Barnard//Columbia Disorientation Guide 2019

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Title

Barnard//Columbia Disorientation Guide 2019

Date

2019

Place

New York, NY

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https://issuu.com/disguide/docs/acfrogalf3pirxxhnxqzermwr60fbqto6kaq9bctsrdval905o

extracted text

DISORIENTATION
GUIDE 2019
Barnard//Columbia

“We must love each other and support each other.”

WELCOME to Barnard and Columbia,
welcome to Morningside Heights, and
welcome to land that is most likely not
yours.
WELCOME to the 2019 disorientation
guide!
this zine is a collaboration between
barnard zine club and other students
across the university who want to help
you (new students, transfer students,
returning students, friends, allies)
learn more about the space you’re
entering. this is not a comprehensive
guide, but an introduction, to the
fighting, loving, and learning done by
student activists and leaders do here. we
hope to inform you of some of the many
opportunities for radical activism that
are within your grasp during your time at
the university.
we hope that this zine is only the beginning for you, a
jumping off point for critical thinking, radical love, and
finding community. ask questions, take space, make
space, and push back!
with love and solidarity,
Disorientation Guide 2019 Team

cover design
by Akash
Jason

Content warning: some of the pages in this zine discuss different
forms of violence, including racism, institutional violence, police
violence, sexual assault & violence, coercion, and transphobia.
Take care of yourself as you read and think about these issues!

Land Acknowledgement
The 2019 Disorientation Guide was
compiled and made on stolen indigenous
land, specifically Lenape land on Turtle
Island. We acknowledge and recognize the
Lenni Lenape and Wappinger peoples, whose
original nations comprise the lands on which
Columbia University is built upon.
We want to acknowledge the ongoing
violence towards indigenous people as well
as their ongoing resistance.
We sincerely invite you, the reader, to take a
few moments right now to reflect on what it
means to be occupying stolen indigenous
land, especially if you’re a settler/visitor and
not indigenous to this land. We hope you
reflect on the fact that this is just an
acknowledgement and take seriously in
exploring next steps to take to further
actively decolonize this place.

All settlers, including recent arrivants, have a
responsibility to consider what it means to acknowledge
the history and legacy of colonialism.









What are some of the privileges settlers enjoy today
because of colonialism?
How can individuals develop relationships with
peoples whose territory they are living on in the
contemporary North American geopolitical
landscape?
What are you, or your organization, doing beyond
acknowledging the territory where you live, work,
or hold your events?
What might you be doing that perpetuates settler
colonial futurity rather than considering alternative
ways forward for North America?
Do you have an understanding of the on-going
violence and the trauma that is part of the structure
of colonialism?
-

Adapted from Allison Jones for Native-Land.ca

Learn more about land acknowledgements, next steps to
actively decolonize, and resources at
native-land.ca/territory-acknowledgement/
Read about the Lenape plaque on campus from the Native
American Council at Columbia:
https://tinyurl.com/honorlenape


 

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In the early 1920’s many
Ivy League schools began
instituting “unofficial
quotas” to limit admitance
of Jewish students.
Columbia’s was the most
severe and slashed the
Jewish population from
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 with
particular discrimination
against Sephardic and
Eastern European Jews.
Quotas like these
remained at Yale, for
example, until the 1960’s.


 

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In 1985, the SAS won their
fight for divestment from
South African Apartheid.
Barnard and Columbia both
divested their respective
endowments from
corporations doing business
in South Africa, including
IBM, CBS, General
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Honeywell, and the
Washington Post.

7

BARNUMBIA SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Being a student with a disability means you will have to work harder than most (if not all) of your classmates. This
is not because of any fault of your own, but the institutions of power you will be relying on. These institutions,
Barnard and Columbia, as well as the city of New York, were not built for you and that makes every step you take a
challenge. This guide aims to make this process easier by identifying a few key actions upon your arrival on
campus. Know that you will have these tools and the help of other students to get past these hurdles.

Barnard’s Services:
Office of Disability Services
If you are a student living with disabilities you should register with ODS now, even if you have not previously
needed accommodations, rather than wait until you might need their services because it takes time and
documentation to be approved for services. Documentation from doctors and therapists of your disability is
required. 3-4 people in ODS take care of over 500 students on campus.
Accommodations:
Academic: ODS can provide academic accommodations to help you in the classroom including extra time on
tests and extra excused absences. You will need to meet with your professor to ‘prove’ your disability.
Residential Life: ODS can provide housing accommodations to make life easier on campus such as a dorm
with AC, a single, a building with wheelchair access, or having a service animal with you on campus. Res Life
has more control than ODS in housing accommodations and this process can be frustrating.
Furman Counseling Services
If you are living with mental health issues you should register with Furman. The intake process can be taxing
as you must share details of your mental health history to determine whether you need long term or short term
counseling. The office will give you referrals but there is also a network of students to offer therapist
recommendations.
Student Services:
Barnard Network for Students with Disabilities
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects you to other students dealing with
similar issues on campus. This is a place to ask for support, ask for recommendations, be part of a greater
community of people that want to help or just vent.
Barnard Pay It Forward
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects students who need someone to help
run errands for them by connecting them to students who are willing to help. This is for anyone who that needs
something from the store but can’, not just students with disabilities (medication, groceries etc.).
Campus and the greater city of New York
- Access to Barnard resources is often blocked by economic access to get a prescription for accommodations
or receive long-term mental healthcare. The Student Health Advisory Committee has collected off-campus
resources for low-income folks and identity based resources that can be found on their FB page.
- Both campus and New York City may be difficult for students with mobility disabilities. Barnard and Columbia
have very old buildings and elevators (especially Milbank and Hamilton). There are tunnels under Columbia
that provide access to parts of Columbia for wheelchair users.
- NYC’s public transportation system is in violation of the American Disability Act (ADA) in that its subway
system is not accessible to people with mobility disabilities. The 1 line subway stop on 116th and Broadway
does not have an elevator (96th Street has an elevator).
Community Advice
-It is important to advocate for yourself but also important to be able to ask for help from a friend, faculty
member, or member disability advocacy community. Molree Williams-Lendor, the director of Title IX and Equity
and the overseer of ODS, is an incredible resource and good person to meet with.
- School may knock you down; it is okay if you don’t have the strength to get up again. Some students find the
need to take a lighter academic load or to take a semester or year off.
-You are not weak for taking time to work on your own health; you are strong for prioritizing yourself. You are
attending a school that does not fully accommodate you and that takes a toll. You may have a different college
experience but that doesn’t mean it won’t be a good one. When the administration does not provide the
support you need, remember you have a community ready to back you up. There an entire community here
excited for you to join us.

ACCESS SUGGESTIONS FOR MOBILIZATIONS
By Sins Invalid - Disability Justice performance project by QTPOC artists
In support of our current collective uprising, we offer these suggestions for making sure that your actions/
marches/ mobilizations include as many of us as possible. This work is ideally done from a deeper political
commitment to disability justice, or at minimum a critique of ableism and an understanding of consent; otherwise
paternalism and abuse can masquerade as “access support.”
• Always have a Disability Point Person. Announce them from the mic; have them wear an armband for
visibility. Their skills should include a disability justice framework, problem solving, and good listening.
• Announce that the event will be fragrance free; ask people who are heavily scented to self-segregate.
• Generally speaking, written text offers an additional mode of communication.
• To support accessibility for folks that are DHoH / for those who can’t hear the mic
§ have an ASL interpreter at the mic
§ use slips of paper to communicate the nuts and bolts of logistics (possibly with chants, to
communicate destinations, the National Lawyers Guild’s #, etc.)
§ have ASL interpreters in the crowd
• Organize push wheelchairs in advance for people who may need them; announce their availability from the
mic
• Organize low stimulation spaces near the main gathering space (e.g. a room, or tent); announce from the
mic
• Organize childcare and changing stations; announce from the mic
• Organize multilingual translation services; announce from the mic
• Have the tactical team spread throughout mobilizations (e.g. the four quadrants)
• Rent walkie-talkies. More information = better access. Be mindful that police escalation needs to be
communicated with participants in a calm manner, and will impact some more than others.
• Provide chairs (folding chairs, mobile bleachers, etc.) for rallies / gatherings where people can expect to be
standing for 20 min or more. Announce their location from the mic and explain that they are for people
with disabilities, elders, and others who cannot stand for a length of time.












At a march:
Do a march route run-through with mobility in mind – possibly seated in a wheelchair or in an abandoned
shopping cart (e. g. looking for grids, grassy areas, hills, holes, etc.)
Invite people with disabilities if they would like to set the pace of the march by being at the front
Give an auditory description of the march route beforehand
Make an announcement before the march regarding the destination and distance of the route, so that folks
can choose to meet the march there.
DO NOT “direct” folks with mobility impairments to where you think they should be; you can offer
respectful suggestions; no one should be hurried along – ideally the slowest pace should set the pace of the
march; no one should touch people or their mobility devices without their consent.
Organize a car or van to drive elders and people with disabilities from the beginning to the end of the
march. Provide seating at the destination.
Have distinct tactical and safety teams
Police liaisons should be communicating with police that there are participants with disabilities (and elders,
pregnant folks, etc) and that the march intends to respect that pace.
Be aware that cops will often target folks with disabilities as perceived “weak links”; cops target folks at the
end of actions as energy dissipates.

Access Suggestions For Public Events: http://sinsinvalid.org/blog/access-suggestions-for-a-public-event


some ways to get yr $$$$’s worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Columbia. it’s expensive to
live in New York, and it’s expensive to go to these schools! here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be careful) and bring Tupperware, or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils, salt and pepper, napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNI)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federal Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don’t know why)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to museums! new york archaelogical repository! state parks!)
• free department and student life retreats
• there’s free paper in the printers*
• there’s a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks! go
• you can get textbooks at the library : ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends; professors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven’t
• there are free classes and teach-ins if you look (book-making! social justice!)
• there’s sometimes free department / club swag beyond t-shirts!
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you’re on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it’s cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard mailroom if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build community! love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on “ethical stealing” (even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others; consider that there’s not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

1968 and Its Afterlives

On April 23, 1968, hundreds of students and faculty began an occupation of five
campus buildings. Black students from the Student Afro-American Society led the
demonstration with an organized and deliberate occupation of Hamilton Hall.
Students from ASA and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), collaborating
with Harlem organizers including the Young Lords and Weather Underground,
called for the termination of weapons research for the Vietnam War and an end to
construction of a gym ("Gym Crow") in Morningside Park. On April 30, the
administration called the police and over 700 violent arrests were made, injuring
many protestors and "triggering a campus-wide strike that shut down the
university" (CU Archives). During this time, Black and brown woman students did
the crucial work of keeping organizers fed and cared for, as seen in the photo of
the Hamilton Hall food pantry and medical supply stock below.

For more information:
bit.ly/CU1968
columbia1968.com
Twitter: @1968CU
BCRW Digital Feminist Archives: "1968 and Its Afterlives"
Democracy Now: "How Black Students Helped Lead the 1968 Columbia U. Strike..."
NYTimes: "The Missing History of the Columbia ’68 Protests"
Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

1968 and Its Afterlives

On April 25, 2018, members of the Liberation Coalition led a tour titled Decolonize
This University and marched through Butler Library demanding an end to
gentrification in Harlem, decolonization of the university, divestment from settler
colonialism and military occupation, and other forms of reparations. An
organization founded last October after a series of white supremacist speakers
were invited to Columbia, the Liberation Coalition seeks futurity in the alliance
between Black and brown Columbia University students and Harlem residents. In
the midst of the graduate workers’ strike which began on April 24 and shortly after
the end of a five-day student occupation of the Lerner piano lounge in demand of
24/7 healthcare services and divestment from systems of policing, the
organization occupied the main stairwell of the library for nearly an hour. Within
minutes, administrators arrived on scene and threatened to call the police. The
University’s recently growing reliance on the NYPD in response to student-ofcolor organizing was also seen on December 4, 2014, when over two hundred
students of color performed a die-in at the annual tree lighting ceremony on
College Walk of Columbia University, after a Staten Island grand jury failed to
indict the police officer who murdered Eric Garner. The die-in followed a Black
Students Organization performance of “Strange Fruit” and calls for radical selflove. Several police vans arrived on College Walk within minutes of students
rallying around the Intercultural Resource Center.
Fifty years later, these events at the University demonstrate the perpetual nature
of student exploitation and feelings of tension, unsafety, and anger. However,
such events also point to the ways that political organizing is a practice of futurity,
of envisioning the possibilities of a better and more just world.

Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

THE HARLEM RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014, the
day when police burst
through residents’
doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later, parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
entering their homes
without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. “ The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage,” one parent said
after the raids. “That's not a good feeling, that you're using me to get a promotion.” 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day, police arrested over 40 people.
The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia’s Morningside campus, and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD’s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
students heard from their own administration:
safety. An email went out the day after the
raids informing students that it would “make
our city and community safer.” The reality,
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there, and that services, not
incarceration, are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What’s more, it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build
a new campus across the street from their
homes, the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tayshanna “Chicken” Murphy, a nationally
ranked high school basketball player, was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities, and employment training to young residents of Grant and

48

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattanville and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporation—
the group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister’s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren’t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don’t provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same, and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison, NYCHA will take away their homes. What’s
more, the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people, arresting 88 in one day.
As students, we can’t accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities, police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses, it is in the University’s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and, in the case of Grant and Manhattanville, been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
“development” that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia’s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University’s outright support for the raids, coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant, sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood, but it is not here
for you.

49

Website: cusafa.org
FB: Columbia University South Asian
Feminism(s) Alliance
Email: cusafa@gmail.com
Instagram: cu_safa
SAFA’s mission is to build leadership and
inspire collective action against systems of
oppression which affect the South Asian
diaspora and descendents of South Asian
indentureship.
We value creating coalitions and collaborating with groups both on and off of
columbia’s campus. We organize an annual artist series with South Asian creatives
from different backgrounds in NYC. In the past, we have also worked with other
campus groups to hold space for discussions around migration, gendered violence
and environmental feminisms.

SAFA is a group for those who have dealt with misogyny and violence of all
forms (including IPV or sexual violence) rampant in their homes, families, and
communities. For those who are queer, trans, or gender non-conforming. For those
who are not able-bodied or thin. For those who have been othered within our
communities because of their race, caste, or religion. This is a group for everyone
who wishes to challenge South Asian gender norms and think critically about the
intersections of our multiple identities.
Feel free to message us anytime to learn how to support SAFA or find out what
we’re up to!

MUJERES
Founded in the late 1990's, MUJERES
is the only femme-led Latinx club on Barnard and 
Columbia's campus. 
We take pride in our growing community and the work 
we do to take up space and make our voices heard.
This year we are looking forward to welcoming
 new members and increasing out impact outside of campus. 

Asian
American
Alliance
Email: aaa@columbia.edu
FB: www.facebook.com/ColumbiaAAA
Yearly Events:
CultureSHOCK (a fundraising
performance showcase with
special guest performers)
Crossroads (a social justice
conference for high school
youth)
Regular Events:
General body meetings (all
are welcome to discuss
pressing issues and build
community)
Other Events:
Unpacking Lunchbox
Politics: East Asian Privilege
(with Yellow Jackets Collective)
Roots: Asian-American
Storytelling (with Club
Zamana)
Language Learning (with
Malama Hawai’i)
Blasian Narratives Screening
and Live Performance (with
Bold, Beautiful, Black at
Barnard)
Critical Perspectives on
Migration (with South Asian
Feminism(s) Alliance and
UndoCU)

Asian American Alliance, or
“Triple-A”, the only explicitly
political and pan-Asian
group on campus, strives to
create space for the APIA
community to build
solidarity among itself and
with other marginalized
communities, address
social/political issues at
Columbia and beyond, and
for students to learn and
unlearn as a collective to
resist oppression of all
forms.
Off-Campus Collaborators
CAAAV: Organizing Asian
Communities, Asian American Legal
Defense and Education Fund,
National Asian Pacific American
Women’s Forum, Adhikaar, Desis
Rising Up and Moving, Chinatown Art
Brigade, Minkwon Center for
Community Action, API Rainbow
Parents of PFLAG NYC, etc.

Trans @
Barnard
Barnard is, without a doubt, the best thing about
Columbia University. But it often fails to support and make space for its trans, gender
non-comforming, and gender questioning students.
If you’re entering Barnard as a trans or non-binary student this year, we see you. (And we’re SO
EXCITED to have you here!) Know that there are
tons of us here to welcome you, to make space for
you, and to invite you to join us in fighting
against an administration that often wants us to
disappear. You are here. You belong here. And you
are never, never alone.
- Mo from GendeRev

Who to
Trust
- Student Life: Karina
and Emy are fantastic
human beings and are a
great resource for issues
that come up in student
orgs
- Primary Care: Dr. Ann
Engelland is a gem, uses
correct pronouns, is
super sensitive about
trans bodies. The rest of
the office? Hit or miss.
- Big Admin: Prez, Board
of Trustees, Provost.
TERFs for the most part.

In The
Classroom
- CU offers preferred name
changes on SSOL. For Barnard, you have to submit a
form in person to the registrar. If you’d like
someone to go with you,
reach out to GendeRev!
- If a professor refuses to
use correct pronouns/your
name, reach out to Dean
Grabiner. She is the kickass queer senior dean and a
great person to talk to!
- The Diana 5 Gender Neutral bathroom is the best.
Hands down.

Barnard is a “women’s college” on paper but not
in practice. We hope this page can be of help
but there is so much more to say about being
trans at Barnard. To talk more, come to GendeRev or email grboard@columbia.edu. We love
you and you belong here.

NATIVE AMERICAN COUNCIL(NAC)
Founded in 1996 by Native students from Barnard and Columbia, the
Native American Council (NAC) is a community and political organization that supports Indigenous students and allies on Columbia’s campus; Our members represent a diverse range of communities, intersectionalities and perspectives, as we also assert the nonexistence of
a monolithic Indigenous identity.
Each year, NAC hosts our annual Columbia Powwow in the late Spring,
where we invite our campus and local Indigenous communities, as well
as allies to share dance and space. NAC’s other large event is the
celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the fall, we have done so
through protest of Columbus Day and Open Mics, and the unveiling of
the Lenape Plaque.
Born from the efforts of NAC members, a plaque recogizing the Lenni
Lenape people as the original inhabitants of the island of Manhattan
was installed in 2016. Beginning with a 2013 petition, the effort
was revived in 2015 with a photo campaign urging Columbia’s administration to #RecognizetheLenape, which was also supported by countless campus and student organizations. NAC aims to continue such
advocacy to make, name, and center spaces of support for Indigenus
peoples and all communities of color and marginalized voices on campus.
Our current iniatives include advocacy for Indigenous representation
on Columbia’s faculty, administration, and services in order to provide adequate spaces and resources for Indigenous students on Columbias Campus. We also look forward to mantaining our relationships
with the many student
organizations that aim
to support students of
color at CU!!

From the Lenape Plaque:
“ The Lenape lived here before and during
colonization of the Americas. This plaque
recognizes these indigenous people of Manhattan, their displacement, dispossession,
and continued presence. It stands as a
reminder to reflect on our past as we contemplate our way forward”

LET’S RECOGNIZE

INDIGENOUS
PEOPLES’ DAY

OCTOBER

2019

For more info @ Native American Council of Columbia University

As many students who identify as first generation
and/or low-income may agree, Columbia University
does not always offer the appropriate safe spaces or
platforms for students to talk about issues that pertain
to them. In order to raise awareness about class issues,
build a first generation and/or low-income community
that transcends all barriers, foster an open and
respectful campus environment, engage in a crossclass dialogue, advocate on behalf of the community,
lead service projects pertaining to these issues and
empower first generation low-income students at
Columbia, we are looking to start a conversation
amongst students about what our community needs.
Entitled FLIP, we look to create safe spaces to discuss
issues relevant to our community in order to combat the
stigmas we might face, promote discussion of
socioeconomic class and education access, and
advocate for resources.

SHAREMEALS
FLiP introduced ShareMeals to
campus in 2016 ShareMeals is
an app designed to connect
those in need of swipes to
those who have too many. It is
available on both iOS and
Android platforms, please
download and help combat
food insecurity on campus.

FLIP LENDING LIBRARY
FLiP maintains a lending library
at Barnard library and on the 4th
floor of Milstein Library at Butler
that is available to all FLI
students on campus.

FLiP works to combat a number
of issues facing the FLI
community on campus today,
including food insecurity, financial
uncertainty, and general
unawareness of FLI issues within
the student community, faculty,
and administration.

G-BODY MEETINGS
FLiP has bi-monthly general
body meetings designed to
promote community building
and provide a necessary outlet
for grievances on campus.

FOOD PANTRY
FLIP was a key player in the
creation of Columbia's Food
Pantry. Designed to combat the
struggle of food insecurity on
campus, it is open to all from 4
-7pm in 582 Lerner Hall.

@FLIPCOLUMBIA

 

SIGN-UP​ | https://bit.ly/2H0RFZb 
QUESTIONS?​ | columbiaallsex@gmail.com  

The Undocumented Students Initiative (we prefer UndoCU) is the first undocumented student group at Columbia
University, and our main objective is to protect and dignify the humanity of every undocumented person. Following the
2016 election, UndoCU, with cooperation of Movimiento Cosecha, staged a walk-out in demand that undocumented
students be protected and UndoCU has since then become a prominent activist group on campus. In order to have
more freedom from the university’s rules and to keep our members’ identity safe, we choose to remain unrecognized by
the Activities Board of Columbia. Therefore, we are currently an independent organization that does not receive funding
from the university.
We not only question the broken immigration system that produces the conditions of our collective subjectivity, but we
critique the white supremacist settler colonial structure that is its root. Therefore, UndoCU is an intersectional
movement that prioritizes solidarity with marginalized communities and the destruction of white supremacy.
Our accomplishments so far:
● Keeping administration accountable for its promises of sanctuary to undocumented students
● Secured summer housing for at-risk students
● Expanded financial support for undocumented students
● Launched and organized ​College Access for Undocumented Students’ Education​ (CAUSE), a Fall Semester college
application program for undocumented high school students in the NYC area, facilitating information and college
councelling services to over undocumented 100 students and parents
● Provided workshops for educators on best practices to serve undocumented middle and high school students
● Educated the campus community at numerous speaking events
● Featured on the Columbia Spectator, Mic.com, Democracy Now!, and—regrettably—Fox News.
Our present priorities include sustaining these accomplishments, supporting the undocumented campus community
at-large, and supporting city-wide and national efforts to overhaul immigration legislation.
For more info check out our 2019 list of demands (posted on our FB page) and sign our petition to demand Columbia
cuts ties with Customs and Border Protection, the government agency that oversees the camps and ICE)
Why should you join UndoCU?
● If you are undocumented, because we love you and you matter.
● If you are an American citizen, because this political system considers you human above all of us, and an
informed political education requires a rooted understanding of this construction.
● If you are neither, because we believe in your humanity as much as most Americans don’t believe in ours.
Despite common pro-immigrant narratives, we have intersectional leadership and make sure that non-white,
non-cisgender, and non-heterosexual identities are surely prioritized here.
INSTAGRAM: @undo_cu
FACEBOOK: @undocumentedcu
EMAIL: ​undocumentedstudentsinitative@gmail.com

 

We are a grassroots organization working to end   
sexual + domestic violence in our campus communities because   
we envision a world free of violence + oppression.  
 
We  recognize   that   sexual   violence   is  a  manifestation   of 
systemic   gender   oppression   which   cannot   be  separated   from   all  
other   forms   of  oppression.   ​Therefore,  the  fight  to end  sexual 
+ domestic violence  cannot  be won without eradicating all other 
forms  of  oppression  including   but   not   limited   to   racism,  
classism, ableism, colonialism, homophobia, + transphobia.   
 
We  seek   to  foster   transparency   around   issues   of 
sexual   violence   because   ​we  believe  that  a  bottom 
up  approach  to  building  power  is  the  only  way  to 
achieve justice.  
 
Our current campaign demands  ​more ​support, 
accessibility, accountability, funding, + 
enforcement ​(SAAFE) to ensure that Columbia  
University is an inclusive educational  
environment where survivors can thrive,  
regardless of their identity (including but not  
limited to race, sex, gender, sexual orientation,  
socioeconomic status, immigration status, +  
religion).  
 
 
A  major   demand   of  our   campaign   is  for  the  creation  of a 
rape crisis center that is physically open 24/7 ​+ staffed 
with  professional  advocates  trained  in  cultural 
competency​.  We  believe   that   these   changes   will   improve  
the   quality   of  resources   for   all   survivors,   especially  
for   survivors   whose   experiences   don’t   match   traditional  
narratives and who come from marginalized communities.  
 
 
 
 
 
Want to get involved?​ Sign up for our listserv @  ​http://noredtapecu.org/new­page/ 
or email  ​noredtapecu@gmail.com​! Our weekly meetings are on Sundays from 7PM­8PM.   
 
Go to ​www.NoRedTapeCU.org​ to learn more about our work + for info on resources. 
 

BUILDING RANK-AND-FILE POWER
FOR A STRONGER GWC-UAW

THE CROW
ISSUE 1

Columbia won’t
cede real power
without a strike

What would you strike for?
Half a year ago, GWC’s and Columbia’s bargaining teams began
negotiations of our first contract. Progress has been discouraging.
So far, after thirteen bargaining sessions, they’ve reached
tentative agreement on only two low-stakes contract articles:
Severability and Union-Management Committee (see below for
descriptions). Columbia has rejected all other GWC proposals,
including those guaranteeing funding to finish our degrees,
rights and protections for international student workers, and real
recourse against supervisor abuse, sexual harassment, moldy and
cramped workspaces, unaffordable insurance, inadequate and
discriminatory health care, flexible leaves of absence….
And no surprise! Last November, a majority of the union
membership voted to accept the UAW International’s negotiated
terms of bargaining with Columbia. These terms include a
moratorium until April 6, 2020 on all strikes, work stoppages,
and other “interferences with Columbia’s operations.” No matter
how convincing and prepared our bargaining committee is at the
bargaining table, until next spring when we reclaim our statutory
right to strike, our bargaining team’s power to force Columbia to
agree to a transformative contract will be limited.
That said, student workers can use this time to our advantage.
As bargaining continues into the fall, we can begin thinking

Tentatively Finalized Contract Articles




Severability — Guarantees if any part of the contract is
nullified by a change in law, the rest of the contract will
remain in effect.
Union-Management Committee — Establishes a
committee comprising an equal number of GWC and
Administration representatives to oversee the administration
of the contract.

about what we’ll have to do together to win this fight against an
institution determined to turn a profit. Rational arguments will
only take us so far when it’s not profitable to provide working and
learning conditions that foster education, impactful research, and a
warm and inclusive campus community — when it’s not profitable
to treat student workers as human beings, with vulnerable bodyminds, by fairly compensating us for our work and service and
guaranteeing benefits like quality health care and housing.
All of us have different needs and hopes for the contract under
negotiation. So what are your priorities? What would you be
willing to stop work for? What about your colleagues?

Past Bargaining Sessions
1.

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Feb 25
March 6 (admin canceled)
March 14
Apr 5
Apr 9
Apr 18
May 1
May 6
May 13
May 29

10.
11.
12.
13.

June 12
June 21
July 11
July 23

Future Bargaining Sessions
(open to all members!)
14. Aug 14, 12:00–5:00pm
Studebaker 469
15. Aug 19, 10:30am–3:00pm
Location TBD

(Under-)Graduate
Workers of
Columbia
What about us?

by Nelson Gomez
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FOR MORE INFORMATION

¡

columbiagradunion.org
columbiaawdu.home.blog
facebook.com/GWCUAW
facebook.com/CAWDU

ABCs
of
GWC
a union glossary

the

Bargaining Committee (BC) •)OZW]XWN\MVGWC
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bargaining unit • <PMOZW]XWN_WZSMZ[ZMXZM[MV\MLJa\PM
]VQWVIVLKW^MZMLJa\PMKWV\ZIK\
business unionism • )UWLMTWN]VQWVQ[U\PI\^QM_[\PM
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VMOW\QI\QWV[\PI\ZMRMK\[\ZIV[XIZMVKa^ITWZQbM[KWUXZWUQ[M
IVLLQ[KW]ZIOM[[\ZQSM[#IVQLMWTWOa\PI\\PMMUXTWaMZIVL
\PM]VQWVIZM¹WV\PM[IUM[QLMº
Columbia Academic Workers for a Democratic
Union (CAWDU) • )OZW]XWNGWCUMUJMZ[_PW
JMTQM^MQVÅOP\QVONWZI\ZIV[NWZUI\Q^MKWV\ZIK\MUXW_MZQVO
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=)?1V\MZVI\QWVITZMXZM[MV\I\Q^M[IVLW]ZMTMK\ML]VQWV
TMILMZ[PQXIKKW]V\IJTM#\PM/?+ZMNWZUKI]K][
Graduate Workers of Columbia (GWC) • Our labor
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Organizing Committee • )OZW]XWNGWC members
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ZMOQWVITJ]ZMI]KZIKa#\PM[W]ZKMWNI]VQWV¼[XW_MZ
UAW International • <PMKMV\ZITILUQVQ[\ZI\QWVWN\PM
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1V\MZVI\QWVITQ[IKTI[[QKbusiness union
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 Go to the CAWDU website for the full Glossary!

Barnard Contingent Faculty
UAW Local 2110
APRIL 2019

JULY 2019

BCF-UAW is a labor union
for all part-time and many
full-time non-tenure-track
(i.e., contingent) faculty at
Barnard. We unionized in
Spring 2015 to fight the
worsening exploitation of
contingent faculty. The
Barnard admin fought us
at every step, bringing in
expensive unionbusting
lawyers to stall, demean,
and defeat our efforts. But
with the support of Barnard
students and alums—and
by setting a deadline to go
on strike—we won. In Spring
2017 we signed a contract
with wage minimums among
the highest in the country
and many improvements
to our benefits and working
conditions. We’re still a far
way, though, from equity
among all of Barnard’s
faculty. BCF-UAW continues
to fight for fairness. And we
continue to win!
facebook.com/bcfuaw

Proud Colors 
 

Follow us on Instagram ​@cuproudcolors

Our Goals 
● To provide QTPoC with a safe, 
inclusive space that serves as both a 
platform for marginalized voices 
and a source of community and 
comfort 
● To encourage community 
activism by providing important 
resources for LGBTQ students of 
color and facilitating discussion 
about important community issues 

Resources for QTPoCs @ Columbia 
1. The Stephen Donaldson Lounge (SDL) ​Located in the 1st floor lounge of Schapiro (Broadway 
and West 115th), this is the home of all LGBTQ student groups, such as Club Q, Q&A, 
GendeRevolution, and ​Proud Colors​. It serves as a general safe space for queer students and 
has some great resources (queer books)! 
2. QHouse ​Located at 546 W 114th street, QHouse is a special interest community (SIC) house 
for queer students. Five floors high, with 12 singles and 2 doubles, it serves as another safe 
space for QTs looking to live surrounded by their peers! ​To learn more, please email Jahlin 
Fernandez at ​jjf2171@columbia.edu​.  

3. First-Generation, Low Income Partnership (FLIP) ​For all of the FLI QTs out there, FLIP offers 
a variety of resources for all FLI students at Columbia, including coat drives, textbooks, and 
access to various programs for food insecure students.  

4. Columbia Mentoring Initiative (CMI) ​CMi is an inter-generational mentoring program that 
connects first year students at Columbia with upper-class mentors. If you’re looking for a 
close-knit LGBTQ community to be apart of- consider joining the CMI LGBTQ family tree! 
5. Columbia Health​ Visit Columbia Psychological Services (CPS) on the eighth floor of Lerner or 
Columbia Health located in John Jay for information on gender counseling and resources 
about transitioning! 

Tips 


Find a community that accepts and respects you for who you are! 



If you seek to create or maintain connections with other QT students- find the time to attend 
at least two LGBTQ events per semester. They’re a great way to make friends! 

We strive to support and empower queer/trans
Asian/Asian-American students while collaborating
with queer/poc organizations to create a community
and safer space for queer students of color.

Like our FB page to stay updated on
meetings and events or look out for our
beautiful flyers created on Microsoft Paint or
reach us at qanda.columbia@gmail.com
We host weekly community
meetings/study breaks with
chocopies, other snacks, and board
games to build the QTAPI
community on campus.
We also have social and political events such as: Queer
Asian Film Fest, Asian LGB-Tea Time with NYU, and Queer
Southeast Asian Panel as well as other collaborative
events with organizations on and off campus.
Some QTAPI resources in NYC: API Rainbow Parents of
PFLAG NYC, Q-WAVE, NQAPIA

*NEWS*ARTS*SPORTS*JAZZ*CLASSICAL*NEW MUSI

WKCR-FM is Columbia’s student-run non-commercial radio
station. You can find us at 89.9 on the dial and irl
broadcasting out of Lerner Hall. Let’s break it down.
*Student-run: As a student-run station, WKCR is a place for
any and all students to learn about radio programming. No
radio experience or musical “expertise” necessary.
*Non-commercial: WKCR has a long history of playing music
and talk radio that is not dictated by what is commercially
viable. WKCR has a reputation for alternative programming
such as: Studio A, showcasing the work of artists and
writers of color; Live Constructions, featuring
experimental, in-studio live sets, The Musician’s Show,
inviting local jazz artists to discuss their music and
influences, as well as Offbeat, our hip hop that emerged in
the 90s and was the first radio show to broadcast MCs like
Biggie, Nas, Tupac, the Fugees, Jay-Z, and the Wu-Tang
Clan.
For more information about our shows check out wkcr.org
HOW TO GET INVOLVED:
Stop by and say hi to us at the activities fair!
Come to our Fall Interest Meeting 
Begin interning! Learn alongside our programmers about
everything from music history to audio engineering

IC*LATIN*HIP HOP*BLUES*FUNK&SOUL*GOSPEL*

WKCR is open and broadcasting 24/7!
Our station is a sweet little club house and haven for music lovers located on the corner of 114th and Broadway.
AS A MEMBER YOU HAVE ACCESS TO:
*A library of 30,000 records and CDs that you can borrow
and use for your radio shows or listen to at home.
*Three, sound-proof studios great for recording interviews
or coming in to do your homework as you listen to music on
our studio monitors.
*An insulated room with amps, mics, a piano and a drum kit!
Come jam with friends or invite an artist to play a set and
we will help you put it on the airwaves!
*Zoom-recorders and lots of other audio equipment you can
use to make field recordings or record interviews.
*Airwaves! We are a recognized radio station in the tristate area and in the world. Use our platform to connect
with your favorite local musicians; go to shows for free
and interview and record a band you admire.
*A community of music-lovers to learn from and alongside!

COME TO OUR CONCERT!SEPTEMBER 19TH 6-9PM BUTLER LAWNS

COLUMBIA QUEER ALLIANCE
founded April 19, 1967
by Stephen Donaldson 
as Student Homophile League
first recognized queer collegiate organization in U.S.

our work
anti-racist
anti-colonial
anti-capitalist
gender liberatory
prison abolitionist
decolonial

past events
Trans Day of Remembrance
Coming Out Muslim
Black Excellence Tour
Israeli Apartheid Week
Community Dinners
Film Screenings

ongoing collaborations with...
Students for Justice in Palestine/Apartheid Divest
Proud Colors
Muslim Students Association
No Red Tape and 24/7 Columbia
Graduate Workers of Columbia
Barnard Center for Research on Women

FALL 2019

CRITICAL THINKING
QUESTIONS ?????
How will you ensure that this campus is
accessible to everyone? (physically,
intellectually, financially, etc.)
Who are campus
buildings named
for? Why?

Do you know and
care about all types
of staff and people
at school?

In what ways do university policies
forcibly gender bodies? How will
you break down gender binaries?
How does the university
support genocide and
occupation in Palestine? In
other settler colonial states?

G

How does non-black POC
anti-blackness show up in NYC?
What will you do to fight
anti-blackness?

How are you
going to
redistribute
wealth?

What questions do
you have? What
intentions do you
have?

What does it mean to be a part of institutions
that actively polices and displaces Harlem
residents?
Do you plan to spend
time in other
neighborhoods? How
do plan to take up
space and interact
with people and the
environment?

love from disguide


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"We must love each other and support each other."





't·•.,

WELCOME to Barnardand Columbia,
welcometo MorningsideHeights,and
welcometo land that is most likelynot
yours.
WELCOME to the 2019 disorientation
guide!
this
zine is a collaboration
between
barnard
zine club and other
students
across
the university
who want to help
you (new students
, transfer
students
,
returning
students
, friends
, allies)
learn
more about
the space
you ' re
entering
. this
is not a comprehensive
guide , but an introduction
, to the
fighting
, loving , and learning
done by
student
activists
and leaders
do here . we
hope to inform
you of some of the many
opportunities
for radical
activism
that
are within
your grasp
during
your time at
the university
.

we hope that this zine is onlythe beginningfor you, a
jumpingoff pointfor criticalthinking, radicallove, and
findingcommunity.ask questions, take space, make
space, and push back!
with love and
Disorientation

solidarity
,
Guide 2019 Team

coverdesign
byAkash
Jason

Contentwarning:some of the pages in this zine discussdifferent
forms of violence,includingracism,institutionalviolence,police
violence,sexual assault& violence,coercion,and transphobia.
Take care of yourselfas you read and think about these issues!

.....................

.. , ..,,,.. ...................

................

. .......................

.. , ........................

What is a zine?
A zine is a self-published1nagazine, meaning its creation and publication
are completelycontrolledby the person or people1naking it.

What goes into a zine?
Anytningyou want! A zine can havepoetry, essays,photography,dra\vings,
cartoons,or pretty much anythlng elseyou can imagine.

How do people use zines?
Zines aren't usuaUycreatedwith the intent of n1akinga profit.You1night

associatezines with riot grrrls in the l 990s,but zines havebeen and are a
part of ma11ysocial1novements.They can be a fonn of creationor rebel

lion or a way to get the word out about son1etning you care about.

Zines,NYC,Barnard/Columbia,and YOU
Interestedin zine-ing your <3 out?The BarnardLibrary is a great placefor
it! Barnardhas a zinelibrary on the first floorof Lefrak and an a\vesome

zine librarian named Jenna Freedman.
TheBarnardZine Club compilesSlLbmissions
based around one theme

each sen1esterand puts out a zine, so co111e
to n1eetingsand contribute!
(We haveoreos!)


join barnard zine club
website:zines.barnard.edu
email:barnardzinesubn1issions@gmail.com
twitter/instagram:@barnardzineclub



feministzine fest
website:femilustzinefestnyc.
wordpress.com

.. .

Land Acknowledgement
The 2019 Disorientation Guide was
compiled and made on stolen indigenous

land, specifically Lenape land on Turtle
Island. We acknowledge and recognize the
Lenni Lenape and Wappinger peoples, whose
original nations comprise the lands on which
Columbia University is built upon.
We want to acknowledge the ongoing
violence towards indigenouspeople as well
as their ongoingresistance.
We sincerely invite you, the reader, to take a
few moments right now to reflect on what it

means to be occupyingstolen indigenous
land, especially if you're a settler/visitor and
not indigenous to this land. We hope you
reflect on the fact that this is just an
acknowledgement and take seriously in
exploring next stepsto take to further
actively decolonize this place.

All settlers, including recent arrivants, have a

responsibilityto considerwhat it meansto acknowledge
the history and legacyof colonialism.


What are some of the privilegessettlers enjoy today
because of colonialism?



How can individuals develop relationshipswith
peoples whose territory

they are living on in the

contemporary North American geopolitical
landscape?


What are you, or your organization, doing beyond

acknowledgingthe territory where you live, work,
or hold your events?


What might you be doing that perpetuates settler

colonial futurity rather than considering alternative
ways forward for North America?


Do you have an understanding of the on-going

violence and the trauma that is part of the structure
of colonialism?
-

Adapted from Allison Jones for Native-Land.ca

Learn more about land acknowledgements, next steps to
actively decolonize, and resources at
native -land.ca/territory

-acknowledgement/

Read about the Lenape plaque on campus from the Native
American Council at Columbia:

https: //ti nyu rl. com/honorlena pe

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Chinese po litical reformist

Colu1nbia University is
founded as I<.ing's College
by a royal charter of
British King George II.

Kang Youwei, graduates

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9
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fron1 Barnard as one of the
first 1.-ansfers and the lirst
\voman ot' co lor.

Barnard is founded
by Columbia University
President Frederick
Aug ustus Porter Barnard,
after the Board of Trustees
rejected Barnard 's
proposition to make
.
Columbia
co , 1
ed. Barnard
stud ents
~
could no t
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Co lumbia 's
classes
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Faculty of
Political Science
admits ,vomen
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instru ctor;
authorizes the
a,vard.ing of
PhDsto
,vomen, despite
Dean Burgess's
opposition .

In 1.he ea rly 1920's n1any
Ivy League schools began
inst.ituling "unofficial
quot.as" to li111itadn1ilance
of Jewish students.
Colunibia 's was the n1osl
severe and slashed Lh e
Jewish population fron1
,tO'X,of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 wilh
particular discrin1inalion
F
against Sephardic and
Eastern Eu ropean Jews.
Quotas like these
reniained al Yale, for
exan ipl e, until the 1960's .

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In reaction to Wor ld
\Var I, Colurnbia
sta rts the Core
Cu1,-iculum, a set of
class standards that
has been adopted
with "Conte1nporary
Civ." intended to
"cu ltivate a critical
and creative
intellectual capacity
that stude nts
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college, in the
pursuit and the
fulfillment of
meaningful lives ."

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kno\vn black st udent at
Barnard, graduates . l-Iurston
\vorked in the Anthropo logy
Department w ith Franz Boas,
collecting black folklore and
oral history.

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In 1985 , the SAS won their
light for d ives1n1en1 froru
South Afr ican Apar1l1eid.
Baru,u·d aud Columbia both
d ivested the ir respective
endow n1ents fron1
corporations do ing business
in South Africa, inc lud ing
IBM , CBS , Genera l
i\1otors, Ford Mo1ors , Coca
Cola, Chev ron , Mobil Oi l,
Ilo neywell, and the
\Vashi nglon Post.

In
ljght of the
assassination of JVlLI( and
student frustration over Vietnam, student
protests erupt over the school's act ive involvement
vvith the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a
,,.,eapons research think -tank affiliated ...vith the U.S.
Department of Defense and plans to bu ild gym
facil ities in Harlem. Srudents for a De1nocratic Society
(SDS) and the Student Afro-An1erican Society (SAS)
united, resulting in Columb ia scrappi ng the Gym plans
and divesting fro,n the IDA. 712 stu dent s ,vere
rrested; The
Universi ty was put on
pause as students
aught "Liberation
Classes" on the la\vn;
he Grateful Dead
gave a free concert.

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After seven st ud ents
go on a ten day
hunger st rike (2007),
the program
previo usly known as
the JVlajor Cultures
seminar is adopted
in to the Core
Curriculum and
transforn1ed into
v.•hat we no"v knov.,
as the Global CORE.

Columbia announces
its plan to expand into
West Harle1n.

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BARNUMBIA
SURVIVAL
GUIDE
FORSTUDE
NTSWITHDISABILITIES
Beinga studentwith a disabilitymeansyou willhaveto workharderthan most(if not all)ofyourclassmates.This
is not becauseofany faultofyourown, but the institutionsofpoweryouwillbe relyingon.Theseinstitutions,
Barnardand Columbia
, as wellas the cityof NewYork,were not builtforyou and that makeseverystep youtake a
challenge.Thisguide aimsto makethis processeasierby identifying a fewkeyactionsuponyourarrivalon
campus.Knowthat you willhavethese toolsand the helpof other studentsto get past these hurdles.
Barnard
's Services:
Officeof Disability
Services
If youare a studentlivingwithdisabilitiesyoushouldregisterwithODSnow, evenif you havenot previously
neededaccommodations,
ratherthanwaituntilyoumightneedtheirservicesbecauseit takestimeand
documentation
to be approvedfor services.Documentation
fromdoctorsandtherapistsof yourdisabilityis
required.3-4 peoplein ODStakecareof over500studentson campus.
Accommodations:
Academic:
ODScanprovideacademicaccommodations
to helpyouin the classroomincludingextratimeon
testsandextraexcusedabsences.Youwillneedto meetwithyourprofessorto 'prove' yourdisability.
Residential
Life:ODScanprovidehousingaccommodations
to makelifeeasieron campussuchas a dorm
withAC, a single,a buildingwithwheelchair
access, or havinga serviceanimalwithyouon campus.ResLife
has morecontrolthanODSin housingaccommodations
andthis processcanbe frustrating.
FurmanCounseling
Services
If youare livingwith mentalhealthissuesyoushouldregisterwith Furman.Theintakeprocesscanbe taxing
as youmustsharedetailsof yourmentalhealthhistoryto determinewhetheryouneedlongtermor shortterm
counseling.Theofficewill giveyoureferralsbut thereis alsoa networkof studentsto offertherapist
recommendations.
StudentServices:
BarnardNetworkforStudents
withDisabilities
Thisstudent-created
(non-university
affiliated)Facebookpageconnectsyouto otherstudentsdealingwith
similarissueson campus.This is a placeto askfor support,askfor recommendations
, be partof a greater
communityof peoplethatwantto helporjust vent.
BarnardPayIt Forward
Thisstudent-created
(non-universityaffiliated)Facebookpageconnectsstudentswho needsomeoneto help
runerrandsfor themby connectingthemto studentswhoarewillingto help. Thisis for anyonewhothatneeds
somethingfromthe storebutcan', notjust studentswithdisabilities(medication
, groceriesetc.).
Campusandthegreatercityof NewYork
- Accessto Barnardresourcesis oftenblockedby economicaccessto get a prescription
for accommodations
or receivelong-termmentalhealthcare.
TheStudentHealthAdvisoryCommitteehascollectedoff-campus
resourcesfor low-income
folksandidentitybasedresourcesthatcanbe foundon theirFBpage.
- BothcampusandNewYorkCitymaybe difficultfor studentswith mobilitydisabilities.BarnardandColumbia
haveveryold buildingsandelevators(especiallyMilbankandHamilton).TherearetunnelsunderColumbia
that provideaccessto partsof Columbiafor wheelchairusers.
- NYC's publictransportation
systemis in violationof theAmericanDisabilityAct (ADA)in that its subway
systemis not accessibleto peoplewith mobilitydisabilities.The 1 linesubwaystopon 116thandBroadway
doesnothavean elevator(96thStreethasan elevator).
Community
Advice
-It is importantto advocatefor yourselfbutalsoimportantto be ableto ask for helpfroma friend, faculty
member,or memberdisabilityadvocacycommunity.MolreeWilliamsLendor, the directorof Title IX and Equity
andthe overseerof ODS, is an incredib
le resourceandgoodpersonto meetwith.
- Schoolmayknockyoudown;it is okayif youdon'thavethe strengthto get up again.Somestudentsfindthe
needto takea lighteracademicloador to takea semesteror yearoff.
-Youare notweakfor takingtimeto workon yourownhealth;youare strongfor prioritizingyourself.Youare
attendinga schoolthatdoesnotfullyaccommodate
youandthattakesa toll. Youmayhavea differentcollege
experiencebutthatdoesn't meanit won't be a goodone.Whenthe administration
doesnotprovidethe
supportyouneed,rememberyou havea communityreadyto backyou up.Therean entirecommunityhere
excitedfor youto join us.

ACCESSSUGGESTIONS
FORMOBILIZATIONS
By Sins Invalid - Disability Justice performance project by QTPOCartists
In support of our current collectiveuprising,,ve offer these suggestionsfor makingsure that your actions/
marches/ mobilizationsinclude as many of us as possible. This work is ideally done from a deeper political
commitment to disabilityjustice,or at minimum a critigueof ableismand an understandingof consent; otherwise
paternalismand abuse can masgueradeas "access support."
• Ahvayshave a Disability Point Person. Announce them from the mic; have them ,vear an armband for
visibility. Their skillsshould include a disabilityjustice frame\\rork, problem solving,and good listening.
• Announce that the event willbe fragrancefree;ask people ,vho are heavily scented to self-segregate.
• Generallyspeaking,,vritten text offers an additional mode of communication.
• To support accessibilityfor folks that are DHoH / for those ,vho can't hear the mic
• have an ASL interpreter at the mic
• use slips of paper to communicate the nuts and bolts of logistics(possibly with chants, to
communicatedestinations,the National LawyersGuild's #, etc.)
• have ASL interpreters in the cro,vd
• Organize push wheelchairs in advance for people ,vho may need them; announce their availabilityfrom the
.

rruc



Organize low stimulationspaces near the maingathering space (e.g. a room, or tent); announce from the
.

rruc







Organize childcareand changing stations;announce from the mic
Organize multilingualtranslation services;announce from the mic
Have the tacticalteam spread throughout mobilizations(e.g. the four quadrants)
Rent ,valkie-talkies. More information = better access. Be mindful that police escalationneeds to be
communicatedwith participants in a calm manner, and willimpact some more than others.
Provide chairs (foldingchairs, mobile bleachers, etc.) for rallies/ gatherings,vhere people can expect to be
standing for 20 min or more. Announce their location from the rnic and explainthat they are for people
with disabilities,elders, and others ,vho cannot stand for a lengthof time.



Ata march:



Do a march route run-through with mobility in mind - possibly seated in a wheelchairor in an abandoned
shopping cart (e.g. looking for grids, grassyareas, hills,holes, etc.)
Invite people with disabilitiesif they would like to set the pace of the march by being at the front
Give an auditory descriptionof the march route beforehand
Make an announcement before the march regardingthe destinationand distance of the route, so that folks
can choose to meet the march there.
DO NOT "direct" folkswith mobilityimpairments to ,vhere you think they should be; you can offer
respectfulsuggestions;no one should be hurried along - ideallythe slowestpace should set the pace of the
march; no one should touch people or their mobilitydevices without their consent.
Organize a car or van to drive elders and people with disabilitiesfrom the beginningto the end of the
march. Provide seating at the destination.
Have distinct tacticaland safety teams
Police liaisonsshould be communicating,vith police that there are participants ,vith disabilities(and elders,
pregnant folks,etc) and that the march intends to respect that pace.
Be a,vare that cops ,villoften target folks,vith disabilitiesas perceived'\veak links"; cops target folksat the
end of actions as energy dissipates.











Access Suggestions For Public Events: http://s insinvalid.org/ blog / access-sugge stions-for-a-public-event

some ways to get yr $$$$ 's worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Columbia. it's expensive to
live in New York, and it's expensive to go to these schools! here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be careful) and bring Tupperware , or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils , salt and pepper , napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNl)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federal Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don 't know why)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to museums! newyork archaelogical repository! state parksl)
• free department and student life retreats
• there's free paper in the printers*
• there's a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks! go
• you can get textbooks at the library : ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends ; professors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven't
• there are free classes and teach-ins if you look (book-making! social justice!)
• there's sometimes free department/ club swag beyond t-shirts !
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you 're on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it's cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard 1nailroom if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build co1nmunity! love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on "ethical stealing " ( even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for ; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others ; consider that there 's not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want ; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food ; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

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On April 23, 1968, hundreds of students and faculty began an occupation of five
campus buildings. Black students from the Student Afro-American Society led the
demonstration with an organized and deliberate occupation of Hamilton Hall.
Students from ASA and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), collaborating
with Harlem organizers including the Young Lords and Weather Underground,
called for the termination of weapons research for the Vietnam War and an end to
construction of a gym ("Gym Crow'') in Morningside Park. On April 30, the
administration called the police and over 700 violent arrests were made, injuring
many protestors and "triggering a campus-wide strike that shut down the
university" (CU Archives) . During this time, Black and brown woman students did
the crucial work of keeping organizers fed and cared for, as seen in the photo of
the Hamilton Hall food pantry and medical supply stock below.

For more information:







bit.ly/CU1968
columbia1968.com
Twitter: @1968CU
BCRW Digital Feminist Archives: "1968 and Its Afterlives"
Democracy Now: "How Black Students Helped Lead the 1968 Columbia U. Strike ..."
NYTimes: "The Missing History of the Columbia '68 Protests"
Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Archives, Columbia Spectator , BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J. Bhatt, BC'18, CUMSPH '20

On April 25, 2018 , members of the Liberation Coalition led a tour titled Decolonize
This University and marched through Butler Library demanding an end to
gentrification in Harlem , decolonization of the university , divestment from settler
colonialism and military occupation , and other forms of reparations. An
organization founded last October after a series of white supremacist speakers
were invited to Columbia , the Liberation Coalition seeks futurity in the alliance
between Black and brown Columbia University students and Harlem residents. In
the midst of the graduate workers' strike which began on April 24 and shortly after
the end of a five-day student occupation of the Lerner piano lounge in demand of
24/7 healthcare services and divestment from systems of policing , the
organization occupied the main stairwell of the library for nearly an hour. Within
minutes , administrators arrived on scene and threatened to call the police. The
University 's recently growing reliance on the NYPD in response to student -ofcolor organizing was also seen on December 4 , 2014 , when over two hundred
students of color performed a die-in at the annual tree lighting ceremony on
College Walk of Columbia University , after a Staten Island grand jury failed to
indict the police officer who murdered Eric Garner. The die-in followed a Black
Students Organization performance of "Strange Fruit" and calls for radical selflove. Several police vans arrived on College Walk within minutes of students
rallying around the lntercultural Resource Center.
Fifty years later , these events at the University demonstrate the perpetual nature
of student exploitation and feelings of tension , unsafety , and anger . However ,
such events also point to the ways that political organizing is a practice of futurity ,
of envisioning the possibilities of a better and more just world .

11111
SPIECH

Images from Columbia University, Barnard College Arc hives, Columbia Spectator, BWOG, and Liberation News
Text and photos curated by Krish J . Bhatt, BC'lB, CUMSPH '20

THE
HARLEM
RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014 , the
day when police burst
,
, · through residents'
'
doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later , parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
entering their homes
• without permits , handcuffing
innocent people , and taking their belongings as evidence . " The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage ," one parent said
after the raids. "That 's not a good feeling , that you're using me to get a promotion. " 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day , police arrested over 40 people.

/ =-.,

The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are N ew York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings lo cated about ten blocks from Columbia's Morningside campus , and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus . The NYPD 's justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
12s sr.'i
...... \ ~/.,.
.........................
.
students heard from their own administration:
'
i. Gant/ Manhattanville
safety . An emai l went out the day after the
:~Housing
raids informing students that it wou ld " make
...............
.Projects
,:, (ii
our city and community safer. " The reality ,

s.t1;E>
s,
however , is that a persistent lack of resources
he Riverside Church
for youth in the community is the reason for the
@
,I,
tj'
violence there, and that services, not
.$'
incarceration , are necessary if the situation is to
~... ,
...... s:"
improve. What's more , it has become clear that r•-••···
': Barnard':
although promises of community investment
'
'
!
College
~
,.................. .
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build St· CCil~Mr-ia
l. ri vei<,ty C'J
a new campus across the street from their
homes , the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among you th at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years ,
but tensions had quieted in 2011 , when Tayshanna "Ch icken " Murphy , a nationally
ranked high school basketball player , was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult ,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring reso urces to youth in the area ,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities , and employment training to young residents of Grant and

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents ofManhattanville
and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporationthe group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister ' s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren 't
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don ' t provide the core services--employment
and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same , and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison , NYCHA will take away their homes . What 's
more , the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people , arresting 88 in one day.
As students, we can 't accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities , police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses , it is in the University ' s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities . It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and , in the case of Grant and Manhattanville , been
ignored--for years . It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
" development " that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia ' s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University's outright support for the raids , coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant , sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood , but it is not here
for you.

Columbia
STUDENTS
FOR
JUSTICE
IN
PALESTINE
is
a
diverse
group of students,
facul ty , staff,
and community
members
from
Columbia
and
Barnard,
organized
on
democratic
principles
to promote
just i ce, human rights,
liberation
, and self-determination
for
the
Palestinian
people . We organize
in accordance
wi th the Palestinian
civil
society
call
for Boycott , Divestment
, and San c tions
(BOS) against
Israel
until
it
ends
the
occupation
of
Pa lestine
and dismantles
its
apartheid
state.

...·.·.
..................
.....'...·.······
......' .................
...... ..................

.. .
··.·.·.·.·

JEWISH

VOICE

chapter
of
Co l u mbia/Barnard
. a student
FOR PEACE is
rganization
that
a
national
o
end
to
the
for
advocates
. an of Palestine • - Israeli
occupati~n
f Jews who
community
o
.
in
we are
a
. ritze
anti-racis~
strive
to prio
we
organize,
our
work
as
and
protest
celebrate,
toge ther .

-----3

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to sign
our
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!

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NEW5 FRO
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facebook . com/CUapartheidd
iv est
facebook . com/ColumbiaSJP
facebook . com/JVPColumbia
& on twitter
@Columb ia SJP

PALE$,INA!



,tt r,\ • •
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which
calls
on
Columbia
to divest
its
stocks
, fun ds ,
and endowment
from
compa n ies
that
profit
from the State
of Israel
' s
v iolations
of in t ernational
l aw a nd
Palestinian
human rights
through
its
ongoi n g system
of settler
colonia
li sm ,
military
occupation
, and apartheid
.
To find

,~,

-~
...
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THE

BEHIND THE
BARNARD REFERENDUM
On Mar ch 24th , 2018 following
a p r ese n tat i o n fr om Col umb i a
University
Apartheid
Di vest
(CUAD),
the
Barnard
College
St uden t Gover nment Assoc i a ti on (SGA) voted
to initiate
a
referendum
o n CUAD' s campa i gn to
d i vest
Barna r d a nd
Columbia ' s endowments
from companies
that
profit
from the
St a t e o f Is r ae l' s apa rth e i d and occupat i o n r eg i me . Th e
r efe r end um asked
Ba rn a r d stude n ts : s h ould
SGA wri te
a
letter
of support
to t he Administration
encouraging
the
Col l ege " to d i vest
from e i ght mul ti n ational
companies
that
profit
from or engage
in the State
of Israe l' s treatment
of
Pales t inians?
"
Following
an
intense
campaigning
period
with
record b r eaking
vo t e r t urn out,
on April
18 the referendum
passed
by a two-to-one
margin,
with 63 . 4 % of respondents
voting
in
favor of divestment!
The passage
of the referendum
was not
only a n unde n iab l e victo r y f o r th e Pa l est i nia n solida r i t y
movement , but also
an u np r ecede nt ed show o f s u ppo r t fr o m
the Barnard
community
in favor
of Palestinian
rights
.
This
referendum
is yet anothe r step
on the path
to fu ll
dives t men t at Barnumbia , and one step closer
to justice
for
the
Pa l estinian
people . Barnard
President
S i an Bei l ock ,
cowing
to institutional
presures
and reactionary
Zionist
alumni
and
do no r s , was qu i c k to
publicly
dismiss
the
results
and the voice
of the student
body.
Neve rt heless ,
CUAD will
continue
to organize
until
Columbia
University
and Ba r na r d Col l ege dives t f r om all companies
compl i ci t in
Is r ael ' s injus ti ces !

for the HOT FACTS on what happened
after
the referendum
, check
out :
apartheiddivest.org
& facebook.com/CUapartheiddivest

Website: cusafa.org
FB: Columbia University South Asian
Feminism( s) Alliance
Email: cusafa@gmail.com
Instagram: cu_safa
SAFA's mission is to build leadership and
inspire collective action against systems of
oppression which affect the South Asian
diaspora and descendents of South Asian
indenture ship.

We value creating coalitions and collaborating with groups both on and off of
columbia's campus. We organize an annual artist series ,vith South Asian creatives
from different backgrounds in NYC. In the past, ,ve have also worked ,vith other
campus groups to hold space for discussions around migration, gendered violence
and environmenta l feminisms.

SOUTH
ASIAN
FEMINISM(S)
ALLIANCE
SAFA is a group for those ,vho ha,re dealt ,vith misogyny and violence of all
forms (including IPV or sexual violence) rampant in their homes, families, and
communities . For those ,vho are queer, trans, or gender non -conforming . For those
,vho are not able-bodied or thin. For those who ha,,e been othered ,vithin our
communities because of their race, caste, or religion. This is a group for everyone
,vho wishes to challenge South Asian gender norms and think critically about the
interse ctions of our multiple identities.
Feel free to message us anytime to learn ho,v to support SAFA or find out ,vhat
we're up to!

MUJERES
Founded in t he late 1990's, MUJERES
is t he only femme- led Latinx club on Barnard and
Columbia 's campus.
We take pride in our growing community and the work
we do to take up space and make o ur voices heard.
This year we are looking forward to we lcoming
ne w members and inc reas in g out impact outside of campus .

Asian
American
Alliance
Ema il: aaa@columbia.edu
FB: www.facebook .com/Co lumbiaAAA
Yearly Events:
CultureSHOCK (a fundraising
performance showcase with
special guest performers)
Crossroads (a social justice
conference for high school
youth)
Regular Events:
General body meetings (all
are welcome to discuss
pressing issues and build
community)
Other Events:
Unpacking Lunchbox
Politics: East Asian Privilege
(with Yellow Jackets Collective)
Roots: Asian-American
Storytelling (with Club
Zamana)
Language Learning (with
Malama Hawai'i)
Blasian Narratives Screening
and Live Performance (with
Bold, Beautiful, Black at
Barnard)
Critical Perspectives on
Migration (with South Asian
Feminism(s) Alliance and
UndoCU}

Asian American Alliance, o r
Tri pie-A", the on ly exp Iicitly
political and pan-Asian
group on camp us, stri ves t o
create spa ce for th e APIA
community to build
solidarity among itself and
wi th other marginalized
communities, address
social/political issues at
Columbia and beyo nd , and
fo r students t o learn and
unlearn as a co llecti ve to
resist oppression of a 11
fo rm s.
11

Off-Campus Collaborators
CAAAV: Organizing Asian
Communities, Asian American Legal
Defense and Education Fund,
National Asian Pacific American
Women's Forum, Adhikaar, Desis
Rising Up and Moving, Chinatown Art
Brigade, Minkwon Center for
Community Action, API Rainbow
Parents of PFLAG NYC, etc.

B.O.S.S.
BARNARD
ORGANIZATION
OFSOUL
SISTERS

WHY
BARNARD
NEVER
BLACK

COLLEGE

& COLUMBIA

BEEN SAFE SPACES

QUEER

FOLKS,

THEIR
EDUCATION

ONLY

IG: barnardboss
emai l: boss@barnard

.edu

& WHITE

FOLKS .

SUPREMACIST
THAT

POLITICS

US . SO BOSS,

OF
IN

US, MENTOR

US & OTHERS,

OUR SPIRITS

WE

FOUNDED

TO EMPOWER

US , LIBERATE

SAFEGUARD

HAVE

FEMMES,

NON - BINARY

HUMAN . THEIR

AS A SPACE

US, SUPPORT

FOR BLACK

SEND US THE MESSAGE

EXCLUDE

"INCLUSION"

UNIVERSITY

OF ENSLAVEMENT,

VIOLENCE,

ARE LESS THAN
EXISTS

& BLACK

HISTORIES

GENTRIFICATION,

1968,

WE EXIST:

AND

.

FB : @BarnardOrganizationofSou
l
SistersHome

this
EXCITED

never:



• -

G• ndet•

wo 1 _, t Io• -

-

NATIVE AMERICANCOUNCIL(NAC)
Founded in 1996 by Native
students
from Barnard
and Columbia,
the
Native
American
Council
(NAC) is a community
and political
organiza
tion
that
supports
Indigenous
students
and allies
on Columbia's
cam pus; Our members represent
a diverse
range
of communities,
intersec
tionalities
and perspectives,
as we also
assert
the nonexistence
of
a monolithic
Indigenous
identity.
Each yea r, NAC hosts
our annual
Columbia
Powwow in the late
Spring,
where we invite
our campus and local
Indigenous
communities,
as well
as allies
to share
dance and space.
NAC's other
large
event
is the
celebration
of I n digenous
Peoples'
Day in the fall,
we have done so
through
protest
of Columbus
Day and Open Mies,
and the unveiling
of
the Lenape Plaque.
Born from the efforts
of NAC members,
a plaque
recogizing
the Lenni
Lenape people
as the original
inhabitants
of the is land of Manhattan
was installed
in 2016 . Beginning
with a 2013 petition,
the effort
was revived
in 2015 with a photo
campaign
urging
Columbia's
adminis tration
to #RecognizetheLenape,
which was also
supported
by countless
campus and student
organizations.
NAC aims to continue
such
advocacy
to make, name, and center
spaces
of support
for Indigenus
peoples
and all
communities
of color
and marginalized
voices
on cam pus.
Our current
inia t ives include
advocacy
on Columbia's
faculty,
administration,
vide adequate
spaces
and resources
for
lumbias
Campus. We also
look forward
to
with the many student
organizations
that
aim
to support
students
of
color
at CU! !

From the Lenape Plaque:
" 1he Lenape lived here beforeand during
colonization of the Americas. Thisplaque
recognizesthese indigenouspeople of Manhattan, their displacement,dispossession,
and continuedpresence.It stands as a
reminder to reflect on ourpast as we contemplate our wayforward"

for Indigenous
re presentat
io n
and services
in order
to pro Indigenous
students
on Co mantaining
our relations
h ips

LET'S RECO(;N l~E

INDIGENOUS
PEOPLES'
DAY
.
American Council
urges
The Native
.
re · ect the violent
the univers i ty to
J
d 'th
olumbia and stan
wi
le gacy Of C
Indigenous
students
on campus

This univers ity :
1 . Rests on L
·
.
enn1.
Lenape lad
2.
Derives
its n
n ,
3.
Benefits
froma;;d~rom
Columbus
black l d
igenous
and
an and labor

__

_.2]J._..
1,_<..,_
_

Columbus Day commemorates
violence
against
and the
displacement
of Indigenous
peoples

___,/l

the

Ind ·
. igenous
Peopl
in y
es ' Da ·
ears of Ind'
Y is rooted
and c 1
igenous
.
I
. e ebrates
th
_orga nization
nd1.genous com
: ~esilience
of
world
mun1.ties
and at this
. across
the
university

For more

info@

Native

American

Council

of Columb i a University

As many students who identify as first generation
and/or low-income may agree, Columbia University
does not always offer the appropriate safe spaces or
platforms for students to talk about issues that pertain
to them. In order to raise awareness about class issues,
build a first generation and/or low-income community
that transcends all barriers,foster an open and
respectful campus environment, engage in a crossclass dialogue, advocate on behalf of the community,
lead service projects pertaining to these issues and
empower first generation low-income students at
Columbia, we are looking to start a conversation
amongst students about what our community needs.
Entitled FLIP, we look to create safe spaces to discuss
issues relevant to our community in order to combat t
stigmas we might face, promote discussion of
socioeconomic class and education access, and
advocate for resources.

SHAREMEALS
FLiP introducedShareMeals t
campus in 2016 ShareMeals is
an app designedto connect
those in needof swipes to
those who havetoo many. It is
available on both iOSand
Android platforms, please
download and help combat
food insecurityon campus

FLIPLENDINGLIBRARY
FLiP maintains a lending librar
at Barnard library and on the 4th
floor of Milstein Library at Butler
that is available to all FLI
students on campus.

FLiP works to combat a numbe
of issuesfacing the FLI
community on campus today,
includingfood insecurity,financial
uncertainty,and general
unawarenessof FLI issues within
the student community, faculty,
and administration.

G-BODYMEETINGS
FLiP has bi-monthly general
body meetings designed to
promote commun ity building
and provide a necessary outlet
for grievances on campus.

FOODPANTRY
FLIP was a key player in the
creation of Columbia's Food
Pantry. Designed to combat the
struggle of food insecurity on
campus, it is open to all from 4
-7pm in 582 Lerner Hall.

0

@FLIPCOLUMBIA

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I https://bit.ly/2HORFZb
I columbiaallsex@gmail.com

Cl(l

The Undocumented Students Initiative (we prefer UndoCU) is the first undocumented student group at Columb ia
University, and our main objective is to protect and dignify the humanity of every undocumented person. Following the
2016 election, UndoCU, with cooperation of Movimiento Cosecha, staged a walk -out in demand that undocumented
students be protected and UndoCU has since then become a prominent activist group on campus. In order to have
mo re freedom from the unive rsity's rules and to keep our members' identity safe, we choose to remain unrecognized by
the Activities Board of Columbia. Therefo re, we are currently an independent organization that does not receive fund ing
from the university.
We not only quest ion the broken immigration system th at produces the conditions of our collective subjectivity, but we
critique the white supremacist settler colonial structure that is its root. Therefore, UndoCU is an intersect ional
movement that prio ritizes solidarity with marginalized communities and the destruction of white supremacy.
Our accomplishments so far:


Keeping administration accountable for its prom ises of sanctuary to undocumented students



Secured summer housing for at-risk students



Expanded financial support fo r undocumented students



Launched and organized College Accessfor Undocumented Students ' Education (CAUSE),a Fall Semester college
application program for undocumented high school students in the NYCarea, faci litating info rmation and college
councelling services to over undocumented 100 students and parents



Provided workshops fo r educators on best practices to serve undocumented middle and high school students



Educated the campus community at numerous speaking events



Featured on the Columbia Spectator, M ic.com, Democracy Now!, and- regrettab ly-F ox News.

Our present prio rities include sustaining these accomplishments, supporting the undocumented campus community
at-large, and supporting city-wide and national efforts to overhaul immigrat ion legislation.
For mo re info check out our 2019 list of demands (posted on our FB page) and sign our petition to demand Columbia
cuts ties with Customs and Border Protection, the government agency that oversees the camps and ICE)
Why should you join UndoCU?


If you are undocumented, because we love you and you matter .



If you are an Amer ican citizen, because this politica l system considers you human above all of us, and an
informed political education requires a rooted understanding of this construction.



If you are neither, because we believe in your humanity as much as most Americans don't believe in ours .

Despite common pro-immigrant narratives, we have intersectional leadership and make sure that non-white,
non-cisgender, and non-heterosexual ident ities are surely prioritized here.
INSTAGRAM: @undo_cu
FACEBOOK
: @undocumentedcu
EMAIL: undocumentedstudentsinitative@gmail

.com

We a re
sexual

a grassroots
+ domestic

we envision

a world

organiz
violence
free

of

at ion working
in our campus
violence+

to end
commun i ties

becaus e

oppression.

We recognize
t hat
sexua l
violence
i s a manifestation
of
systemic
gender
oppression
which cannot
be separated
from all
other
forms of oppression.
Therefore,
the fight
to end sexual
+ domestic
violence
cannot
be won without
eradicating
all
other
forms
of
oppression
including
but
not
l i mi ted
to
rac is m,
classism
, ableism , colonialism,
homophobia,
+ transphobia
.
We seek
to foster
transparency
around
issues
of
sexual
violence
because
we believe
that
a bottom
up approach
to building
power is the only way to
achieve
justice
.

we use direct
action
to expose the
violence
our
institution+
larger
society
normalizes.

A major
rape
with

demand

of

crisis
center
professional

our
that

Our cu r rent campaign
demands
more support ,
accessibility,
accountability
, funding,+
enforcement
(SAAFE) to ensure
that Columb i a
Uni versity
is an inclusive
educational
environment
where survivors
can thrive,
regardless
of their
identity
(inc l uding but not
lim i ted to race,
sex, gender , sexual
orientation,
socioeconomic
status,
immigration
status,
+
rel i gion) .

campa i gn

is

for

the

is physically
open
advocates
trained

creation
24/7
in

of

a

+ staffed

cultural

We be lie ve t hat
these
changes
wil l i mprove
the qual i ty of resources
for all
survivors,
especially
for survivors
whose experiences
don't
match traditional
narratives
and who come from marg i nal ized communities.
competency.

////////////////

////////////////

work we do is
always centered
on
the needs+
experiences
of su rviv o r s.
The

///////////

////////////////

,

Want to get invol ved ? Sign up for our listserv@
http://noredtapecu.org/new
-page/
or emai l noredtapecu @gmail.com ! Our week l y meetings
are on Sundays from 7PM- 8PM.
Go to

www.NoRedTapeCU.orgto learn

////////////////

////////////////

more

about

our

work + for

////////////////

info

on resources.

///////////

,

BUILDING RANK-AND-FILE POWER
FOR A STRONGER GWC-UAW

ISSUE 1

Colum,bia won't
cede real power
without a strike
What would you strike for?
Half a year ago, c, ,vc•s and Cohnnbia 's bargain ing teams began
negotiations of our firsl contract. Pr ogress has been discouraging .
So far, afler lhirrccn bargaining session s, the y've reache d
tentative agree,nent on only two low-stakes contrac t articles:
Severability and Un ion -Mana genien t Coni,nittee (see below for
descriptions). Colu1nbia has rejecte d all ou1er G\ VC proposals,
in cludin g those guaranteei ng funding to finish ou ,· degrees,
rig hts an d protections for in terna tional sruden t wor kers, and real
recourse against supervisor abuse, sexua l har a.•,stn ent , mo ldy and
cra,np ed workspaces, unaffordable in suran ce, inad equale and
disctin1inatory heallh care, flexihle leaves of absence ....
And no surp rise! Last November, a majorit y of th e union
n1emb ers hip voted to accept th e UA\V Jnt erna tional 's nego tiat ed
terms of bargainin g ,vith Columbia . These tet1ns include a
morat oriu ,n unti l Aptil 6, 2020 on alJ stri kes, wor k stoppages ,
and other " inlerfere nces with Colu,nb ia's operatio ns." No manet
h ow convincing and pr epar ed our ba,·gaining com ,nitt ee is at the
bargaining table, until next sprin g when we ,·eclaim our sta tu to ry
rig ht lO strike, our ba rgai nin g tea1n's pow er lo force Colu,nbia 10
agree to a transforinative co ntra ct will be limited.
That said , srudcn l workers can use thi s time to our advantage.
As bargaining continues into the fall, " 'e can begin tl1inking

Tentatively
Finalized
Contract
Articles


Severabll lty - Guaranlecs if any par t of the contract is
nullified by a change in law, the rest of the contrac t " 'ill
reoiain in effecL
• Union-Manag eme nt Comm ittee - Establishes a
con11nittee comprising an equal number of c,vc and
Ad1n in is1rarion represen 1ati,·es to o,·etsee lhe ad ,n in.isrration
of lhe cont racL

aboul what we'll have to do together to win iliis fighr againsl an
institution cleterm.inecl to turn a ptofit. Rational argtunenL5 will
only take us so far when it's not profitable to provide working and
learning con ditio ns that foster education , i,npactful reseatch, an d a
warin and inclusive ca ,npu s commtu1ity - when it's not profitable
to trcal studen t workers as hwnan beings , with vulne,·ab le body1ninds, by fair ly compensar ing us for our work and serv ice and
guara nt eeing henefits like quality health care and hou sing.
All ofus ha ve different need~ and hopes for tl1e contra ct under
nego tiation. So what arc your prioriti es? \Vhat would you be
willing to stop work for? \Vhar about your collea g ues?

PastBargaining
Sessions
I.

Feb 25
)I I.arch

2.

6 (ad,nin canceled)
1•farch I+

3. .\ pr 5
4.
5.

6.
7.

8.

Apr9
Apr 18
?-lay I
)l [ay 6
?-1.ay13

9. :\lay 29

10. June 12
11. June 21
12. July 11
13. July 23

FutureBargain
ingSessions
(opentoall members
!)
14. Aug 14, 12:00 - 5:00p m
Studebaker 469
15. Au g 19, 10:30am - 3:00pm

Loca tion TBD

(Under-)Graduate
Workers of
Colu1nbia
What about us?
by Ne ls on Gomez
Before graduating, I was-paradoxically-an
undergraduate
organizer for the Graduate \\'orkers ofColun1bia. Between
the nan1e itself and the headlines about "graduate students
walking out" and "graduate
workers bargaining;' you
probably wouldn't know that
undergraduate T As and graders
are represented by the union as
well. Even ,ny coworkers were
surprised to learn that they were
unionized!
Fittingly, the relationship
between undergraduate workers
and their union is best described
as being one gigantic afterthought. Bargaining com,nittee elections
would be held in a space that undergraduates had no S\\~peaccess
to. Organizers typically didn't have undergraduate contacts so
outreach was lin1ited, if not non-existent.
Also, since grad studencs make up the vast n1ajority of the
bargaining unit, most bargaining proposals are tailored to their
needs. This bia~ has been so glru·ingly obvious to Colun1bia's
negotiators that they proposed excluding undergrads and other
casual workers fron1 a contract because n1any proposals "don't
,nake sense" when applied to then1.
There are also issues inherent LO undergrads that n1ake them
difficult to w1ionize. The n1ost obvious one is that, like i\,Jaster's
studenL~, they have high turnover. PhD students can spend
upwards of five to seven years studying at Columbia, \\~th half
of that ti,ne spent perfonning departn1ental service. By contTast,
undergrads a re expected to graduate in four years and often don't
becmne instructional assistants until their third or fourth year. It
takes per.;istent effort to organize then1, and it doesn't help 1.hatthe
university won't tell new hires that they're unionized.
Thru1kfully weVe ,nade progress on this front. Undergrad and
CA\VDU participation has drawn attention to these issues, which
is why I still believe that we can negotiate a contract chat's strong
for us and grad srudencs. I would caution, though, that we'IJ only
be able lo do this by treating undergrads as coequals in this fight.

Ii,liI~·J
t,li1:II~Ii,li1~•J,
!i it,l~ I
fiiiil columbiagradunion.org
~

columbiaawdu.home.blog
facebook.com
/ GWCUAW
facebook.com
/ CAWDU

the

s

a union glossary
Bargaining Committee (BC ) • A group of ten Q~Y.C.
n1cmbers elected 10 conduct contract negotiations. At
present, there are no term li1nits and no reca!J process for BC
1nen1bers.There will be elections in Septe111ber2019.
bargaining unit • The group of workers represented by the
union and covered bv, !.he contract.
business unionisni • A n1odel of unionism that views the
r.~r.i.~-~.1}9..fi!!'.
as consumers of a product, i.e. !.he contract,
delivered by !.he union bureaucracy; an approach to conu·act
negotiations that rejecLstransparency, valorizes compro,nise.
and discourages strikes; an ideology that the emplorer and
the uruon are '·on the san1e side."'
Columbia Academic Workers for a Democratic
Union (CAWDU) • A group ofQ1Y.9.members who
believe in fighting for a transformativ<>conu·act. en1powering
our coworkers, developing diver.;e leaders . and holding
!l.A\rJni~x.i:11ii.\gr,i_;I,
representatives and our elected union
leadership acconntable; the G\\'C reforn1 caucus.
Graduate Workers of Columbia (GWC) • Our lahor
union representing approxin1acely 3600 undergraduate and
gradua1e student academic ,vorkers (TAs, RAs, graders,
preceptors). G\VC is a part ofUA\\'_Local_21_10.
open bargaining • An arrange1nent in which the contract
bargaining process is kept transparent to the !fl.l:\k.~!.19.
..i:i!!',
such as by allowing men1bers to attend bargaining sessions.
Q~Y,Q.has open bargaining.
Organizing Committee • A group of Q~Y.G.n1en1bcrs
that n1eeLsweekly LO discuss organizing conversations and
experiences, talk shop, and plan events.
rank and file, the • The workers who comprise a union..
as opposed to the representatives of the union's national or
regional bureaucrac)~ the source ofa union's power.
UAW International • The cen1.raladmiui.stration of th<'
United A.uto\ \'orkers, headquartered in Derroi1. Regional
acln1inisrrations are geographically distributed. \ Ve are in
Region 9A, lwadquartcred in Farnungton, CT. 171e U.\\\'
I nten-iaLionalis a classic ~.\!~\n!;.'l,~.\!P.ig1),.
UAW Local 2110 • 171e individual unions comprising the
U.\\\' ru·e Locals. \Ve are in Local 2110, an amalgan1ared
Local (i.e.. 1nultiple 9.~r~.i.~1i.i:1g
__
\l_!}~_~!l)
representing dozens of
workplaces around NYC, including at Colun1bia. Barnard,
Teach<>rsCollege, J\lo~IA, ACLU. and B,\1\1. Local 2110
has a solid history ofn1ilitancy and clfective strikes.

+- Go to the CAWDU website for the full Glossary!

BarnardContingentFaculty
UAW Local2110
BCF-UAW is a labor union
for all part-time and many
full-time non-tenure-track
(i.e., contingent)faculty at
Barnard. We unionized in
Spring 2015 to fight the
worsening exploitationof
contingent faculty. The
Barnard admin fought us
. at every step, bringing in
expensive unionbusting
lawyers to stall, demean,
and defeat our efforts. But
with the support of Barnard
students and alums-and
JULY 2019
by setting a deadline to go
..
on strike-we won. In Spring

2017 we signed a contract
r.m~r.ffirnia.~fir.rlirrnm~~,
with wage minimums among
the highest in the country
and many improvements
to our benefits and working
conditions. We're still a far
way, though, from equity
among all of Barnard's
faculty. BCF-UAWcontinues
to fight for fairness. And we
continue to win!
facebook.com/bcfuaw

APRIL 2019

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bitty/S-WS-2019

rou
Follow us on lnstagram @cuproudcolors

Ot11·Goals
To provide QTPoC with a safe,
inclusive space that serves as both a
platform for marginalized voices
and a source of community and
comfort
To encourage community
activism by providing important
resources for LGBTQ students of
color and facilitating discussion
about important community issues

ResotII·cesf01·QTPoCs @ Colt1mllia
The Stephen DonaldsonLounge(SDL) Located in the 1st floor lounge of Schapiro (Broadway
and West 115th), this is the home of all LGBTQ student groups, such as Club Q, Q&A,
GendeRevolution, and Proud Colors. It serves as a general safe space for queer students and
has some great resources (queer books)!

_

QHouse Located at 546 W 114th street, QHouse is a special interest community (SIC) house
for queer students. Five floors high, with 12 singles and 2 doubles, it serves as another safe
space for QTs looking to live surrounded by their peers! To learn more, pleaseemail Jahlin

Fernandez at jjf2171@columbia.edu.
First-Generation, Low Income Partnership(FLIP) For all of the FLI QTs out there, FLIP offers
a variety of resources for all FLI students at Columbia, including coat drives, textbooks, and
access to various programs for food insecure students.

Columbia Mentoring Initiative (CM() CMi is an inter-generational

mentoring program that
connects first year students at Columbia with upper-class mentors. If you're looking for a
close-knit LGBTQ community to be apart of- consider joining the CMI LGBTQ family tree!

Columbia Health Visit Columbia Psychological Services (CPS) on the eighth floor of Lerner or
Columbia Health located in John Jay for information on gender counseling and resources
about transitioning!

Tips
Find a community that accepts and respects you for who you are!
If you seek to create or maintain connections with other QT students- find the time to attend
at least two LGBTQ events per semester. They're a great way to make friends!

Columbia Queer and Asian

We strive to support and empower queer/trans
Asian/Asian-American students while collaborating
with queer/poc organizations
to create a community
and safer space for queer students of color.

Like our FB page to stay updated on
meetings and events or look out for our
beautiful flyers created on Microsoft Point or
reach us at ganda .columbia@gmail .com
We host weekly community
meetings/study breaks with
chocopies, other snacks, and board
games to build the QTAPI
community on campus.
We also have social and political events such as: Queer
Asian Film Fest, Asian LGB-Tea Time with NYU, and Queer
Southeast Asian Panel as well as other collaborative
events with organizations
on and off campus .
Some QTAPI resources in NYC: API Rainbow Parents of
PFLAG NYC, Q -WAVE, NQAPIA

*NEWS*ARTS*SPORTS*JAZZ*CLASSICAL*NEW

WKCR-FM is Columbia's
student-run
station
. You can find us at 89.9
broadcas
t ing ou t of Lerner
Hall.

MUSJ

non-commercial
radio
on the dial
and irl
Let's
break
it down.

*Student-run:
As a studen t -run sta ti on, WKCR is a place
any and all
studen t s to learn
abou t radio
programming.
radio
experience
or musical
"exper ti se" necessary
.

for
No

*Non-commercial:
WKCR has a long history
of playing
music
and talk
radio
t ha t is not dictated
by what is commerc ial ly
viable
. WKCR has a reputa tio n for alternative
programming
such as: Studio
A, showcas in g the work of artists
and
writers
of color;
Live Constructions
, featuring
experimental,
in-s t udio l i ve sets,
The Musician's
Show,
inviting
local
jazz artists
to discuss
their
music and
influences,
as well as Offbeat , our h ip hop that
emerged
in
the 90s and was the first
radio
show t o broadcast
MCs like
Biggie,
Nas, Tupac,
the Fugees,
Jay-Z,
and the Wu-Tang
Clan.
For more informa tio n abou t our shows check ou t wkcr.or g
HOWTO GET INVOLVED:
Stop by and say h i to us at the activities
fair!
Come to our Fall
Interest
Meeting
Begin inte rning!
Learn alongside
our programmers
everything
from music his tor y to audio
engineering

about

:C*LATIN*HIP

WKCR is
Our
sic

open

station
lovers

HOP*BLUES*FUNK&SOUL*GOSPEL*

and

broadcasting

24/7!

is a sweet
little
club house and haven for
located
on the corner
of 114th and Broadway.

mu-

AS A MEMBER YOU HAVE ACCESS TO:
*A library
of 30,000
records
and CDs that
you can borrow
and use for your radio
shows or listen
to at home.
*Three,
sound-proof
studios
great
for recording
interviews
or coming in to do your homework as you listen
to music on
our studio
monitors.
*An insulated
room with amps, mies,
a piano
and a drum kit!
Come jam with friends
or invite
an artist
to play a set and
we will
help you put it on the airwaves!
*Zoom-recorders
and lots
of other
audio
equipment
you can
use to make field
recordings
or record
interviews.
*Airwaves!
state
area

We are
and in

a recognized
the world.

radio
Use our

station
platform

in the trito connect

with your favorite
local
musicians;
go to shows for free
and interview
and record
a band you admire.
*A community
of music-lovers
to learn
from and alongside!

COME TO OUR CONCERT!SEPTEMBER 19 TH 6-9PM BUTLER LAWNS

1-

l. ._,

I

.,, .. 1, itn

~?,'Att

·r'

•.,

I
j

COLUMBIAUEEAALLIANCE
founded April 19, 1967
by Stephen Donaldson
as Student Homophile League
first recognized queer collegiate organization in U.S.

aur wark







anti -racist
anti -colonial
anti -capitalist
gender liberatory
prison abolitionist
decolonial

past events
Trans Day of Remembrance
Coming Out Muslim
Black Excellence Tour
Israeli Apartheid Week
Community Dinners
Film Screenings

angaing callabaratians with ...







Students for Justice in Palestine / Apartheid Divest
Proud Colors
Muslim Students Association
No Red Tape and 24/ 7 Columbia
Graduate Workers of Columbia
Barnard Center for Research on Women

cu

8JIJU.1ARD

COL:..£~

RM> XO

www.
wbar. o rg
wbar@barnard. edu

In 1993, a group of womenat Barnard applied for a rock
show at Columbia' s radio station, WKCR
. Whenthey were rejected,
they decided to create an alternative . WBAR
first went on the
air on April 1, 1993.
WBAR
is a student-run, non-commercial , freeform , online
radio station. In addition to our programming, we do ticket
giveaways , host various music-related events on campus, and hold
two live concerts a year , one in the fall and one in the spring .
WBAR
offers freedom and creativity to DJs and listeners who
seek a less structured form of radio expression. DJs are free to
create their own show concepts and playlists for a weekly 2hour-long slot .
WBAR
is also a resource for any student and activist groups
who might need audio equipment {such as microphones or a PA) for
events . These can be signed out through a contract form if you
send us an email {listed above) .

Keep an eye out for upcoming announcements about our
general interest meeting and call for FALL 2019 season
applications!

?????
• • • •
How will you ensure that this campus is
accessible to everyone? (physically,
intellectually, financially, etc.)

Who are campus
buildings named
for? Why?

Do you know and
care about all types
of staff and people
at school?

In what ways do university policies
forcibly gender bodies? How will
you break down gender binaries?

How does the university
support genocide and
occupation in Palestine? In
other settler colonial states?



How does non-black POC
anti-blackness show up in NYC?
What will you do to fight
anti-blackness?

How are you
going to
redistribute
wealth?

What questions do
you have? What
intentions do you
have?

What does it mean to be a part of institutions
that actively polices and displaces Harlem
residents?
Do you plan to spend
time in other
neighborhoods? How
do plan to take up
space and interact
with people and the
environment?

love from disguide

Item sets