Manhattan House has been able to successfully select each of its members in this space so far.
We are advocating continuously for Manhattan House to be accessible to all Indigenous students
and for it to continue to have proper resources allocated each year.
Manhattan House Information
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/manhattanhouseCU/
Address: 628 W 114th St, 1st floor (back suite)

NATIVE AMERICAN COUNCIL(NAC)
Founded in 1996 by Native students from Barnard and Columbia, the
Native American Council (NAC) is a community and political organization that supports Indigenous students and allies on Columbia’s campus; Our members represent a diverse range of communities, intersectionalities and perspectives, as we also assert the nonexistence of
a monolithic Indigenous identity.
Each year, NAC hosts our annual Columbia Powwow in the late Spring,
where we invite our campus and local Indigenous communities, as well
as allies to share dance and space. NAC’s other large event is the
celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the fall, we have done so
through protest of Columbus Day and Open Mics, and the unveiling of
the Lenape Plaque.
Born from the efforts of NAC members, a plaque recogizing the Lenni
Lenape people as the original inhabitants of the island of Manhattan
was installed in 2016. Beginning with a 2013 petition, the effort
was revived in 2015 with a photo campaign urging Columbia’s administration to #RecognizetheLenape, which was also supported by countless campus and student organizations. NAC aims to continue such
advocacy to make, name, and center spaces of support for Indigenus
peoples and all communities of color and marginalized voices on campus.
Our current iniatives include advocacy for Indigenous representation
on Columbia’s faculty, administration, and services in order to provide adequate spaces and resources for Indigenous students on Columbias Campus. We also look forward to mantaining our relationships
with the many student
organizations that aim
to support students of
color at CU!!

From the Lenape Plaque:
“ The Lenape lived here before and during
colonization of the Americas. This plaque
recognizes these indigenous people of Manhattan, their displacement, dispossession,
and continued presence. It stands as a
reminder to reflect on our past as we contemplate our way forward”

Trans @
Barnard
Barnard is, without a doubt, the best thing about
Columbia University. But it often fails to support and make space for its trans, gender
non-comforming, and gender questioning students.
If you’re entering Barnard as a trans or non-binary student this year, we see you. (And we’re SO
EXCITED to have you here!) Know that there are
tons of us here to welcome you, to make space for
you, and to invite you to join us in fighting
against an administration that often wants us to
disappear. You are here. You belong here. And you
are never, never alone.
- Mo from GendeRev

Who to
Trust
- Student Life: Karina
and Emy are fantastic
human beings and are a
great resource for issues
that come up in student
orgs
- Primary Care: Dr. Ann
Engelland is a gem, uses
correct pronouns, is
super sensitive about
trans bodies. The rest of
the office? Hit or miss.
- Big Admin: Prez, Board
of Trustees, Provost.
TERFs for the most part.

In The
Classroom
- CU offers preferred name
changes on SSOL. For Barnard, you have to submit a
form in person to the registrar. If you’d like
someone to go with you,
reach out to GendeRev!
- If a professor refuses to
use correct pronouns/your
name, reach out to Dean
Grabiner. She is the kickass queer senior dean and a
great person to talk to!
- The Diana 5 Gender Neutral bathroom is the best.
Hands down.

Barnard is a “women’s college” on paper but not
in practice. We hope this page can be of help
but there is so much more to say about being
trans at Barnard. To talk more, come to GendeRev or email grboard@columbia.edu. We love
you and you belong here.

Columbia University South Asian Feminism(s) Alliance
SO
​ UTH

SAFA’s mission is to ​encourage dialogue and mobilize leadership and community
action against systems of oppression in the South Asian community. Our goal is to
provide a space for South Asians, Indo-Caribbeans and allies to come together and
find strength in our similarities and our differences, to learn about ourselves
as well as others, and to find solace in each other when the rest of the world
fails to accept us.
A​SIAN
SAFA is a group for those who have dealt with misogyny and violence of all forms
(including IPV or sexual violence) rampant in their homes, families, and
communities. For those who have felt like their skin was too dark, their arms too
hairy, their voices too opinionated. For those who are queer, trans, or gender
non-conforming. For those who are not able-bodied or thin. For those who are not
on a track to becoming doctors, engineers, lawyers. For those who have been
othered within our communities because of their race, caste, or religion. ​This is
a group for everyone who wishes to challenge South Asian gender norms and think
critically about the intersection of one’s multiple identities.
F​EMINISM(S)
Through group discussions, film screenings, mentorship programs and more, SAFA
aims to cultivate awareness of struggles faced by so many members of the South
Asian diaspora and folks at home, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity
between SAFA and other activist and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who
identifies with our mission to come to a meeting and join us in making this
campus a more inclusive place.
A​LLIANCE

Sign-up at bit.ly/AllSexFall18
Questions? Please reach out!
Columbiaallsex@gmail.com | Facebook.com/CUAllSex

Asian
American
Alliance

Email: aaa@columbia.edu
FB: www.facebook.com/ColumbiaAAA

Asian American Alliance, or “Triple-A”, the only explicitly political and
pan-Asian group on campus, strives to create space for the APIA
community to build solidarity among itself and with other marginalized
communities, address social/political issues at Columbia and beyond,
and for students to learn and unlearn as a collective to resist oppression
of all forms.

Yearly Events:
CultureSHOCK (a fundraising
performance showcase with
special guest performers)
Crossroads (a social justice
conference for high school youth)

Regular Events:
General body meetings (all are
welcome to discuss pressing
issues and build community)

Other Events:
Unpacking Lunchbox
Politics: East Asian Privilege
(with Yellow Jackets Collective)

Roots: Asian-American
Storytelling (with Club Zamana)
Language Learning (with
Malama Hawai’i)

Blasian Narratives Screening
and Live Performance (with
Bold, Beautiful, Black at Barnard)

Critical Perspectives on
Migration (with South Asian
Feminism(s) Alliance and
UndoCU)

Get Involved!
September 7, 4:30 PM: Info
session where you can talk
to our board members!
Early September: Apply to
be an OCM board member
to help plan programming
with AAA
Now: Like us on Facebook
for regular updates on our
programming, general body
meetings, and opportunities
in the city to take action!

CAAAV: Organizing Asian
Communities, Asian American Legal
Defense and Education Fund,
National Asian Pacific American
Women’s Forum, Adhikaar, Desis
Rising Up and Moving, Chinatown Art
Brigade, Minkwon Center for
Community Action, API Rainbow
Parents of PFLAG NYC, etc.

The following pages are reprinted w/permission from the zine A Brief History of Civil Di

isobedience @ Columbia University! Email disguide2016@gmail if you want more info

Here are some clubs that don’t have
their own page this year or are
currently inactive, but have still done
important work on campus. Feel free to
check out their online presence and
reach out!
IDENTITY BASED
Q House
Alianza
Student Organization of Latinos
Lucha
Mobilized African Diaspora (MAD)

ACTIVIST
Students Against Mass Incarceration
Columbia Against Gentrification (CAGe)
Just Labor at JTS
Take Back the Night
Liberation Coalition
Science for the People
Welcome to Barnard

POLITICAL EDUCATION
ROOTed
Intercultural Resource Center
Collective Advocacy Project (CAP)

PUBLICATION
Re:Claim

OTHER
Society for the Advancement of Underrepresented
Filmmakers (SAUF)
ALISE: Columbia Students for Sensible Drug Policy
Barnard Center for Research on Women (not a club)
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cover design by Abu Nara

you can find us online at facebook.com/cubcdisguide and on Issuu.com, or email us at
disguide2016@gmail.com! xoxo

content warning:
Some of the pages in this zine discuss different forms of violence,
including racism, institutional violence, police violence, sexual
assault & violence, coercion, and transphobia.
We invite you to take care of yourself as you read & think about
these issues!

There are no rules when making a zine!

What is a zine?

It rhymes with bean (short for magazine)

A zine is a self-pu blished magazine, meaning its creation and publication
are completely control led by the person or people making it.
Zines are usually made on paper and reproduced with a photocopier or printer. Zine creators are often
motivated by a desire to share knowledge or experience with people in marginalized or otherwise less-em powered communities. (from the Barnard Zine Library definition)

What goes into a zine?
Anything you want! A zine can have poetry, essays, photography, dr awings,
cartoons, or pretty much anything else you can im agine.

How do people use zines?
Zines aren't usually created \.viththe intent of making a profit. You might just
associate zines with riot grrr ls in the 1990s, but zines have been and are a
part of many social movements. They can be a form of creation or rebel
lion or a way to get the word out about something you care about.

Zines, NYC, Barnard/Columbia, and YOU
Interested in zine-ing your <3 out? The Barnard Library is a great place for
it! Barnard has a zine library on the third floor of Milstein and an awesome
zine librarian named Jenna Freedman.
The Bar11ardZine Club compiles sub1nissionsbased arou11done theme
each semester an d puts out a zine, so come to meetings and contribute!
(We have oreos!)

join barnard zine club
website: zines.barnard.edu
email: barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
twitter/instagram: @barnardzineclub

feminist zine fest
website: feministzinefestnyc.wordpress.com

Land Acknowledgement
The 2018 Disorientation Guide was
compiled and made on stolen indigenous
land, specifically Lenape land on Turtle
Island. Barnard and Columbia occupies
stolen Lenape land and we would like to
recognize the violent occupation of stolen
indigenous land and the violent use of stolen
labor to build these institutions.
We want to acknowledge the ongoing
violence towards indigenous people as well
as their ongoing resistance.

We sincerely invite you , the reader, to take a
few moments right now to reflect on what it
means to be occupying stolen indigenous
land, especially if you're a settler/visitor

and
not indigenous to this land. We hope you
reflect on the fact that this is just an
acknowledgement and take seriously in
exploring next steps to take to further
actively decolonize this place.

All settlers, including recent arrivants, have a

responsibility to consider what it means to acknowledge
the history and legacy of colonialism.


What are some of the privileges settlers enjoy today
because of colonialism?



How can individuals develop relationships with
peoples whose territory
contemporary

they are living on in the

North American geopolitical

landscape?


What are you, or your organization, doing beyond

acknowledging the territory where you live, work,
or hold your events?


What might you be doing that perpetuates settler

colonial futurity rather than considering alternative
ways forward for North America?


Do you have an understanding of the on-going
violence and the trauma that is part of the structure
of colonialism?
Adapted from Allison Jones for Native-Land.ca

Learn more about land acknowledgements, next steps to
actively decolonize, and resources at
native-land.ca/territory-acknowledgement/
Read about the Lenape plaque on campus from the Native
American Council at Columbia:

https: //ti nyu rl. com/honorlena pe

••
I
7
I
Columbia Universii)' is
founded as King's ColJege
by a royal charter of
British King George II.

I
II
II
!)

-_L/~.J.:.-:.,,:~
Kang Tung Pih , daughter of
Ch inese politi ~al ref'<>
rmist
Kang Youwei, graduates
from Barn,trd as one of the
first tr·ansf'ers a nd the ~irst
,voman of color.

Barnard is founded
by Colun1bia Universii)r
President Frederick
Augustus Port er Barnard,
after the Board of Trustees
rejected Barnard's
propos ition to make
Columb ia co..__.,
ed . Barnard
students
~
could not
~
,-: ej:
attend
'
Colurnbia's
classes
until

1900.

f)

9

Facultr of
Political Scienc e
admits vvomen
to classes, vvith
permission of
instructor;
authorizes the
awarding of
PhDs to
women, despite
Dean Burgess's
opposition.

In the early I920's n1any
Ivv Lea gue schools began
in~titutin g "unof ficial
quotas" to lin1it adn1itanc e
of Jewish students.
Colun1b ia's was the n1ost
severe and slashed the
Jewish population fron1
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in I 922 wit11
pal'ticu lar discrin1 ination
f
against Sephardic and
Eastern European Jews.
Quotas like these
ren1ained at Yale, for
exa rnpl e, unti l tJ1e I 960's.

I
!)
I
!)

In reaction to Wor ld
\1/ar I, Co lumbia
sta r ts the Core
Curriculum, a set of'
class standards that
has been adopted
vvith "Conten1porary
Civ." intended to
"cultivate a critical
and creative
intellectual capacii)r
that students
emp loy long after
college , in the
pursu it and the
fulfillment of
meaningful lives."

ahrie

colonialist

I
f)
Zora Neale Hurston, the first
knovvn bla .ck student at
Barnard, graduates. Hurston
,vork ed in the Anthropology
Department with Franz Boas,
collecting black folklore and
oral history.

II

In 1985, the SAS 1von their
fight for divesuuent fron1
South African Apartheid.
Barnard and Co lun1bia both
divested their respective
endo\\ '111entsfron1
corporations doing business
in South Africa, including
IBM , C BS, General
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Honeywell, and the
\ 1/ashington Post.

n

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{j

II

light of the
assassination of J\1LKand
student frustration over Vietnam, student
protests erupt over the school's active involvement
"vith the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a
\>Vea
pons research think-tank affiliated "vith the U.S.
Department of Defense and plans to build gym
facilities in Harlen1. Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS) and the Student Afro-Arnerican Society (SAS)
united, resulting in Columbia scrapp ing the Gym plans
and divesting fro1n the IDA. 712 students were
arrested; The
University 'vvasput on
pause as students
taught "Liberation
Classes" on the la~rn;
Th e Grateful Dead
gave a free concert .

hUtory

After seven students
go on a ten day
hunger strike (2007) ,
the progra1n
previously kno\ vn as
the Major Cultures
se1ninar is adopted
into the Core
Curriculum and
transformed into
~,hat we no,"' kno,"'
as the Global CO RE.

Columbia announces
its plan to expand into
\Vest Harle1n.

The Manhattanville project has displaced many
Harlem residents and businesses while creating
shiny new complexes for Columbia schools.

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WHICHPARTSOFTHESEMISSIONSMATTERTO YOU?
BARNARDCOLLEGEMISSIONSTATEMENT
Barnard College aims to provide the highest quality liberal arts education to
promising and high-achieving young women , offering the unparalleled advantages of
an outstanding residential college in partnership with a major research university.
With a dedicated faculty of scholars distinguished in their respective fields , Barnard
is a community of accessible teachers and engaged students who participate
together in intellectual risk-taking and discovery. Barnard students develop the
intellectual resources to take advantage of opportunities as new fields , new ideas,
and new technologies emerge. They graduate prepared to lead lives that are
professionally satisfying and successful, personally fulfilling , and enriched by love of
learning.
As a college for women , Barnard embraces its responsibility to address issues of
gender in all of their complexity and urgency, and to help students achieve the
personal strength that will enable them to meet the challenges they will encounter
throughout their lives. Located in the cosmopolitan urban environment of New York
City, and committed to diversity in its student body, faculty and staff, Barnard
prepares its graduates to flourish in different cultural surroundings in an
increasingly inter-connected world.
The Barnard community thrives on high expectations. By setting rigorous academic
standards and giving students the support they need to meet those standards ,
Barnard enables them to discover their own capabilities. Living and learning in this
unique environment , Barnard students become agile , resilient , responsible , and
creative , prepared to lead and serve their society.

COLUMBIACOLLEGEMISSIONSTATEMENT
A Lifetime of Learning , a World of Opportunity
At Columbia College, a uniquely designed Core Curriculum of philosophy , history ,
politics , literature , art, music , science and writing provides every student with a
comprehensive and truly transformational understanding of modern civilization. The
distinctively personal and highly interactive seminar format of the Core courses
develops the essential ability for engagement in an increasingly diverse and rapidly
changing world. Regardless of ensuing life choices, the Core Curriculum forms the
foundation for a lifetime of continued learning.
Columbia students also have the exclusive opportunity to enhance their chosen
studies through the unparalleled energy, vitality and multicultural variety of New
York City. No other college in America offers students the integration of the highest
level of educational excellence in a community with an incomparable offering of
professional , career and life experiences.
There is no more effective and dynamic preparation for the future than studying at
Columbia College in the heart of the world's most cosmopolitan city.

some ways to get yr $$$$ 's worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Columbia. it's expensive to
live in New York, and it's expensive to go to these schools I here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be carefuJ) and bring Tupperware , or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils , salt and pepper , napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNI)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federal Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don 't know why)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to 1nuseumsl new york archaelogical repository I state parks!)
• free department and student life retreats
• there 's free paper in the printers*
• there 's a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks I go
• you can get textbooks at the library: ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends ; profes sors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven ' t
• there are free classes and teach -ins if you look (book -making! social justice!)
• there 's sometimes free department/ club swag beyond t-shirts!
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you ' re on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it's cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard mail room if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build community! love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on "ethical stealing " (even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others ; consider that there 's not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want ; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food ; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

Our demands
Replace raci st statues and name s on
campus with people of color who
resisted oppression.

Decolonizethe curricula by centralizing
and privileging the voices and
knowledge of marginalized people.

Stop gentrifying Harlem.
Providefree tuition for Indigenous and
Black students, especially those from
the Lenni Lenape diaspora and Harlem
communities.

Repeal university rules that silence and
oppress students.

Allocate financial and legal resources in
defense of all marginalized identities.

RecognizeIndigenous Peoples ' Day.
Empoweruniversity workers by
bargaining living wages, full benefits ,
and workplace protections in their
union contracts.

Divest from white supremacy , settler
colonialism , military occupation and
fossil fuels.

Reconstitute the Board of Trustees with
community representatives instead of
1%ers.

We demand liberation!

For more information on our
demands or to contact us:

(!) LiberationCoalition
@liber

ationcoalitlon @ mal l.com

WH :

SUPRE

Why this map?
Columbia University was built on the backs
of Black and Indigenous people. It was their
blood, sweat, and tears that laid the bricks and
concrete, and who provided rich white men
the time to ponder curricula. Throughout its
history, Columbia has faced resistance to its
complicity in racist violence and real gains have
been won-such as the establishment of the
Manhattan House and the Malcolm X Lounge.
We hope this map continues to grow and
contributes to current and future struggles to
hold the institution accountable to the people
that it has marginalized throughout its history.

Definition of
key terms
I

ITE
:MACY

I



"Decolonization " The repatriation of
Indigenous and Black life, land, values,
language and knowledge. The recognition of
European-American settler colonialism and
the marginalization of Indigenous and Black
people. [Linda T. Smith, Margaret Kovach]



"Anti-Black Racism " Intentional and
unintentional systematic oppression of
Black people rooted in slavery that is utilized
to preserve a global anti-Black system
that exists across political, economic, and
cultural domains. [PROP Committee of CUSSW]



"Settler Colonialism " The genocide,
forced removal and replacement of
Indigenous populations with a settler society
(such as Europeans moving to the Western
Hemisphere) that develops a distinct identity
and sovereignty on the occupied land .
[Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz]



"white Supremacy " A political, economic,
and cultural hierarchy designed to control
access to resources (such as housing,
education, and health care) and reinforce
white superiority and domination over people
whose physical appearance and cultural
practices are different than those found
in white Europe. [FrancesAnsley, Iris Marion
Young]

HAVEMEYER HALL
(opened 1898)
Named for FrederickChristianHavemeyer,Classof 1825
Fundedby TheodoreHavemeyer,Classof 1868

Columbia is awash in money derived from
the slave trade. Slave merchants provided
the initial funds for Columbia's endowment,
which now stands at $10 billion, and have
even directly financed some of the buildings
that students use today, including Havemeyer
Hall. The Havemeyers were one of nine slave
merchant families who founded Columbia,
and they continued to profit from slave
labor in the sugar industry until slavery was
abolished in Cuba in 1886, just 10 years
before they financed Havemeyer Hall. We
demand Columbia acknowledge its complicity
in slavery by changing the name of this hall
and providing free tuition to descendants of
the encaptured people forced to build this
University.


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THOMAS JEFFERSONSTATUE
{installed 1914)

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ThirdPresidentof the UnitedStates, 1801-1809; no affiliation
with ColumbiaUniversity

Thomas Jefferson is universally known
for his role in crafting the Declaration of
Independence . Less often discussed is his
commentary devaluing black beings, and
his continued profit from an estimated 600
encaptured people forced into slave labor
at Monticello mansion . Jefferson's wavering
presence in conversations on slavery directly
relates to his own benefit from slave labor.
In place of Columbia's Jefferson statue,
we demand the university erect statues of
individuals such as Harriet Tubman , Sojourner
Truth, or Ida B. Wells; Black women who
dedicated their lives to the struggle against
slave owners like Jefferson. Students of the
past have protested the statue due to its
symbolic violence, and those protests should
be met with change.

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LemerHall

ButlerLIi



medium.com/@MADatCU /mobilized-african-diaspora mad-statement-to-columbia-university-6859db2cf614
■ npr.org/ 2012/03/11/148305319/life
-at-jeffersonsmonti ce Ilo-as -his-slaves -saw-it

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114thSI

BUTLER LIBRARY
(opened 1934)
Named for NicholasMurray Butler,Presidentof Columbia
University
, 1902-1945

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Nicholas Murray Butler was a President of
Columbia University and an open supporter of
fascism. He remained friends with Mussolini
until the US joined WWII, and in 1933, invited
Hans Luther, Nazi Germany's ambassador, to
speak at Columbia, stating Luther represented
"an emissary from a friendly people ". Butler
suggested that admitted students take
physicals to "find grounds to eliminate
socially unappealing Jews smart enough
to have passed the [university's] entrance
examination ". Unfortunately, the library 's
name is symbolically apt for a universit y like
Columbia. The core curriculum is almost
completely white and male- a state of affairs
Hitler would have been proud of. Not only do
we demand the library 's name be changed
but the core curriculum be decolonized.


magazine.columbia.edu
/ reviews/ spring-2010/h ear-no-evil

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LENNI LENAPEPLAQUE
{installed 2016)
First recognitionof Columbia'soccupationof Indigenousland.

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The Lenni Lenape people have a history on
this land that extends over 10 ,000 years.
The first treaty signed by the U.S. government
was with the Lenni Lenape, which promised
statehood in exchange for allyship in the
Revolutionary War. Despite this promise,
settler colonialists continued to occupy Lenni
Lenape land, committing acts of genocide
and forced migration. Today, the Lenni Lenape
and the Nanticoke run a sovereign tribal
government. In 2016, the Native American
Council finished a five year long effort for
recognition of the Lenape land that Columbia
occupies. Naming the land and the people
is a critical first step , but true decolonization
would mean the repatriation of Indigenous life
and land for the Lenni Lenape diaspora and
for all Indigenous peoples, tribes, and Nations.


JohnJay





nanticoke-lenape.info/ hist ory.ht m
delawarenation.com/ about-us/
delawaretribe.org/ home-page/ about-the-tribe/
lenapeindiantribeofdelaware.com

BARNUMBIASURVIVALGUIDEFORSTUDENTSWITHDlSABILITIES
Being a student with a disability means you will have to work harder than most (if not all) of your classmates. This
is not because of any fault of your own, but the institutions of power you will be relying on. These institutions,
Barnard and Columbia, as well as the city of New York, were not built for you and that makes every step you take a
challenge. This guide aims to make this process easier by identifying a few key actions upon your arrival on
campus. Know that you will have these tools and the help of other students to get past these hurdles.
Barnard's Services:
Office of Disability Services
If you are a student living with disabilities you should register with ODS now , even if you have not previously
needed accommodations , rather than wait until you might need their services because it takes time and
documentation to be approved for services. Documentation from doctors and therapists of your disability is
required. 3-4 people in ODS take care of over 500 students on campus.
Accommodations:
Academic : ODS can provide academic accommodations to help you in the classroom including extra time on
tests and extra excused absences. You will need to meet with your professor to 'prove ' your disability.
Residential Life: ODS can provide housing accommodations to make life easier on campus such as a dorm
with AC , a single , a building with wheelchair access, or having a service animal with you on campus. Res Life
has more control than ODS in housing accommodations and this process can be frustrating.
Furman Counseling Services
If you are living with mental health issues you should register with Furman. The intake process can be taxing
as you must share details of your mental health history to determine whether you need long term or short term
counseling. The office will give you referrals but there is also a network of students to offer therapist
recommendations.
Student Services:
Barnard Network for Students with Disabilities
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects you to other students dealing with
similar issues on campus. This is a place to ask for support , ask for recommendations , be part of a greater
community of people that want to help or just vent.
Barnard Pay It Forward
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects students who need someone to help
run errands for them by connecting them to students who are willing to help . This is for anyone who that needs
something from the store but can', not just students with disabilities (medication , groceries etc.).
Campus and the greater city of New York
- Access to Barnard resources is often blocked by economic access to get a prescription for accommodations
or receive long-term mental healthcare. The Student Health Advisory Committee has collected off-campus
resources for low-income folks and identity based resources that can be found on their FB page.
- Both campus and New York City may be difficult for students with mobility disabilities. Barnard and Columbia
have very old buildings and elevators (espec ially Milbank and Hamilton). There are tunnels under Columbia
that provide access to parts of Columbia for wheelchair users.
- NYC's public transportation system is in violation of the American Disability Act (ADA) in that its subway
system is not accessible to people with mobility disabilities . The 1 line subway stop on 116th and Broadway
does not have an elevator (96th Street has an elevator).
Community Advice
-It is important to advocate for yourself but also important to be able to ask for help from a friend , faculty
member , or member disability advocacy community. Molree Williams-Lendor, the director of Title IX and Equity
and the overseer of ODS , is an incredible resource and good person to meet with.
- School may knock you down; it is okay if you don't have the strength to get up again. Some students find the
need to take a lighter academic load or to take a semester or year off.
-You are not weak for taking time to work on your own health ; you are strong for prioritizing yourself. You are
attending a school that does not fully accommodate you and that takes a toll. You may have a different college
experience but that doesn 't mean it won't be a good one. When the administration does not provide the
support you need, remember you have a community ready to back you up. There an entire community here
excited for you to join us.

ACCESSSUGGESTIONSFOR MOBILIZATIONS
By Sins Invalid - Disability Justice performance project by QTPOC artists
Tnsupport of our current collec tive uprising, ,ve offer these suggestions for making sure that your actions/
n1arches/ n1obilizations include as man y of us as possible. This work is ideally done from a deeper political
commitn1ent to disability justice, or at n1inin1um a critique of ableisn1 and an understanding of consent; othenvise
paternalism and abuse can masquerade as "access support."
• Always have a Di sability Point Person . Announce them from the mic; have them ,vear an ar1nband for
visibility. Their skills should inc lude a disability justice franie,vork, problem solving, and good listening .
• Announce that the event ,vill be fragrance free; ask peop le ,vho are heavily scented to self-segregate.
• Generally speaking, ,vritten text offers an additional n1ode of comn1unication.
• To support accessibility for folks that are DHoH / for those ,vho can't hear the n1ic
• have an ASL interpreter at d1e mic

use slips of paper to communicate the nuts and bo lts of logistics (possibly ,vith chants , to
communicate destinations, die National La,vyers Guild's #, etc.)
• ha,e ASL interpreters in the cro,vd
• Organize push ,vheelchairs in advance for people ,vho n1ay need them; annow1ce d1eir availability from the
.

nuc



Organize low stimulation spaces near the main gathering space (e.g. a room, or tent); announce from the
nuc



















Organize childcare and changing stations; announce from the mic
Organize multilingua l translation services; announce from the mic
I-la ve the tactical tean1 spread throughout n1obilizations (e.g. the four quadrants)
Rent walkie-talkies. More information = better access. Be mindful that police escalation needs to be
con1municated ,vith participants in a caltn manner , and will in1pact so1ne more than others.
Provide chairs (folding chairs, mobile bleachers, etc.) for rallies / gatherings where people can expect to be
standing for 20 n1it1or more. Announce their location from the mic and explain that d1ey are for people
,vith disabilities , elders, and others ,vho cannot stand for a lengili of titne .

At a march:
Do a march route run-d1rough wid1 mobility in mind - possibly seated in a ,vheelchair or in an abandoned
shopping cart (e. g. looking for grids, grassy areas, hills, ho les, etc.)
Invite peop le ,vith disabilities if d1ey ,vould like to set the pace of the march by being at the front
Give an auditory description of the n1arch route beforehand
Make an announcement before the march regarding the destination and distance of the route , so that folks
can choose to meet the march there.
DO NOT "direct" folks with mobility impairments to where you think the y should be; you can offer
respectful suggestions; no one should be hurried along - ideally the slowest pace shou ld set d1e pace of the
march; no one should touch people or their 111obilitydevices ,vid1out d1eir consent.
Organize a car or van to drive elders and peop le with disabilities from the beginning to the end of the
march. Provide seatit1g at the destination.
Have distinct tactical and safety teams
Police liaisons shou ld be communicating with police that there are participants ,vith disabilities (and elders,
pregnant folks, etc) and that the march intends to respect that pace.
Be a,vare that cops ,vill often target folks ,vith disabilities as perceived '\veak links"; cops target folks at the
end of actions as energy dissipates.

Access Sugg es tions For Public Event s: http ://s insinvalid.o rg/ blog / access -suggestio ns-for-a-p ublic-eve nt

Columbia
STUDENTS
FOR
JUSTICE
IN
PALESTINE
is
a
diverse
group
of students,
f acul ty , staff,
and community
members
f rom
Columbia
and
Barnard,
organized
on
democratic
princip
le s to promote
justice,
human rights,
liberation,
and self-determination
for
the
Pa les tinian
people.
We organize
in accordance
with
the
Palestinian
civi l society
ca l l for Boycott,
Divestment,
and Sanctions
(BOS) against
Israe l until
it
ends
the
occupation
of
Palestine
and dismantles
its
apartheid
state.

·.•.·.·.······
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chapter
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FOR PEACE is
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celebrate
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JVP

SJP launched
February
of 2016 ,
&

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

APARTHEID DIVEST
wh ich calls
on
Columbia
to divest
its
stocks
, funds ,
and endowment
from
companies
that
p r ofit
from the State
of Israel
' s
violations
of international
law and
Palestinian
human rights
through
its
ongoing
system
of settler
colonialism
military
occupation
, and apartheid
.
To find

out

more,

check

out

apartheiddivest.com
\

bit.ly/CUADpet

divestment

or go to
to sign
our
petition
!

facebook . com /CO apartheiddivest
faceboo k.com/ColumbiaSJP
facebook
. com/JVPColumbia
& on twitter
@ColumbiaSJP

AJI!
NEW{, FROM

,

PALES,INA!

THE

BEHIND THE
BARNARD REFERENDUM
On March 24th , 2018 following
a presentation
from Columb i a
Universi ty Apartheid
Di vest
(CUAD), t he Barnard
College
Student
Government
Association
(SGA) voted
to initiate
a
referendum
on CUAD' s campaign
to divest
Barnard
and
Columbia ' s endowments from companies
that profit
from the
State
of Israel ' s apa rth e id and occupa ti on regime . The
referendum
asked
Barnard
students
: should
SGA write
a
le t ter of support
t o the Administration
encouraging
th e
College
" to divest
from eight multinational
companies
that
profit
from or engage in the State of Israel ' s t reatment
of
Pa l estinians?"
Following
an
b r eak i ng voter

intense
turnout

campaigning
period
with
, on April
18 the referendum

record passed
voting
in

by a two-to-one
margin , with 63 . 4 % of respondents
favor of divestment!
The passage
of the r efe r endum was not

only an undeniable
victory
for the Palestinian
movement , but also an unprecedented
show of
the Barnard communi ty in favor of Palestinian

solidarity
support
from
rights .

This referendum
is yet another
step on the path to full
divestment
at Barnumbia , and one step c l oser to justice
for
the Pa l es ti n i an peop l e . Barnard
Pr es i den t Si an Be il ock ,
cow in g to inst i tut i ona l presures
and reactionary
Zionist
a l umni and donors , was quick
to publicly
dismiss
the
results
and the voice
of the student
body.
Nevertheless,
CUAD will
con tinu e to organize
until
Col umbia University
and Barnard College
divest
from all companies
complicit
in
Israel ' s in j ustices
!
for

the

after
apartheiddivest.org

HOT FACTS on what

the

referendum,

happened
check out :

& facebook.corn/CUapartheiddivest



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STRIKE PROI..IFERAT&D
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TME /NC>U.SRIAL REVOLUTION

-

Welive in a world markedby exploitation,rising inequality,racism,
sexism,homophobia,transphobia,ableism,oppression,imperialist
war,environmentaldegradation
. As socialists,we believethat these
horrorsstemfrom capitalism-the socialand economicsystemwe live
underthat valuesthe profits of a tiny minorityabovethe needsof the
vast majorityof humanity.And Columbiaisn't exemptfrom its injustice.
1

TheColumbiaadministrationstayssilentas Palestinesolidarity
activistsand pro-Palestinefaculty membersare blacklistedand
threatened;it opposesthe democraticand historic vote of
graduatestudentsto form a union; it policesand
displacesworking-classpeople of color in Harlem;it protects
rapists.andassailants;andthe list goeson and on.
1

Wearethe BarnardColumbiabranchof the International
SociaJistOrganization:
a groupof students,workers,and
communitymembersdedicatedto fightingall formsof
exploitationand oppression,andto buildinga radically
differentworld-a socialistworld-in whichhumanneed,
·ustice anddemocrac are aramount

:-- -

Weentercampuswith a choice: Are we here
• simplyto get a degreefrom an elite university,or
arewe goingto actuallychallengethe inequality
and oppressionthat gets reproducedhere?

ur meetingsstud

I
International Socialist Organization
·~ FB: Barnard Columbia Socialists ~
~
columbia.lso@gmall.com
~
•we meet Thursdays @Spm/locatlon TBD•

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CA

THE
HARLEM
RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattan ville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4 , 2014 , the
/ :•, day when police burst
. ' · through residents '
· doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later , parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
··{f entering their homes
' · without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. "T he police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage, " one parent said
after the raids. "T hat's not a good feeling , that you're using me to get a promotion. " 103
people were indicted in the raid ; that day , police arrested over 40 people .

~J

The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia's Morningside campus , and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYP D ' s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
l'.!S S,fe\
students heard from their own administration:
........\ ~/).......................... .
(. Gant/ Manhattanv ille
safety. An email went out the day after the
: Housing Proj ects
raids informing students that it would " make
....
~-················
-~ (<I
our city and community safer. " The reality ,
(o~'li
sg1
es,
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there , and that services , not
incarceration , are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What ' s more , it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
(
residents when Columbia won approval to build
51· Cn.luinhia t:J
Uri ,ers11y
a new campus across the street from their
homes, the expansion has brought them only
band -aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and -on over the past 40 years ,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tays hanna "Chicken " Murphy , a nationally
ranked high school basketball player , was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult ,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities , and employment training to young residents of Grant and

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattan ville and Grant , but the West Harlem Development Corporation the group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act .
The WHDC , mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister ' s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small -scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren ' t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses ,
and they don ' t provide the core services --employment and crisis response --that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses .
Now , many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same , and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes , which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison , N YCHA will take away their homes . What's
more , the N YPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids . The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattan ville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people , arresting 88 in one day.
As students , we can 't accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities , police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our U niversity expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses , it is in the U niversity ' s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities . It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived --and , in the case of Grant and Manhattanville , been
ignored --for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
" development " that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia ' s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University ' s outright support for the raids , coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant , sends a
clear message to residents : Columbia is coming to your neighborhood , but it is not here
for you.

Graduate
Workers
of Columbia-UAW
It 's time for Columbia to come to the bargaining table. Harvard ,
Brown, NYU, Cornell, The New School, American University,
Brandeis, Tufts, American and Georgetown have all agreed to
bargain with graduate workers after they won a union election.
Call President Bollinger at (212) 854-9970 and tell him that
Columbia is on the wrong side of history , and it's past time to sit
down at the table with CU's hardworking graduate workers.

columbiagradunion.

org

Columbia
hasbeendelaying
forfouryears.

Here'showyoucanhelp
Columbia
GradWorkers
Everyone: Call President Bollinger 's office and tell him
to bargain: (212) 854-9970

Alumni:

Sign the alum petition at
columbiagradunion.org/alum

and pledge

not to donate to the University until they
recognize our rights and bargain

Faculty:

Sign the faculty petition at
columbiagradunion.org/faculty

Thank
youforstanding
withthousands
ofColumbia
gradworkers
andontherightsideofhistory!
columbiagradunion.org

Columbia
isontheWrong
SideofHistory
It has been over a year since grad workers at Columbia voted for a union by
an overwhelming margin. Since then , Columbia administrators have tried
every trick in the book , including asking the Trump administration to throw
out the results of our election , to avoid bargaining with us.
Columbia has spent undisclosed but significant sums retaining Proskauer
Rose to help delay bargaining with graduate workers. Instead of bargaining
fair recourse for sexual harassment, one of the main reasons graduate
workers voted to unionize , Columbia spends money on a law firm enmeshed
in its own $SOM gender -bias lawsuit and who defends the University against
claims of sexual harassment . Such questionable use of resources betrays our
community , the university 's reputation and donors ' trust.
We work hard and are dedicated to the
core principles of Columbia, but we have
had enough. We work long hours for the
university , and most of us take home less
than $30,000 a year while securing millions
in grants and research funding.
We won a union election with
72% of the vote sixteen months ago-and
the law is clear. Columbia must bargain
with us. As long as they refuse to respect
our legal rights , we will take action to take
our power back.

Following
ourstrikevote
, aftera majority
ofgraduate
worke~

Harvard
University
agreed
tobargain
with1
Columbia
continues
tosidewiththe1%ratl

Columbia
Grad
Workers
AreGaining
Momentum
Every
Day
We have been fighting for our union for four years- from the card drive in
2014, to our election in 2016, to certification in 2017 , to the strike - and
growing stronger every day.
We want a union because we want to make progress on issues like late pay,
real recourse in the event of sexual harassment and assault , dilapidated lab
facilities, and stable pay and benefits.
More than 200 elected officia ls, including Senators Bernie Sanders and Chuck
Schumer, Reps. Jerry Nadler and Grace Meng (and even the President of
Ireland), have joined 70 student groups, hundreds of faculty and more than
2,000 alumni and students in asking Columbia to do the right thing - but
they continue to refuse.
This growing momentum makes clear
that Columbia's efforts to b lock our
democratic rights here on our campus
cannot hold back the rising tide of
academic workers seeking to improve our
conditions and make our universities
more just and inc lusive for all.



: atHarvard
votedinfavorofunionization
,

theirunion.
Butunlike
Harvard,
~erthanour72%democratic
majority.

, •.....•••.•...•.•.•...•.•..•..... ..•••.•.•.••••.....•.•..•.•.••...•.......•.•...•
What you can expect this year from Q:

contact us!

.••.•

• facilitated discussions about topics related to being LGBTQ
(religion! dating! race! media!)
• movie nights & watch parties (POSE?Queer Eye? Stick It?)
• crafts and other de-stressing activities
• FOOD!and gay swag (fanny packs?!)
• events like the above "" that will be closed spaces for
people of color

facebook: barnardQ
email:

clubQbaroard@gmaiLcom
co-presidents: anai
(atf21 13@barnard.edu),
gaby (gf2330@bamard.edu

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• ••• • •• •• •• • •• •• •• • ••• • ••••••••••••••

• ••• • ••• • •

fti>BARNARD
, ............... ............................................

.... ......... .

What's up with Q?
• we are Barnard's club for LGBTQstudents
• we had a brief hiatus, and now we are coming back
with renewed values
• we are committed to being an inclusive group and
centering the most marginalized voices in the
LGBTQcommunity, especially people of color
•••• • ••••••

• ••• • ••••••

• ••• • •• •• ••• • •• • ••• • ••••••

• ••• •• ••••• • ••• • ••• • ••••••

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#

Can't-miss radical conferen ce on campus!

! ! ! ! truste d and su
rtive administrato r alert !!!
Jessica Cannon, director of the Well Woman
program is a true ange l descended from heaven as
well as a trusted advocate and co-conspirator for
marg inalized students on campus. If you have any
hea lth- , stress-, rela tions hip- related concern (or just
wan t to make an adu lt friend!) Jess ica is the best.
She has walk-in office ho urs m-f 1-4pm in cozy 119
reid hall (around corner from brooks e levators).
Also check ou t peer educator office hou rs sun, tues,
weds, thurs 7-9pm (POC-on ly on Tuesdays!)

look out for the Barnard Center for Research on
Women's annual Scholar and Feminist
Confe rence in the spr ing semester (and other
events th roughout the year!) the BCRW is really
radica l and brings amazing activ ists and scholars
together every spr ing to share t heir knowledge

Proud
Colors
*Statement
of
Purpose
As Queers of Color, we are forced to straddle a history of division. Historically speaking,
the struggle for racial equality has been heterosexist in its vision, and the queer liberation movement has been predominantly Euro-centric in its scope. As people who struggle with our own
questions of identity, we are also burdened by the need to find a tenuous balance between groups
that have traditionally displayed open hostility towards each other, framing their struggles as
entirely separate, completely independent missions.
We reject such a view. A historical perspective shows that the highly complex processes that constructed the identities of people of color as the villified. Other also resulted in an often unspoken
consequence: heterosexism. Men of color have been constructed as maniacal sexual perverts,
women of color as exotic sexual objects, white women as passive sexual victims, and white men
as virile sexual protectors.
While the creation of racialized gender stereotypes are obvious, what is not so obvious is the
normalization of sexuality along lines of race and gender. From this normalization results com pulsory heterosexuality, and its flip-side, homophobia. During the period of European imperialism that heralded the beginning of modern racism, the considerable number of institutions
and cultural practices of same-sex sexual behavior in colonialized societies were destroyed by an
imposed compulsory heterosexuality.
Clearly the roots of racism and heterosexism are not independent, but rather intimately connected. Any recognition of racism must necessarily recognize sexism and homophobia at the same
time. Any liberation movement that does not do so denies the complexity of its oppression, and
is doomed to failure in its struggle against the oppression as a result.
But current conventional wisdom insists that the struggles against various oppressions must not
be combined. As a result, Queers of Color are often marginalized within groups that are already
marginalized. We are forced to fight racism and homophobia in society at large, as well as racism within the queer community, and homophobia within communities of color. We must face a
constant onslaught of multiple oppressions, coming from all directions at once. What is lacking,
and blatantly so, is a safe space in the University community where Queers of Color are marginalized no further, and are free to discuss and address issues and concerns that are unique to our
situation.
But at the same time, we also recognize the importance of linking oppressions. From our perspective, we see, on a day to day basis, the intersections of racism and homophobia,
as well as their connections with sexism, classism, and other forms of discrimination. We also
recognize the importance of collective action and struggle, and are committed to such strategies
in combating and destroying institutionalized racism and heterosexism, as well as other forms of
.
oppression.
As a result, Queers of Color is committed to an organization that does not discriminate on any
basis, especially race and sexual preference. We welcome anyone and everyone who is committed
to addressing issues and concerns that affect many people, but Queers of Color in particular. We
claim unity with all organizations that are committed to fighting racism and homophobia. And
we look forward to the day when society is truly and totally egalitarian.
In the tradition of the Combahee River Collective, and in the footsteps of Queers of Color like
James Baldwin and Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga and Jewel Gomez, and Nick Deocampo, we
rightfully claim our place.
-April 17, 1995
*Proud Colors was started as Queers of Color

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CDLUl1BIAUEEAALLIANCE
founded April 19, 1967
by Stephen Donaldson
as Student Homophile League
first recognized queer collegiate organization in U.S.

aur wark







anti -racist
anti -colonial
anti -capitalist
gender liberatory
prison abolitionist
decolonial

past events
Trans Day of Remembrance
Coming Out Muslim
Black Excellence Tour
Israeli Apartheid Week
Community Dinners
Film Screenings

angaing callabaratians with ...







Students for Justice in Palestine / Apartheid Divest
Proud Colors
Muslim Students Association
No Red Tape and 24/ 7 Columbia
Graduate Workers of Columbia
Qj
Barnard Center for Research on Women

Columbia Queer and Asian

We strive to support and empower queer/trans
Asian/Asian-American students while col laborat ing
with queer/poc organizations
to create a community
and safer space for queer students of color .

Like our FB page to stay updated on
meetings and events or look out for our
beautiful flyers created on Microsoft Point or
reach us at qanda.columbia@gmail.com
We host weekly community
meetings/study breaks with
chocopies, other snacks, and board
games to build the QTAPI
community on campus.
We also ha v e social and political events such as: Queer
Asian Film Fest, Asian LGB-Tea Time with NYU, and Queer
Southeast Asian Panel as well as other collaborative
events with organizations
on and off campus .
Some QT API resources in NYC: API Rainbow Parents of
PFLAG NYC, Q -WAVE, NQAPIA

new, * A,I, * Spo,t, * Jan * Cla11ical * new fflu,ic * lalin
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89.9 WKCRFM-NYis Columbia University's
student-run,
non-commercial radio station.
Let's break it down.
*Student-run : As a student-run station,
WKCRprides itself
on being a space for all students to learn about radio programming. Absolutely no radio experience or musical *expertise* necessary.
*Non-Commercial: WKCRhas a long history of playing music
and talk radio that is not dictated by what is commercially viable. WKCRhas a reputation for alternative
programming such as: Studio A, our literary
show showcasing queer
writers and writers of color; Live Constructions, featuring experimental,
in-studio live sets; The Musician's Show,
inviting local jazz artists
to discuss their music and influences, as well as Offbeat our hip hop show that emerged
in the 1990s, the first to broadcast MCs like Tupac, Biggie,
Wu-Tang Clan, Nas, Jay Z, and the Fugees. (For more infor mation on all our shows visit wkcr.org!)
How to get involved!
1. Stop by and say hi at our table at the Activities
Fair!
2. Come to the fall interest
meeting on Sunday, Suptember
9th (exact time and location TBA) to learn more about our
departments and find a show you want to shadow weekly .
3. Expect an email from our lovely intern coordinators
Bruce
and Rachel, who will be a guide and resource you can count
on.
4. Begin interning ! Learn alongside a fellow programmer
about everything from music history to audio engineering.

The African Show * ffliddle Ea,le,n Influence, * Sound, of

C

* llip llop * Blue, * runk & Soul * Go,pel * Indian Cla,,ical
WKCRis open and broadcasting 24/7!
Our station is a sweet little
club house and haven for music lovers located on the corner of 114th and Broadway.
WKCRalso has hella

resources that YOUSHOULD
USE!
Such as:

*A library of 30,000 records and CDs that you can borrow
and use for your radio shows or listen to at home.
*Three, sound-proof studios great for recording interviews
or coming in to do your homework as you listen to music on
our studio monitors.
*An insulated room with amps, mies, a piano and a drum kit!
Come jam with friends or invite an artist to play a set and
we will help you put it on the airwaves!
*Zoom-recorders and lots of other audio equiptment you can
use to make field recordings or record interviews.
*Airwaves! We are a recognized radio station in the tristate area and in the world. Use our platform to connect
with your favorite local musicians; go to shows for free
and interview and record a band you admire.
*A community of music-lovers

to learn

from and alongside!

iJ

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'

***ALSO! *** This fall we will be having a FESTIVALfrom
October 11th-October 13th celebrating
Latinx Heritage in
NYC. If you are a self-identifying
Latinx student interested in guest DJing email jr3629@barnard.edu!

)hina * U,bano lalina * Som de B,azil * Ca,ibe lalino *

*

BOAT
BOAT, aka the BarnardOutdoor AdventureTeam, is
Barnard's back-packing
, hiking, nature-exploringcollective. We
organize free and subsidizedforays into the wildernessof
Manhattanand beyond (beyond ! ! !), making natureaccessible for
every/body regardlessof income.Jfu like leaves, smores, trail
songs, and blisters (jk) (well, maybe) come hang with us on one of
our adventures!We've gone kayaking in the Hudson, swimming
and sleeping under the stars in Harri1nanPark, and camping with
,vild horses on AssateagueIsland in Maryland, just to name a few.
In fact, when we traveled to Montreal to participatein the InterCollegiate Winter OlympicGames, we became Barnard's only
competingteam (bringinghome exactly zero medals be we're not
that hardcore). Like us on facebookat BOAT - BarnardOutdoor
AdventureTeam, follow us on insta @boatbarnard, and shoot us
an email at barnard.boat@gmail.com to get on our listserv! We
,velcomeall experience levels :D

www
.wbar. org
wbar@barnard
. edu

In 1993, a group of women at Barnard applied for a rock
show at Columbia's radio station, WKCR
. When they were rejected,
they decided to create an alternative . WBARfirst went on the
air on April 1, 1993.
WBARis a student-run,
non-commercial, freeform, onl i ne
radio station . In addition to our programming, we do ticket
giveaways, host various music-related events on campus, and hold
two live concerts a year, one in the fall and one in the spring.
WBAR
offers freedom and creativity
to DJs and listeners
who
seek a less structured form of radio expression. DJs are free to
create their own show concepts and playlists
for a weekly 2hour-long slot .
WBARis also a resource for any student and activist
groups
who might need audio equipment (such as microphones or a PA) for
events . These can be signed out through a contract form if you
send us an email (listed above) .

Keep an eye out for upcoming announcements about our
general interest meeting and call for FALL2018 season
applications!

Barnard Contingent Facu_l~yUAW Local 2110 (BCF-UAWJ is
the newest labor union on the Barnard/
Columbia campus. We unionized in
Spring 2015 to fight the worsening
exploitationof contingent (i.e.,nontenure-track)faculty at Barnard. The
BC administrationfought us at every
step, bringing in expensiveunionbusting
lawyers to stall, demean, and defeat
our efforts. But with the support

of Barnard students and alums-and by setting
a deadline to go on strike-we won. In Spring 2017
we signed a contract with wage minimums among the highest in
the country and many improvementsto our benefits and working
conditions. We're still a far way, though, from equity among all of
Barnard's faculty, and BCF-UAWcontinues to fight for fairness. Our
parent union, UAW Local 2110also representsBC support staff, CU
support staff, CU grad workers (GWC), and CU postdocs (CPW).

Local 2110 has been fighting for and winning pay
equity, gender equity, and economic justice for
Barnard & Columbia workers for over 40 years.
3 KEY STRUGGLES TO PAY ATTENTION TO THIS YEAR:
• GWC-UAW : Forcing the Bollinger administration to respect the overwhelming
democratic will of Columbia grad workers and start bargaining a contract.
• BCF-UAW : Demanding Barnard stop cheating unionized First-Year Seminar faculty
of their FYS stipend that the highly-paid non-union faculty still receive.
• CPW-UAW : Supporting Columbia postdocs (CPW) as they hold an election for
federal recognition of their union.

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We a r e a grassr oo ts or ga ni zat ion wor ki ng to end
sex ua l + domes ti c v i olence
i n our campus communiti
we envision
a world free of violence+
oppression.

es b e ca u se

We recognize
that
sexua l v i olence
is
a manifestation
of
systemic
gender
oppression
which cannot
be separated
from al l
other
forms
of oppression
. Therefore
, the fight
to end sexual
+ domestic
violence
cannot
be won without
eradicating
all other
forms
of oppression
including
but
not
limited
to
racism,
class i sm, ableism,
co l onial i sm , homophobia,
+ transphobia
.

we use direct ac t i on
t o exp o se the
vi o lence our
institution+
larger
s o c i ety no rmal i zes .

We seek
to foster
transparency
around
i ssues
of
sexual
violence
because
we believe
that
a bottom
up approach
to building
power is the only way to
achieve
justice.
Our current
accessibility
enforcement
Univers i ty
env i ronment
regardless
lim i ted to
soc i oeconom
rel i gion) .

campaign
demands
mor e support,
, accountability,
funding , +
(SAAFE) to ensure
that Columbia
i s an inclusive
educat i onal
where surv i vors can thrive ,
of their
ident i ty (includ i ng but not
race , sex, gender , sexual
orientation,
i c status , i mmi gration
status , +

A major
demand of our campaign
is for the creation
of a
rape crisis
center
that is physically
open 24/7 + staffed
with
professional
advocates
trained
in
cultural
competency.
We believe
that
these
changes
will
improve
the quality
of resources
for all
surv i vors , espec i ally
for survivors
whose exper i ences
don't
match traditional
narratives
and who come from marginalized
communities
.

////////////////

////////////////

The wor k we do is
alway s c entered
on
the needs+
experiences
of

sur v i v or s .

///////////

////////////////

,

Want to get involved?
Si gn up for our l i stserv@
htt;p;//noredtapecu.org/new-page/
or email
noredtapecu@gmail
. com ! Our wee kly meetings
are on Sundays
from 7PM- 8PM.
Go to www.NoRedTapeCU.orgto learn

////////////////

////////////////

more

about

our

work+

////////////////

for

info

on resources.

///////////

,

As many students who identify as first generation
and/or low -income may agree, Columbia University
does not always offer the appropriate safe spaces or
platforms for students to ta lk about issues that pertain
to them . In order to raise awareness about c lass issues,
build a first generation and/or low -income community
that transcends all barriers, foster an open and
respectfu l campus environment, engage in a cross class dialogue, advocate on behalf of the community,
lead service projects pertaining to these issues and
empower first generation low -income students at
Columbia, we are looking to start a conversation
amongst students about what our community needs.
Entitled FLIP, we look to create safe spaces to discuss
issues relevant to our community in order to combat t
stigmas we might face, promote discussion of
socioeconomic class and education access, and
advocate for resources .

SHAREMEALS
FLiPintroducedShareMeals t
campus in 2016 ShareMeals is
an app designed to connect
those in needof swipes to
those who havetoo many. It is
available on both iOSand
Android platforms. please
downloadand help combat
food insecurity on campus.

FLIP LENDING LIBRARY
FLiP maintains a lending librar
at Barnard library and on the 4th
floor of Milstein Library at Butler
that is available to all FLI
students on campus.

FLiPworks to combat a numbe
of issues facing the FLI
community on campus today,
includingfood insecurity, financial
uncertainty,and general
unawarenessof FLI issues within
the student community, faculty,
and administration.

G-BODYMEETINGS
FLiP has bi-monthly general
body meetings designedto
promote community building
and provide a necessaryoutlet
for grievances on campus.

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FOODPANTRY
FLIP was a key player in the
creation of Columbia's Food
Pantry. Designedto combat the
struggle of food insecurity on
campus, it is open to all from 4
-7pm in 582 LernerHall.

0

@FLIPCOLUMBIA

Divest Ba1·na1·df01· Columbia
a just Tram·ition Divestfo,·
&
Climate justice
hn1Lii, on f,1N'h0Ql (Qr m ort' 1nlo'

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c-olunll,1,1divc"••lf
• Krn.iel.c-f.lrn

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• •

- . . .• •







Climatejtt tice i a moven1ent tl1af under tand climate change
not only a an e11viron1T1entali ue, but <l an i tle of social
ju rice. Climate change doe n't affect everybody in t11e ame \vay ,
and the people facing the mo t harn1 are tl10 e already uffering
y temic opp re ion , including ant iblack raci m , exploitation,
and imperialism . For example, sea level ri e is di placing people
from i land nation like Kirib ,tti and tl1e Mar hall J land , who
have al,·eady uffered hi torie of violent colon iu1tion. Even in
\Yealthy nation like the U .. , Black and bro ,Yn people (e pecially
tho e \.-vhoar·e incar ce rated and /or undo cllmented ) are
di proportionately

killed o r di placed by extreme ,veatl1er event ,
like hu1·1icane and heat \Yave . In general, the wealthie t people
produce the mo t greenhou e ga emi ion , but their privilege
protects them from the ,-vorst effect of climate change and
po llution .





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Dive tment i the act of withdra,vin g finan cial
in ve trn ent from it certain indu try or regime. Often
u ed a a t,1ct ic within a broader ocial moven1ent ,
dive~tment has hi torically been used to resisc Ollth
African aparthe id, the tobacco indust 1, ,, p rivate prison ,
Israeli -Pale tinian apartheid, Well s Fargo, and the fossiJ
fttel indu str, r. Thollgh it i highly unlikeJy that
dive tment alone could topple any of these giant • it can
,,veake11 them by fighting the normalization of their
harmn1I practice , ,vhiJe expandin g po liti ca l and
fi nan cial opp ortun itie s for alt ernativ e sy tern s.
pJ,otD by SanzVrlasqun
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U11at @e've~on
In March 2017, Barnard· Board of
Tru tees voted to divest from fos ii
fuel companies that deny cli mate
science or do not try to mitigate
their effe-cts on climate change .
While it' a big ,.vin for the
campaign, we are not yet done . We
\vill cont inu e to over ee the
dive tment proce to en ur •e the
college fully follow through.
Additionally, "climate deniers '' l1as
yet to be define d, and ,vill be
crucial in deciding Barnard's future
.
1nve tment .
Al o in March 2017, in re pon e to 5 yea r s
of student organizing for fo il fuel
dive tment , Colun 1bia announced that ic
wottld dive t from companie making
more than 35);;of re ,renue from coaJ
production.
However, the university remains inve ted
in oil and gas co mpanie s that commitjt1st
a mucl1 , if not more, violence by
accelerating clima te change and poi oning
enti re communi tie . In fact, Columbia
ren1c:1insdirectly invested in Phillips 66 . a
company that will o,vn 25%of the Dako ta
Access Pipelu1e if th e p1-oject is completed .

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Thougl1 CDCJ and DB \vill continue to fight for full divestment from
fo ii ft1el , \Yeare beginning to shift our focus toward r•einvestment
in aju st tran ition . The term ju t tran ition" refer to the
tran formation of our cur rent exploitative, fo il fuel economy into
ne"v system prioritizing equity and ecological limit . Many Black
and brown people in New York are already building ajust tran ition
with inst itution like \\'Orker-o,vned busine s es. environmental
justice organizations , and anti-gen trifi cation networks. A a $9billion institu tion that profit from the violent gentlification of
Harlem. Columbia is more than obligated to inve t money in the e
com munitie and their work . For more info on reinve tment, check
otlt our ummer reinve t tudy at reinvestcu .tumblr.com ~



I

On April 23, 1968, hundreds of students and faculty began an occupation of five
campus buildings. Black students from the Student Afro-American Society led the
demonstration with an organized and deliberate occupation of Hamilton Hall.
Students from ASA and Students for a Democratic Society (SOS), collaborating
with Harlem organizers including the Young Lords and Weather Underground,
called for the termination of weapons research for the Vietnam War and an end to
construction of a gym ("Gym Crow") in Morningside Park. On April 30, the
administration called the police and over 700 violent arrests were made , injuring
many protestors and "triggering a campus-wide strike that shut down the
university" (CU Archives). During this time, Black and brown woman students did
the crucial work of keeping organizers fed and cared for, as seen in the photo of
the Hamilton Hall food pantry and medical supply stock below.

For more information:







bit.ly/CU1968
columbia1968.com
Twitter: @1968CU
BCRW Digital Feminist Archives: "1968 and Its Afterlives"
Democracy Now: "How Black Students Helped Lead the 1968 Columbia U. Strike ..."
NYTimes: "The Missing History of the Columbia '68 Protests"
Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator , BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18 , CUMSPH '20

I

~



I

I

On April 25, 2018 , members of the Liberation Coalition led a tour titled Decolonize
This University and marched through Butler Library demanding an end to
gentrification in Harlem, decolonization of the university, divestment from settler
colonialism and military occupation , and other forms of reparations. An
organization founded last October after a series of white supremacist speakers
were invited to Columbia , the Liberation Coalition seeks futur ity in the alliance
between Black and brown Columbia University students and Harlem residents . In
the midst of the graduate workers ' strike which began on April 24 and shortly after
the end of a five-day student occupation of the Lerner piano lounge in demand of
24/7 healthcare services and divestment from systems of policing , the
organization occupied the main stairwell of the library for nearly an hour. Within
minutes, admin istrators arrived on scene and threatened to call the police. The
University's recently growing reliance on the NYPD in response to student-ofcolor organ izing was also seen on December 4 , 2014, when over two hundred
students of color performed a die-in at the annual tree lighting ceremony on
College Walk of Columbia University, after a Staten Island grand jury failed to
indict the police officer who murdered Eric Garner. The die-in followed a Black
Students Organization performance of "Strange Fruit" and calls for radical selflove. Several police vans arrived on College Walk within minutes of students
rallying around the lntercultural Resource Center.
Fifty years later , these events at the University demonstrate the perpetual nature
of student exploitation and feelings of tension , unsafety, and anger. However,
such events also point to the ways that political organizing is a practice of futurity,
of envisioning the possibilit ies of a better and more just world.

HATE
SPEECH

-

VIOi.ENCE

Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberatio n News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

Columbia University Black Students' Organization (BSO)
Our Mission: Concerned with the recognition and understanding of the diverse needs of
the African American community, the Black Student Organ ization prides itself on being a
group that provides, support , discussion and solutions to the Columbia and greater NYC
communities . Offering a support system to underclassmen , and addressing social and
political issues , we are a community of strong voices and people.
Meeting: Thursday 9-11, 106 Hartley Hall
bso @columbia .edu

MUJERES
Founded in the late 1990 ' s, MUJERES
is the only femme-led Latinx club on Barnard and
Columbia's campus .
We take pride in our growing community and the work
we do to take up space and make our voices heard .
This year we are looking forward to welcoming
new members and increasing

• • •

out impact outside of campus .

Wecome

<-£~icon!
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of 2022!
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Ourmissionis to:
Cele
brate,empower, and highlightintersectionolity anddiversity in oil its forms,
especially as it pertainsto Lotinidodand Chiconidad.
Weaim to provide our membership
with a safeandengaging environment in order to fulfill their educational goals, promote
their cultural consciousness,and helpthem become active in servingthe needsof their
community.

BEING
CHICANX@
CU
• Find homein thecity. SupportMexican
businesses
and bring yourself comfort!Wehave createdo
googlemapwith placesfor foodand fun goo.gl/ s23evD
• Knowledgeis Powerl Checkout classesat the
Centerfor the Studyof Ethnicity and Race(CSER)
• Findcommunity on campus.

@chiconxcoucuson FBand IG
chiconxcoucus@gmo
il.com

ACCESS I ABILITY
Centenngt'1ere-

ot

stude,115
ol COiorlow,g
'Mlh

\

of Barnard College
and Columbia
University
(V-Day ) is a community on campus that aims to raise
onsciousness
on issues
involving
race,
gender,
class ,
sexuality,
disability
(and other oppressed
identities)
among th e
university
' s student
body . It aims to build a community that has
an understanding
of and cares for these identities
. Proceeding
from our aims, we hold regular
meetings
to engage with these
topics
and issues
that culminate
i n an annual performance
in
hich we encour ge communi - wide
a~ti ~·c.:.:::
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Statement

: Voices

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Past V-DayEvents:
. y ag,n
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1hc
color cast.)

a self-identified

'tten
by LGBTQ
.
of monologues_ wri hat queers the
5 · A collection
ia University
t nhood .
BeyondCis-tcrhood, 20J ~ollege
and Col~~ narrative
of woma
~
students
of Bar~a~ and expands on t

dialogue
on gene

Respcct(ability), 2016 : a performance
and physical
dis/ability

1and mental

centering
on experiences
and illness .

of able ism,

. s._o_f _s -tu- d~ents of color
AcccssfAbilit,, 20: 7 : centered
around the narrat_iv_e
at Barnard and Columbia living
with ldis)ab1.l1.t{::;sary
of 1968
I Storiesof Resistance, 2018 : Commemorated. 50 year
reeningann Guided healing
space
1
university
·
protests
b Y having . a fl mand
sc care.
·
to th i nk about political
resistance

,___

Do you want to play

2

ot1h•r,em.

UndoCU

The Undocumented Students Initiative (we prefer UndoCU) is the first undocumented student group at
Columbia University , and our main objective is to protect and dignify the humanity of every undocumented
person. Following the 2016 election , UndoCU , with cooperation of Movimiento Cosecha , staged a walk-out in
demand that undocumented students be protected and Undocu has since then become a prominent activist
group on campus.
We not only question the broken immigration system that produces the conditions of our collective subjectivity ,
but we critique the white supremacist settler colonial structure that is its root. Therefore , UndoCU is an
intersectional movement that prioritizes solidarity with marginalized communities and the destruction of white
supremacy.
Our accomplishments so far:
• Keeping administration accountable for its promises of sanctuary to undocumented students
• Secured summer housing for at-risk students
• Expanded financial support for undocumented students
• Educated the campus community at numerous speaking events
• Featured on the Columbia Spectator , Mic.com , Democracy Now!, and-regrettably-Fox
News.
Our present priorities include sustaining these accomplishments , supporting the undocumented campus
community at-large , and supporting city-wide and national efforts to overhaul immigration legislation .
Why should you join UndoCU?
• If you are undocumented , because we love you and you matter.
• If you are an American citizen , because this political system considers you human above all of us , and
an informed political education requires a rooted understanding of this construction.
• If you are neither , because we believe in your humanity as much as most Americans don't believe in
ours.
Despite common pro-immigrant narratives , we have intersectional leadership and make sure that
non-white, non-cisgender , and non-heterosexual identities are surely prioritized here.
CONTACT: undocumentedstudentsinitative@gmail.com

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ManhattanHouse
Manhattan House is an on-campus residence where Indigenous students and allies maintain their
communal identities, host events , and relieve the pressures of unjversity and city life. The house
was founded in 2012 as a Special Interest Community by a group ofNative American CounciJ
members already living together who wanted to secure a home for Indigenous Columbia students
for years to come. As the only physical space on campus dedicated to Indigenous students ,
Manhattan House is a hub of social life and a refuge from the prejudice , misunderstanding , and
homesickness that Indigenous students often experience.
Retaining Manhattan House as an Indigenous student space has proved challenging since its
founding. Before housing was switched to a flat rate, the fmancial inaccessibility of the buil ding
in which it was housed hindered students' ability to live there. During the first five years , the
community was subject to "resolutions" such as assigning non-Indigenous and non-all ied transfer
students to the space at random without notifying the House or the transfer placements in order
to retain the dorm . Trus resuJted in the Manhattan House community enduring racist speech,
manjpuJation, cuJtural insensitivity , and the need to expend undue emotiona l labor to mediate
external conflicts in our own home.
In 2017 , Manhattan House moved to lliver Hall. The new dorm is not without its challenges , but
Manhattan House has been able to successfully select each of its members in trus space so far.
We are advocating continuously for Manhattan House to be accessible to all Indigenous students
and for it to continue to have proper resources allocated each year.
Manhattan House Information
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/manhattanhouseCU/
Address: 628 W 114th St, I st floor (back suite)





NATIVE AMERICANCOUNCIL(NAC)
Founded
in 1996 by Native
students
from Barnard
and Columbia , the
Native
American
Council
(NAC) is a community
and political
organiza
tion
that
supports
Indigenous
students
and allies
on Columbia's
cam pus; Our members
represent
a diverse
range of communities,
intersec
tionalities
and perspectives,
as we also
assert
the nonexistence
of
a monolithic
Indigenous
identity
.
Each year,
NAC hosts
our annual
Columbia
Powwow in the late
Spring,
where we invite
our campus and local
Indigenous
communities,
as well
as allies
to share
dance and space . NAC's other
large
event
is the
celebration
of Indigenous
Peoples'
Day in the fall,
we have done so
through
protest
of Columbus
Day and Open Mies,
and the unveiling
of
the Lenape
Plaque.
Born from the efforts
of NAC members,
a plaque
recogizing
the Lenni
Lenape people
as the original
inhabitants
of the island
of Manhattan
was installed
in 2016.
Beginning
with a 2013 petition,
the effort
was revived
in 2015 with a photo
campaign
urging
Columbia's
administration
to #RecognizetheLenape,
which was also
supported
by count less
campus and student
organizations.
NAC aims to continue
such
advocacy
to make, name, and center
spaces
of support
for Indigenus
peoples
and all
communities
of color
and marginalized
voices
on cam pus.
Our current
iniatives
include
advocacy
for Indigenous
representation
on Columbia's
faculty,
administration,
and services
in order
to pro vide adequate
spaces
and resources
for Indigenous
students
on Co lumbias
Campus. We also
look forward
to rnantaining
our relationships
with the many student
organizations
that
to support
students
color
at CU!!

aim
of

From the Lenape Plaque:

" TheLenape lived here beforeand during
colonization of the Americas. Thisplaque
recogniz es these indigenous people of Manhattan, their displacement, dispossession,
and continuedpresence.It stands as a
reminder to refled on ourpast as we contemplate our wayforward "

'

I

,

inv.ite
administration

want:s

never:

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barnardsoulsisters.squarespace.com
facebook.com/BarnardOrganizationofSoulSisters
instagram.com/barnardboss

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Barnar
of SoulSisters

Colu mbia Univers i ty Sout h Asia n Femini sm(s) All ia nce
SOUTH

SAFA's mission is to encourage dialogue and mobilize leadership and community
action against systems of oppression in the South Asian community. Our goal is to
provide a space for South Asians, Indo-Caribbeans and allies to come together and
find strength in our similarities
and our differences , to learn about ourselves
as well as others , and to find solace in each other when the rest of the world
fails to accept us .
ASIAN

SAFAis a group for those who have dealt with misogyny and violence of all forms
(including
IPV or sexual violence)
rampant in their
homes, families,
and
communities. For those who have felt like their skin was too dark, their arms too
hairy, their voices too opinionated . For those who are queer, trans, or gender
non-conforming. For those who are not able-bodied or thin . For those who are not
on a track to becoming doctors, engineers,
lawyers. For those who have been
othered within our communities because of their race, caste, or religion . This is
a grou p for everyone who wishes to challenge South Asian ge nder norms and t hink
critical l y about t he intersectio n of one's multiple identities .
FEMINISM(S)

Through group discussions,
film screenings,
mentorship programs and more, SAFA
aims to cultivate
awareness of struggles faced by so many members of the South
Asian diaspora and folks at home, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity
between SAFAand other activist and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who
identifies
with our mission to come to a meeting and join us in making this
campus a more inclusive place.
ALLIANCE

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Sign-up at bit.ly/AllSexFall18
Questions? Please reach out!
Columbiaallsex@gmail.com I Facebook.com/CUAllSex

Asian
American
Alliance
Ema il: aaa@columbia.edu
FB: www.facebook.com/ColumbiaAAA
Asian American Al liance, or "Triple-A", the only explicit ly political and
pan-Asian group on campus, strives to create space for the APIA
community to build solidarity among itself and with other marginalized
communities,
address social/political issues at Columbia and beyond,
and for students to learn and unlearn as a col lective to resist oppression
of a ll forms.

Yea rly Events:
CultureSHOCK

(a fundraising
performance showcase with
specia l guest performers)
Crossroads (a social justice
conference for high schoo l youth)

Regular Eve nts:
General body meetings

(al l are
we lcome to discuss pressing
issues and bui ld community)

Other Events:
Unpacking Lunchbox
Politics: East Asian Privilege
(wi th Yellow Jackets Col lective)

Roots: Asian-American
Storytelling (with Club Zamana)
Language Learning (with
Malama Hawai'i)

Blasian Narratives Screening
and Live Performance (with
Bold, Beautifu l, Black at Barnard)

Critical Perspectives on
Migration (with South Asian
Feminism(s)
UndoCU)

A lliance and

Get Involved!
September 7, 4:30 PM: Info
session where you can t a Ik
to our board members!
Early September: Apply to
be an OCM board member
to help plan programming
w ith AAA
Now: Like us on Facebook
for regular upd at es on ou r
programming,
general body
meetings , and opportunities
in the city to take actio n !

Off-Campus
Collaborators
CAAAV: Organizing Asian
Communities, Asian American Legal
Defense and Education Fund,
National Asian Pacific American
Women's Forum, Adhikaar, Desis
Rising Up and Moving, Chinatown Art
Brigade, Minkwon Center for
Community Act ion, API Rainbow
Parents of PFLAG NYC, etc.

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Here are some clubs
that
don't
have
their
own page this
year
or are
currently
inactive,
but have still
done
important
work on campus.
Feel free
to
check out their
online
presence
and
reach
out!
IDENTITY BASED
Q House

Alianza
Student
Organization
of Latinos
Lucha
Mobilized
African
Diaspora
(MAD)

ACTIVIST
Students
Against
Mass Incarceration
Columbia
Against
Gentrification
(CAGe)
Just Labor at JTS
Take Back the Night
Liberation
Coalition
Science
for the People
Welcome to Barnard
Columbia
Students
for Socialist
Revolution

POLITICAL
ROOTed
Intercultural
Collective

EDUCATION
Resource
Center
Advocacy
Project
(CAP)

PUBLICATION
Re:Claim

OTHER
Society
for the Advancement
of Underrepresented
Filmmakers
(SAUF)
ALISE: Columbia
Students
for Sensible
Drug Policy
Barnard
Center
for Research
on Women (not a club)

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