Barnard/Columbia Disorientation Guide 2016

Item

Current View

Title

Barnard/Columbia Disorientation Guide 2016

Date

2016

Place

New York, NY

Source

https://issuu.com/disguide/docs/final_dis_guide_2016_print

extracted text

Table of Contents
Welcome to the Disorientation Guide!............................................................................................................................... 3
Zine FAQ................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
The Rundown......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Columbia: A Brief Colonialist History................................................................................................................................ 6
The Columbia Student Strike of 1968................................................................................................................................. 8
The Core............................................................................................................................................................................... 10
WelcomeToBarnard............................................................................................................................................................. 11
Admin*................................................................................................................................................................................. 12
Manhattan House................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Native American Council................................................................................................................................................... 15
Columbia Queer Alliance................................................................................................................................................... 16
What is AllSex?.................................................................................................................................................................... 18
No Red Tape......................................................................................................................................................................... 19
A Lot More Deadly: A radical woc/non binary/queer organization............................................................................ 20
Black Students’ Organization............................................................................................................................................. 21
South Asian Feminism(s) Alliance.................................................................................................................................... 22
LUCHA................................................................................................................................................................................. 23
Asian Pacific Islander American Organizing................................................................................................................... 24
Student Organization of Latinos....................................................................................................................................... 30
Divest Barnard’s Guide to Moving Money....................................................................................................................... 32
Columbia Divest for Climate Justice................................................................................................................................. 34
Jewish Voice for Peace......................................................................................................................................................... 36
Students for Justice in Palestine......................................................................................................................................... 37
Columbia, Capitalism, and You!........................................................................................................................................ 38
Student Worker Solidarity.................................................................................................................................................. 39
Graduate Workers of Columbia University...................................................................................................................... 40
Barnard Contingent Faculty Union.................................................................................................................................. 41
WKCR................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
The Columbia Marching Band and U............................................................................................................................... 43
Barnard Outdoor Adventure Team (BOAT).................................................................................................................... 44
Potluck House...................................................................................................................................................................... 45
re:CLAIM Magazine........................................................................................................................................................... 46
The Harlem Raids................................................................................................................................................................ 48
What Is Corporate Feminism?........................................................................................................................................... 50
Barnard Columbia Solidarity Network............................................................................................................................. 51

2

Welcome to the Disorientation Guide!

a

This pamphlet exists to provide you (a new Barnumbia
student) with an alternative perspective and understanding
of what Barnard/Columbia is, what Barnard/Columbia
does, and what it means to be a student located at an
institution of such deep-rooted global power. This is a guide
for everyone who is curious about the ways you may
experience oppression at this school, and ways in which being
a student here forces you to participate in oppressive systems.

Being a
dissenting student is a compromising position. Even while we
protest for humane treatment of workers on campus, we still benefit from Barnard/Columbia’s
abusive employment of that labor; Even while we consider our own questions of justice and equality,
we are standing on a campus built on land stolen from indigenous people in buildings where cleaning,
plumbing, gardening, security, maintenance and reconstruction are done almost entirely by people
who cannot afford to attend this University. For many of us, this dissonance is a catalyst to take action
and use our privilege to undo the systems that we object to, including the ones that our privilege is
built on.
We believe that injustice cannot be undone using the same tools that create injustice. While we have
gained many hard-won victories from the Barnard/Columbia administrations, we know that these
administrations do not prioritize our well-being unless they have been pushed to do so. However, the
administration frequently takes credit for championing social justice concerns. For example, in the
wake of campus-wide protests against Columbia’s failure to support survivors of sexual assault,
Columbia and Barnard now offer extensive sexual-violence prevention training. Remember that the
University only created this program (and other’s like it) as a response to student protest. Be wary of
the values that the University claims to promote, and carefully observe the actions that it takes.
As students we are committed to learning together, and as the group Asians for Black Lives states, “we
don’t have it all figured out, but we are committed to taking a stand, and learning as we go. We will
not wait to be perfect, because we believe the time is now and we would rather be held accountable
for our mistakes than forgiven for our inaction.” We believe that as we learn together and work
together we are stronger than the sum of our parts.
We invite you to peruse this guide and get in contact with the groups mentioned. We hope it will
encourage you to evaluate Barnard and Columbia more critically, empower you to speak up against
the injustices you encounter, and offer give you a community where you belong. We are extremely
excited to meet you and work with you! Welcome!
Solidarity,
The Disorientation Guide Team

*While each author in the guide may not agree with the words of every other author, we all stand
behind this guide as a whole.

 

 

3

LeFrak!

4

5


 

1
9
2
2

6

In the early 1920’s many
Ivy League schools began
instituting “unofficial
quotas” to limit admitance
of Jewish students.
Columbia’s was the most
severe and slashed the
Jewish population from
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 with
particular discrimination
against Sephardic and
Eastern European Jews.
Quotas like these
remained at Yale, for
example, until the 1960’s.


 

!
!
!
!
!
!

1
9
8
5

In 1985, the SAS won their
fight for divestment from
South African Apartheid.
Barnard and Columbia both
divested their respective
endowments from
corporations doing business
in South Africa, including
IBM, CBS, General
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Honeywell, and the
Washington Post.

7

They Said it Could Never Happen at
Columbia…

 

 

 

 

8

!
!

!

9

10

11

ADMIN*

your guide to who to complain to
and who to go to for money
The bureaucracy runs deep at Columbia University – if you want to get anything done,
be it a protest or a teach-in, it helps to know who to talk to and who to press for money. This
guide will help you understand who’s in charge of what, and who to ask/yell at/complain to
for what.

Administrators: Names to Know

President Lee Bolinger (PrezBo) – Responsible for the whole university, but mostly for buying land,
broadening corporate projects, and gentrifying Harlem (and hence, well liked by administrators.)
Nigh-impossible to get a meeting with.
Barnard President Deborah Spar (DSpar) – Corporate feminist. Much easier to get a meeting with.
“Directly concerned” with student interests, has a (limited) history of caving to and appeasing them.
Suzanne Goldberg, Rules administrator – Also EVP of Student Life and Presidential Advisor on
Sexual Assault. Arguably the most hated figure among the campus left, also mostly a figurehead for
PrezBo. She’s often responsible for halting or delaying most student progress. All complaints for
breaking of university rules of conduct go through her office, as do most larger student issues.
John Coatsworth, Provost – Responsible for the university budget and function. His office plays a
role in determining wages of students and other workers.
Cristen Kromm, Dean of Student Life – New in her role as of last year. Has claimed to be very
interested in talking to students; still, often unhelpful in acting towards progress. Go to for larger
issues of student life.
Josh Lucas, Director of Student Engagement – Oversees almost all student clubs & advisors at
CU. Very concerned for student interests. Go to for serious conflicts over student groups.
Alina Wong, Dean of Barnard Student Life – Oversees activities and clubs at Barnard. A lovely
human being who will stay up late to help you with logistical emergencies if you know her. Come to
her with any issues over broader club function at Barnard.
Melinda Aquino, Head of Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) – Huge student ally. Will fight for
your rights against discrimination. The OMA oversees a number of cultural, identity, and LGBT
groups.
Chris Woods, head of LGBTQ+ @Columbia – Arguably the single most proactive student ally on
campus. Will help you start initiatives and fight for you in cases of discrimination.

Governing Boards

Columbia and Barnard clubs are overseen by a set of student-led governing boards. If your club is
under them, or your project aligns with their goals, you can go to these boards for a co-sponsorship
(i.e. they will give you money for events.) Also email them for help finding funding.

12

The Student Governing Board (SGB) deals with most activist, political, identity-conscious,
humanitarian, and religious groups at CU. Their primary concern is free speech – they will go to
lengths to protect your rights to put on whatever kind of action you want, so long as you follow
university rules (and possibly even when you don’t, in certain circumstances.) Keep in mind,
however, that they have to defend people of all political views. Representation is most often by
those with no connection to the issues, to avoid bias. (columbia.edu/cu/SGB; sgb@columbia.edu)
The Activities Board at Columbia (ABC) governs more activity-based groups, including cultural
groups. This is a fine line shared with SGB, but ABC governs groups like BSO (the Black Students
Organization,) AAA (Asian American Alliance,) Chicanx Caucus – but not all cultural groups. Their
concerns are often technical, and there have been recent complaints by cultural groups that they are
poorly represented and wish to move to SGB. The question & process are still underway.
(http://abc-columbia.squarespace.com/, abc@columbia.edu)
The Governing Board at Barnard (GBB) is the newest governing board and has perhaps the least
resources and connections. They’re technically an arm of SGA, Barnard’s student council. GBB
Groups don’t often encounter trouble, since Barnard Student Life is generally supportive.
(http://tinyurl.com/BarnardGBB; gbb@barnard.edu)

Funding

Outside funding is often necessary to bring together an event. Some funds and offices that
cosponsor on-campus events are:





LGBTQ@Columbia

The Gatsby Foundation
(good for performances)

Cosponsorships from other
groups

Governing Boards

**The Chaplain’s Fund
(funds almost anything)
The Office of Multicultural
Affairs
The President’s & Provost
Fund (for 1st time events)





**Capital Investment Fund
(for buying long-term gear)
Columbia Student Life
**The Kraft Family Fund (for
anything “multi-cultural”)

**funds that have lots of money and aren’t often used

Hot Tips

Professors often feel they have very little leverage in the university at large and rarely come to
direct aid, but some will speak out on behalf of students or help you with other advice. Samuel
Roberts of IRAAS, Nadia Abu El-haj and Neferti Tadiar of Anthropology, and Joseph Messad of
MESAAS are some examples of professors who have been helpful to activists in the past.

Additional funding for events & even going to conferences can be obtained by contacting
academic departments. Departments have limited funding for the year (so contact early in the
academic year!) and are most likely to sponsor projects by majors or concentrators. Try emailing the
department administrator, chair, or a professor you’re close to in the department.
If you’re on a club e-board, stay in contact with your club advisor & governing board rep.
They will help you out in tricky situations and help you to navigate this ridiculous bureaucracy.
If there isn’t a club for something yet – but ought to be – start one! Use friends in another club to
help you book space and get funds. You can be recognized by a governing board after one year.

13

Manhattan
House
Manhattan
House

Manhattan House

Manhattan
House
is an
on-campusresidence
residencewhere
where Indigenous
Indigenous students
maintain
their
comManhattan
House
is an
on-campus
studentsand
andfriends
friends
maintain
their
communal
identities,
host
events,
and
relieve
the
pressures
of
university
and
city
life.
The
house
was
founded
munal identities, host events, and relieve the pressures of university and city life. The house was founded
in 2012 as a Special Interest Community by a group of NAC members already living together who wantin 2012
as a Special Interest Community by a group of NAC members already living together who wanted to secure a home for Indigenous Columbians for years to come. As the only physical space on campus
ed to secure a home for Indigenous Columbians for years to come. As the only physical space on campus
dedicated to Indigenous students, Manhattan House is a hub of social life and a refuge from the prejudice,
dedicated
to Indigenous
Manhattan
House is students
a hub ofoften
social
life and a refuge from the prejudice,
misunderstanding,
andstudents,
homesickness
that Indigenous
experience.
misunderstanding, and homesickness that Indigenous students often experience.
Retaining Manhattan House as an Indigenous student space has proved challenging since its founding.

Retaining
House
an Indigenous
student
has proved
challenging
since its founding.
While Manhattan
there are more
than as
enough
students eager
to fillspace
the space
yearly, the
financial inaccessibility
of
While
are in
more
than
enough
eager
to fillwith
the space
financial
inaccessibility
of
thethere
building
which
it is
housedstudents
(like most
buildings
Specialyearly,
Interestthe
spaces)
has hindered
students’
the building
which
is retain
housed
most
Interest
has hindered
students’
ability to in
live
there.itTo
the(like
house,
the buildings
communitywith
has Special
even been
subjectspaces)
to “resolutions”
such as
assigning
students
the space
randomtowithout
notifyingsuch
the as
ability
to live non-Indigenous
there. To retainand
thenon-allied
house, thetransfer
community
hastoeven
beenatsubject
“resolutions”
Housenon-Indigenous
or the transfer placements.
This has
resulted
in the Manhattan
House
community
enduring
racistthe
assigning
and non-allied
transfer
students
to the space
at random
without
notifying
speech,
cultural insensitivity,
and thein
need
expend undue
emotional
labor enduring
to mediateracist
exHouse
or themanipulation,
transfer placements.
This has resulted
thetoManhattan
House
community
ternal
conflicts
in
our
own
home.
We
are
advocating
continuously
for
Columbia
Housing
to
differentiate
speech, manipulation, cultural insensitivity, and the need to expend undue emotional labor to mediate exfinancial
andincommunal
policiesWe
between
residentialcontinuously
communities rightfully
labelled
as ‘Special
Interest’
ternal
conflicts
our own home.
are advocating
for Columbia
Housing
to differentiate
and communities that require support for culture and marginalized identity.
financial and communal policies between residential communities rightfully labelled as ‘Special Interest’
and communities that require support for culture and marginalized identity.

14

Native American
Council of Columbia
Universityof Columbia University
Native
American
Council

The presence of Native American and Indigenous students at Columbia University invokes a rich and
complex history. However, our narratives often remain unknown or undermined, and so we aim to offer
a piece of them here. The Native American Council of Columbia University (NAC) was founded in 1996
by students at Barnard and Columbia College to support the academic, political, and social needs of the
university’s Indigenous student body. In NAC’s 20th year, the organization consists of students from
many Indigenous nations across the Americas, Pacific islands, and beyond, as well as allies and friends
from around the world.
Our community celebrates the diverse intersectional identities and experiences of its members, and embraces all Indigenous students irrespective of enrollment, status, blood quantum, etc. We find it important
for our allies to understand that our community and Indigenous peoples at large are not a monolith with
regard to national affiliations (read: tribe, band, people, community), language, academic interests, or politics. Furthermore, the NAC community prioritizes a strong and increasingly service-oriented relationship
to Native folks beyond the university who live in and/or hold indigenous affiliation to the New York area;
we make an active promise to not speak for them.
Our major annual events include Indigenous Peoples’ Day (a counter-celebration to Columbus Day),
a powwow in the late spring (the only annual powwow in Manhattan), and Native American Heritage
Month in November. All are welcome at these events. This Indigenous Peoples’ Day (10 October 2016)
will celebrate a plaque’s installment on South Campus that recognizes the Lenape as the original people
of Manhattan. Moving forward, our community will continue to focus on Indigenous faculty and staff
representation and improving the scope and nature of Columbia’s Indigenous-student recruitment. As our
community expands, we seek to achieve adequate resources targeted to Indigenous student experiences at
Columbia University.
NAC Contact Information:
E-mail: nac.columbia@gmail.com (listserv available)
Facebook: Native American Council at Columbia University (follow for updated meeting locations/times)
Meetings: Wednesdays @ 8:00 p.m., 420 Hamilton Hall

15

The Columbia Queer Alliance (CQA) is a student
organization for queer and trans students.
CQA recognizes the diverse intersections of
identities, backgrounds and needs of our
community, and remains committed queer and
trans liberation hand-in-hand with anti-racism,
anti-sexism and anti-imperialism.
[image description: the CQA logo. the letters
'cqa' in curly font, filled in with rainbow colors,
with a Columbia crown on top of the 'q' and a
heart after the 'a']

cqaboard@columbia.edu
16

CQA is proud to serve as a safer space for
queer and trans students to share, grow, learn
and heal. Some events we've held in the past
include a performance of 'Coming Out Muslim',
patch and zine-making workshops, Queer and
Trans Consent 101, and a screening of
'Tangerine'.
We meet Sundays at 2pm in the Steven
Donaldson Lounge, a queer/trans (physically
accessible!) space in the basement of Furnald.
[image description: Students for Justice in
Palestine's mock apartheid wall from spring
2016. CQA's logo is visible on the right]

www.facebook.com/cqa.cu
17

18

 

We are a grassroots organization working to end   
sexual + domestic violence in our campus communities because   
we envision a world free of violence + oppression.  
 
We  recognize   that   sexual   violence   is  a  manifestation   of 
systemic   gender   oppression   which   cannot   be  separated   from   all  
other   forms   of  oppression.   ​Therefore,  the  fight  to end  sexual 
+ domestic violence  cannot  be won without eradicating all other 
forms  of  oppression  including   but   not   limited   to   racism,  
classism, ableism, colonialism, homophobia, + transphobia.   
 
We  seek   to  foster   transparency   around   issues   of 
sexual   violence   because   ​we  believe  that  a  bottom 
up  approach  to  building  power  is  the  only  way  to 
achieve justice.  
 
Our current campaign demands  ​more ​support, 
accessibility, accountability, funding, + 
enforcement ​(SAAFE) to ensure that Columbia  
University is an inclusive educational  
environment where survivors can thrive,  
regardless of their identity (including but not  
limited to race, sex, gender, sexual orientation,  
socioeconomic status, immigration status, +  
religion).  
 
 
A  major   demand   of  our   campaign   is  for  the  creation  of a 
rape crisis center that is physically open 24/7 ​+ staffed 
with  professional  advocates  trained  in  cultural 
competency​.  We  believe   that   these   changes   will   improve  
the   quality   of  resources   for   all   survivors,   especially  
for   survivors   whose   experiences   don’t   match   traditional  
narratives and who come from marginalized communities.  
 
 
 
 
 
Want to get involved?​ Sign up for our listserv @  ​http://noredtapecu.org/new­page/ 
or email  ​noredtapecu@gmail.com​! Our weekly meetings are on Sundays from 7PM­8PM.   
 
Go to ​www.NoRedTapeCU.org​ to learn more about our work + for info on resources. 
 

19

20

“And struggle is at the heart of it all”

—from the BSO History as found by Omoyeni Clement and Dorian Barnwell
02/20/2012

Disregard what you may have gleaned about Columbia from the myriad of
recruitment material. Columbia is not the progressive, forward-thinking
picture of diversity that it claims to be; no, rather it is
anti-Black to the core, in every sense of the term.
How so? Columbia is an institution that functions –
but even more so thrives -- on the exploitation of
Black
labor and Black communities; directly aids and
contributes
to the displacement of Black communities; benefits
from the
destruction of Black communities; invests in industries -fossil fuels for
one -- that directly lead to the disproportionate mortality rates
of Black
people; engages in capitalist enterprises that put profit over Black life;
works with the
state to violently police Blackness; co-opts Black organizing to uphold its
“progressive” image -- i.e. South African and prison divestment; produces, proliferates, and perpetuates antiBlack ideology; disrespects, disregards, and denies Black life.
As an anti-Black institution Columbia’s actions include, but are not limited to: holding a slave auction the day
the first trustees were sworn in; financing plantations as a slave bank; robbing Black burial grounds and
trading Black slave’s bodies to experiment on in the medical school throughout the 19th century; refusal to
even acknowledge the demands of Harlem community members before, during, and since ‘68; divesting from
apartheid South Africa to “strengthen their financial portfolio,” but refusing to contribute it to the organizing
of Coalition for a Free South Africa; in 1987, taking no action in the wake of yt (white) football players
assaulting Black students, yt students planting “[yt] power -- KKK” signs on campus, and bringing KKK
literature to campus; refusing to establish the Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS)
until 1993; displacing mass numbers of Black and Brown residents from West Harlem to make room for
their expansion plans; promising to provide community benefits but failing to follow up; working with NYPD
for years to survey and then raid the Manhattanville and Grant housing projects to arrest over 100 Black
youths based on social media surveillance; continuing to invest in fossil fuel companies despite the many ways
in which climate change have already had on Black communities -- just to name a few things.
As an extension of its anti-Black foundations, Columbia tries desperately to stifle and delegitimize collective
organizing, especially Black collective organizing. From curriculum to the campus codes of conduct,
Columbia establishes a guise of control, attempts to antagonize activism.
However, student-activists’ organization and movements have the potentiality for change. Think: halting of
the Morningside Park gym, forcing divestment from South Africa, eventual founding of IRAAS, creation of
the OMA, the addition of Toni Morrison to the Lit Hum curriculum, and divestment from private prisons -all the work of students’ collective organization.
Even still, Columbia would like you to imagine that the world that has been constructed in front of and all
around you is untouchable, incapable of deconstruction -- this is true, but only if you try to do things on your
own. For us to forge the freedom that we deserve requires a collective organization of resistance, a mobilized
effort that operates on our terms, an effort that does not fear the university, an effort that positions us as the
object of our own freedom rather than the subject of another’s.

 
The Black Students’ Organization (BSO) bso@columbia.edu
 
Meeting: Thursdays, 9-11pm in the Malcolm X Lounge

21

 
​ SOUTH  
SAFA’s  mission  is  to  ​encourage  dialogue  and  mobilize  leadership  and  community 
action against patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism in the South Asian community. Our 
goal  is  to  provide  a  space  for  us  to  come  together  and  find  strength  in  our 
similarities and our differences, to  learn about ourselves as well as others, and 
to find solace in each other when the rest of the world fails to accept us.  
ASIAN  

SAFA  is  a  group  for  those  who  have  dealt  with  misogyny  rampant  in  their homes, 
families, and communities. For  those  who have felt like  their  skin was too dark, 
their  arms  too  hairy,  their  voices  too   opinionated.  For  those  who  are  queer, 
trans,  or  do  not  conform  to  the  binary  altogether.  For  those  who  are  not 
able­bodied  or  thin.  For  those  who  are   not  on  a  track  to  becoming  doctors, 
engineers,
​  lawyers.  This  is  a  group  for  everyone  who  wishes  to challenge South Asian 
gender norms and think critically about the intersection of one’s multiple identities. 
FEMINISM(S)  

Through  group  discussions,  film  screenings,  mentorship  programs  and  more,  SAFA 
aims  to  cultivate  awareness  of  struggles  faced  by  so  many  members  of  the  South 
Asian diaspora, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity between SAFA and 
other activist  and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who identifies with 
our  mission  to  come  to  a  meeting  and  join  us  in  making  this  campus  a  more 
inclusive place.  

ALLIANCE 
 
 

 

22

23

A BRIEF RUNDOWN ON APIA ORGANIZING AT 
COLUMBIA & BARNARD  
 
Although Columbia and Barnard’s APIA community has 
rarely rallied around a single issue, Asian American 
students, working in solidarity with other students of color, 
have nevertheless made tremendous impact on the 
University’s trajectory. Most notably, the Center for Ethnicity 
and Race Studies (CSER) was created in 1996 only after 
Black, Asian, Latinx, and 
Indigenous students united 
to organize a hunger strike 
that brought the university 
to a grinding halt. CSER 
now houses the 
undergraduate Asian 
American Studies, Latino 
Studies, Native 
American/Indigenous 
Studies, Comparative 
Ethnic Studies, and Individualized Study programs (all of 
which are lumped into an “Ethnicity and Race Studies” major 
on a diploma). Though CSER has yet to receive department 
standing or ​offer 
any courses on 
Southeast Asia​, 
the center stands 
as a testament to 
the power of 
student of color 
organizing.  

24

 
Since then, APIA 
students have continued 
to make their mark, 
although rarely as a 
single unified contingent 
given the diversity Asian 
and Pacific Islander 
communities. Rather, a 
variety of Asian student 
organizations have 
worked to serve their 
respective constituents, 
coming together to co­author or co­sign statements or 
co­host relevant programming. Asian Pacific Islander 
American Heritage month, for example, boasts a roster of 
events every single night in April, each organized by 
different APIA cultural and political groups. APIA groups 
seem also to 
come together 
in moments of 
crisis. Last 
spring, when 
Black Student 
Organization 
held Columbia 
College 
Student 
Council 
accountable 
for failing to 
consult 
students of color in a “race and diversity proposal” to deans 
of the college, 
25

representatives from Asian American Alliance, Club 
Zamana, and Korean Students Association joined BSO and 
other student of color groups to revise CCSC’s proposal. 
Efforts like these, along with the rise of the ​Students of Color 
Coalition​, which formed last winter alongside the​ BCSN​,  
offer glimpses at more coordinated movements in the future.   
 
In the meantime, APIA students are also working as 
individuals, contributing to movements big and small both at 
Columbia/Barnard and in the city of New York. In spring 
2016, for example, over a year after Akai Gurley was shot in 
a Brooklyn housing project, 
the sentencing of killer cop 
Peter Liang mobilized 
thousands of Chinese 
Americans (many funded and 
organized by right­wing police 
organizations) to march in 
support of Liang. Many Asian 
American students at 
Columbia joined members of 
CAAAV and other NYC 
organizations to pack the 
courts in support of Akai Gurley, taking a stance against 
anti­Black racism that runs deep in many Asian 
communities.  
 
SOME APIA ORGS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THIS 
ARTICLE & THEIR HISTORIES:  
 
Founded in 1995, Asian American Alliance (AAA) is one of 
Columbia’s oldest APIA student organizations. As a student 
group “recognized” by the Columbia administration and 
student council boards, AAA has the ability to leverage 
26

student club funding, space, and grants in order to put on 
university­wide events. This advantage allows AAA to reach 
a broad audience on a consistent basis. AAA’s core­member 
group typically consists of students who have had varying 
levels of experience with politicization and radicalization. 
This means some members may be very comfortable 
navigating conversations about colonization and anti­racist 
work, while others may be just beginning to identify what 
discrimination and prejudice feel like. Given this spectrum of 
exposure to different issues, AAA’s goal is to learn and 
unlearn as a community while working in tandem with off 
campus organizations and on­campus student groups. 
 
Founded in the 1970s as the Indian Students Association, 
Club Zamana is the umbrella organization for all South 
Asian interest groups on Barnard/Columbia's campus. This 
commitment to South Asian solidarity and acknowledging 
the relationships of peoples throughout the subcontinent 
despite drawn boundaries kindled the movement to rename 
the club "Club Zamana" in 1987. Club Zamana has fostered 
close relationships with many different clubs focused on 
different facets of the South Asian identity, be it religion, 
nationality, music or dance. This commitment to providing a 
space for those who identify as South Asian to engage with 
what that means can be seen in the large variety of events 
which Club Zamana board members organize, from social 
service to political to something as simple as a study break, 
and culminates in Club Zamana's largest event of the 
academic year, Tamasha, the largest cultural showcase on 
campus, where each South Asian performance group is 
given a platform to show the Columbia/Barnard community 
the artistic side of the what it means to be South Asian.  
 
27

Asian Political Collective (APC) is a non­hierarchical 
consensus­based group of Asian Americans at Columbia. 
Founded in the spring of 2014 by a group of former 
AAA­members, APC formed to address a lack of overtly 
political space for Asian Americans on campus after a 
tumultuous year that saw 
the use of yellowface in a 
Barnard College theater 
production, as well as 
the beginnings of 
Columbia’s prison 
divestment campaign. 
Seeking to avoid the 
bureaucracy and 
hierarchy of other Asian 
American student 
organizations, APC does 
not have official 
university standing and 
remains small and 

community/consensus­driven, aimed at supporting the 
immediate political goals of its members. APC has thus 
been able to take a more confrontational stance than other 
Asian student organizations. In the past two years, APC has 
held Columbia Musical Theater Society accountable for its 
use of yellowface in a production of ​The Drowsy Chaperone; 
sent groups of volunteers to support CAAAV, a grassroots 
Asian organization fighting gentrification in New York City; 
hosted a bi­weekly reading group for political education; and 
shown out to pack the courts of Akai Gurley in the Peter 
Liang trials.  
28

 
Q&A, short for Queer & Asian, is a new Asian American 
organization founded in November 2015 for LGBTQIA+ 
Asian students at Columbia. Q&A sprouted out of a 
AAA­hosted panel which called for a space of solidarity and 
support on campus for this particular intersection of 
identities. For the last two semesters, Q&A has been 
working on building its family and figuring out the roles it 
wants to serve in its community(ies). This year, Q&A will be 
seeking official club standing to be able to obtain funding 
and access to spaces on campus in order to host events 
that highlight the work of queer Asian creators, and to 
provide a more nurturing space for its members. Q&A strives 
to be an organization that empowers those who share queer 
and Asian identities to come together, heal, and grow, as 
well as to work towards broader goals of education, political 
activism, and queer liberation.  
 
CONTACT INFO  
aaa@columbia.edu  
zamana@columbia.edu  
apc­reading­group@googlegroups.com  
qanda.columbia@gmail.com 
 
Image credits:  
All images from Barnard Digital Collections in order:  
Asian Women’s Coalition & DAAWN, 1986 
Grace Lee Boggs 
Asian Women’s Coalition, 1990s 
Club Zamana, 1991 
Asian Students’ Association, 1980s 
Asian American Alliance, 1990s 
Yuri Kochiyama 

29

 
 

The ​Columbia University Student Organization of Latinos (SOL)​ seeks to foster and 
empower the existing Latinx/Latin American identities on campus in an effort to 
celebrate and strengthen the Latinx Community at Columbia University.  
 
As a blanket organization, SOL connects the Latinx Constituency on campus: 
 
Alumni Organizations 
● Latino Alumni Association of Columbia University 
Cultural Organizations 
● Chicano Caucus 
● Grupo Quisqueyano 
● Por Colombia 
● Organization of Latin American Students  
● Sabor  
● MexCU 
Multi­Cultural Greek Life Organizations 
● Sigma Lambda Gamma National Sorority, Inc.  
● Sigma Lambda Beta International Fraternity, Inc. 
● Omega Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.  
● Phi Iota Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 
● Lambda Pi Chi Sorority, Inc.  
Pre­professional Organizations 
● Latinx Professional and Educational Network (formerly 
HSF) 
● Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers  
● Columbia Quest Scholars  
Social Justice/Identity Organizations 
● Mujeres  
● Casa Latina 
● LUCHA 
● Columbia First­generation Low­Income Partnership 
 
 

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In addition to co­sponsoring events, SOL hosts many of its own events throughout the 
year, often the result of collaboration across several organizations.  
 
On  the  night  of  Friday  April  15th,  Columbia  University's  Latinx  community  celebrated 
their  annual  "​Latinx  Awards:  Una  Noche  de  Gala​"  with  dinner,  an  award  ceremony, 
raffles,  a  live  salsa  band,  and  dancing.   CU  Latinxs  came  together  to  honor  the 
individuals  and  organizations that  work  tirelessly  to foster and  empower  the  Latinx  and 
Latin American  identities  on  campus; to  celebrate achievement,  culture,  resilience,  one 
another. 
  

 

 
Latinx  Awards:  Una  Noche  de  Gala​,  involved Student  Organization of  Latinos (SOL), 
Chicanx  Caucus,   Grupo  Quisqueyano,  Lambda  Pi  Chi,  Latino  Alumni  Association  of 
Columbia  University,  Latinx  Heritage  Month,  Latinx  Professional  and  Educational 
Network  (formerly  HSF),  Phi  Iota  Alpha,  Sabor,  Society  of  Hispanic  Engineers,  and 
more! 

 
Follow us! 
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/sol/ 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SOL.Columbia 
Instagram: cu_sol 
Snapchat: cu_sol 

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Facebook:
facebook.com/ColumbiaDivestforClimateJustice
Website:
columbiaclimatejustice.com
Email:
columbiadivest@gmail.com
Cool Divest Zine!
bit.ly/CDCJWhydivest

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Columbia Divest for
Climate Justice
Who Are We?

We are a student group pushing Columbia’s
administration to divest the university’s holdings in the
top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel companies from our
$9.6 billion endowment. We also ask that they reinvest
these funds into sustainable community projects that
benefit communities in Harlem that continue to be
impacted by Columbia’s relentless expansion.

Climate Justice v. Environmentalism

Our organizing is based in the concept of climate justice
which is a way of viewing climate change as a social
justice issue. Classic environmentalism tends to be
motivated by white, upper-middle class individuals and
often ignores the ways that climate change does and will
affect us differently based on our gender, racial, and
economic backgrounds. We believe that climate change
presents an opportunity to undermine capitalism and
create a system that benefits everyone, particularly lowincome communities of color that are considered
disposable by the fossil fuel industry.

Our Power

As students at an elite university we have incredible
power to affect social change. Our actions draw national
and international attention, as demonstrated by our April
2016 sit-in, and we must use this privileged platform to
uplift the voices of those most affected by climate change
and environmental injustice.
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36

For 67 years, the Palestinian people have carried on their struggle for liberation, resisting
Zionist erasure, ethnic cleansing, and settler colonization. Columbia Students for Justice in
Palestine stand with the Palestinian people and all those who struggle for their autonomy
and freedom.
We, Students for Justice in Palestine, are a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, and
community members at Columbia University in the City of New York, organized on
democratic principles to promote justice, human rights, liberation, and self-determination
for the Palestinian people. We organize around the principles of the Palestinian Civil
Society call for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel which are 1) selfdetermination of the Palestinian people 2) Right of Return for all refugees and 3) full
equality for all citizens regardless of ethnic or religious backgrounds.
In partnership with our ally, Jewish Voice for Peace
(JVP), we launched our Boycott, Divestment, and
Sanctions campaign Apartheid Divest in February
2016. We have taken the BDS movement as our
tool to support the Palestinian people in their
struggle for self-determination, not only because the
Palestinian people have called upon us to do so, but
because it is a way to address our own complicity in
Israel’s settler colonial project. Where does our
responsibility lie and why do we do this work? The United States funds the Israeli war
machine with over 3 billion dollars annually in military and foreign aid. Our university has
extensive ties with Israeli institutions and organizations. Our tuition dollars fund the
stewards of apartheid through investments in our endowment. Our location in the US
and, specifically, as students at Columbia University, furthers our own complicity in
apartheid and the ethnic cleansing of Palestine.
Above all, we work to support the Palestinian people because we are first and foremost,
students who organize around democratic principles, at the core of which is the principle of
justice. While the platitudes may be numerous, the message remains true; an injustice
anywhere remains a threat to justice everywhere. We, as SJP, stand against all forms of
oppression and discrimination- racism, gender and sexual oppression, capitalism,
colorism, ableism, et al.

We are SJP. We stand for justice.
We stand for Palestine.

37

International Socialist Organization (ISO)

,
Why is it that we have all the technology and means to
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,
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produce immense wealth—enough food to feed everyone 4 meals
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o
per day, enough homes and construction materials to house
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everyone, the capacity to provide education and healthcare for
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all—and yet, in the U.S., the top 1% controls more than a third of
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the nation’s wealth? Why is it that 66 million children still go hungry
C A an d Y
each year, that millions of people are homeless, and that the overwhelming
majority still do not have access to quality schools and medical services?

The reason is that the system we currently live under--capitalism--is
fundamentally based on exploiting the many to make profit for the few. Under capitalism, a
minority ruling class directly profits off of the labor of the majority, the working class, who is
forced to sell their ability to work in order to survive. Capitalism is responsible for countless wars, endless poverty,
and mass exploitation and oppression for the sake of profit; and as a capitalist institution, Columbia is complicit in
all of these processes.
Columbia is not simply an intellectual island in which independent inquiry is allowed to flourish. Its
administration directly benefits from maintaining capitalism and the inevitably racist, sexist, classist, and
homophobic conditions that arise from it. Columbia is a place where students are molded into the next generation of
bosses, politicians, and CEOs who have a stake in maintaining the status quo. Its primary function as a capitalist
institution is far more corporate than educational: it exists to train the 1% to rule and reproduce intellectual workers
and research for profit at the expense of students, workers, neighboring residents, and the global community at large.
Columbia’s actions have made this evident throughout the course of its history. Columbia’s administration
is currently hard at work displacing hundreds of Harlem residents for the sake of its expansion into Manhattanville;
supporting the oppression of Palestinians both through its investments and by suppressing anti-Israel speech by
students and faculty; funding the destruction of the planet; and worrying about its reputation rather than
guaranteeing rights and resources for survivors of sexual violence (just to name a few examples). This is all in
addition to what Columbia students already know--that Columbia extracts exorbitant fees well over the median
family income from students, while paying its president millions of dollars per year to chastise student activists and
act as Columbia’s respectable, liberal figurehead.
While Bollinger gets paid an outrageous salary, it is actually the workers on this campus--from custodians
to professors, support staff to TAs, most of whom are woefully underpaid--that allow Columbia to function. As
students, we also occupy a unique space within the corporate institution that is Columbia, and that position gives us
the power to make a real change, especially when we can collaborate with workers on campus and people in the
communities around Columbia.
All the issues mentioned above are embedded within contexts outside of the university, but we can still
make a disproportionate impact by acting against the profit-driven motives of the administration. We’re the ones the
university is meant to accommodate, we’re the ones who uphold their reputation, and we’re the ones who often pay
(either through tuition and/or donations as alumni). As stakeholders in a capitalist institution, we don’t only have the
power, but also the responsibility to fight against its oppressive policy. As you can see in Columbia’s own history of
student activism, student movements can often lead to change on a larger scale; just think of the Boycott,
Divestment, and Sanctions movement against apartheid South Africa, which inspired a new generation of students to
push their administration to withdraw its investments from the private prison industry. Now, a new wave of students
is pushing for divestment from fossil fuel companies and Israeli apartheid.
We, as socialists, see that these issues of oppression are all interrelated because they all have the same roots
in the foundations of the capitalist system. The fight against sexual violence is part of the fight against transphobia,
which is part of the fight against prisons, which is part of the fight against racism, and so on and so forth. Moreover,
this fight is global, and there are revolutionary socialists fighting for justice all over the world; from Greece to South
Africa, from Egypt to Puerto Rico. Because the fight against oppression and exploitation spans so many issues and
regions across the world, we must develop political principles and experience that we carry outside of the gates of
Columbia and well past our graduation. We enter campus with a choice: Are we here simply to get a degree from an
elite school, or are we going to actually challenge the inequality and oppression that Columbia perpetuates? We
don’t look proudly at the institution of Columbia University; and yet, we have a vision of a world beyond
corporatized schooling in which access to quality education is available to all, in which the students, faculty, and
workers who run schools democratically design the institutions that they want to be a part of, and in which
education, inquiry, and scholarship are the uninhibited governing values that drive our schools.

38

39

Who are we?
The ​Graduate Workers of Columbia​ (GWC-UAW) is the union representing teaching and research
assistants at Columbia.
What’s our story?
We began organizing a union in 2014 and have been working to overturn a federal legal precedent
called the Brown decision that prevents graduate workers at private universities from unionizing. We
expect a ruling from the National Labor Relations Board very soon, which will not only allow us to hold
a vote to gain recognition for our union, but will also allow votes to take place for other grad unions
across the country including The University of Chicago, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, and more.
Why do we want a union?
Columbia RAs and TAs face insecure conditions, including inadequate pay, unmanageable cost of
living increases, a lack of fair grievance procedures, and insufficient health care, family benefits, and
international student services. We are seeking the right to collective bargaining so that we can improve
our conditions and strengthen worker rights at Columbia.
How does this affect undergraduates?
Two ways: first, we are seeking to represent ​any student workers​ doing teaching or research work,
including undergraduates. If you want to sign up, contact us at ​columbiagradunion@gmail.com
Second, even if you aren’t a student worker, TAs and RAs are a major part of undergraduate instruction
and do a large part of the work that goes into making Columbia a strong research institution. Our
working conditions are undergraduate learning conditions -- a more secure workplace enhances our
ability to do our jobs well.
How can I get involved?
We are always looking for more organizers who can help make our union strong. Please fill out a “Get
Involved” form on our website: ​www.columbiagradunion.org​ and we’ll loop you in!

40

The Barnard Contingent
Faculty Union (BCF-UAW)
In September 2015, 91.2 % of the eligible voting
Barnard contingent faculty chose a union. We are now
negotiating a first contract with the Barnard administration.

WHO ARE “CONTINGENT” FACULTY? & WHY HAVE THEY UNIONIZED? Contingent
faculty are professors NOT on the tenure track. The “tenure track” is the classic model of
professional development in American higher education, whereby a scholar is hired for a
probationary period of about 7 years as an Assistant Professor. If the professor passes her 7th year
tenure review, she is granted tenure and promoted to Associate Professor (and perhaps later to full
Professor). Such professors are granted competitive salaries, full benefits, regular raises, and a
voice in the running of the college. At other elite liberal arts colleges that charge Barnard-level
tuition tenure-track faculty are the norm; at Barnard they are the exception. The vast majority
of teaching at Barnard is done by contingent faculty, most of whom receive povertylevel wages, have no job security from semester to semester, few opportunities for
promotion, and receive no benefits. We have formed a union to address these problems and
force the Barnard administration to commit to the college’s teaching and learning mission.

HOW HAS THE BARNARD ADMINISTRATION RESPONDED? In typical corporate style,
President Debora Spar brought in the most notorious unionbusting law firm in the
country (Jackson Lewis P.C.) to represent her in negotiations. Over the last six months of
bargaining the Jackson Lewis lawyer has refused to offer improvements to benefits and job
security and has proposed wages that are, on the whole, worse than today. At no point has Debora
Spar sat down with unionized faculty to discuss our concerns or our ideas to improve teaching and
learning conditions at Barnard. She has chosen instead to spend at least $100,000 and counting to
get Jackson Lewis to attempt to crush our resolve at the bargaining table.

HOW CAN YOU HELP THE UNION? Barnard’s history of progressive activism has inspired
generations of students and alumnae to fight for social and economic justice. Join us in Fall 2016
as we extend this proud tradition and escalate our campaign for fair working conditions.
www.bcfuaw.org

facebook.com/bcfuaw

twitter.com/bcfuaw

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instagram.com/bcfuaw

WKCR
The Original FM
So I hear you like Louis Armstrong. That’s
funny, because here at WKCR we also like
Louis Armstrong. In fact, we like him so much
that we celebrate his birthday twice a year.
That’s right, one man, two birthdays. But
don’t worry, if you flipped to the no-Satchmo
camp that’s ok too. WKCR isn’t just a Louis Armstrong fan club. Actually, WKCR has
deep roots that extend throughout the broad watershed of college radio and we have
been building those roots for 75 years. Only at WKCR have we engaged, in person, the
kinds of celebrities who haunt the wet dreams of Columbia students. Neoconservative who likes Ayn Rand? We have interviewed her
in the studio. Jazz head who worships Dizzy? We have a red
chair that he once sat in. Like the new-fangled
compositional meddling of John Zorn? Well, not only does he
also like the new-fangled programming sound of WKCR, we
were one of the first stations to play his music.
But we also have a library of thousands of LPs for those
members who are scared of talking to people. What’s that?
None of this
sounds
appealing to
you? I can
understand
that; however,
don’t sew your
ears shut yet.
We might still
have something
for you. Like news and arts? We’ve got it,
and you can listen to some of the finest
broadcast journalism to ever grace the
airwaves of Morningside Heights. Like
history?
We’ve got that also. In 1968 when riots
were raging and Columbia was at the
heart of political change in New York
Robert Siegel of NPR’s All Things Considered fame
City, WKCR was there to cover the events.
there in the center, covering the ’68 protests
Running hundreds of feet of cables under
the flagstone bricks on lower campus, WKCR provided intensive coverage for the
Columbia riots and consistently broke national news stories faster than the major
news networks. We have all of that on original reel-to-reel tapes in our archives.

WKCR is a place for your voice to be heard.
So tune those dials to 89.9 MHz and listen!
42

the Columbia Marching Band and U 
TW 4 racist bs 
 
Young frosh, I write this story of woe so that you may avoid making the same
 
mistakes I did at yr tender period.
 
Make no mistake, there are groups at our school that do and say racist things.
 
I’m going to tell u about the marching band: 
I was a person of color who tried to join the marching band. there are some
 
really cool, nice, and caring people in it. they play cool music. but it ended
 
up not working for me as a poc. this is why.
 
 
Here are a sample of jokes they've said and condoned as a group in my presence:
 
TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW 
What's the difference between a bench and a Mexican father?
 
A bench can support a family of five.
 
 
What did MLK get on his SATs? 
Barbecue Sauce. 
Literally WTF. These are NOT okay, and NOT what this campus needs.  
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
 
Ppl did try to accommodate me as a person of color but when jokes like that are
 
written into your traditions, when a group of yt ppl openly sing the n­word bc
 
"it's in the lyrics".... It's not the place to be for some people.
 
2x a year the Columbia University Marching Band puts on a show called Orgo
 
Night, in which they skewer or parody certain aspects of campus life. sometimes
 
these topics are benign, but often they are not. they sometimes end up directed
 
at really hard labor that activists across campus are doing. Orgo Night has
 
become an argument about free speech, but I don’t think that’s what it is. even
 
though the University condones it and even provides security for it, I think
 
this is about people being able to “tell it like it is” at the expense of
 
others’ emotional safety. 
the band does not make Columbia a safe space. 
BUT STILL…. 
U might hear they party hard and be drawn to that… but activists party harder
 
;) 
U may want to make music on campus. Here are some cool groups where you don’t
 
have to deal w/ casual singing of racial slurs and put down the hard work and
 
emotional labor of activists: 
Voltage!!!! 
CUSH!!!! 
Or start yr own band and try to play in the Potluck/Greenboro basement!!!!
 
 
Just whatever you do, go forth, be safe, and know that the Columbia marching 
band can be difficult as f##k if you are a minority in any sense. 

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re:CLAIM
CALLING WRITERS & ARTISTS
re:claim is a publication at Columbia that works to center the
voices, well-being, and liberation of Black people, people of
color, disabled and neurodivergent people, femme, queer, gender-non-conforming and trans people, migrants, workers, and
all marginalized identities in both content and in leadership. We
strive to embody values rooted in histories of activism, anti-oppression politics, creative resistance, and freedom of expression
for those who have been historically silenced.
We started up in the late winter/early spring of 2016 as a staff
consisting predominantly of people of color, women and femmes
in conversation with people doing activism of all kinds. For many
of us, helping to build re:claim came in response to the hurt we
have experienced at the hands of mainstream campus media,
which routinely excludes Black people and people of color from
its ranks, and demonizes activists groups. We do not purport
to be “objective” (and remain suspicious of those who do), but
instead strive to create content rooted in our own experiences
and communities.
re:claim publishes first-person narrative, news, creative writing,
and visual art.
Please reach out to reclaim.at.cu@gmail.com or any of the folks
listed on reclaimmagazine.wordpress.com if you are interested
in getting involved! We make decisions by consensus using a
non-hierarchal structure. Recognizing that people have different
capacities for and ways of contributing labor, time, and energy,
we strive to make involvement as accessible and accommodating as possible. On-boarding involves a brief conversation with a
couple current committee members just to make sure we’re on
the same page. We’d love to have you!

46

Why I’m Occupying a Building at Columbia: Love, Power, and Climate Justice
"We must believe that we can change for the
better and that we deserve better. In addition
to symbolically taking down the fossil fuel
industry and other villains of our capitalist
economy, we must use this moment to redirect resources towards the creation of the
beautiful."
by: Iliana Salazar-Dodge
Dreams and Visions
"As a person born in Zimbabwe, and raised
in South Africa, Ivory Coast and Tunisia, I
have always had to negotiate my own identities in different racial/ethnic/national/cultural
terrains and these works are about that tension."
by: Thando Miambo

This Letter Will Self-Destruct
[Content warning: relationship abuse, emotion-

al abuse, implied self-harm, suicidal ideation]

"And here I am, the child you always/never
wanted, standing at the mirror, reaching all
the way back, before empire, before sugar,
before family, before nation, to a wholeness
I’ll never be able to remember."
by: Anonymous
Unheard Voices: Interviews on Coping After Sexual and Intimate Partner
Violence
[Content warning: This piece discusses sexual violence, dating violence, PTSD, and panic attacks.]
"Survivors need spaces to heal--in community, in sharing stories, and in relating to and
validating one another.”
Image Credit: ‘All Hands’ by Diane Perin
Hock. Photo: Kati Turcu/Epoch Times.

47

THE HARLEM RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014, the
day when police burst
through residents’
doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later, parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
entering their homes
without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. “ The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage,” one parent said
after the raids. “That's not a good feeling, that you're using me to get a promotion.” 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day, police arrested over 40 people.
The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia’s Morningside campus, and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD’s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
students heard from their own administration:
safety. An email went out the day after the
raids informing students that it would “make
our city and community safer.” The reality,
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there, and that services, not
incarceration, are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What’s more, it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build
a new campus across the street from their
homes, the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tayshanna “Chicken” Murphy, a nationally
ranked high school basketball player, was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities, and employment training to young residents of Grant and

48

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattanville and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporation—
the group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister’s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren’t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don’t provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same, and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison, NYCHA will take away their homes. What’s
more, the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people, arresting 88 in one day.
As students, we can’t accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities, police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses, it is in the University’s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and, in the case of Grant and Manhattanville, been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
“development” that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia’s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University’s outright support for the raids, coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant, sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood, but it is not here
for you.

49

50

51

Wanna uncover Barnumbia’s
dirty little secrets?
*passion area: social justice

Wed 8.31.16 10pm 606 W. 114th

*activist meet & greet

Fri 9.2.16 1pm Furnald Lawn

*activist tours of campus

Sat 9.3.16 2, 2:30, 3pm Sun Dial

*civil disobedience training
Sun 9.4.16 2pm Sun Dial

More events coming soon!
www.facebook.com/BCDisguide2016/
Table of Co11te11ts
Welcome to the Disorientation Guide! .........................................................
......................................................................3
Zine FAQ.................................................................................................................................................................................
4
The Rundown .........................................................................................................................................................................5
Colwnbia: A Brief Colonialist History ................................................................................................................................6
The Colwnb ia Student Strike of l 968............................................................................................................
.....................8
The Core .............................................................................
.................................................................................................. 10
WelcomeToBarnard. ............................................................................................................................................................
11
Admin" ..........................................................................................
....................................................................................... 12
Manhattan House ................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Native American Council ................................................................................................
..................................................15
Colwnbia Queer Alliance...................................................................................................................................................16
What is AllSex?....................................................................................................................................................................
18
No Red Tape .........................................................................................................................................................................19
A Lot More Deadly: A radical woe/non binary/queer organization ............................................................................20
Black Students' Organ ization ...............................................................................................................................
.............. 21
South Asian Feminism(s) Alliance....................................................................................................................................22
LUCHA .................................................................................................................................................................................
23
Asian Pacific Islander American Organizing ...................................................................................................................24
Student Organization of Latinos ...........................................................
............................................................................ 30
Divest Barnard's Guide to Moving Money ...................................................
....................................................................
32
Columbia Divest for Clima te Justice .................................................................................................................................34
Jewish Voice for Peace.........................................................................................................................................................
36
Students for Justice in Palestine .....................................................................................................................
....................37
Colwnbia, Capitalism, and You!...............................................................................................................
......................... 38
Studen t Worker Solidarity..................................................................................................................................................
39
Graduate Workers of Colwnbia University................................................
......................................................................40
Barnard Contingen t Faculty Union ..................................................................................................................................
41
WKCR ...................................................................................................................................................................................
42
The Colwnb ia Marching Band and U............................................................................................................................... 43
Barnar d Ou tdoor Adventure Team (BOAT)...................................................................................................................
. 44
Potluck House .............................................................................................................................
.........................................45
re:CLAIM Magazine ...........................................................................................................................................................
46
The Harlem Raids ..................................................
..............................................................................................................48
What Is Corporate Feminism? ...........................................................................................................................................50
Barnar d Colwnbia Solidarity Network ............................................................................................................................. 51

2

Welcome to the Disorientation Guide!

This pan1phlet exists to provid e you (a ne,v Bal11u111bia
student) ,,vith all alternative perspecti\'e al1d und erstanding
of 1vhatBan1al·d/Colw11bia is, 1vhat Bal11al·d/Coltu11bia
does, alld ,vhat it n1eal1sto be a student located at all
institution of such deep-roote d global po\ver. This is a guide
for everyone \vho is ctu·ious about the ,vays you n1ay
experience oppression at tl1isschool, al1d 1vaysin ,vhich being
a st11denthere forces you to pal·ticipate in oppressive systen1s.
Being a
dissenting student is a con1pronusing position. Even 1vhile,ve
protest for ht1111al1e
t:reatn1entof ,vorkers on Calllpus, we still benefit fron1 Bal11al·d/Coh1111bia's
abusive en1ployn1ent of tl1atlabor; Even ,,vhile ,ve consider our O\VJlquestions of justice and equality,
1veal'e stal1ding on a Ca111pus
built on lal1d stolen frorn indigenous people in buildings \vhere clealung,
plun1bing, gai·de1ung, secw·ily, n1aintenal1cealld reconstruction al'e done aln1ost entirely by peop le
\Vho cal1not afford to attend tlus University. For n1al1y of us, tlus dissonal1ce is a catalyst to take action
alld use ow· privilege to tu1do the systen1s tl1at,,ve object to, including the ones iliat otu· privilege is
built on.
We believe that irrjustice cal1not be tu1done using tl1e sal11etools tl1atcreate injustice. vVhile 1vehave
gained n1al1yhal·d-won victo1ies fron1 tl1e Bal-nal·d/Colun1bia adnunistrations, 1vekt101viliat tl1ese
adnunistrations do not prioritize otu· ,veil-being tu1less tl1eyhave been pushed to do so. Ho, vever, tl1e
adnunist:ration fi·equently takes credit for chal11pio1ungsocial justice conce111s.For exan1ple, in tl1e
\Vake of can1pus-wide protests against Colt111
1bia's failtu·e to support stuvivors of sexual assault,
Colun1bia al1d Bal11al·d 110\voffer extensive sexual-violence prevention t:raitung.Ren1en1ber tl1attl1e
University only created tl1isprograrn (al1d otl1er's like it) as a response to student protest. Be 1v~u)'of
tl1e values tl1attl1e University clain1s to pron1ote, alld cal·efully obse1ve tl1e actions tl1atit takes .
As students 1veal'e conm1itted to leal·ning together, alld as ilie group Asial1sfor Black Lives states, ''Ive
don't have it all figtu·ed out, but 1ve al'e con1nulted to taking a stand, al1d learning as 1vego. vVe ,,vi]]
not ,,vait to be perfect, because 1vebelieve tl1e rirne is no\v alld ,ve 1vould ratl1er be held accotmtable
for otu-nustakes tl1al1forgiven for our inaction." \ i\Tebelieve that as 1veleal·n together al1d 1vork
togetl1er ,ve al'e stronger tl1al1tl1e stu11of ow· palts.
\ i\Te invite you to peruse tl1isguide alld get in contact 1vitl1ilie groups n1entioned. vVe hop e it 11,iJl

encotu-age you to evaluate Bal-nal·d alld Colun1bia n1ore critically, en1po,ver you to speak up against
tl1e injustices you encotu1ter, alld offer give you a conm1tuuty 1vhere you belong. \ i\Te al'e extTen1ely
excited to n1eet you alld \Vork 11~tl1
you! \ i\Telcon1e!
Solidality,
The Disori entation Guide Tean1
*v\'l1ile each autl1or in tl1e gtude n1ay not agree ivitl1tl1e1vords of eve1)' otl1er autl1or, ,,ve all stai1d
behind tllis guide as a ,vhole.

3

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1

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I

TOGETHER ATLAS

keychain'
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'

So you ' re kinda holding a zin e
in your hands , but maybe yo u don ' t really
know
what a zine 1.s. That ' s a-okay.
We' re here from the Barnard Zine Club to help .

l

What is a zine?
n zine is a self-published
completely

controlled

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What goes

and publication

are

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magazine , meaning its creation
by the person or people making it .

into

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a zine?

Anything you want! A zine can have poetry , essays , photography , drawings ,
cartoons , or pretty
much anyth in g else you can imagine. Her e at the Zine Club
we've made ones with the mes called
"Gro wing Up", "Maps" , and "The Middle
Schoo l Dance " so you have plenty of freedom !

~
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1[1

How do people

keyc

Putting
Barnard
~

I

NYC, Barnard/Columbia,

Inte rested in zine - ing your <3 out? You'r. · ····· ,: great place fo r it . Barnard
h as a Z..1.nc L..1.
b r ary on th e f 1.rs
'
t fl oor o f ....,""'
LeFrak.
·
"" "".·an d an awesome zine
l i b rari an
named Jenna E"reedman.
The Zine Club at Barnard compiles submissions
based around one theme eac h
semes te r and puts out a Zin e , so come to meetings and c ontribu te! (We have
Ore os)
New York hos ts mult iple Zi ne E"ests throughout
the year , l ike the Femin is t
Zine Fest (which was at the ' Nar d last year!),
the Brooklyn Zine E"est, etc .
so keep an eye out and an ear open .
NYU has a col l ection of riot grrr l zines in their
l ibrary , so borrow an NYU
friend ' s ID and go check it ou t !

the
Zine

Internet

to Good Use:

Club

Zine

~

Zine

J«~ -...

Fest

Website : brooklynzinefest
Twitter : @bkl ynz in efest
Feminist

~ROFILE

and YOU!

Websi te : zi ne s.barnard.ed
u
E- Mai l : zines@barnard . edu
Twitter/Instagram:
@barnardzineclub
Brooklyn

'

zines?

Zines aren ' t usually created
with Lhe in t ent of making a pr ofit . Zines are
associated
with counterculture
movements like punk in the 1970 ' s and riot
grrr l s i n the 199 0 's. They can be a form of creation
or rebe lli on or a way
get the word out about something you care about . You can trade zines with
ot he r zinesters
or just hand ' em out !

Zines,

1

use

. com

Fest

Website : ferninis t zin e festnyc.wordpress

. corn

4

©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© ,©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© ;1;,_.,

.

Manbattanvtlle 1181ds-ln JWl8 o!2014 the NYPD conducted a rakl oiMiuihatta.nville bomes-t.he largest raid In NYOhistory. ColwDI)!& puhUo
satocyoomplle<1with tile NYPD dUJ'll>gthis raid. and lod.o,y Columbla.oonr.tnues ti's masatve expansion Into Manbattanvllle .
'!'ran$ 81>.1clentAooeptance,Me
- -------Trust.sea chose to
r nwnerou.e town halls alld ltudent prenure to allow transgoncler students at Barnard, the Barn&l'C1Bou<! of
2020. Weloomelll lhrmally a<1mtt-.sgenc1erstu
dents lnJuru,of 2016 (one of the wt women's ooueges to do so), st&rtl.ngwlt.h t.ho olass of

OOlumbia Prloon Divest Victory- In .Tune of 2016, the Columbl&Prlaon Dtvest oamp&Jgn won the1r demand that OolumbtlLUniversity oeaaa
lnvesUng In prlV""' prtlOU corpore.Uons-maJUDg OolumbUI.the first American college to divest lrom private prlaona. Tllls hlotol'lc Win camo
a.tier a year of student orga.oJztng iMJuding a 40 person s11,1n of Low In April, 2016.

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#SolJc!ar!tyWltllM!zzou ana #~
demOJlStrat.ton,load by Blaclc r, noerned8tudtntl960-0n

President.,Tim Wolf~=t

of CO stu dents £atborecSon 1,ow' S
other protest., were ooourrlng . A OOUoct1ve

~~t.e•t

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__

the Week of No,,.;;,ber 8:;

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vlo!ont l'aciam on campUa.~~~;!,~
se:'donta at Mlzzou bold a !Ustorto

we"'

ents """" su-.i
In f01'Cln8
t.nolr
POlloeviolence a.nd death threats. 'l'hat
k
•tu4ents ofM1zzou, Itllace, and Yal
ll wee
<lena.nds for Improved racla!Justtoe 81

""-'<leo.ta
flwec1w1tll eictrerne
tile Sun Dial to 8t&ne!In 901ldarlcy :&"::on,

o':::;3,::ci
student orean.tzere tssWld DWD4l'<l<la

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Rules of Conduct,- (otherwlae k:Dowtlaa t.he l'Uleeofp-)
were re-Instituted In November, 2016 (afterbelnl!<le-1\lnetf or 6 years) . The runr
Rwee docreasecl transparency of student c1Lllc1pllnary
processes and lnDreesed-\y
of J)Ulllahment. for CAmpusact.ivlSm. Hundreds or
otudonta packed town b.alls ln Sprmgof201S toprotetJt the lmplement.atlonof the l\ules, which theyaaw as &threai to ft'ee ~ one&mpWI,
buL the newlYrormed University JudlcJal Board moved forward. az,;yw33.

5

••
I
7
I
- Li~&:!

Kang Tun g Pih, daughter of
Chin~se po litical reformist

Columbia University is
founded as J<ing's College
by a roya l charter of
British King George 11.

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!)

Kang You\.vei, g raduates

from Barnard as one of' the
first transfers and the Iirsl

,.,..,-,
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'

Colu,nbia's
classes
unti l
1900.
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9
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9
,..,

\voman of' co lor.

Barnard is founded
by Columbia University
President Frederick
Augustus Porter Barnard,
after the Board of Trustees
rejected Barnard's
proposition to inake
Columbia co, ·\
ed . Barnard
students
could not
a rte n d

.

I
II
!)
II

6

Faculty of
Po litical Science
ad1nits ,vome n
to classes, ,vi th
penn ission of
instructor;
authorizes the
awarding of
PbDs to
,vomen , despite
Dean Burgess's
opposition.

In the ea rly J920 's niany
Ivy League schools began
insLiluling "unofficial
quotas" lo lin1i1 adniilance
of J ewish students.
Coluni bia's was the niosl
severe and slashed lhe
Jewish population fron1
11,09(, of students in I 920
lo 22% in 1922 with
particular discrin1inalion
F
against Sephardic m1d
Easlern European J ews.
Quotas like these
reniained al Yale, for
exan ipl e, until the J960 's .

I
!)
I
!)

In reaction to \Vorld
\.Var I, Co lum bia
starts the Core
Curriculum, a set of
class sta ndards that
has been adopted
with "Contemporary
Civ." int ended to
"cultivate a cr itical
and c1·eative
intellectua l capacity
that students
emp loy long after
college, in the
pursuit and the
fulfillment of
n1eaningful lives.''

a brie

colonialist

I
f)
Zora Neale Hurston, the first
kno"vn black student at
Barnard, graduates . Hurston
worked in the Anthropology
Department ,vith Franz Boas,
collecting black folklore and
oral history.

I
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II

II

l11 198 5, 1.heSAS won rheir
fight for di,·eslnte11t front
SouLlt African ApartJteid.
Ilar11ard and Coluntbia both
dives1.ed their respecr.i,·e
eudownt euts front
corporatio11s doing business
i11South Africa, including
IBM, CDS, GeueraJ
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Iloneywe ll, and Lite
\,V ashingtou Post.

)jght of tbe
assass ination of MLK and
student frustration over Vietnam, student
protests erupt over the schoo l's active involvement
"vith the Inst itut e for Defense Analyses (IDA), a
weapons research think-tank affiliated with the U.S.
Department of Defense and plans to build gym
facilities in Harlem. Students for a Democratic Society
(SOS) and the Student Afro-J\mer ican Society (Si\S)
un.ited, resulting in Colu1nbia scrapping the Gym plans
and divesting fron1 the I DA. 712 students vvere
arrested; The
University was put on
pause as students
taught "Liberation
Classes" on the lawn;
The Grateful Dead
gave a free concert.

7

hiitory

?
iel

()
()
II

After seven students
go on a ten day
hung er str ike (2007),
the program
previously known as
the Major Cu ltures
seminar is adopted
into the Core
Curricuhuu and
tra nsfo rmed into
,vhat '"e no~ , kno-.,,v
as the Global CORE.

Columbia announces
its plan to expand into
West Harlem.

They Said it Could Never Happen at
Colun1bia...
the columbia student strike of 1968
In 1968, just like today, Colu1nbia ,vas heavily involved in ,vea pons research for the Departn1ent of
Defense. In 1968, just like today, Colu1nbia practiced racist development policies in the Harlen1
co1nmunity. In 1968, nvo student groups led an uprising that changed the history of America. Today , it
doesn't take a weathennan to know which way the \/\rind blo,¥s ...
For years, social disillusionment and institutional disenchantment had si1nmered on campus and off;
the "var in Vietnam began to bring popular hostility to"vards all forms of authority to a boil. Civil rights
activists "vere beginning to move towards Black Po\l\1 er. Relations between the Un iversity and the Har lem
co1nmunity were strained to the point of breaking over the construction of a private University gymnasium
on public land in J\ilorningside Park; this tension ,vas exacerbated by the assassination of I<:ingand the
ensuing riots in Harlen1.
On April 23, 1968, Students
for a Democratic So ciety (SDS) and
the Student Afro -American Society
(SAS) united for the first time to
occupy the gym construction site. The
Universi~y called in the 26th Precinct
of the NYPD to forcibly remove
them, so students mar ched ba ck to
Hamilton and occupied it, taking
Dean Coleman as a hostage. The SAS
members "vere far more serious and
better trained than the SDS members,
so the next morning they evicted all of
the white students from Hamilton;
SDS marched over to Low Library
Mt1.themt1.
l1i.;, llr1.ll«m,>()1·c11pieiJ
by the m,Nt raiJ,,wl,1111iJe11t
.,, a11iJ
'Ju.bbeiJ
'£iben,terJZ,)lle5."
and took over President Kirk's offices.
Over the next ,veek, students and supporters also occupied Avery, Fayerweather and Mathe1natics. The
strikers were supported by hundreds of students "vho rallied in front of the occupied buildings, running
supplies and press releases back and forth; they "vere opposed by a handfu l of ath letes and alumni "vho
called themse lves the "1\ilajority Coalition." Finally, in the ear ly 1norning hours of April 30, President Kirk
instructed the NYPD to invade the occupied buildings and remove the students by force. The police
rioted :712 were arrested and 148 were injured in the police violence; 372 co1nplaints of po lice bruta lity
were filed. 1\11.ost
of those arrested and injured were not in the occupied buildings, but were just students
on South La,vn who had co1ne to watch. Some students evacuated from the buildings ,¥ere made to "valk
by a line of police ofl1cers while being beaten by each one; others V\7ere dragged head-first down marb le
stairs.

8

On May 6, IGrk unsuccessfully
attempted to reopen the University as
most students and n1any faculty members
boycotted their classes. An alternative
"Liberation School" was established on
South La"vn, ~,ith classes about the
Cuban Revolution and the history of
Native Americans taught in a tTuly
collaborative method. Students put on
guerilla theater pieces; the Grateful Dead
played a free concert. The strike lasted
until Friday, JVlay 17, ~,hen community
activists, with the help of student strike
leaders, seized a Columbia-owned lowincome apartment building slated for
demo lition . Within hours , police cleared
the building and arrested 117 people,
including 56 students. On May 21, near'.),
300 students protesting disc iplinary action
against strike leaders again occupied
l~lamiJton Hall; the administration again
called in the NYPD and they rioted again.
Forty -seven student bystanders ,;vere
arrested, and 68 people "vere reported
Ic,111i,
, i111<1_
ge of theNYPD be.,1tit\{J
aniJarre.1t1
i1_g,,t11iJe11t,,
,1cc11pying
ii Co/11111/,iil
buiuJin_q.
injured, including 17 police.
The last action that spring came on June 4, graduation day. Several hundred graduating senio rs
walked out of the ceremonies and held a counter-commencement on Low Plaza. With this peaceful
symbolic gesture, the tumultuous spring semester of 1968 came to a close. Over the course of' the never -robe-forgott en six weeks , 1,100 were arrested at Columbia. Hundreds of arrest ed students went home for
the summer facing suspension or expu lsion, not kno"ving if they would be allo"ved to retu rn. Others took
their experiences to Chicago, for the Den1ocratic Convention of 1968. So1ne formed the Weathermen, a
gueri lla organization committed to ending American imperialism b,y force. The legacy of 1968 on campus is
the formation of the University Senate, a more democratic governing body - and of a campus security
department that is co1n1nitted to using espionage to stifle student protest rnovements before they erupt and
that n1aintains still closer ties to the 26th Precin ct of the NYPD. They said it could n ever happen at
Columbia, but it happened at Columbia . They sa,y it cou ld never happen again at Colurnbia ...

9

The C.OreCurrtculumis an educational model begun byC.Olumbiain 1919. A distinct set
of requirements and experiences for all undergraduates at CXJ,
the core cultivates a
"...critical and creative intell~
caP3City that students employ long after colle,ge,in
the pursuit and the fulfillment of me,amngful lives." (C.Olumbia's website) While the
cur.riculum's concentration on western thoug!:lt makes one apt for dinner parties and
intell~
foreplay, it bas been both e:qjoyed and critiqued by students since it's bn:th.
Here are a handful of student's thoug!:lts on the core.

My experience
leaving the core is not that it
need not be a project of indoctrinationbut
rather an exploration of where modernity comes
from. It's tempting to say "old white men's words are
meaningless" but any concerted understanding of power requires an inquiry into its origins. Marx's method emphasizes
this at its core, and he spent years and years researchingthe
very literatureand thought he sought to overcomethrough revolutionaryclassstruggle. Taketh:e~core=~as:~
-----a similarproject, ask where
__
./
capitalism and identityoppression come from.
It'll show you a lot
about how we ended
up in the world we
are today.

,-

The core has us racing fast
through thousands of pages of white men
musing about their idyllic lovers aid eating
habits and bloodthirst.Not that I wasn't happy
to be reading"the classics" or whatevercolonialist term they're using now, but for any
non-white and/or non-cis-male person it
took a toll to be repeatedlydiscussing romanticized depictions of "barbarians•
and frail female characters.It isn't that
we shouldn't read books by authors
that we disagreewith, by no means.
--But the lack of diversityof experience
in the canon was miserable, and often
made me feel isolated in discussion,
especiallywhen it came to mattersof
class.
...So my advice to the next
generation of Lit-Hum
readers is this:speakup.
Speak up ,n class
when someone says
something that hurts.

l

To study the core "\
without addressingthis
issue is to normalizea
systemthat benefrtsfew
and oppressesmany.
Since the canon is alreadly defined, to retro- i
actively attempt to ,
insert others into it is
to try to mold the
ideas of oppressed
groups to those of
the oppressors, thus
reinforcing the oppressive hierarchy we are
trying to destroy. Therefore any attempt to preserve the canon while
opening it up to excluded
groups is hypocriticalbecause the ,_...., ___
,
canon always has and alwayswill be defined by the groups in power.
......,

..

Exceptforfrosci, I'm a big fan. It gets meto read books I wouldn't get around
to readingotherwise.
Ladiesand Gentlemen,for your Eurocentricviewingpleasure, I give you,
the Core Cumculum!!!

It is vitally important to keep in mind that the core is racist, sexist,classist, and the like not purely
becauseof choicesmade by Columbia's administration. Blaming Columbia for the university's choices
will not go back and re-writethis historyof exclusion.

10

Tile PEol'LE .
,t-.1 <o N,.RoL ➔



Leadership
PRESIDENTSPAR



PRESIDENT'SCOUNCIL
PRESIDENT'SOFFICE
TASK FORCEON DIVERSITY&
INCLUSION
TRUSTEES
PASTPRESIDENTS

ard . or

CHE"CKUS OU.T
ONLINE: : W[BSI TE

COl'-1INGi SOON

Welcome

Our Mission

-

In 1887, a small group of determined women decided to create a college for

Welcometo Barnard
is a resource for
students, · faculty,
staff, alumni, local
residents or anyone
else to navigate the
numerous administrative
channels to enact change,
seek support, or maintain
accountability of the
Barnard administration.
This website is intended
to increase transparency
and build institutional
memoryof the administrative
decision making processes
for tbe benefit of the student
body, faculty, staff , alumni ,
local residents and
stakeholders at large .

11

ity,
, hailing
from

ures
, the
ygo

IN*
your guide to who to complain to
and who to go to for money
The bureaucracy runs deep at Columbia University - if you want to get anything done,
be it a protest or a teach- in, it helps to know who to talk to and who to press for money . This
guide w ill help you understand who ' s in charge of what , and who to ask/ye ll at/comp lain to
for what.

Administrators: Names to Know
President Lee Bolinger (PrezBo) - Responsible for the whole university, but mostly for buying land,
broadening corporate projects, and gentrifying Har lem (and hence, well liked by administrators .)
Nigh-impossible to get a meeting with .
Barnard Pre sident Deborah Spar (DSpar) - Corporate feminist. Much easier to get a meeting with.
"Directly concerned" with student interests, has a (limited) history of caving to and appeasing them.
Suzanne Goldberg , Rules administrator - Also EVP of Student Life and Presidential Advisor on
Sexual Assault. Argu a bly the most hated figure among the campus left, also mostly a figurehead for
PrezBo. She's often responsible for ha lting or delaying most student progress. All complaints for
breaking of university rules of conduct go through her off ice, as do most larger student issues .
John Coatsworth, Provost - Responsible for the university budget and function. His office plays a
role in determining wages of students and other workers .
Cristen Kromm , Dean of Student Life - New in her role as of last year. Has claimed to be very
interested in talking to students; still, often unhelpful in acting towards progress . Go to for larger
issues of student life.
Josh Lucas, Director of Student Engagement - Oversees almost all student clubs & advisors at
CU . Very concerned for student interests . Go to for serious conflicts over student groups.
Alina Wong, Dean of Barnard Student Life - Oversees activit ies and clubs at Barnard . A lovely
human being who will stay up late to he lp you with logistical emergencies if you know her . Come to
her with any issues over broader club function at Barnard .
Melinda Aquino, Head of Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) - Huge student ally. Will fight for
your rights against discrimination. The OMA oversees a number of cultural , ident ity, and LGBT
groups.
Chris Woods, head of LGBTQ+ @Columbia -Arguably the single most proactive student ally on
campus . Will help you start initiatives and fight for you in cases of discriminat ion.

Governing Boards
Columbia and Barnard clubs are overseen by a set of student-led governing boards. If your club is
under them , or your project aligns with their goals, you can go to these boards for a co-sponsorship
(i.e. they will give you money for events.) Also email them for help finding funding .

12

The Student Governing Board (SGB) deals with most activist , political , ident ity-conscious,
humanitarian, and religious groups at CU. Their primary concern is free speech - they w ill go to
lengths to protect your rights to put on whatever kind of act ion you want , so long as you follow
un iversity rules (and possibly even when you don 't, in certain circumstances.) Keep in mind,
however , that they have to defend peop le of all polit ica l views. Representation is most often by
those with no connection to the issues , to avoid bias. (columbia.edu/cu/SGB; sgb@columbia.edu )
The Activities Board at Columbia (ABC) governs more activity-based groups , including cultural
groups. Th is is a f ine line shared with SGB , but ABC governs groups like BSO (the Black Students
Organization ,) AAA (Asian American Alliance,) Chicanx Caucus - but not all cultura l groups. Their
concerns are often technica l, and there have been recent complaints by cultural groups that they are
poorly represented and wish to move to SGB. The question & process are still underway .
(http://abc-columbia.sguarespace.com/
, abc@columbia .edu)
The Governing Board at Barnard (GBB) is the newes t governing board and has perhaps the least
resources and connect ions. They're technically an arm of SGA , Barnard's student counci l. GBB
Groups don't ofte n encounter trouble, since Barnard Student Life is generally supportive.
(http://tinyurl.com/BarnardGBB ; gbb@barnard .edu)

Funding
Outside funding is often necessary to bring toge ther an event. Some funds and offices that
cosponsor on-campus events are:





LGBTQ@Columbia
The Gatsby Foundat ion
(good for performances)
Cosponsorsh ips from other
groups
Governing Boards





**The Chap lain 's Fund
(funds almost anything)
The Off ice of Mult icul t ural
Affairs
The Pres ident 's & Provost
Fund (for 1st t ime events)





**Capita l Investment Fund
(for buying long-term gear)
Columbia Student Life
**The Kraft Fami ly Fund (for
anything "multi-cultural")

**funds that have lots of money and aren 't often used

Hot Tips
Professors often feel t hey have very litt le leverage in the university at large and rarely come to
direct aid, but some will speak out on beha lf of students or help you with other advice. Samuel
Roberts of IRAAS , Nadia Abu El-haj and Neferti Tadiar of Anthropology, and Joseph Messad of
MESAAS are some examples of professors who have been helpful to activists in the past.
Additional funding for events & even going to conferences can be obtained by contacting
academic departments. Departments have lim ited funding for the year (so contact early in the
academic year!) and are most likely to sponsor projects by majors or concentrators. Try emailing the
department administrator , cha ir, or a professor you're close to in the department.
If you're on a club e-board , stay in contact with your club advisor & governing board rep.
They will help you out in tr icky situations and help you to navigate th is rid icu lous bureaucracy.
If there isn't a club for something yet - but ought to be - start one! Use friends in another club to
help you book space and get funds. You can be recognized by a governing board after one year.

13

Manhattan House
Manhattan House is an on-campus residence where Indigenous students and friends 1naintain their co1nmunal identities , host events , and relieve the pressures of university and city life. The house was founded
in 2012 as a Special Interest Cotnmw1ity by a group ofNAC members already living together who wanted to secure a home for Indigenous Colun1bians for years to come. As the only physical space on campus
dedicated to Indigenous students , Manhattan House is a hub of social life and a refuge from the prejudice ,
misunderstanding , and ho1nesickness that Indigenous students often experience.
Retaining Manhattan House as an Indigenous student space has proved challenging since its founding.
While there are more than enough students eager to fill the space yearly , the financial inaccessibility of
the building in which it is housed (like 1nost buildings with Special Interest spaces) has hindered students'
ability to live there. To retain the house , the co1nmunity has even been subject to " resolutions" such as
assigning non-Indigenous and non -allied transfer students to the space at rando1n without notifying the
House or the transfer placements. This has resulted in the Manhattan House co,nrnunity enduring racist
speech , manipulation , cultural insensitivity , and the need to expend undue emotional labor to mediate external conflicts in our own home. We are advocating continuously for Colun1bia Housing to differentiate
financial and communal policies between residential co1n1nunities rightfully labelled as ' Special Interest'
and co,nmunities that require support for culture and marginalized identity.

14

Native American Council of Columbia University
The presence ofNative American and Indigenous students at Columbia University invokes a rich and
complex history. However, our narratives often remain unknown or undermined, and so we ai1nto offer
a piece ofthe1n here. The Native American Council of Columbia University (NAC) \.Vasfounded in 1996
by students at Barnard and Columbia College to support the acade1nic, political, and social needs of the
university's Indigenous student body. In NA C's 20th year, the organization consists of students fro1n
many Indigenous nations across the A1nericas, Pacific islands, and beyond, as well as allies and friends
from around the world.
Our con1munitycelebrates the diverse intersectional identities and experiences of its me1nbers, and embraces all Indigenous students irrespective of emollment, status, blood quantum, etc. We find it i1nportant
for our allies to understand that our co1n1nunityand Indigenous peoples at large are not a monolith with
regard to national affiliations (read: tribe, band, people, com1nunity), language, acade1nic interests, or politics. Furthermore, the NAC community prioritizes a strong and increasingly service-oriented relationship
to Native folks beyond the university who live in and/or hold indigenous affiliation to the New York area;
we make an active pron1iseto not speak for them.
Our major annual events include Indigenous Peoples' Day (a counter-celebration to Columbus Day),
a powwow in the late spring (the only annual pov.rwowin Manllattan), and Native American Heritage
Month in Novetnber. All are welcome at these events. This Indigenous Peoples' Day ( 10 October 2016)
will celebrate a plaque's installtnent on South Campus that recognizes the Lenape as the original people
of Manhattan. Moving forward, our community will continue to focus on Indigenous faculty and staff
representation and improving the scope and nature of Columbia's Indigenous-student recruitment. As our
community expands, we seek to achieve adequate resources targeted to Indigenous student experiences at
Colu1nbiaUniversity.
NAC Contact lnfonnation:
E-mail: nac.colun1bia@ginail.com (listserv available)
Facebook: Native American Council at Colwnbia University (follow for updated meeting locations/times)
Meetings: Wednesdays@ 8:00 p.m., 420 Han1iltonHall

15

The Columbia
organizafion

Queer Alliance (CQA) is a sfudenf
for q_ueer and frans
sfudenfs
.

CQA recognizes
f he d ;verse i nfersecf ions of
;den+ ;fies , backgrounds
and needs of our
communify , and remains
commiffed
q_ueer and
frans
liberafion
hand-in-hand
wifh anfi-racism,
anfi-sexism
and anfi-imperialism
.
[image descripfion
: fhe CQA 1090. +he leffers
'cq_a' in curly fonf , filled in wifh rainbow
colors ,
wifh a Columbia
crown on fop of fhe 'q_' and a
hear+ offer fhe 'a']

cq_aboa rd@col umbi a .ed u

16

OUR~ENGE
~~tf
LflJGHTER
o,=
UR

CQA is proud fo serve as a safer space for
q_ueer and frans sfudenfs
fo share l 9row l learn
and heal. S"ome evenfs we've held in +he pas+
i n c Iu de a perform a nc e of I Co mi n9 0 u + Mus Ii m 1
pafch and zine-makin9 workshopsl
Queer and
Tr a ns Con sen+ I O11 a nd a screen i n9 of
1
Tan9erine 1 •
1

We meef S"undays a+ 2pm in +he S"feven
Donaldson Loun9e a q_ueer/ frans (physically
access; bl e}) space in +he base men+ of Furn a Id.
1

(ima9e descripf;on:
S"fudenfs for J"usfice in
Palesfine's
mock aparfhe;d
wall from sprin9
201b. CQA's 1090 is visible on +he ri9h+]

www .face book .com / cq_a .cu

17

-

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18

We ar e a grass root s organizat
i on wor ki ng to end
sexua l+
domestic
v i olence
in our campus communities
we envision

a world

free

of

We recognize
that
sexual
system i c gender
oppression
other
forms of oppression.
+ domestic
forms
of
classism,

violence

cannot

violence+

be won without

including
, colonialism,

we us e direct
action
to e xpos e the
violence
our
institution+
larger
society
normalizes .

A major
rape
with

demand

of

crisis
center
professional

our
that

.

violence
is
a manifestation
of
which cannot
be separated
from all
Therefore
, the fight
to end sexual

oppression

ableism

oppression

beca use

eradicating

but
not
homophobia,

all

limi ted
to
+ t ransphobia

other

racism
.

We seek
to foster
transparency
around
issues
of
sexual
v i olence
because
we believe
that
a bottom
up approach
to building
power is the only way to
achieve
justice.
Our current
campaign
demands
more support,
accessibility
, accountability
, funding ,+
enforcement
(SAAFE) to ensure
that Columb i a
University
is an inclusive
educational
environment
where survivors
can thrive,
regardless
of t heir i dent i ty (i nclud i ng but not
lim it ed to race,
sex , gender , sexual
orientation
socioeconomic
status , immigrat i on status,
+
re l i gion) .

campaign

is

for

the

is physically
open
advocates
trained

creation
24/7
in

of

a

cultural

We bel ie ve that
t hese changes
will
improve
the quality
of resources
for all
survivors,
especially
for survivors
whose experiences
don 't match traditional
narrat i ves and who come from marginalized
communit i es .

////////////////

//////////~

////////////////

get involved?
Si gn up for our listse rv@
http : //noredtapecu
email
noredtapecu@qmail.com
! Our weekly meetings
are on Sundays

Want to

or

Go to www.NoRedTapeCU,ora to learn

////////////////

more

about

////////////////

our

work+

////////////////

19

,

The work we do is
always c entered
on
the needs+
experiences
of survivors.

+ staffed

competency.

////////////////

,

for

info

. org/new

from

- paqe/

7PM- 8PM.

on resources.

///////////

,

You died . I cried. And kept on getting up . A littl e slower. And

A LOT MORE DEADLY
We are a radical woe,/ non binary/ queer organ,zaUon dedicated to makrng sure Columbla

comes correct on ttie Issuesthat so drnstlcallv affoo us. \Ve believe in a campus where
~eryo ne, the people , have power and wh ere tti e emot io nal and physical labor of activism is
acknowledged . We believe in a Columbia that doesn 't stand for racist trad ttlons, micro/macro
aggressions , or the pure downrigh t racism that happens in OUR space. We believe a wo rld
outside Columbia exists, one v,here they are shooting us down In the streets, in our cars,in our
churches, and we must fight alongside our brother s and sisters for the imd of this. We 11rein
the revolution agaJnsl ant.-Bladc and Brown racism, st.rte sanctioned murder and the mass
lncarcorntlon of Black and Brmvn fathers,

taking up space where
this interest$ you,

\I/ @ belong

SOil$,

brothers and partners . We will not apo logize for

and we feel NO shame for being M
radicat" In our demands.

COME FIND OUT W HAT WE'RE ABOUT

Meet with us! 11

FRIDAY, SEPTEM18ER 16@ 8 PM @ THE
SUNDIAL TO SEE WHAT WE ' R[ ALL ABOUT

email us at: alotmoredeadly@gmail.com

nveerusot: @alotmoredeadly
like vs at : www .facebook.com/alotmoredeadly

It ls our duty to fight for our freedom .
It is our duty to win.
We must love each other and support each other.
We have nothing to lose but our chains.

20

1r

"Ai1d strt1ggle is at th e he art of it all"
....:fron1tl1e BSO History as found by 0111oyeni Clen1ent and Dorian Barnwell
02/20/20 12
Disregard ,,vhat you n1ay have gleaned about Colun1bia fron1 tl1en1yriad of
recruitn1ent n1aterial. Colun1bia is not the progressive, fon vard-tlunking
picnu·e of diversity tl1atit clain1sto be; no, rather it is
anti-Black to tl1e core, in every sense of tl1e tern 1.
Ho,v so? Colun1bia is an institution tl1atftu1ctions but even n1ore so thrives -- on tl1e exploitation of
Black
labor and Black con1n1w1ities;directly aids and
contTibutes
to the displacen1ent of Black con1n1wuties;ben efits
ti·on1tl1e
'ff 1
desn·uction of Black con1n1wuties;invests in indusn·ies fossil fuels for
on e - that directly lead to the disproportionate n1ortalily rates
of Black
'li,;;;r,i,t
people; engages in capitalist enterprises that put profit over Black life;
,vorks 1vithtl1e
state to ,~olently police Blackness; co-opts Black organizing to uphold its
"progressive" in1age- i.e. South African and prison divesnnent; produces, proliferates, and perpetuates antiBlack ideology; disrespects, disregards, and de1ues Black life.

r ••

g68

·

As an anti-Black institution Colun1bia's actions include, but are not linuted to: holding a slave auction the day

tl1efu·st nustees \Veres1,vo111in; financing plantations as a slave bank; robbing Black btuial grotu1ds and
n·ading Black slaYe'sbodies to experin1ent on in d1e n1edical school du·oughout the 19tl1cent1iry;ren1sal to
even ackI10,vledgetl1e den1ands of Harlen1 con1n1tuutyn1en1bersbefore, dwing, and since '68; divesting fron1
apartheid Soud1 Africa to "strengd1en their fu1ancial portfolio," but refusing to connibute it to tl1eorgaiuzing
of Coalition for a Free Soud1 Africa; in 1987, taking no action in tl1eivake of yt (vvlute)football players
assaulting Black sl11dents,yt srudents planting "(yt) power - KKK" signs on can1pus, and bringing KKK
literattu·e to can1pus; ren1sing to establish tl1eInstit11tefor Research in African-An1erican Studies (IRAAS)
w1til 1993; displacing n1ass ntunbers of Black and Brown residents fro111\"I est Harlen1 to 111akeroo111for
tl1eir ell.'])ansionplans; pronusing to provide con1n1tu1itybenefits but failing to folloi,vup; ,vorking 1,vid1NYPD
for years to survey and tl1e11raid d1e l\1anhattai1,~e and Grant housing projects to arrest over 100 Black
youtl1s based on social 111ediastu-veillai1ce;contintung to invest in fossil fuel con1panies despite tl1e111ai1
y ,vays
in ,vhich clin1ate chai1gehave already had on Black conm1u1uties- just to nan1e a fe,v things.
As ai1extension of its ai1ti-Black fow1dations, Colun1bia n·ies desperatel y to stifle ai1d delegitinuze collective

orgai1izing,especially Black collective orgai1izing.Fron1 ctu-ricultm1to tl1e can1pus codes of conduct,
Coltm1bia establishes a guise of conn·ol, atten1pts to antago1uze acti,~sn1.
Ho,vever, stt1dent-activists'orgaiuzation and n1oven1entshave ilie potentiality for change. Think: halting of
the Monungside Park gyn1, forcing divestn1ent fron1 Soutl1 Afiica, event11alfow1ding of IRAAS, creation of
the OMA, tl1eaddition of To1u Monison to tl1e Lit Hun1 cw-riculun1,ai1d divestn1ent fro111p1ivate prisons -all the ,vork of stt1dents' collective orgaiuzation.
Even still, Coltunbia ,vould like you to in1agine d1at the " 'orld that has been consn·ucted in front of ai1d all
ai·ow1dyou is untou chable, incapable of deconsn·uction - dus is nue, but only if you n-yto do dungs on yow·
O\\IJL For us to forge d1e freedo111d1ative deserve requires a collective orgaiuzation of resistance, a n1obilized
effo1t d1atoperates on otu· tern1s, ai1 effort d1at does not feai· tl1e tu1iversity,ai1 effort tl1atpositions us as d1e
object of otu· 01V11
freedon1 rad1er thai1 the subject of ai1otl1er's.
1l1e Black Students' Orgaiuzation (BSO) bso@coltm1bia.edu
Meeting: 'f'hursda ys, 9-1lpni in d1e Malcoln1 X Lotu1ge

21

SOUTH
SAFA's mission is to encourage dialogue and mobilize leadership and community
action against patriarchy,
misogyny, and sex i sm in the South Asian community. Our
goal is to provide a space for us to come together and find strength in our
similarities
and our differences,
to learn about ourselves as well as others, and
to find solace in each other when the rest of the world fails to accept us.
ASIAN

SAFAis a group for those who have dealt with misogyny rampant in their homes,
families,
and communities. For those who have felt like their skin was too dark,
their arms too hairy, their voices too opinionated.
For those who are queer,
trans,
or do not conform to the binary al together.
For those who are not
able-bodied or thin . For those who are not on a track to becoming doctors,
engineers, lawyers. This is a group for everyone who wishes to challenge South Asian
gender norms and think critica ll y about the intersection

of one's multiple

identities.

FEMINISM(S)

Through group discussions,
film screenings, mentorship programs and more, SAFA
aims to cultivate
awareness of struggles faced by so many members of the South
Asian diaspora, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity
between SAFAand
other activist
and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who identifies
with
our mission to come to a meeting and join us in making this campus a more
inclusive place.
ALLIANCE

-----

.

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. ..
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. ·:

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22

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23

A BRIEF RUNDOWN ON APIA ORGANIZING AT
COLUMBIA & BARNARD
Although Columbia and Barnard's APIA community has
rarely rallied around a single issue, Asian American
students, working in solidarity with other students of color,
have nevertheless made tremendous impact on the
University's trajectory. Most notably, the Center for Ethnicity
and Race Studies (CSER) was created in 1996 only after
Black, Asian, Latinx, and
Indigenous students united
to organize a hunger strike
that brought the university
to a grinding halt. CSER
now houses the
undergraduate Asian
American Studies, Latino
Studies, Native
American/ Indigenous
Studies, Comparative
Ethnic Studies, and Individualized Study programs (all of
which are lumped into an "Ethnicity and Race Studies" major
on a diploma). Though CSER has yet to receive department
standing or offer
any courses on
Southeast Asia,
the center stands
as a testament to
the power of
student of color
Grace Lee
organ1z1ng
.
Boggs!
Barnard
Graduate!

24

Since then , APIA
students have continued
to make their mark ,
although rarely as a
single unified contingent
given the diversity Asian
and Pacific Islander
communities . Rather , a
variety of Asian student
organizations have
worked to serve their
respective constituents ,
coming together to co-author or co-sign statements or
co-host relevant programming. Asian Pacific Islander
American Heritage month , for example , boasts a roster of
events every single night in April , each organized by
different APIA cultural and political groups. APIA groups
seem also to
come together
in moments of
crisis. Last
spring , when
Black Student
Organization
held Columbia
College
Student
Council
accountable
for failing to
consult
students of color in a "race and diversity proposal " to deans
of the college ,

25

representatives from Asian American Alliance , Club
Zamana , and Korean Students Association joined BSO and
other student of color groups to revise CCSC 's proposal.
Efforts like these , along with the rise of the Students of Color
Coa lition , which formed last winter alongside the BCSN ,
offer glimpses at more coordinated movements in the future.
In the meantime , APIA students are also working as
individuals , contributing to movements big and small both at
Columbia/Barnard and in the city of New York. In spring
2016, for example , over a year after Akai Gurley was shot in
a Brooklyn housing project,
the sentencing of killer cop
Peter Liang mobilized
thousands of Chinese
Americans (many funded and
organized by right-wing police
organizations) to march in
support of Liang. Many Asian
American students at
Columbia joined members of
CAAA V and other NYC



organizations to pack the
courts in support of Akai Gurley , taking a stance against
anti-Black racism that runs deep in many Asian
communities .
SOME APIA ORGS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THIS
ARTICLE & THEIR HISTORIES :
Founded in 1995, Asian American Alliance (AAA) is one of
Columbia 's oldest APIA student organizations. As a student
group "recognized " by the Columbia administration and
student council boards , AAA has the ability to leverage

26

student club funding , space , and grants in order to put on
university-wide events. This advantage allows AAA to reach
a broad audience on a consistent basis . AAA's core-member
group typically consists of students who have had varying
levels of experience with politicization and radicalization .
This means some members may be very comfortable
navigating conversations about colonization and anti-racist
work , while others may be just beginning to identify what
discrimination and prejudice feel like . Given this spectrum of
exposure to different issues , AAA 's goal is to learn and
unlearn as a community while working in tandem with off
campus organizations and on-campus student groups .
Founded in the 1970s as the Indian Students Association ,
Club Zamana is the umbrella organization for all South
Asian interest groups on Barnard/Columbia's campus . This
commitment to South Asian solidarity and acknowledging
the relationships of peoples throughout the subcontinent
despite drawn boundaries kindled the movement to rename
the club "Club Zamana" in 1987. Club Zamana has fostered
close relationships with many different clubs focused on
different facets of the South Asian identity , be it religion ,
nationality , music or dance . This commitment to providing a
space for those who identify as South Asian to engage with
what that means can be seen in the large variety of events
which Club Zamana board members organize , from social
service to political to something as simple as a study break ,
and culminates in Club Zamana 's largest event of the
academic year , Tamasha , the largest cultural showcase on
campus , where each South Asian performance group is
given a platform to show the Columbia /Barnard community
the artistic side of the what it means to be South Asian .

27

Asian Political Collective (APC) is a non-hierarchical
consensus -based group of Asian Americans at Columbia .
Founded in the spring of 2014 by a group of former
AAA -members, APC formed to address a lack of overtly
political space for Asian Americans on campus after a
tumultuous year that saw
the use of yellowface in a
Barnard College theater
production , as well as
the beginnings of
Columbia 's prison
divestment campaign.
Seeking to avoid the
bureaucracy and
hierarchy of other Asian
American student
organizations , APC does
not have official
Yuri Kochiyama!
university standing and
Harlem resident!
remains small and

community /consensus -driven , aimed at supporting the
immediate political goals of its members. APC has thus
been able to take a more confrontational stance than other
Asian student organizations. In the past two years, APC has
held Columbia Musical Theater Society accountable for its
use of yellowface in a production of The Drowsy Chaperone ;
sent groups of volunteers to support CAAAV , a grassroots
Asian organization fighting gentrification in New York City ;
hosted a bi-weekly reading group for political education ; and
shown out to pack the courts of Akai Gurley in the Peter
Liang trials .

28

Q&A, short for Queer & Asian, is a new Asian American
organization founded in November 2015 for LGBTQIA+
Asian students at Columbia. Q&A sprouted out of a
AAA-hosted panel which called for a space of solidarity and
support on campus for this particular intersection of
identities. For the last two semesters, Q&A has been
working on building its family and figuring out the roles it
wants to serve in its community(ies). This year, Q&A will be
seeking official club standing to be able to obtain funding
and access to spaces on campus in order to host events
that highlight the work of queer Asian creators, and to
provide a more nurturing space for its members. Q&A strives
to be an organization that empowers those who share queer
and Asian identities to come together, heal, and grow, as
well as to work towards broader goals of education, political
activism, and queer liberation.
CONTACT INFO
aaa@columbia.edu
zamana@columbia.edu
apc-reading-group@googlegroups.com
qanda.columbia@gmaiI.com
Image credits:
All images from Barnard Digital Collections in order:
Asian Women's Coalition & DAAWN, 1986
Grace Lee Boggs
Asian Women's Coalition, 1990s
Club Zamana, 1991
Asian Students' Association, 1980s
Asian American Alliance, 1990s
Yuri Kochiyama

29

The Columbia University Student Organization of Latinos (SOL) seeks to foste r and
empower the exist ing Latinx/Latin American identities on campus in an effort to
celebra te and strengthe n the Latinx Community at Colum bia University.
As a blanket organization , SOL connects the Latinx Consti tuency on campus :

Alumni Organizations


Latino Alumni Association of Columbia University

Cultural Organizations


Chicano Caucus



Grupo Quisqueyano



Por Colomb ia



Organization of Latin Amer ican Students



Sabor





MexCU

Multi-Cultural Greek Life Organizations


Sigma Lambd a Gamma Nationa l Soror ity, Inc.



Sigma Lambda Beta International Fraterni ty , Inc.



Omega Phi Beta Sorority , Inc.



Phi Iota Alpha Fraternity , Inc.



Lambda Pi Chi Sorority , Inc.

Pre-profess ional Organizations


Latinx Professional and Educational Networ k (formerly
HSF)



Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers



Columbia Quest Schola rs

Social Justice/Identity Organizations


Mujeres



Casa Latina



LUCHA



Columbia First-genera tion Low-Income Partnership

30

In addition to co-sponsor ing events, SOL hosts many of its own events throughout the
year , often the result of collaboration across several organizations.
On the night of Friday April 15th, Columbia University's Latinx community celebrated
their annual "Latinx Awards: Una Noche de Gala" with dinner , an award ceremony,
raffles, a live salsa band, and dancing. CU Latinxs came together to honor the
individuals and organizations that work tirelessly to foster and empower the Latinx and
Latin American identities on campus; to celebrate achievement, culture, resilience , one
another.

Latinx Awards: Una Noche de Gala, involved Student Organization of Latinos (SOL),
Chicanx Caucus, Grupo Quisqueyano , Lambda Pi Chi , Latino Alumni Association of
Columbia University , Latinx Heritage Month, Latinx Professional and Educational
Network (formerly HSF) , Phi Iota Alpha, Sabor, Society of Hispanic Engineers , and
more!

Follow us!
http://www.columbia .edu/cu/sol/
F acebook: www.facebook.com/SOL .Columbia
lnstagram : cu_sol
Snapchat: cu_sol

01

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volu ntarily,
clima t e justice is not for you! If you want to help create a world where
eve ryone has access to a susta inable environment, clean water, healthy food, economic
justice and community power , hop on board the climate justice train!

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32

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33

1
Facebook:
facebook.com/ColumbiaDivestforClimateJustice
Website:
columbiaclimatejustice.com
Email:
columbiadivest@gmail.com
Cool Divest Zine!
bit.ly/CDOWhydivest
34

Col un1bia Divest for
Cliniate Justice
Who Are We?
We are a student group pushing Columbia's
administrationto divest the university'sholdings in the
top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel companiesfrom our
$9.6 billion endowment. We also ask that they reinvest
these funds into sustainablecommunity projects that
benefit communities in Harlemthat continue to be
impacted by Columbia'srelentlessexpansion.

Climate Justice v. Environmentalism
Our organizingis based in the concept of climate justice
which is a way of viewing climate change as a social
justice issue. Classicenvironmentalismtends to be
motivated by white, upper-middleclass individualsand
often ignores the ways that climate change does and will
affect us differently based on our gender,racial, and
economicbackgrounds.We believethat climate change
presentsan opportunity to underminecapitalism and
create a system that benefits everyone, particularly lowincome communitiesof color that are considered
disposableby the fossil fuel industry.

Our Power
As students at an elite university we have incredible
power to affect social change. Our actions draw national
and international attention, as demonstratedby our April
2016 sit-in, and we must use this privileged platform to
uplift the voices of those most affected by climate change
and environmentalinjustice.
35

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36

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For 67 years , the Palestinian people have carried on their struggle for liberation , resisting
Zionist erasure , ethnic cleansing , and settler colonization. Columbia Students for Justice in
Palestine stand with the Palestinian people and all those who struggle for their autonomy
and freedom .
We , Students for Justice in Palestine, are a diverse group of students, faculty , staff, and
community members at Columbia University in the City of New York , organized on
democratic principles to promote justice , human rights , liberation , and self-determination
for the Palestinian people. We organize around the principles of the Palestinian Civil
Society call for Boycott , Divestment and Sanctions (BOS) against Israel which are 1) selfdetermination of the Palestinian people 2) Right of Return for all refugees and 3) full
equality for all citizens regardless of ethnic or religious backgrounds .
In partnership with our ally, Jewish Voice for Peace
(JVP) , we launched our Boycott , Divestment , and
Sanctions campaign Apartheid Divest in February
2016 . We have taken the BOS movement as our
tool to support the Palestinian people in their
struggle for self-determination , not only because the
Palestinian people have called upon us to do so, but
apartheiddivest.org
because it is a way to address our own complicity in
Israel's settler colonial project. Where does our
responsibility lie and why do we do this work? The United States funds the Israeli war
machine with over 3 billion dollars annually in military and foreign aid. Our university has
extensive ties with Israeli institutions and organizations. Our tuition dollars fund the
stewards of apartheid through investments in our endowment. Our location in the US
and, specifically, as students at Columbia University , furthers our own complicity in
apartheid and the ethnic cleansing of Palestine .

APARTHE
DIVESr

Above all, we work to support the Palestinian people because we are first and foremost ,
students who organize around democratic principles , at the core of which is the principle of
justice . While the platitudes may be numerous , the message remains true; an injustice
anywhere remains a threat to justice everywhere. We , as SJP , stand against all forms of
oppression and discrimination- racism , gender and sexual oppression , capitalism ,
colorism , ableism , et al.

We are SJP. We stand for justice.
We stand for Palestine.

37

International Socialist Organization (ISO)
Why is it that we have all the technology and means to
produce immense wealth-enough food to feed everyone 4 meals
per day , enough homes and construction materials to house
everyone , the capacity to provide education and healthcare for
all- and yet, i.n the U.S., the top 1% controls more than a third of
the nation ' s wealth? Why is it that 66 million children still go hungry
each year , that millions of people are home less, and that the overwhelming
majority still do not have access to quality schools and medical services?
The reason is that the system we currently live under--capitalism--is
fundamentally based on exploiting the many to make profit for the few. Under capitalism , a
minority ruling class direct ly profits off of the labor of the majority , the working class , who is
forced to sell their ability to work in order to survive. Capitalism is responsible for countless wars, endless poverty ,
and mass exploitation and oppression for the sake of profit; and as a capitalist institution , Columbia is complicit in
all of these processes.
Columbia is not simply an intellectual island in which independent inquiry is allowed to flourish. Its
administration directly benefits from maintaining capitalism and the inevitably racist, sexist, classist, and
homophobic conditions that arise from it Columbia is a place where students are molded into the next generation of
bosses, politicians , and CEOs who have a stake in maintaining the status quo. Its primary function as a capitalist
institution is far more corpora te than educational : it exists to train the I% to rule and reproduce intellectual worke rs
and research for profit at the expense of students , workers, neighboring residents, and the global community at large.
Columbia 's actions have made this evident throughout the course of its history . Columbia 's administration
is currently hard at work displacing hundreds of Harlem residents for the sake of its expansion into Manhattanville ;
supporting the oppression of Palestinians both through its investments and by suppress ing anti-Israel speech by
students and faculty ; funding the destruction of the planet ; and worry ing about its reputation rather than
guaranteeing rights and resources for survivors of sexual vio lence Uust to name a few examples). This is all in
addition to what Columbia students already kno"v--that Columbia extracts exorbitant fees well over the median
family income from students , while paying its president millions of dollars per year to chastise student activists and
act as Columbia's respectab le, liberal figurehead.
While Bollinger gets paid an outrageous salary, it is actually the workers on this campus--from custodians
to professors , support staff to T As, most of whom are woefully underpaid--that allow Co lumbia to function. As
students, we also occupy a unique space within the corporate institution that is Columbia, and that position gives us
the power to make a real change, especially when we can collaborate with workers on campus and people in the
communities around Columbia.
All the issues mentioned above are embedded within contexts outside of the university, but we can still
make a disproport ionate impact by acting against the profit-driven motives of the administration. We 're the ones the
university is meant to accommodate, we ' re the ones who uphold their reputation , and we 're the ones who often pay
(either through tuition and/or donations as alumni). As stakeho lders in a capitalist institution, we don't only have the
power , but also the responsibi lity to fight against its oppressive policy. As you can see in Columbia 's own history of
student activism , student movements can often lead to change on a larger scale ; just think of the Boycott ,
Divestmen t, and Sanctions movemen t against apartheid South Africa , wh ich inspired a new generation of students to
push their administration to withdraw its investments from the private prison industry. Now , a new \.Vaveof students
is pushing for divestment from fossil fue l companies and Israeli apartheid .
We, as socia lists, see that these issues of oppression are all interrelated because they al I have the same roots
in the foundations of the capitalist system. The fight against sexual violence is part of the fight against transphobia ,
which is part of the fight against prisons , which is part of the fight against racism , and so on and so forth. Moreover,
this fight is global , and there are revolutionary socialists fighting for justice all over the world ; from Greece to South
Africa , from Egypt to Puerto Rico. Because the fight against oppression and exploitation spans so many issues and
regions across the world , we must develop political princip les and experience that we carry outside of the gates of
Columbia and we ll past our graduation. We enter campus with a choice: Are we here simply to get a degree from an
elite school , or are we goi ng to actually challenge the inequality and oppression that Columbia perpetuates? We
don 't look proud ly at the institutio n of Columbia Univers ity; and yet, we have a vision of a world beyond
corporatized schooling in whic h access to quality education is availab le to all, in whic h the students , faculty, and
workers who run schools democratical ly design the institutions that they want to be a part of, and in which
education , inquiry, and scholarship are the uninhib ited governing values that drive our schools.

38

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39

Graduate Workers of Columbia University
a union for research and teaching assistants
!JAW lDCAL 2110

Who are we ?
The Graduate Workers of Columbia (GWC- UAW) is the union representing teaching and research
assistants at Columbia .

What 's our story?
We began organizing a union in 2014 and have been working to overturn a federal legal precedent
called the Brown decision that prevents gradua te workers at priva te universities from unionizing . We
expect a ruling from the National Labor Relations Board very soon, which will not only allow us to hold
a vote to gain recognition for our union, but will also allow votes t o take place for other grad unions
across the country including The University of Chicago , Cornell, Harvard, Yale, and more.

Why do we want a union?
Columbia RAs and TAs face insecure condi tions, including inadequa te pay, unmanageable cost of
living increases, a lack of fair grievance procedures, and insufficient health care , family benefi ts , and
international student services. We are seeking the right to collective bargaining so that we can improve
our cond itions and streng then worker rights at Columbia .

How does this affect undergraduates ?
Two ways : first , we are seeking to represent any student workers doing teaching or research work,
including undergraduates . If you want to sign up, contac t us at columbiagradunion@gmail.com
Second , even if you aren 't a student worker , TAs and RAs are a major part of undergraduate instruction
and do a large part of the work t hat goes into making Columbia a strong research institution. Our
working cond itions are undergraduate learning conditions - - a more secure workplace enhances our
ability t o do our jobs well.

How can I get involved?
We are always looking for more organizers who can help make our union strong. Please fill out a "Get
Involved " form on our websi te: www .columb iagradun ion.org and we'll loop you in!

40

The Barnard Contingent
Faculty Union (BCF-UAW)
In Sept emb er 2015 , 91.2 % of the eligible voting
Barnard contingent faculty chose a union . We are now
negotiating a first contract with th e Barn ard administration.
WHO ARE "CONTINGENT " FACULTY? & WHY HAVE THEY UNIONIZED? Contingent
faculty are professors NOT on the tenure track. The "tenure track" is the classic model of
professional development in American higher education, whereby a scholar is hired for a
probationary period of about 7 years as an Assistant Professor. If the professor passes her 7th year
tenure review, she is granted tenure and promoted to Associate Professor (and perhaps later to full
Professor). Such professors are granted competitive salaries, full benefits, regular raises, and a
voice in the running of the college. At other elite liberal arts colleges that charge Barnard -level
tuition tenure-track faculty are the norm; at Barnard they are the exception . The vast majority
of teaching at Barnard is done by contingent faculty , most of whom receive poverty-

level wage s , have no job security from semester to seme s ter, few opportunities for
promotion , and receive no benefits . We have formed a union to address these problems and
force the Barnard administration to commit to the college's teaching and learning mission .

HOW HAS THE BARNARD ADMINISTRATION RESPONDED? In typical corporate style,
Presi dent Deb ora Spar br o ught in th e mos t noto rio us unionb usting law fir m in the
co untry (Jackson Lewis P.C.) to represent her in negotiations. Over the last six months of
bargaining the Jackson Lewis lawyer has refused to offer improvements to benefits and job
secur ity and has proposed wages that are, on the whole, worse than today . At no point has Debora
Spar sat down with unionized faculty to discuss our concerns or our ideas to improve teaching and
learning conditions at Barnard. She has chosen instead to spend at least $ 100,000 and counting to
get Jackson Lewis to attempt to crush our resolve at the bargaining table .

WA4ES

:>

ACHOLIA
T~

HOW CAN YOU HELP THE UNION? Barn ard 's history of progressive activism has inspired
generations of students and alumnae to fight for social and economic justice . Join us in Fall 2016
as "''e extend this proud tradition and escalate our campaign for fair working conditions .
www. bcfuaw.o rg

0 fa ceboo k.com/bcf uaw

0

twitte r.com/bcf uaw

41

Q instag ram.com/bcf uaw

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member s wh o e.re see.red of te. l k in g to pe opl e. Whe.t 's t he.t ?
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sou nds
e.ppee.l in g to
you?
I ce.n.
.
u nder ste.nd
the. t : h owever,
'
don 't s ew ., OU r
..,.,-,..,•.c, • ..,;., ::=:,-'"
c,......y ,•......,~
""'-u"
to
ee.r s s bu t yet.
l,WKc~
. S tu~e-n t-=.R:c:.u-n StJ tir n,
We migh t s t ill
\ , Offey~ bive[y N ews Cov rd
he.ve something
- ,, · f or you. Like news e.nd e.rt s? We've got i t ,
e.nd you ce.n lis te n to so me of the f in est
br oe.dce.s t j our ne.lis mt o ever gre.ce the
e.irwe. ves of Mor nin gs ide Keigh ts. Like
h is t ory?
We've got the.t e.lso . In 196 8 wbe n ri ot s
were re.g in g e.nd Col u mb ie. we.s e.t the
hee.rt of polit ice.l che.nge in New York
Robe rt S i e g e l of NPR 's Ail
Things
Consid e r e d fam e
Cit y, WKCR we.s there to cover the events .
th e r e in th e ce nt e r , cov er ing t h e
68 pr o t es t s
Runnin g hu ndred s of feet of ce.b l es u nder
t he f l e.gst one b rick s on l ower ce.mpu s , WKC
R pr ov ided int ensi ve covere.ge fo r t he
Col u mb ie. ri ots e.n d cons i s te nt l y b r oke ne.t i one.l news sto rie s f e.st er the. n t he me.jor
news netw ork s . Wehe.ve e.11 of t he.t on orig in e.l ree l - to- ree l te.pe s in our e.rchi ves.
v_

o(

1

WKCR is a pla ce for your v oice to be h e ard .
So tun e t hos e dia l s t o 89 . 9 MHz and listen!

42

the

Young

this
story
of
mistakes
I did
Make no mistake,
there
are groups
at
I'm going to tell
u
I was a person
of color
who tried
really
cool,
nice,
and caring
people
up not working
for
Here

are

frosh

Columb i a Marching
TW 4 racist

, I write

Band
bs

and

O

woe so that
you may avoid
making
the same
at y r tender
period.
our school
that
do and say racist
things
.
about the marching
band:
to join
the marching
band . there
are some
in it.
they play
coo l music . but it ended
me as a poc . this
is why .

a sample
of jokes
the y ' ve said
and condoned
as a group
in my presence:
TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW TW
What 's the di fference
between
a bench and a Mex i ca n father
?
A bench
can support
a family
of fi ve .
What

Literally

WTF. These

did MLK ge t on his SATs?
Barbecue
Sauc e .
are NOT okay , and NOT what this

campus

needs.

Ppl did
written

try to accommodate
me as a person
of color
but when jokes
li ke that
are
into
your traditions,
when a group
of yt ppl openly
s i ng thenword be
'' it 's in the lyr i c s'' ....
It's
not the place
to be for some people .
2x a year
the Columbia
Oniversity
Marching
Band puts
on a show ca lled
Orgo
Night,
in which they
ske wer or parody
certain
aspects
of campus
life . sometimes
these
top i cs are benign,
but often
they are not . they
sometimes
end up directed
at really
hard
labor
that
activists
across
campus are doing . Orgo Night
has
become an argument
about
free
speech,
but I don't
think
that's
what it is . even
though
the Oniv ersit
y condones
it and even provides
security
for it,
I think
this
is about
people
being
able
to "tell
it like
it is" at the expense
of
others'
emotional
safety.
the band does not make Columbia a safe
space.
BOT STILL ....
O might
hear
they party
hard and be drawn to that ... but activists
party
harde r
; )

O may want to make music
on campus . Here are some c ool groups
where you don ' t
have to deal
w/ casua l singing
of racial
slurs
and put down the hard work and
emotional
labor
of activists
:
Vo ltage!!!!
COSH ! ! ! !
Or start
yr own band and try to p lay in the Potluck/Greenboro
basement!!!!

Just

whatever
you do , go forth,
band can be difficuit
as

be safe,
and know that the Coiumbia
marching
f##k if you are a minority
in any sense.

43

I

-

,..

13A11-~ tir.DO\lflXtJ/?.l\\>'f~I~ It l\\-1
.:;,/

.-

--

---

44

i

,~

POTLUCK POTL UCK: A SONNET (SORT OF)

At pot luck we have lots and lots of fun
We cook some good food and play snow football
Fmeen dang people love each other all
Before you know it each semester's done
We're anti -racist and anti -prison
we keep doors open so there are no walls
Need salt or love, just up the stairwell call
Not utoptayet, but almost one???

Getting 1n 1Beasy -- no lottery t'be won
Frosh come and see us --apply for ne xt year
Between us and the dogs, we promise cheer
8 rooms --housemates for aJ.l, singles for some
When all's said a.nd done , we hope you wllljoin
Or come Fridays for catan a.nd pork loin
(+ vegetarian/ vegan op/Ions)

45

CALLINGWRITERS& ARTISTS
re:claim is a publication at Columbia that works to center the
voices, well-being, and liberation of Black people, people of
color, disabled and neurodivergent people, femme, queer, gender-non-conforming and trans people, migrants, workers, and
all marginalized identities in both content and in leadership.We
strive to embody values rooted in histories of activism, anti-oppression politics, creative resistance, and freedom of expression
for those who have been historically silenced.
We started up in the late winter/early spring of 2016 as a staff
consisting predominantly of people of color, women and femmes
in conversation with people doing activism of all kinds. For many
of us, helping to build re:claim came in response to the hurt we
have experienced at the hands of mainstream campus media,
which routinely excludes Black people and people of color from
its ranks, and demonizes activists groups. We do not purport
to be "objective" (and remain suspicious of those who do), but
instead strive to create content rooted in our own experiences
and communities.
re:claim publishes first-person narrative, news, creative writing,
and visual art.
Please reach out to reclaim.at.cu@gmail.comor any of the folks
listed on reclaimmagazine.wordpress.comif you are interested
in getting involved! We make decisions by consensus using a
non-hierarchal structure. Recognizing that people have different
capacities for and ways of contributing labor, time, and energy,
we strive to make involvement as accessible and accommodating as possible. On-boarding involves a brief conversation with a
couple current committee members just to make sure we're on
the same page. We'd love to have you!

46

Why I'm Occupying a Building at Columbia: Love, Power, and Climate Justice

"We must believe that we can change for the
better and that we deservebetter. In addition
to symbolically taking down the fossil fuel
industry and other villains of our capitalist
economy, we must use this moment to redirect resources towards the creation of the
beautiful."
by: Iliana Salazar -Dodge

Dreams and Visions

"As a person born in Zimbabwe, and raised
in South Africa, Ivory Coast and Tunisia, I
have always had to negotiate my own identities in different racial/ethnic/national/cultural
terrains and these works are about that tension."
by: Thando Miambo

This Letter Will Self-Destruct

7



--- -·
..,..~

~

---,;:..

,,. .,,..

[Contentwarning:relat
ionshipabuse,emotional abuse,implied self-harm, suicidal ideation]
"And here I am, the child you always/never
wanted, standing at the mirror, reaching all
..:: the way back, before empire, before sugar,
before family, before nation, to a wholeness
I'll never be able to remember."

...

by: Anonymous

Unheard Voices: Interviews on Coping After Sexual and Intimate Partner
Violence

[Content warning:This piece discusses sexual violence, dating violence, PTSD, and panic attacks.]
"Survivorsneed spaces to heal--in community, in sharing stories, and in relating to and
validatingone another."
Image Credit: 'All Hands' by Diane Perin
Hock. Photo: Kati Turcu/Epoch Times.

47

THE
HARLEM
RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4 , 2014 , the
'
day when police burst
_,
1
, •through residents '
~
~ doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later , parents
w hose children were
arrested would recall police
. entering their homes
' without permits , handcuffing
innocent people, and taking the ir belongings as evidence. " The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage ," one parent said
after the raids. "That 's not a good feeling, that you're using me to get a promotion. " 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day , police arrested over 40 people.

.':"
.
,
I

The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia's Morn ingside campus , and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD 's justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia

1.
students heard from their own administration:
!. Gant/ Manhattanville
safety. An email went out the day after the
' Housing Proje cts
raids informing students that it would "make
•...... ... .. ... .. ... ... ........................
"G ( <I
our city and community safer ." The reality,
,;fl -1'.;i;;e
St
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there , and that services , not
incarceration , are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What's more , it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build 5l · CQlumbia I!
Ur iv1,rr;1t)
·
a new campus across the street from their
homes , the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.

~~-~
0.,..............
.

There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years ,
but tensions had quieted in 2011 , when Tayshanna "Chicken" Murphy , a nationally
ranked high school basketball player , was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult ,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area ,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services , after school activities, and employment training to young residents of Grant and

48

Manhattanville . The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents ofManhattanville
and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporationthe group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister's nonprofit, has been more wil ling to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren ' t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don 't provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in th e raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same , and in many ways has worsened. NY CHA decided in 201 S to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
ch ildr en when they return from prison , NYCHA will take away their homes. What's
more , the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people , arresting 88 in one day .


As students , we can 't accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities , police raids are the last
resort of a city tha t chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses , it is in the University's interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is tr ying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and , in th e case of Grant and Manhattanville , been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
" development" that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass inca rce ration is just one aspect of Columbia ' s broader effect
on th e neighborhood: dispossession and displacement . The
University's outright support for the raids , coup led with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant, sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood , but it is not here
for you.

49

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No(E&
T APE

Wanna uncover Barnumbia's
dirty little secrets?
* passion area: social justice
Wed 8.31.16 10pm 606 W.114th

* activist meet & greet
Fri 9.2.16 1pm Furnald Lawn

* activist tours of campus
Sat 9.3.16 2, 2:30, 3pm Sun Dial

*civil disobedience training
Sun 9.4.16 2pm Sun Dial

Item sets