Barnard+Columbia Disorientation Guide 2017

Item

Current View

Title

Barnard+Columbia Disorientation Guide 2017

Date

2017

Place

New York, NY

Source

https://issuu.com/disguide/docs/final_dis_guide_2017

extracted text

ZINE FAQs
What is a zine?

A zine is a self-published magazine, meaning its creation and publication
are completely controlled by the person or people making it.

What goes into a zine?

Anything you want! A zine can have poetry, essays, photography, drawings,
cartoons, or pretty much anything else you can imagine.

How do people use zines?
associate zines with riot grrrls in the 1990s, but zines have been and are a
lion or a way to get the word out about something you care about.

Zines, NYC, Barnard/Columbia, and YOU

-

zine librarian named Jenna Freedman.
each semester and puts out a zine, so come to meetings and contribute!
(We have oreos!)

join barnard zine club

website: zines.barnard.edu
email: barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
twitter/instagram: @barnardzineclub

feminist zine fest

website: feministzinefestnyc.wordpress.com


 

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In the early 1920’s many
Ivy League schools began
instituting “unofficial
quotas” to limit admitance
of Jewish students.
Columbia’s was the most
severe and slashed the
Jewish population from
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 with
particular discrimination
against Sephardic and
Eastern European Jews.
Quotas like these
remained at Yale, for
example, until the 1960’s.

!
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!
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!
!

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In 1985, the SAS won their
fight for divestment from
South African Apartheid.
Barnard and Columbia both
divested their respective
endowments from
corporations doing business
in South Africa, including
IBM, CBS, General
Motors, Ford Motors, Coca
Cola, Chevron, Mobil Oil,
Honeywell, and the
Washington Post.

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some ways to get yr $$$$’s worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Columbia. it’s expensive to
live in New York, and it’s expensive to go to these schools! here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be careful) and bring Tupperware, or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils, salt and pepper, napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNI)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federal Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don’t know why) (pay 4 insurance, not the loan)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to museums! new york archaelogical repository! state parks!)
• free department and student life retreats
• there’s free paper in the printers*
• there’s a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks! go
• you can get textbooks at the library : ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends; professors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven’t
• there are free classes and teach-ins if you look (book-making! social justice!)
• there’s sometimes free department / club swag beyond t-shirts!
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you’re on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it’s cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard mailroom if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build community! love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on “ethical stealing” (even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others; consider that there’s not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

Marxist Student Association
In the United States, millions
of workers and youth have
poured into the streets,
outraged at the election of
Donald Trump and the farright
demonstrations
in
Charlottesville.
Mass marches and demonstrations show our strength,
but that's only the beginning; working together, we can
accomplish much more.
Our generation is the first to have a lower standard of
living than the generation before us. Capitalism offers
no way forward, which is why the majority of our
generation is opposed to capitalism. But a better world
is possible!
In order to get there, the Columbia
Marxist Student Association aims
to study the lessons of
revolutionary history and theory to
inform how we can intervene in
history.
As students, it is imperative that we link up with the
working class since it is the only class in society that
can stop capitalism in its tracks.

“Without revolutionary theory, there can be
no revolutionary movement.” –V.I. Lenin

“Life is beautiful. Let the future generations
cleanse it of all evil, oppression, and violence
and enjoy it to the full.” –Leon Trotsky

“The philosophers have only interpreted the
world, in various ways. The point, however,
is to change it.” –Karl Marx

If you’re interested in our ideas,
we hold weekly discussions on
Mondays.
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/columbia.marxists/

Email:
Columbia.marxists@gmail.com

Columbia​ ​University​ ​South​ ​Asian​ ​Feminism(s)​ ​Alliance
SO
​ UTH

SAFA’s mission is to ​encourage dialogue and mobilize leadership and community
action against systems of oppression in the South Asian community. Our goal is to
provide a space for South Asians, Indo-Caribbeans and allies to come together and
find strength in our similarities and our differences, to learn about ourselves
as well as others, and to find solace in each other when the rest of the world
fails​ ​to​ ​accept​ ​us.
A​SIAN
SAFA is a group for those who have dealt with misogyny and violence of all forms
(including IPV or sexual violence) rampant in their homes, families, and
communities. For those who have felt like their skin was too dark, their arms too
hairy, their voices too opinionated. For those who are queer, trans, or gender
non-conforming. For those who are not able-bodied or thin. For those who are not
on a track to becoming doctors, engineers, lawyers. For those who have been
othered within our communities because of their race, caste, or religion. ​This is
a group for everyone who wishes to challenge South Asian gender norms and think
critically​ ​about​ ​the​ ​intersection​ ​of​ ​one’s​ ​multiple​ ​identities.
F​EMINISM(S)
Through group discussions, film screenings, mentorship programs and more, SAFA
aims to cultivate awareness of struggles faced by so many members of the South
Asian diaspora and folks at home, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity
between SAFA and other activist and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who
identifies with our mission to come to a meeting and join us in making this
campus​ ​a​ ​more​ ​inclusive​ ​place.
A​LLIANCE

 

We are a grassroots organization working to end   
sexual + domestic violence in our campus communities because   
we envision a world free of violence + oppression.  
 
We  recognize   that   sexual   violence   is  a  manifestation   of 
systemic   gender   oppression   which   cannot   be  separated   from   all  
other   forms   of  oppression.   ​Therefore,  the  fight  to end  sexual 
+ domestic violence  cannot  be won without eradicating all other 
forms  of  oppression  including   but   not   limited   to   racism,  
classism, ableism, colonialism, homophobia, + transphobia.   
 
We  seek   to  foster   transparency   around   issues   of 
sexual   violence   because   ​we  believe  that  a  bottom 
up  approach  to  building  power  is  the  only  way  to 
achieve justice.  
 
Our current campaign demands  ​more ​support, 
accessibility, accountability, funding, + 
enforcement ​(SAAFE) to ensure that Columbia  
University is an inclusive educational  
environment where survivors can thrive,  
regardless of their identity (including but not  
limited to race, sex, gender, sexual orientation,  
socioeconomic status, immigration status, +  
religion).  
 
 
A  major   demand   of  our   campaign   is  for  the  creation  of a 
rape crisis center that is physically open 24/7 ​+ staffed 
with  professional  advocates  trained  in  cultural 
competency​.  We  believe   that   these   changes   will   improve  
the   quality   of  resources   for   all   survivors,   especially  
for   survivors   whose   experiences   don’t   match   traditional  
narratives and who come from marginalized communities.  
 
 
 
 
 
Want to get involved?​ Sign up for our listserv @  ​http://noredtapecu.org/new­page/ 
or email  ​noredtapecu@gmail.com​! Our weekly meetings are on Sundays from 7PM­8PM.   
 
Go to ​www.NoRedTapeCU.org​ to learn more about our work + for info on resources. 
 

Welcome​ ​Chicanx​ ​Class​ ​of​ ​ ​2021​

​​​​

​​

 

“Brown​ ​is​ ​not​ ​a​ ​color,
It​ ​is​ ​a​ ​city,​ ​a​ ​continent,
A​ ​whole​ ​world​ ​that​ ​expands​ ​beyond​ ​the​ s
​ ea.
Brown,​ ​is​ ​not​ ​a​ ​color,
It’s​ ​a​ ​way​ ​of​ ​life,
A​ ​way​ ​of​ ​struggle,
A​ ​way​ ​to​ ​survive.”
- Cherrie​ ​Moraga
 

Our​ ​Mission​ ​is​ ​to: 
Celebrate,​ ​empower,​ ​and​ ​highlight​ ​intersectionality​ ​and​ ​diversity​ ​in​ ​all​ ​its​ ​forms, 
especially​ ​as​ ​it​ ​pertains​ ​to​ ​Latinidad​ ​and​ ​Chicanidad.​ ​We​ ​aim​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​our​ ​membership 
with​ ​a​ ​safe​ ​and​ ​engaging​ ​environment​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​fulfill​ ​their​ ​educational​ ​goals, 
promote​ ​their​ ​cultural​ ​consciousness,​ ​and​ ​help​ ​them​ ​become​ ​active​ ​in​ ​serving​ ​the 
needs​ ​of​ ​their​ ​community.  
 

BARNUMBIA SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Being a student with a disability means you will have to work harder than most (if not all) of your
classmates. This is not due to any fault of your own, but issues that arise from dealing with institutions.
Barnard and Columbia, as well as the city of New York, were not built for you and that may make every
step you take a challenge. This guide aims to make this process easier by identifying a few key actions to
take upon your arrival on campus. You will have these tools and the help of other students to get beyond
these hurdles.

Barnard Services:

Office of Disability Services (ODS)
If you are a student living with disabilities you should register with ODS now, even if you have not
previously needed accommodations, rather than wait until you might need their services because it takes
time and documentation to be approved for services. Documentation from doctors and therapists of your
disability is required. Only 3-4 people in ODS take care of over 400 students on campus.
Accommodations:
Academic: ODS can provide academic accommodations to help you in the classroom including extra time
on tests and extra excused absences. You will need to meet with your professor to ‘prove’ your disability.
Residential Life: ODS can provide housing accommodations to make life easier on campus such as a dorm
with AC, a single, a building with wheelchair access, or having a service animal with you on campus. Res
Life has more control than ODS in housing accommodations.
Furman Counseling Center
If you are a student living with mental health issues you must register with Furman. The intake process
can be taxing as you must share details of your mental health history to determine whether you need long
term or short- term counseling. The office will give you referrals but there is also a network of students to
offer therapist recommendations.

Student Services:

Barnard Student Network for Disability Advocacy
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects you to other students dealing
with similar issues on campus. This is a place to ask for support, ask for recommendations, speak to the
student health representative, be part of a greater community of people that want to help or just vent.
Barnard Pay It Forward
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects students who need someone to
help run errands for them with students who are willing to help. This is for anyone who is unable to get
out of bed that needs something from the store, not just students with disabilities (medication, groceries
etc.). Students may post in the group either asking for something or offering to get something.
Campus and the city of New York
- Both campus and New York City may be difficult for students with mobility disabilities. Barnard and
Columbia have very old buildings and (crappy) elevators (especially Milbank and Hamilton). You must
leave early to get to class on time and it would be wise to inform your professor of your situation because
you may be late for class. There are tunnels under Columbia that provide access to parts of Columbia for
wheelchair users.
- NYC’s public transportation system is not ADA compliant providing full access to people with mobility
disabilities. The 116th subway line 1 stop on does not have an elevator (96th Street has an elevator).

Community Advice:
-Avoid taking general education requirements that will be challenging for you until you are more
acclimated to college life.
-It is important to advocate for yourself but also important to be able to ask for help from a friend, faculty
member, or member disability advocacy community. Dean Grabiner, the freshmen class dean, is an
incredible resource and good person.
-School may knock you down; it is okay if you don’t have the strength to get up again. Some students find
the need to take a lighter academic load or to take a semester or year off.
-You are not weak for taking time to work on your own health; it is an incredibly brave and important
thing to do. You are attending a school that does not fully accommodate you and that takes a toll. You may
have a different college experience but that doesn’t mean it won’t be a good one. No matter what anyone
says, your disability absolutely does not mean you do not deserve to be here. There an entire community
here excited for you to join us!

UndoCU
Unless​ ​you’ve​ ​been​ ​living​ ​under​ ​a​ ​rock,​ ​you’re​ ​aware​ ​that​ ​the​ ​undocumented​ ​immigrant​ ​community​ ​has
been​ ​Trump’s​ ​and​ ​most​ ​targeted​ ​and​ ​most​ ​profitable​ ​scapegoat​ ​since​ ​day​ ​one​ ​of​ ​his​ ​campaign.​ ​Through
sensationalism​ ​of​ ​the​ ​most​ ​hateful​ ​order,​ ​the​ ​Trump​ ​administration​ ​has​ ​led​ ​the​ ​dissolution​ ​of​ ​any
discussion​ ​of​ ​immigration​ ​into​ ​a​ ​baseless​ ​yet​ ​firebrand​ ​decree​ ​of​ ​dehumanization,​ ​while​ ​his​ ​opponents,
the​ ​Democratic​ ​Party,​ ​and​ ​third​ ​party​ ​politicians​ ​retort​ ​with​ ​plans​ ​to​ ​control,​ ​and​ ​regulate​ ​immigrants
through​ ​a​ ​tired​ ​liberal​ ​narrative​ ​of​ ​the​ ​meritocratic,​ ​multicultural​ ​American​ ​dream—with​ ​no​ ​room​ ​in
between​ ​for​ ​the​ ​actual​ ​self-determination​ ​of​ ​all​ ​immigrants.
The​ ​Undocumented​ ​Student​ ​Initiative​ ​(we​ ​prefer​ ​UndoCU)​ ​exists​ ​to​ ​untangle​ ​these​ ​constrictions​ ​from​ ​all
sides.​ ​We​ ​are​ ​the​ ​first​ ​undocumented​ ​student​ ​group​ ​at​ ​Columbia​ ​University,​ ​and​ ​our​ ​main​ ​objective​ ​is​ ​to
protect​ ​and​ ​dignify​ ​the​ ​humanity​ ​of​ ​every​ ​undocumented​ ​person.​ ​We​ ​not​ ​only​ ​question​ ​the​ ​broken
immigration​ ​system​ ​that​ ​produces​ ​the​ ​conditions​ ​of​ ​our​ ​collective​ ​subjectivity,​ ​but​ ​we​ ​critique​ ​the​ ​white
supremacist​ ​settler​ ​colonial​ ​structure​ ​that​ ​is​ ​its​ ​root.​ ​Therefore,​ ​UndoCU​ ​is​ ​an​ ​intersectional​ ​movement
that​ ​prioritizes​ ​solidarity​ ​with​ ​marginalized​ ​communities​ ​ ​and​ ​the​ ​destruction​ ​of​ ​white​ ​supremacy.
Following​ ​the​ ​2016​ ​election,​ ​UndoCU,​ ​with​ ​cooperation​ ​of​ ​Movimiento​ ​Cosecha,​ ​staged​ ​a​ ​walk-out​ ​in
demand​ ​that​ ​undocumented​ ​students​ ​be​ ​protected​ ​and​ ​Undocu​ ​has​ ​since​ ​then​ ​become​ ​a​ ​prominent
activist​ ​group​ ​on​ ​campus.​ ​We​ ​ensured​ ​Columbia​ ​would​ ​do​ ​its​ ​best​ ​to​ ​become​ ​a​ ​sanctuary​ ​campus,
secured​ ​summer​ ​housing​ ​for​ ​at-risk​ ​students,​ ​educated​ ​the​ ​campus​ ​community​ ​at​ ​numerous​ ​speaking
events,​ ​and​ ​have​ ​been​ ​featured​ ​on​ ​the​ ​Columbia​ ​Spectator,​ ​Mic.com,​ ​Democracy​ ​Now!,
and—regrettably—Fox​ ​News.
Having​ ​only​ ​formed​ ​in​ ​September​ ​2016,​ ​UndoCU​ ​is​ ​a​ ​young​ ​movement​ ​that​ ​cannot​ ​spare​ ​to​ ​build​ ​slowly.
During​ ​the​ ​Trump​ ​presidency,​ ​we​ ​do​ ​not​ ​possess​ ​the​ ​privilege​ ​of​ ​time.​ ​Our​ ​upcoming​ ​campus​ ​challenges
include:​ ​abolishing​ ​the​ ​use​ ​of​ ​the​ ​word​ ​“illegal”​ ​in​ ​reference​ ​to​ ​immigrants​ ​or​ ​immigration​ ​in​ ​general,
changing​ ​the​ ​manner​ ​by​ ​which​ ​the​ ​university​ ​labels​ ​undocumented​ ​students​ ​from​ ​“international”​ ​to
“domestic”,​ ​creating​ ​an​ ​undocumented​ ​student​ ​resource​ ​center,​ ​and​ ​undocumented​ ​student​ ​scholarships.
On​ ​a​ ​broader​ ​scale,​ ​the​ ​DREAM​ ​Act,​ ​the​ ​HOPE​ ​Act,​ ​and​ ​preventing​ ​the​ ​dissolution​ ​of​ ​DACA​ ​will​ ​all​ ​be
our​ ​priorities​ ​as​ ​the​ ​American​ ​populace​ ​seems​ ​to​ ​not​ ​be​ ​tired​ ​of​ ​dissecting​ ​and​ ​devouring​ ​the​ ​humanity​ ​of
immigrants.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​event​ ​that​ ​the​ ​federal​ ​position​ ​on​ ​undocumented​ ​immigrants​ ​becomes​ ​even​ ​harsher,
we​ ​stand​ ​ready​ ​to​ ​resist,​ ​and​ ​we​ ​expect​ ​our​ ​allies​ ​to​ ​do​ ​the​ ​same.
Why​ ​should​ ​you​ ​join​ ​UndoCU?
If​ ​you​ ​are​ ​undocumented,​ ​because​ ​we​ ​love​ ​you​ ​and​ ​you​ ​matter.
If​ ​you​ ​are​ ​an​ ​American​ ​citizen,​ ​because​ ​this​ ​political​ ​system​ ​considers​ ​you​ ​human​ ​above​ ​all​ ​of​ ​us,​ ​and​ ​an
informed​ ​political​ ​education​ ​requires​ ​a​ ​rooted​ ​understanding​ ​of​ ​this​ ​construction.
If​ ​you​ ​are​ ​neither,​ ​because​ ​we​ ​believe​ ​in​ ​your​ ​humanity​ ​as​ ​much​ ​as​ ​most​ ​Americans​ ​don’t​ ​believe​ ​in​ ​ours.
Despite​ ​common​ ​pro-immigrant​ ​narratives,​ ​we​ ​have​ ​intersectional​ ​leadership​ ​and​ ​make​ ​sure​ ​that
non-white,​ ​non-cisgender,​ ​and​ ​non-heterosexual​ ​identities​ ​are​ ​surely​ ​prioritized​ ​here.

Are​ ​you​ ​looking​ ​for​ ​a​ ​community
where​ ​your​ ​background,​ ​experiences,
and​ ​identities​ ​are​ ​valued?​ ​Want​ ​to
make​ ​friends​ ​with​ ​the​ ​coolest​ ​kids​ ​on
campus?​ ​Join​ ​Mujeres!
Mujeres​ ​provides​ ​an​ ​organization​ ​of
cultural​ ​support​ ​and​ ​leadership
development​ ​for​ ​Latinx​ ​students​ ​and
allies​ ​at​ ​Barnard​ ​College,​ ​Columbia
University.​ ​We​ ​promote​ ​awareness
and​ ​pride​ ​in​ ​the​ ​diverse​ ​Latinx​ ​culture​ ​and​ ​heritage.​ ​We​ ​discuss
everything​ ​from​ ​self-love​ ​to​ ​the​ ​decolonization​ ​of​ ​food,​ ​hold​ ​bake
sales,​ ​and​ ​host​ ​an​ ​annual​ ​Mujeres​ ​Empowerment​ ​Dinner.​ ​Come​ ​say
hi​ ​at​ ​our​ ​weekly​ ​general​ ​body​ ​meetings​ ​EVERY​ ​WEDNESDAY!
FAQs:
● Do​ ​I​ ​have​ ​to​ ​self-identify​ ​as​ ​a​ ​Latina​ ​or​ ​as​ ​a​ ​woman​ ​to​ ​join?
NOPE.​ ​Everyone​ ​is​ ​welcome!
● Is​ ​Mujeres​ ​for​ ​Barnard​ ​students​ ​only?​ ​No.​ ​While​ ​our
meetings​ ​are​ ​held​ ​on​ ​Barnard’s​ ​campus,​ ​any​ ​student​ ​from​ ​the
University​ ​is​ ​welcome.
● Why​ ​should​ ​I​ ​join?​ ​Because​ ​college​ ​is​ ​a​ ​time​ ​for​ ​self-growth
and​ ​our​ ​Mujeres​ ​family​ ​is​ ​here​ ​to​ ​support​ ​you​ ​as​ ​a​ ​student,
individual,​ ​and​ ​person​ ​of​ ​color​ ​on​ ​this​ ​campus.

Meeting​ ​topics​ ​are​ ​decided​ ​by​ ​YOU!​ ​Suggest​ ​your​ ​ideas​ ​at​ ​our​ ​first
general​ ​body​ ​meeting​ ​in​ ​September.​ ​We’ll​ ​keep​ ​you​ ​posted​ ​on​ ​the
date​ ​and​ ​time​ ​of​ ​our​ ​first​ ​g-body​ ​meeting​ ​soon.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​meantime….
● Like​ ​Mujeres​ ​on​ ​Facebook
● Follow​ ​us​ ​on​ ​Instagram​ ​@barnardmujeres
● Connect​ ​with​ ​us​ ​through​ ​email​ ​at​ ​mujeres@barnard.edu

Mobilized African Diaspora (MAD)
In 2015, following a string of racist incidents, black students at the University of Missouri gained
national attention after they launched a campaign to end the culture of anti-blackness on campus
and demand that the president of the university resign. In response, a group of black students at
Columbia University, later named the Mobilized African Diaspora (MAD), began to hold
meetings and planned a rally in solidarity. After the rally, MAD continued to hold meetings and
crafted their first official list of demands.
Since it’s inception, MAD has operated under a radical Black queer feminist lens, striving to use
intersectional dialogue to combat violence inflicted upon Black queer folk, as well as uplift their
voices. We utilize an intersectional approach because the liberation of queer Black women
signifies freedom for all, as their freedom necessitates the destruction of all systems of
oppression. Today, MAD serves as a productive space for Black students at Columbia University
to organize against racism and use our privilege as students of this institution to fight against
gentrification and Columbia’s role in furthering anti-blackness.
When it comes to action, our members have dedicated impressive amounts of time and labor to
ensure that Columbia not only feels our presence, but acknowledges and respects our demands.
This involves many forms of action, but one of the most important is staying in tune with the
concerns of the Black community on campus and in the surrounding area in order to inform our
goals and missions. Last semester, for example, we hosted several grievance forums, where we
allowed our fellow Black students to share their experiences in a safe space. Understanding
Columbia’s long history of overlooking and disregarding the voices of Black students, we find it
critical to provide such spaces. Our activism also includes teach-ins on issues such as eco-racism
and legal rights training, organizing rallies that center the black, queer, feminist perspective, and
launching campaigns, like our recent TJBDAY campaign, in which we dressed an on-campus
statue of Thomas Jefferson in a KKK hood and released a statement demanding that the
University acknowledge their persistent tolerance of a deeply rooted culture of white supremacy.
Despite what we have already accomplished as a group, we recognize that there is much more to
be done in order to reinforce and normalize Blackness so that our identities are not lost in the
shadow of this predominantly white institution. We strongly believe that a university’s strength
lies in the ability to foster respect and and a sense of community among its different groups, but
here at Columbia, “diversity” is merely a facade—eclectic and complex forms of Blackness are
often suppressed, while Blackness that can be categorized, owned, and advertized is praised.
Resultantly, we have crafted a list of goals and demands to improve the black experience and
hold the University accountable for its shortcomings.
We demand that the University eliminate the student contribution and improve financial aid for
minority groups. We demand that the University improve its Black faculty representation and
restructure the Core Curriculum to include Intro to African-American Studies and Intro to

Comparative Ethnic Studies as requirements. We demand that the University prioritize the
physical safety and mental health of women, queer, and trans people of color. Laterally, we aim
to condemn and disassemble white supremacist, racist, heteronormative, and neo-colonialist
ideals that place restraints on Blackness and harm all black life. We also aim to improve our own
engagement with the Harlem community, work against the University’s efforts to gentrify the
neighborhood and displace its primary and rightful residents, as well as continue researching and
uncovering the harmful systems and mechanisms that threaten to impede the fight for Black
liberation.
We understand the scope of these goals and the hard work that it will take to accomplish
them, and for that reason, we are always seeking new minds and voices to welcome into our
group. While we strongly encourage that our members attend weekly meetings at a minimum,
there is no set time commitment. MAD is a non-hierarchical organization, hence all roles and
committees exist horizontally and equally to each other. To get involved, follow us on Facebook
and Twitter, or email us at mad.columbia@gmail.com for information on upcoming meeting
dates, teach-ins, and other events. As a member of MAD, you can join us in the fight to
normalize the presence of othered groups in and around campus, as well as put an end to the
social, political, and economic disenfranchisement perpetuated by the University.

~~89.9 on the dial and streaming online 24/7 at
wkcr.org~~~
Our nickname, "The Original FM," is somewhat of a misnomer, but
WKCR-FM is one of the oldest radio stations around. We are
Columbia University's student-run radio station, founded in
1941.
What we Broadcast can be summed up by other nickname: "The
Alternative". We have a history of featuring music and talk
programming that many consider commercially non-viable.(Not a
problem for us: we're non-commercial.)
Catch anything from Reggae, Hindustani, Celtic, Cumbia, Indie
Rock, Non-Western Classical, Field Recordings, Experimental,
Folk, Carnatic, Afrofunk, Film Hits, Ethio-Jazz, and Chuigushou
to Hip Hop on our "In All Languages" programs.
Check out our "New Music" Department, which played an important
role in the establishment of what is known today as the New York
Downtown Scene, which features experimental and avant-garde
programming.
Or tune in to Studio A, our Arts Department's weekly live
literature show, which highlights poetry, prose and experimental
work by queer writers and writers of color.
KCR was one of the first radio stations to bring Jazz to the
airwaves and we have maintained our reputation as one of the
preeminent radio stations in the world for broadcasting Jazz of
the past and present. Over the years our station has hosted
icons Charles Mingus, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Ellington, Sun Ra
and many others.

Our Latin Department was the first to bring salsa to the
airwaves and continues to celebrate genres such as mambo,
chachachá and bugalú.
Like Hip Hop? KCR's Sketch Armstrong and Bobbito García Show is
considered one of the most influential radio programs of the
1990's dedicated to underground Hip Hop. Their show gave
exposure to artists who would go on to become the biggest names
in Hip Hop, including Nas, Notorious B.I.G., the Wu-Tang Clan,
Jay Z, Eminem and The Fugees.
The WKCR News Department provides a unique take on local,
national, and global issues. Student reporters continue the
tradition of KCR’s award-winning coverage of the Columbia
University student strike of 1968, and highlight issues relevant
to Columbia and its surrounding communities (eg.Harlem). In
recent months, the department has covered many activist
initiatives and demonstrations taking place in the greater New
York area.
~~If you are interested in becoming a DJ, you can find contact
information for each department at wkcr.org!~~

the next few pages are reprinted w/ permission from the zine A Brief History of Civil Disobedi

ience @ Columbia University! Email disguide2016@gmail if you want more info

THE HARLEM RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014, the
day when police burst
through residents’
doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later, parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
entering their homes
without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. “ The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage,” one parent said
after the raids. “That's not a good feeling, that you're using me to get a promotion.” 103
people were indicted in the raid; that day, police arrested over 40 people.
The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia’s Morningside campus, and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD’s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
students heard from their own administration:
safety. An email went out the day after the
raids informing students that it would “make
our city and community safer.” The reality,
however, is that a persistent lack of resources
for youth in the community is the reason for the
violence there, and that services, not
incarceration, are necessary if the situation is to
improve. What’s more, it has become clear that
although promises of community investment
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
residents when Columbia won approval to build
a new campus across the street from their
homes, the expansion has brought them only
band-aid solutions and increased police violence.
There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tayshanna “Chicken” Murphy, a nationally
ranked high school basketball player, was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities, and employment training to young residents of Grant and

48

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattanville and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporation—
the group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money--has been slow to act.
The WHDC, mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister’s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren’t
bad, but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses,
and they don’t provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses.
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same, and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes, which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison, NYCHA will take away their homes. What’s
more, the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people, arresting 88 in one day.
As students, we can’t accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities, police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses, it is in the University’s interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and, in the case of Grant and Manhattanville, been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
“development” that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia’s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University’s outright support for the raids, coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant, sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood, but it is not here
for you.

49

 
 

 
 

 

 

 
 
 
Where​ ​and​ ​what​ ​is​ ​Manhattanville?  Where​ ​and​ ​what​ ​is​ ​Manhattanville? 
​ ​Manhattanville​ ​extends​ ​from​ ​West​ ​122​nd​​ ​street​ ​north​ ​to​ ​West​ ​134​th​​ ​street​ ​and​ ​from​ ​the​ ​H
​ ​Manhattanville​ ​extends​ ​from​ ​West​ ​122​nd​udson 
​ ​street​ ​n
River​ ​west​ ​to​ ​the​ ​City​ ​College​ ​campus.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​home​ ​to​ ​Manhattanville​ ​residents​ ​that​ ​generally 
River​
w

est​
t

o​
t

he​
C

ity​
C

ollege​
c

ampus.​
I

t​
​is​ ​home
have​ ​fewer​ ​economic​ ​and​ ​educational​ ​opportunities​​ ​than​ ​residents​ ​of​ ​Morningside​ ​Heights, 
have​​in​​f​Newer​
​economic​
​educational​
home​ ​to​ ​the​ ​most​ ​well-endowed​ ​institution​
ew​ ​York​
​City.​ ​This​​a​dnd​
ynamic​
​is​ ​felt​ ​daily​​o​bpportun

those​ ​who​ ​are​ ​effectively​ ​locked-out​ ​of​ ​o
ur​ ​gated​
​but​​w
​it​ell-endowed​
​is​ ​felt​ ​with​ ​additional​
​strength 
home​
​to​​c​tampus,​
he​ ​most​
​institution​
​in​ ​N
on​ ​the​ ​too​ ​frequent​ ​occasion​ ​that​ ​Columbia​
U

niversity​
f

lexes​
i

ts​
w

allet​
t

o​
s

hape​
t

he​
a

rea​
i

n​
i

ts 
those​ ​who​ ​are​ ​effectively​ ​locked-out​ ​of​ ​our​ ​gated
white-columned​ ​image.  

on​ ​the​ ​too​ ​frequent​ ​occasion​ ​that​ ​Columbia​ ​Univ
​image.  
How​ ​has​ ​Columbia​ ​used​ ​its​ ​economic​ ​awhite-columned​
dvantage​ ​to​ ​take​ ​advantage? 
 

1960s​​ ​-​ ​Columbia​ ​(CU)​ ​plans​ ​to​ ​build​ ​a​ ​g ym​ ​in​ ​Morningside​ ​Park​ ​that​ ​would​ ​largely​ ​exclude 
local​ ​residents.​ ​The​ ​plan​ ​becomes​ ​known​
​as​ ​“Gym​
How​
​has​ ​C​Crow.” 
olumbia​ ​used​ ​its​ ​economic​ ​advantag
Also​ ​begins​ ​eliminating​ ​Single​ ​Room​ ​Occupancy​
h

ousing​
​in​ ​the​​(CU)​
​area;​​p​blans​
y​ ​one​​to​
​estimate,​
1960s​​ ​-​ ​Columbia​
​build​ ​a​C​ ​gU ym​ ​in​ ​M
displaced​ ​over​ ​7,000​ ​residents​​ ​in​ ​the​ ​decade​ ​before​ ​1968. 
local​ ​residents.​ ​The​ ​plan​ ​becomes​ ​known​ ​as​ ​“Gy
1968​​ ​-​ ​“Gym​ ​Crow”​ ​scraped​ ​after​ ​week-long​ ​occupation​ ​of​ ​campus​ ​buildings​ ​by​ ​the​ ​student 
​barlem​
egins​​c​eommunity 
liminating​ ​Single​ ​Room​ ​Occupancy
Afro-American​ ​Society​ ​coordinated​ ​with​Also​
​the​ ​H
displaced​
​7,000​
​residents​
​ ​in​ ​t​she​
​decade​
1990​​ ​-​ ​CU​ ​purchases​ ​the​ ​Audubon​ ​Ballroom,​
​where​ ​o
​Mver​
alcolm​
​X​ ​delivered​
​several​
peeches​
​and ​bef
was​ ​assassinated,​ ​and​ ​tries​ ​to​ ​turn​ ​it​ ​into​
a


l

aboratory.​
C

ommunity​
g

roups​
p

rotest​
t

he​
p

roject 
1968​​ ​-​ ​“Gym​ ​Crow”​ ​scraped​ ​after​ ​week-long​ ​occ
and​ ​succeed​ ​in​ ​preserving​ ​the​ ​landmark. 
Afro-American​ ​Society​ ​coordinated​ ​with​ ​the​ ​Har
1991​​ ​-​ ​Mville​ ​Community​ ​Board​ ​9​ ​starts​ ​work​ ​on​ ​a​ ​redevelopment​ ​plan;​ ​it​ ​is​ ​certified​ ​in​ ​2005 
1990​​ ​-​ ​CU​ ​purchases​ ​the​ ​Audubon​ ​Ballroom,​ ​wh
2003​ ​-​ ​CU​ ​submits​ ​plan​ ​for​ ​$6.7​ ​billion​ ​expansion​ ​into​ ​Manhattanville​ ​that​ ​would​ ​require​ ​the 
was​
​assassinated,​
​and​ ​p​tries​
​turn​ ​it​ ​into​ ​a​ ​labor
acquisition​ ​and​ ​demolition​ ​of​ a​ ll​ ​but​ ​three​
​buildings​
​in​ ​the​ ​17-acre​
roject​​to​
​area. 
2006​​ ​-​ ​Empire​ ​State​ ​Development​ ​Corporation​
​(ESDC)​ ​ien​nters​
​contract​ ​w​tith​
lee​ ​King​ ​Rosen​ ​& 
and​ ​succeed​
​preserving​
he​ ​A​landmark. 
Fleming,​ ​a​ ​planning​ ​and​ ​engineering​ ​consulting​
f

irm,​
t

o​
d

etermine​
w

hether​
M

​suffers 
1991​​ ​-​ ​Mville​ ​Community​ ​Board​ ville​
​9​ ​starts​
​work​ ​on
from​ ​“urban​ ​blight”​ ​(precondition​ ​for​ ​use​ ​of​ ​eminent​ ​domain).​​ ​Both​ ​corporations​ h
​ ad​ ​been 
2003​ ​-​ ​CU​ ​submits​ ​plan​ ​for​ ​$6.7​ ​billion​ ​expansio
previously​ ​contracted​ ​and​ ​paid​ ​by​ ​CU​ ​in​ ​relation​ ​to​ ​this​ ​project. 
acquisition​
​and​ ​demolition​
f​ ​all​ ​but​ ​three​ ​buildi
2008​​ ​-​ ​ESDC​ ​deems​ ​neighborhood​ ​“blighted.”​
​Nick​ ​Sprayegen,​
​owner​ ​of​ ​o
​Tuck-It-Away 
​Empire​
​State​
​Development​
Storage,​ ​and​ ​gas​ ​station​ ​owners​ ​Gurnam​2006​
​Singh​​ ​-​a​ nd​
​Parminder​
​Kaur,​
​sue​ ​the​ ​state. ​Corporation​
2009​ ​-​ ​The​ ​New​ ​York​ ​State​ ​Supreme​ ​Court,​
​Appellate​
ivision​ ​rules​
​eminent​ ​domain​
​was 
Fleming,​
​a​ ​p​D
lanning​
​and​​that​
​engineering​
​consulting​
illegal​ ​in​ ​this​ ​case​ ​because​ ​it​ ​was​ ​for​ ​the​from​
​benefit​
o

f​
a

n​


elite”​
p

rivate​
i

nstitution 
​“urban​ ​blight”​ ​(precondition​ ​for​ ​use​ ​of​ ​emi
2009​​ ​-​ ​ESDC​ ​appeals​ ​to​ ​New​ ​York​ ​State​ ​Court​ ​of​ ​Appeals,​ ​which​ ​overturns​ ​the​ ​ruling​ ​in​ ​favor 
previously​
​contracted​ ​and​ ​paid​ ​by​ ​CU​ ​in​ ​relation
of​ ​Columbia 
​ ​ESDC​
eems​​Columbia​
​neighborhood​
​N
2010​​ ​-​ ​U.S.​ ​Supreme​ ​Court​ ​decides​ ​not​ ​t2008​
o​ ​hear​​ ​-​the​
​case,​ ​d
​giving​
​the​ ​green​​“​lblighted.”​
ight​ ​to 
Storage,​​and​
​and​
​gas​​their​
​station​
​owners​ ​Gurnam​ ​Singh​ ​a
give​ ​the​ ​store​ ​owners​ ​market​ ​rate​ ​compensation​
​take​
​properties. 
2014​​ ​–​ ​NYPD​ ​executes​ ​early​ ​morning​ ​raid​
​at​ ​Manhattanville​
ouses.​
​Residents​
​had​ ​tried​
​to  ​App
2009​
​-​ ​The​ ​New​ ​H
​York​
​State​
​Supreme​
​Court,​
collaborate​ ​with​ ​city​ ​officials,​ ​law​ ​enforcement,​ ​and​ ​CU​ ​for​ ​a​ ​year​ ​to​ ​stem​ ​gang​ ​violence​ ​in​ ​a 
illegal​ ​in​ ​this​ ​case​ ​because​ ​it​ ​was​ ​for​ ​the​ ​benefit​
way​ ​that​ ​might​ ​not​ ​obstruct​ ​the​ ​futures​ ​of​ ​so​ ​many​ ​young​ ​people.​ ​CU​ ​boasted​ ​of​ ​raid​ ​in​ ​an 
​ ​-​ ​ESDC​ ​a​that​
ppeals​
​N​aew​
​York​ ​State​ ​Court​ ​o
email​ ​and​ ​is​ ​believed​ ​to​ ​have​ ​assisted​ ​in​2009​
​the​ ​surveillance​
​led​ ​to​​to​
​the​
rrests. 
of​ ​Columbia 
2016/2017​​ ​-​ ​Manhattanville​ ​Campus​ ​opens 
 
2010​​ ​-​ ​U.S.​ ​Supreme​ ​Court​ ​decides​ ​not​ ​to​ ​hear​ ​t

2016/2017​​ ​-​ ​Manhattanville​ ​Campus​ ​opens 
 
 
CU​ ​Manhattanville​ ​Expansion 
The​ ​expansion​ ​uprooted​
​a​ ​community​ ​to​ ​which​ ​it​ ​returned​ ​little​ ​in​ ​terms​ ​of​ ​opportunities​ ​for 
th​
north​
​to​ ​West​
34​
​ ​street​ ​a​H
nd​
​from​
​the​ ​H
udson 
education​
​and​​1​e
mployment.​
aving​
​learned​
​from​
​previous​ ​efforts​ ​to​ ​uproot​ ​the​ ​neighborhood 
e​ ​t(Gym​
o​ ​Manhattanville​
r

esidents​
t

hat​
g

enerally 
​Crow),​ ​Columbia​ ​created​ ​a​ ​fund​ ​for​ ​local​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​initiatives​ ​in​ ​West​ ​Harlem,​ ​but 
without​
​also​
​implementing​
​ ​structure​ ​for​​H
​the​
​dispersal​ ​of​ ​these​ ​funds,​ ​money​ ​has​ ​been 
nities​
​ ​than​
​residents​
​of​ ​M​aorningside​
eights, 
difficult​
t

o​
a

ccess​
a

nd​
i

n​
t

he​
e

nd,​
i

t​
w

on’t​
d

o​
e

nough​
New​ ​York​ ​City.​ ​This​ ​dynamic​ ​is​ ​felt​ ​daily​ ​by  ​to​ ​help​ ​the​ ​community.​ ​As​ ​Columbia 
faculty​ ​and​ ​students​ ​start​ ​looking​ ​to​ ​live​ ​close​ ​to​ ​their​ ​Manhattanville​ ​campus,​ ​they​ ​will​ ​price 
d​ ​campus,​ ​but​ ​it​ ​is​ ​felt​ ​with​ ​additional​ ​strength 
long-term​ ​residents​ ​out​ ​of​ ​their​ ​homes​ ​and​ ​properties​ ​and​ ​break​ ​up​ ​long-standing​ ​social 
versity​
​flexes​
ts​ ​w
allet​
​shape​
​the​ ​a​in​rea​
​in​ ​e​its 
networks.​
​In​ ​f​iact​
​this​
​has​ ​t​so​
tarted​
​already​
​these​
arly​ ​days​ ​of​ ​the​ ​new​ ​campus. 
 
Moving​ ​Forward 
​need​​a​tdvantage? 
o​ ​build​ ​a​ ​means​ ​of​ ​communication​ ​between​ ​Columbia​ ​University​ ​students,​ ​to​ ​whom 
ge​ ​t​ ​W
o​ e​​take​
the​ ​university​ ​administrators​ ​listen​ ​much​ ​more​ ​often​ ​than​ ​community​ ​residents,​ ​and​ ​those 
Morningside​ ​Park​ ​that​ ​would​ ​largely​ ​exclude 
residents​ ​whose​ ​needs​ ​aren’t​ ​being​ ​met​ ​in​ ​a​ ​community​ ​which​ ​Columbia​ ​directly​ ​exploits. 
ym​  ​Crow.” 
y​ ​hPast​
ousing​
​in​ ​the​
​area;​ ​by​ ​one​ ​estimate,​ ​CU 
​Student​
​Efforts 
​ ​CAGE​
​(Coalition​ ​Against​ ​Gentrification)​​ ​–​ ​frequent​ ​meetings​ ​with​ ​members​ ​of​ ​the​ ​community, 
fore​
​1968. 
led​ ​the​ ​protests​ ​against​ ​the​ ​expansion 
cupation​
​of​ ​campus​ ​buildings​ ​by​ ​the​ ​student 
City​ ​News​ ​at​ ​the​ ​Columbia​ ​Spectator​​ ​–​ ​published​ ​articles​ ​exposing​ ​Columbia’s​ ​interaction​ ​with 
rlem​
c

ommunity 
the​ ​community​ ​and​ ​made​ ​this​ ​news​ ​accessible​ ​to​ ​students​ ​and​ ​community​ ​members;​ ​some​ ​of 
here​
​Malcolm​
​Xere​
​ ​delivered​
peeches​
​and 
these​
​stories​ ​w
​picked​ ​up​​s​beveral​
y​ ​larger​​s​n
ews​ ​organizations 
  
ratory.​
​Community​ ​groups​ ​protest​ ​the​ ​project 
Further​ ​Reading 
“The​ ​Radiant​ ​University,”​ ​Steven​ ​Gregory 
n​ ​a​ ​redevelopment​ ​plan;​ ​it​ ​is​ ​certified​ ​in​ ​2005 
“Understanding​ ​Columbia​ ​University’s​ ​Expansion​ ​into​ ​West​ ​Harlem:​ ​An​ ​Activist’s​ ​Guide” 
on​ City​
​into​​N​M
anhattanville​
​w​Could​
​require​
​the 
ews​
​(old​ ​coverage)​​t​ohat​
n​ ​the​
olumbia​
​Spectator 
ings​
​in​ ​t​that​
he​​B​1ind:​
7-acre​
​project​
rea. 
“Ties​
​Checking​
​on​ ​t​ahe​
​Manhattanville​ ​Community​ ​Benefits​ ​Agreement,​ ​six​ ​years 
later,”​
T

he​
E

ye,​
T

he​
C

olumbia​
S

pectator 
​(ESDC)​ ​enters​ ​contract​ ​with​ ​Alee​ ​King​ ​Rosen​ ​& 
“Organizing​
​Against​ ​G​w
entrification​
​U.,”​ ​S​socialistWorker.org 
​firm,​
​to​ ​determine​
hether​ ​Mville​
uffers 

inent​ ​domain).​​ ​Both​ ​corporations​ ​had​ ​been 
n​ ​to​ ​this​ ​project. 
Nick​ ​Sprayegen,​ ​owner​ ​of​ ​Tuck-It-Away 
and​ ​Parminder​ ​Kaur,​ ​sue​ ​the​ ​state. 
pellate​ ​Division​ ​rules​ ​that​ ​eminent​ ​domain​ ​was 
​of​ ​an​ ​“elite”​ ​private​ ​institution 
of​ ​Appeals,​ ​which​ ​overturns​ ​the​ ​ruling​ ​in​ ​favor 

the​ ​case,​ ​giving​ ​Columbia​ ​the​ ​green​ ​light​ ​to 

re:claim magazine

calling wr it er s & ar t ist s!
re:claim is a publication at Columbia that works to center the voices, well-being, and liberation of
Black people, people of color, disabled and neurodivergent people, femme, queer, gender-nonconforming and trans people, migrants, workers, and all marginalized identities in both content
and in leadership. We strive to embody values rooted in histories of organizing, anti-oppression
politics, creative resistance, and freedom of expression for those who have been historically
silenced.
We started up in the late winter/early spring of 2016 as a staff consisting predominantly of
people of color, women and femmes in conversation with people doing organizing of all kinds.
For many of us, helping to build re:claim came in response to the hurt we have experienced at
the hands of mainstream campus media, which routinely excludes Black people and people of
color from its ranks, and demonizes activist groups. We do not purport to be "objective" (and
maintain suspicion of those who claim objectivity), but instead aim to create, solicit, and honor
content rooted in our own experiences and communities. re:claim publishes first-person
narrative, news, creative writing, and visual art. In the coming year, we specifically want to
prioritize group structures that challenge the burdens of labor placed on marginalized groups as
a “default” in organizing and publishing spaces at Columbia, addressing this within our
publication as well as in our larger communities.
Please reach out to reclaim.at.cu@gmail.com or any of the folks listed on
reclaimatcu.wixsite.com/reclaimatcu if you are interested in getting involved! We make decisions
by consensus using a non-hierarchal structure. Recognizing that people have different
capacities for and ways of contributing labor, time, and energy, we strive to make involvement
as accessible and accommodating as possible. On-boarding involves a brief conversation with a
couple current committee members just to make sure we're on the same page. We'd love to
have you!

W hat W e’ve Published
Why I’m Occupying a Building at
Columbia: Love, Power, and Climate
Justice by Iliana Salazar-Dodge

Untitled by Megan Wicks

“We must believe that we can change for the
better and that we deserve better. In addition
to symbolically taking down the fossil fuel
industry and other villains of our capitalist
economy, we must use this moment to
redirect resources towards the creation of the
beautiful.”

Dreams and Visions by Thando Miambo

Senior Interview: Kevin Chen and Rachel
Poirier by Claire Zuo
“‘I think there are several things embedded in
activist groups and activist identity that don’t
really get accounted for. Who’s bearing the
brunt of the emotional labor, what does the
leadership look like, how are these
configured?’ --R.P.
‘What do we want? In care it’s easy to lose
sight of that -- it’s easy to lose sight of what
we actually desire, so that people end up
feeling burnt out, exhausted, bearing the
brunt of this.’”--K.C.

“Our Cry: Gynnya” by Rosalyn Huff
[Content warning: This piece discusses anti-Black
violence, death and misogynoir.]

“Our men are stolen from us every day.
We rally. We riot. We rage.
We are stolen, too.
They retreat.
‘Say her name!’ Her family cries.
‘GYNNYA!’
Our men fail us every day.
We fuss. We fight. We forgive.
We never fail.
They forget.”

Urgent: Letter from Eyricka King at
Franklin Correctional Facility
[Content warning: physical abuse, sexual assault,
anti-Blackness (specifically anti-Black state
violence), transmisogyny, state violence]

“They are denying me medical treatment.…
Please contact everybody, the news stations,
call the facility.… I wrote you 3 different times
since this happened only to get the mail
returned to me shredded up in pieces.… They
only care once you have people from the
outside call in.”

Read/listen online:
● “Why Students Need the #RighttoRecord” by Brandee Blocker
● “Velvet: A Playlist” by Charlene Adhiambo, and more…...

Page​ ​1

How​ ​Barnard​ ​Contingent​ ​Faculty​ ​Won​ ​Their​ ​First​ ​Contract
By​ ​Gerard​ ​Di​ ​Trolio
*Reprinted​ ​from​​ ​In​ ​These​ ​Times

The​ ​contingent​ ​faculty​ ​at​ ​Barnard​ ​College
have​ ​won​ ​their​ ​first​ ​contract,​ ​adding
another​ ​victory​ ​for​ ​precarious​ ​academic
workers​ ​across​ ​the​ ​country.
Barnard​ ​Contingent​ ​Faculty-UAW​ ​Local
2110​ ​(BCF-UAW)​ ​is​ ​made​ ​up​ ​of​ ​about​ ​200
adjunct​ ​professors​ ​and​ ​term​ ​faculty,
predominantly​ ​women.​ ​It​ ​was​ ​certified​ ​back
in​ ​October​ ​2015​ ​and​ ​had​ ​been​ ​negotiating
with​ ​Barnard’s​ ​administration​ ​since
February​ ​of​ ​last​ ​year.
In​ ​December,​ ​after​ ​getting​ ​nowhere,​ ​union
members​ ​voted​ ​by​ ​an
overwhelming​ ​majority—89
percent—in​ ​support​ ​of​ ​a​ ​strike.
A​ ​strike​ ​date​ ​was​ ​set​ ​for
February​ ​21,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​tentative
agreement​ ​was​ ​reached​ ​with
just​ ​five​ ​days​ ​to​ ​spare.​ ​On
March​ ​26,​ ​BCF-UAW
announced​ ​that​ ​a​ ​five-year
contract​ ​had​ ​been​ ​ratified​ ​by​ ​its
membership.​ ​More​ ​than​ ​90
percent​ ​voted​ ​in​ ​favor.
"I​ ​think​ ​it's​ ​a​ ​strong​ ​contract.​ ​In​ ​some​ ​ways
we​ ​had​ ​to​ ​compromise​ ​and​ ​there's​ ​room​ ​for
improvement​ ​but​ ​we​ ​have​ ​a​ ​very​ ​good​ ​first
contract​ ​and​ ​it​ ​creates​ ​a​ ​foundation​ ​for​ ​us
moving​ ​forward,"​ ​says​ ​Siobhan​ ​Burke,​ ​a
Barnard​ ​graduate​ ​and​ ​adjunct​ ​lecturer​ ​of
dance,​ ​who​ ​also​ ​sits​ ​on​ ​BCF-UAW's
bargaining​ ​committee.
The​ ​main​ ​issues​ ​for​ ​members​ ​were​ ​wages,
benefits,​ ​workload​ ​and​ ​job​ ​security.
Adjuncts​ ​will​ ​now​ ​get​ ​$7,000​ ​per
three-credit​ ​course,​ ​instead​ ​of​ ​the​ ​current
average​ ​of​ ​$6,000,​ ​and​ ​that​ ​will​ ​increase​ ​to
$10,000​ ​over​ ​the​ ​course​ ​of​ ​the​ ​contract.
Full-time​ ​term​ ​professors​ ​will​ ​have​ ​a

minimum​ ​salary​ ​of​ ​$60,000,​ ​rising​ ​to
$70,000​ ​within​ ​five​ ​years.
Adjuncts​ ​will​ ​also​ ​have​ ​access​ ​to​ ​healthcare
for​ ​the​ ​first​ ​time,​ ​with​ ​those​ ​teaching​ ​six​ ​or
more​ ​credits​ ​in​ ​an​ ​academic​ ​year​ ​receiving​ ​a
50​ ​percent​ ​contribution​ ​from​ ​Barnard​ ​for
medical​ ​insurance​ ​costs.
And​ ​in​ ​the​ ​area​ ​of​ ​job​ ​security,​ ​adjuncts​ ​will
have​ ​access​ ​to​ ​some​ ​severance​ ​and​ ​be​ ​able
to​ ​receive​ ​multi-year​ ​appointments.​ ​They
will​ ​also​ ​receive​ ​earlier​ ​notification​ ​of​ ​their
teaching​ ​status​ ​and​ ​course​ ​loads,​ ​under​ ​the
new​ ​contract.
"We​ ​are​ ​pleased​ ​that​ ​the
Barnard​ ​Contingent​ F
​ aculty
union​ ​has​ ​ratified​ ​its​ ​first
contract,​ ​which​ ​reflects​ ​the
College’s​ ​deep​ ​respect​ ​for​ ​union
members’​ ​significant
contributions​ ​to​ ​our
community.​ ​We​ ​look​ ​forward​ ​to
continue​ ​building​ ​a​ ​strong
partnership​ ​with​ ​our
contingent​ ​faculty,​ ​to​ ​ensure
our​ ​students​ ​and​ ​our​ ​academic​ ​program
flourish,”​ ​Provost​ ​Linda​ ​Bell​ ​said​ ​in​ ​a
statement.
Mobilizing​ ​membership
BCF-UAW's​ ​victory​ ​was​ ​in​ ​large​ ​part​ ​due​ ​to
its​ ​mobilizing​ ​strategy.
"At​ ​each​ ​key​ ​step​ ​of​ ​the​ ​way—particularly
organizing​ ​the​ ​strike​ ​authorization​ ​vote​ ​and
preparing​ ​for​ ​a​ ​strike—we​ ​reached​ ​out​ ​to
our​ ​members​ ​through​ ​phone​ ​banking,
email,​ ​social​ ​media,​ ​informational​ ​meetings
and​ ​one-on-one​ ​conversations​ ​on​ ​campus.
Because​ ​many​ ​adjuncts​ ​juggle​ ​multiple​ ​jobs,
it's​ ​a​ ​challenging​ ​group​ ​to​ ​organize.​ ​They're

Page​ ​2

How​ ​Barnard​ ​Contingent​ ​Faculty​ ​Won​ ​Their​ ​First​ ​Contract
By​ ​Gerard​ ​Di​ ​Trolio
*Reprinted​ ​from​​ ​In​ ​These​ ​Times

pulled​ ​in​ ​many​ ​directions.​ ​So​ ​staying​ ​in
contact,​ ​keeping​ ​people​ ​informed​ ​and
maintaining​ ​open​ ​lines​ ​of​ ​communication
was​ ​essential,"​ ​says​ ​Burke.
Barnard​ ​went​ ​to​ ​significant​ ​lengths​ ​to​ ​have
contract​ ​negotiations​ ​go​ ​its​ ​way.​ ​The​ ​college
hired​ ​notorious​ ​union​ ​busting​ ​law​ ​firm
Jackson​ ​Lewis​,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​federal​ ​mediator​ ​was
brought​ ​in,​ ​showing​ ​how​ ​fraught​ ​the
negotiations​ ​were.
Burke​ ​cautions​ ​that​ ​how​ ​Barnard​ ​respects
the​ ​contract​ ​remains​ ​to​ ​be​ ​seen.
"Will​ ​they​ ​try​ ​to​ ​create​ ​new​ ​job​ ​titles​ ​that
are​ ​outside​ ​the​ ​recognition​ ​clause​ ​of​ ​our
contract?​ ​And​ ​find​ ​ways​ ​around​ ​the
contract?​ ​Based​ ​on​ ​the​ ​process​ ​we​ ​went
through,​ ​I​ ​wouldn't​ ​be​ ​surprised,"​ ​she​ ​said.
Student​ ​support
Another​ ​major​ ​factor​ ​in​ ​BCF-UAW's​ ​victory
was​ ​the​ ​role​ ​of​ ​student​ ​activism.​ ​When​ ​a
possible​ ​strike​ ​was​ ​on​ ​the​ ​horizon,​ ​Barnard
students​ ​mobilized​ ​to​ ​pressure​ ​the
administration​ ​through​ ​the​ ​Student-Worker
Solidarity​ ​(SWS)​ ​organization.
"In​ ​January​ ​and​ ​February,​ ​we​ ​started​ ​door
knocking​ ​in​ ​the​ ​dorms​ ​and​ ​gathered​ ​more
than​ ​700​ ​signatures​ ​on​ ​a​ ​student​ ​petition.
At​ ​the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​we​ ​encouraged​ ​students
to​ ​get​ ​their​ ​parents​ ​to​ ​call​ ​the​ ​president​ ​and
provost​ ​of​ ​the​ ​college,"​ ​says​ ​Meghan
Brophy,​ ​a​ ​Barnard​ ​student​ ​and​ ​SWS
member.​ ​"It​ ​was​ ​a​ ​good​ ​way​ ​to​ ​talk​ ​to

students​ ​who​ ​didn't​ ​know​ ​what​ ​was
happening​ ​or​ ​who​ ​were​ ​only​ ​reading​ ​emails
from​ ​the​ ​administration.​ ​I​ ​think​ ​we​ ​learned
a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​practical​ ​organizing​ ​skills​ ​from​ ​that
experience,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​helped​ ​us​ ​remember​ ​to
really​ ​see​ ​what​ ​information​ ​we​ ​needed​ ​to
publicize​ ​more."
The​ ​group​ ​also​ ​spearheaded​ ​a​ ​number​ ​of
actions​ ​like​ ​having​ ​students​ ​line​ ​the​ ​halls
that​ ​Barnard's​ ​bargaining​ ​team​ ​had​ ​to​ ​travel
down​ ​to​ ​reach​ ​the​ ​negotiating​ ​table,
organized​ ​marches​ ​and​ ​helped​ ​to​ ​circulate​ ​a
petition​ ​among​ ​alumni.
"The​ ​administration​ ​tries​ ​all​ ​these
divide-and-conquer​ ​tactics​ ​like​ ​pitting
financial​ ​aid​ ​and​ ​campus​ ​programs​ ​against
living​ ​wages​ ​and​ ​benefits​ ​for​ ​contingent
faculty.​ ​We​ ​want​ ​to​ ​show​ ​we​ ​will​ ​be​ ​united
and​ ​not​ ​divided​ ​by​ ​all​ ​these​ ​tactics,"​ ​said
Brophy.
The​ ​irony​ ​behind​ ​an​ ​elite​ ​women's​ ​college
trying​ ​to​ ​stonewall​ ​a​ ​bargaining​ ​unit​ ​that​ ​is
predominantly​ ​women​ ​was​ ​not​ ​lost​ ​on
students.
"When​ ​Barnard​ ​says​ ​that​ ​it​ ​advocates​ ​for
women,​ ​especially​ ​women​ ​in​ ​the​ ​academy
and​ ​higher​ ​education,​ ​they're​ ​speaking
about​ ​a​ ​very​ ​specific​ ​subset​ ​of​ ​women,”​ ​said
Becca​ ​Breslaw,​ ​a​ ​Barnard​ ​student​ ​and​ ​SWS
member.​ ​“There​ ​are​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​leaders​ ​that
have​ ​come​ ​out​ ​of​ ​Barnard​ ​that​ ​they​ ​push​ ​for
us​ ​that​ ​represent​ ​this​ ​corporate​ ​feminist
appeal​ ​rather​ ​than​ ​advocating​ ​for​ ​all
women,​ ​especially​ ​working-class​ ​women.

50

Women’s​ ​College​ ​vs.​ ​Women​ ​Workers
Women’s​ ​College​ ​vs.​ ​Women​ ​Workers

Page​ ​1
Page​ ​1

Don't​ ​be​ ​fooled​ ​by​ ​their​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric.​ ​Even​ ​the​ ​most​ ​"socially​ ​conscious"​ ​university
Don't​ ​be​ ​fooled​ ​by​ ​their​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric.​ ​Even​ ​the​ ​most​ ​"socially​ ​conscious"​ ​university
administrator​ ​is​ ​still​ ​a​ ​boss.
administrator​ ​is​ ​still​ ​a​ ​boss.
*Reprinted​ ​from​ ​Jacobin​ ​Magazine
*Reprinted​ ​from​ ​Jacobin​ ​Magazine

By​ ​Meghan​ ​Brophy
By​ ​Meghan​ ​Brophy

Debates​ ​about​ ​cultural​ ​appropriation​ ​and
Debates​ ​about​ ​cultural​ ​appropriation​ ​and
free​ ​speech​ ​at​ ​elite​ ​universities​ ​have
free​ ​speech​ ​at​ ​elite​ ​universities​ ​have
consumed​ ​both​ ​the​ ​Left​ ​and​ ​Right​ ​lately.
consumed​ ​both​ ​the​ ​Left​ ​and​ ​Right​ ​lately.
While​ ​some​ ​college​ ​administrators​ ​have
While​ ​some​ ​college​ ​administrators​ ​have
acquiesced​ ​to​ ​student​ ​demands​ ​around
acquiesced​ ​to​ ​student​ ​demands​ ​around
these​ ​issues,​ ​with​ ​many​ ​incoming​ ​student
these​ ​issues,​ ​with​ ​many​ ​incoming​ ​student
orientation​ ​programs​ ​incorporating​ ​the
orientation​ ​programs​ ​incorporating​ ​the
language​ ​of​ ​social​ ​justice​ ​and
language​ ​of​ ​social​ ​justice​ ​and
intersectionality,the​ ​underlying​ ​class
intersectionality,the​ ​underlying​ ​class
dynamics​ ​of​ ​these​ ​schools​ ​remain
dynamics​ ​of​ ​these​ ​schools​ ​remain
unchanged.​ ​Amid​ ​left-sounding​ ​rhetoric
unchanged.​ ​Amid​ ​left-sounding​ ​rhetoric
from​ ​the​ ​top,​ ​workers​ ​at​ ​these​ ​elite​ ​colleges
from​ ​the​ ​top,​ ​workers​ ​at​ ​these​ ​elite​ ​colleges
continue​ ​to​ ​run​ ​into​ ​barriers​ ​when
continue​ ​to​ ​run​ ​into​ ​barriers​ ​when
organizing​ ​on​ ​campus.
organizing​ ​on​ ​campus.

Barnard​ ​College,​ ​a​ ​women’s​ ​liberal​ ​arts
Barnard​ ​College,​ ​a​ ​women’s​ ​liberal​ ​arts
college​ ​where​ ​I​ ​am​ ​a​ ​student,​ ​exemplifies
college​ ​where​ ​I​ ​am​ ​a​ ​student,​ ​exemplifies
the​ ​ability​ ​of​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric​ ​and​ ​class
the​ ​ability​ ​of​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric​ ​and​ ​class
inequality​ ​to​ ​coexist.​ ​From​ ​its​ ​Social​ ​Justice
inequality​ ​to​ ​coexist.​ ​From​ ​its​ ​Social​ ​Justice
Institute​ ​to​ ​its​ ​Zine​ ​Library,​ ​Barnard
Institute​ ​to​ ​its​ ​Zine​ ​Library,​ ​Barnard
showcases​ ​its​ ​feminist​ ​credentials,
showcases​ ​its​ ​feminist​ ​credentials,
marketing​ ​itself​ ​as​ ​an​ ​institution​ ​dedicated
marketing​ ​itself​ ​as​ ​an​ ​institution​ ​dedicated
to​ ​“address[ing]​ ​issues​ ​of​ ​gender​ ​in​ ​all​ ​of
to​ ​“address[ing]​ ​issues​ ​of​ ​gender​ ​in​ ​all​ ​of
their​ ​complexity​ ​and​ ​urgency.”
their​ ​complexity​ ​and​ ​urgency.”

​ ​In​ ​recent​ ​years,​ ​Barnard​ ​has​ ​hosted
​ ​In​ ​recent​ ​years,​ ​Barnard​ ​has​ ​hosted
commencement​ ​speakers​ ​such​ ​as​ ​Sheryl
commencement​ ​speakers​ ​such​ ​as​ ​Sheryl
Sandberg​ ​and​ ​Hillary​ ​Clinton.​ ​It​ ​even
Sandberg​ ​and​ ​Hillary​ ​Clinton.​ ​It​ ​even
awarded​ ​a​ ​Medal​ ​of​ ​Distinction​ ​to​ ​Lena
awarded​ ​a​ ​Medal​ ​of​ ​Distinction​ ​to​ ​Lena
Dunham.​ ​Yet​ ​at​ ​the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​Barnard
Dunham.​ ​Yet​ ​at​ ​the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​Barnard
administrations​ ​past​ ​and​ ​present​ ​have​ ​come
administrations​ ​past​ ​and​ ​present​ ​have​ ​come
into​ ​conflict​ ​with​ ​workers​ ​on​ ​campus.
into​ ​conflict​ ​with​ ​workers​ ​on​ ​campus.

Whether​ ​by​ ​attempting​ ​to​ ​cut​ ​back​ ​on​ ​office
Whether​ ​by​ ​attempting​ ​to​ ​cut​ ​back​ ​on​ ​office
workers’​ ​and​ ​dorm​ ​attendants’​ ​health
workers’​ ​and​ ​dorm​ ​attendants’​ ​health
benefits​ ​in​ ​1996,​ ​a​ ​move​ ​that​ ​sparked​ ​one
benefits​ ​in​ ​1996,​ ​a​ ​move​ ​that​ ​sparked​ ​one
ofthe​ ​longest​ ​strikes​ ​ever​ ​to​ ​take​ ​place​ ​at​ ​a
ofthe​ ​longest​ ​strikes​ ​ever​ ​to​ ​take​ ​place​ ​at​ ​a
college​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States,​ ​or​ ​by​ ​hiring​ ​a
college​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States,​ ​or​ ​by​ ​hiring​ ​a

notorious​ ​anti-labor​ ​law​ ​firm​ ​to​ ​negotiate
notorious​ ​anti-labor​ ​law​ ​firm​ ​to​ ​negotiate
with​ ​its​ ​newly​ ​organized​ ​contingent​ ​faculty
with​ ​its​ ​newly​ ​organized​ ​contingent​ ​faculty
union​ ​in​ ​2016,​ ​Barnard,​ ​like​ ​many​ ​other
union​ ​in​ ​2016,​ ​Barnard,​ ​like​ ​many​ ​other
colleges,​ ​is​ ​riven​ ​by​ ​the​ ​class​ ​divide​ ​between
colleges,​ ​is​ ​riven​ ​by​ ​the​ ​class​ ​divide​ ​between
administrators​ ​and​ ​campus​ ​workers.
administrators​ ​and​ ​campus​ ​workers.

These​ ​conflicts​ ​suggest​ ​that​ ​rather​ ​than
These​ ​conflicts​ ​suggest​ ​that​ ​rather​ ​than
producing​ ​a​ ​more​ ​egalitarian​ ​institution,
producing​ ​a​ ​more​ ​egalitarian​ ​institution,
Barnard’s​ ​social​ ​justice​ ​rhetoric​ ​is​ ​part​ ​of​ ​a
Barnard’s​ ​social​ ​justice​ ​rhetoric​ ​is​ ​part​ ​of​ ​a
limited​ ​brand​ ​of​ ​liberal,​ ​“lean-in”​ ​feminism.
limited​ ​brand​ ​of​ ​liberal,​ ​“lean-in”​ ​feminism.

“Barnard​ ​Cuts​ ​Women​ ​and​ ​Children
“Barnard​ ​Cuts​ ​Women​ ​and​ ​Children
First”
First”

In​ ​1996,​ ​about​ ​165​ ​office​ ​workers​ ​and
In​ ​1996,​ ​about​ ​165​ ​office​ ​workers​ ​and
dormitory​ ​attendants,the​ ​majority​ ​of​ ​whom
dormitory​ ​attendants,the​ ​majority​ ​of​ ​whom
were​ ​women​ ​of​ ​color,​ ​carried​ ​out​ ​a
were​ ​women​ ​of​ ​color,​ ​carried​ ​out​ ​a
successful​ ​six-month​ ​strike​ ​following​ ​the
successful​
​six-month​
​strike​ ​following​
administration’s​
​proposal​
​to​ ​reduce​​the
​their
administration’s​
p

roposal​
t

o​
r

educe​ ​their
health​ ​benefits.
health​ ​benefits.

Originally​ ​organized​ ​in​ ​1972,​ ​Barnard
Originally​ ​organized​ ​in​ ​1972,​ ​Barnard
workers​ ​in​ ​UAW​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​(then​ ​District
workers​ ​in​ ​UAW​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​(then​ ​District
65)​ ​were​ ​among​ ​the​ ​lowest​ ​paid​ ​workers​ ​on
65)​ ​were​ ​among​ ​the​ ​lowest​ ​paid​ ​workers​ ​on
campus​ ​in​ ​an​ ​increasingly​ ​unaffordable​ ​city.
campus​ ​in​ ​an​ ​increasingly​ ​unaffordable​ ​city.
In​ ​an​ ​interview​ ​with​ ​the​ ​New​ ​York​ ​Times,
In​ ​an​ ​interview​ ​with​ ​the​ ​New​ ​York​ ​Times,
Local​ ​2110​ ​President​ ​Maida​ ​Rosenstein
Local​ ​2110​ ​President​ ​Maida​ ​Rosenstein
described​ ​many​ ​of​ ​the​ ​strikers​ ​as​ ​“single
described​ ​many​ ​of​ ​the​ ​strikers​ ​as​ ​“single
mothers​ ​who​ ​barely​ ​make​ ​it​ ​paycheck​ ​to
mothers​ ​who​ ​barely​ ​make​ ​it​ ​paycheck​ ​to
paycheck.”​ ​Barnard​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​add​ ​health
paycheck.”​ ​Barnard​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​add​ ​health
care​ ​premiums​ ​to​ ​their​ ​list​ ​of​ ​expenses.
care​ ​premiums​ ​to​ ​their​ ​list​ ​of​ ​expenses.

During​ ​this​ ​time,​ ​sympathetic​ ​faculty​ ​moved
During​ ​this​ ​time,​ ​sympathetic​ ​faculty​ ​moved
classes​ ​off​ ​campus​ ​and​ ​students​ ​organized
classes​ ​off​ ​campus​ ​and​ ​students​ ​organized
to​ ​support​ ​the​ ​strikers.​ ​Workers​ ​at​ ​Yale,
to​ ​support​ ​the​ ​strikers.​ ​Workers​ ​at​ ​Yale,
who​ ​were​ ​on​ ​strike​ ​at​ ​the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​held​ ​a
who​ ​were​ ​on​ ​strike​ ​at​ ​the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​held​ ​a
joint​ ​rally​ ​with​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​in​ ​New​ ​York​ ​City.
joint​ ​rally​ ​with​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​in​ ​New​ ​York​ ​City.
The​ ​Student​ ​Strike​ ​Committee​ ​staged
The​ ​Student​ ​Strike​ ​Committee​ ​staged

Women’s​ ​College​ ​vs.​ ​Women​ ​Workers

Page​ ​2

Don't​ ​be​ ​fooled​ ​by​ ​their​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric.​ ​Even​ ​the​ ​most​ ​"socially​ ​conscious"​ ​university
administrator​ ​is​ ​still​ ​a​ ​boss.
*Reprinted​ ​from​ ​Jacobin​ ​Magazine

By​ ​Meghan​ ​Brophy

demonstrations​ ​and​ ​eventually,​ ​a​ ​sit-in​ ​in
solidarity​ ​with​ ​the​ ​striking​ ​workers.​ ​In
response,​ ​Barnard​ ​withheld​ ​their​ ​diplomas.
With​ ​the​ ​ongoing​ ​strike​ ​and​ ​suppression​ ​of
student​ ​activism​ ​in​ ​support​ ​of​ ​it,the​ ​1996
graduation​ ​became​ ​a​ ​site​ ​of​ ​struggle.​ ​During
the​ ​ceremony,​ ​both​ ​strikers​ ​outside​ ​the
main​ ​gates​ ​and​ ​students​ ​in​ ​the​ ​audience
held​ ​protest​ ​signs.
As​ ​Judith​ ​Shapiro,​ ​a​ ​renowned​ ​feminist
anthropologist​ ​and​ ​Barnard’s​ ​president​ ​at
the​ ​time,​ ​began​ ​to​ ​speak,​ ​students​ ​unfurled
a​ ​banner​ ​reading​ ​“Anti-Worker​ ​=
Anti-Woman,​ ​Contract​ ​Now.”
Eventually,​ ​Barnard​ ​withdrew​ ​its​ ​health
care​ ​proposal​ ​and​ ​conceded​ ​to​ ​the​ ​strikers’
demands.​ ​But​ ​the​ ​school​ ​hasn’t​ ​changed.​ ​As
recently​ ​as​ ​2012,the​ ​administration​ ​sought
to​ ​freeze​ ​pay​ ​and​ ​reduce​ ​maternity​ ​leave​ ​for
the​ ​same​ ​group​ ​of​ ​workers,​ ​leading​ ​to​ ​the
creation​ ​of​ ​Barnard​ ​and​ ​Columbia’s​ ​United
Students​ ​Against​ ​Sweatshops​ ​local,
Student-Worker​ ​Solidarity.
Faculty​ ​Fight​ ​Back
On​ ​Equal​ ​Pay​ ​Day,the​ ​provost​ ​of​ ​Barnard
College​ ​discussed​ ​her​ ​research​ ​on​ ​the
importance​ ​of​ ​women-led​ ​firms​ ​in​ ​closing
the​ ​gender​ ​pay​ ​gap.​ ​Yet​ ​just​ ​a​ ​few​ ​months
earlier,​ ​Barnard​ ​Contingent​ ​Faculty—about
two​ ​thirds​ ​of​ ​whom​ ​are​ ​women—set​ ​a​ ​strike
deadline​ ​during​ ​their​ ​fight​ ​for​ ​a​ ​fair​ ​first
contract.

Organized​ ​and​ ​certified​ ​in​ ​2015,​ ​Barnard
Contingent​ F
​ aculty-UAW​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​began
yearlong​ ​negotiations​ ​with​ ​Barnard​ ​College
in​ ​February​ ​2016.​ ​Like​ ​many​ ​others​ ​in​ ​the
growing​ ​academic​ ​precariat,​ ​Barnard’s
adjuncts​ ​and​ ​other​ ​non-tenure-track​ ​faculty
were​ ​fighting​ ​for​ ​demands​ ​such​ ​as​ ​higher
minimum​ ​per​ ​course​ ​pay,​ ​access​ ​to
affordable​ ​health​ ​and​ ​retirement​ ​benefits,​ ​a
grievance​ ​procedure,​ ​and​ ​job​ ​security.
While​ ​Barnard’s​ ​president​ ​was​ ​busy​ ​writing
an​ ​op-ed​ ​for​ ​the​ ​New​ ​York​ ​Times​ ​about
body​ ​image,​ ​cosmetic​ ​surgery,​ ​and​ ​aging
among​ ​her​ ​“liberal,​ ​feminist-leaning,​ ​highly
educated​ ​peer​ ​group”​ ​on​ ​the​ ​Upper​ ​East
Side,the​ ​anti-union​ ​law​ ​firm​ ​Jackson​ ​Lewis
handled​ ​negotiations​ ​with​ ​the​ ​contingent
faculty​ ​on​ ​behalf​ ​of​ ​the​ ​administration.
Frustrated​ ​by​ ​months​ ​of​ ​the​ ​administration
stalling,​ ​contingent​ ​faculty​ ​voted​ ​to​ ​approve
a​ ​strike​ ​deadline​ ​by​ ​an​ ​overwhelming
majority​ ​of​ ​89​ ​percent​ ​in​ ​December.​ ​In​ ​a
campus-wide​ ​email,the​ ​administration
implied​ ​that​ ​a​ ​strike​ ​would​ ​contribute​ ​to
students’​ ​post-election​ ​distress.
Meanwhile,the​ ​law​ ​firm​ ​they​ ​retained​ ​wrote
that​ ​Obama-era​ ​anti-discrimination​ ​laws
were​ ​“aggressive”​ ​and​ ​that​ ​Trump​ ​would
“return​ ​to​ ​traditional​ ​theories​ ​of
discrimination.”
Students​ ​organized​ ​rallies​ ​and​ ​went
door-to-door​ ​in​ ​dorms​ ​to​ ​petition​ ​in​ ​support
of​ ​professors.​ ​With​ ​student​ ​support​ ​rapidly
growing,the​ ​administration​ ​attempted​ ​to​ ​pit
living​ ​wages​ ​and​ ​benefits​ ​for​ ​adjunct

Don't​ ​be​ ​fooled​ ​by​ ​their​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric.​ ​Even​ ​the​ ​most​ ​"socially​ ​conscious"​ ​university
administrator​ ​is​ ​still​ ​a​ ​boss.
*Reprinted​ ​from​ ​Jacobin​ ​Magazine

By​ ​Meghan​ ​Brophy

professors​ ​against​ ​financial​ ​aid​ ​and​ ​campus
programs​ ​for​ ​students.
Ultimately,​ ​Barnard​ ​Contingent
Faculty-UAW​ ​Local​ ​2110​ ​reached​ ​an
agreement​ ​a​ ​few​ ​days​ ​before​ ​the​ ​strike
deadline.​ ​Their​ ​first​ ​contract—which
included​ ​the​ ​highest​ ​minimum​ ​per​ ​course
pay​ ​for​ ​adjuncts​ ​of​ ​any​ ​college​ ​in​ ​New​ ​York
City—was​ ​ratified​ ​in​ ​March​ ​2017.
Not​ ​Just​ ​Barnard
The​ ​problem​ ​is​ ​not​ ​confined​ ​to​ ​Barnard​ ​or
its​ ​administration.​ ​While​ ​one​ ​Barnard
student​ ​correctly​ ​called​ ​the​ ​school​ ​“a
women’s​ ​college​ ​for​ ​the​ ​one​ ​percent”​ ​in​ ​the
Columbia​ ​Spectator,these​ ​patterns​ ​extend
far​ ​beyond​ ​one​ ​college​ ​in​ ​New​ ​York​ ​City.
This​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​anti-worker​ ​liberal​ ​hypocrisy​ ​is
nothing​ ​new​ ​on​ ​college​ ​campuses.​ ​Likewise,
the​ ​ascendance​ ​of​ ​corporate​ ​“lean​ ​in”
feminism—prominently​ ​displayed​ ​in​ ​the
Clinton​ ​campaign​ ​and​ ​in​ ​much​ ​of​ ​the
mainstream​ ​women’s​ ​movement—is​ ​not
confined​ ​to​ ​campuses.
Elite​ ​universities​ ​may​ ​try​ ​to​ ​hide​ ​it​ ​behind
the​ ​progressive​ ​language​ ​of​ ​their​ ​brochures,
but​ ​their​ ​place​ ​in​ ​the​ ​system​ ​at-large​ ​hasn’t
changed.​ ​While​ ​many​ ​college​ ​presidents
criticized​ ​the​ ​Trump​ ​administration​ ​in
graduation​ ​speeches​ ​this​ ​year,they’ve​ ​also
been​ ​eagerly​ ​awaiting​ ​Trump’s​ ​National
Labor​ ​Relations​ ​Board​ ​appointments​ ​in
hopes​ ​these​ ​appointees​ ​will​ ​overturn​ ​the
board​ ​ruling​ ​that​ ​allows​ ​graduate​ ​workers​ ​to
organize​ ​unions.

A​ ​few​ ​months​ ​ago,​ ​a​ ​dean​ ​at​ ​Yale​ ​who​ ​has
touted​ ​her​ ​commitment​ ​to​ ​supporting
students’​ ​“multifaceted​ ​identities”​ ​made
headlines​ ​for​ ​publicly​ ​calling​ ​New​ ​Haven
residents​ ​“white​ ​trash”​ ​and​ ​“low​ ​class​ ​folks.”
When​ ​housekeepers​ ​at​ ​the​ ​Harvard-owned
Doubletree​ ​Hotel​ ​were​ ​organizing​ ​a​ ​union​ ​in
2014,​ ​as​ ​Sarah​ ​Leonard​ ​and​ ​Rebecca​ ​Rojer
have​ ​detailed,​ ​Sheryl​ ​Sandberg​ ​couldn’t​ ​find
time​ ​to​ ​meet​ ​with​ ​them​ ​when​ ​she​ ​was​ ​on
campus​ ​to​ ​speak.​ ​Harvard’s​ ​first​ ​woman
president​ ​fought​ ​them​ ​every​ ​step​ ​ofthe​ ​way.
The​ ​list​ ​goes​ ​on.
Elite​ ​universities’​ ​administrations​ ​can
accommodate​ ​a​ ​particular​ ​brand​ ​of​ ​identity
politics​ ​and​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric.​ ​That
rhetoric​ ​does​ ​not​ ​threaten​ ​their​ ​bottom​ ​line
or​ ​tight​ ​grip​ ​on​ ​control​ ​of​ ​the​ ​campus.​ ​But
when​ ​university​ ​workers​ ​engage​ ​in​ ​some
old-fashioned​ ​collective​ ​action​ ​on​ ​the
job,these​ ​administrators​ ​suddenly​ ​drop
their​ ​intersectional​ ​commitments—or,​ ​even
worse,​ ​use​ ​that​ ​progressive​ ​rhetoric​ ​against
those​ ​workers.
Don’t​ ​be​ ​fooled​ ​by​ ​their​ ​progressive
posturing.​ ​Even​ ​the​ ​most​ ​“socially
conscious”​ ​college​ ​administrator​ ​is​ ​still​ ​a
boss.

The Columbia Queer Alliance (CQA) is a student
organization for queer and trans students.
CQA recognizes the diverse intersections of
identities, backgrounds and needs of our
community, and remains committed queer and
trans liberation hand-in-hand with anti-racism,
anti-sexism and anti-imperialism.
[image description: the CQA logo. the letters
'cqa' in curly font, filled in with rainbow colors,
with a Columbia crown on top of the 'q' and a
heart after the 'a']

cqaboard@columbia.edu

ia
mb

,

,
ISM

Why is it that we have all the technology and means to
produce immense wealth—enough food to feed everyone 4 meals
per day, enough homes and construction materials to house
everyone, the capacity to provide education and healthcare for
all—and yet, in the U.S., the top 1% controls more than a third of
the nation’s wealth? Why is it that 66 million children still go hungry
each year, that millions of people are homeless, and that the overwhelming
majority still do not have access to quality schools and medical services?
The reason is that the system we currently live under--capitalism--is
fundamentally based on exploiting the many to make profit for the few. Under capitalism, a
minority ruling class directly profits off of the labor of the majority, the working class, who is
forced to sell their ability to work in order to survive. Capitalism is responsible for countless wars, endless poverty,
and mass exploitation and oppression for the sake of profit; and as a capitalist institution, Columbia is complicit in
all of these processes.
Columbia is not simply an intellectual island in which independent inquiry is allowed to flourish. Its
administration directly benefits from maintaining capitalism and the inevitably racist, sexist, classist, and
homophobic conditions that arise from it. Columbia is a place where students are molded into the next generation of
bosses, politicians, and CEOs who have a stake in maintaining the status quo. Its primary function as a capitalist
institution is far more corporate than educational: it exists to train the 1% to rule and reproduce intellectual workers
and research for profit at the expense of students, workers, neighboring residents, and the global community at large.
Columbia’s actions have made this evident throughout the course of its history. Columbia’s administration
is currently hard at work displacing hundreds of Harlem residents for the sake of its expansion into Manhattanville;
supporting the oppression of Palestinians both through its investments and by suppressing anti-Israel speech by
students and faculty; funding the destruction of the planet; and worrying about its reputation rather than
guaranteeing rights and resources for survivors of sexual violence (just to name a few examples). This is all in
addition to what Columbia students already know--that Columbia extracts exorbitant fees well over the median
family income from students, while paying its president millions of dollars per year to chastise student activists and
act as Columbia’s respectable, liberal figurehead.
While Bollinger gets paid an outrageous salary, it is actually the workers on this campus--from custodians
to professors, support staff to TAs, most of whom are woefully underpaid--that allow Columbia to function. As
students, we also occupy a unique space within the corporate institution that is Columbia, and that position gives us
the power to make a real change, especially when we can collaborate with workers on campus and people in the
communities around Columbia.
All the issues mentioned above are embedded within contexts outside of the university, but we can still
make a disproportionate impact by acting against the profit-driven motives of the administration. We’re the ones the
university is meant to accommodate, we’re the ones who uphold their reputation, and we’re the ones who often pay
(either through tuition and/or donations as alumni). As stakeholders in a capitalist institution, we don’t only have the
power, but also the responsibility to fight against its oppressive policy. As you can see in Columbia’s own history of
student activism, student movements can often lead to change on a larger scale; just think of the Boycott,
Divestment, and Sanctions movement against apartheid South Africa, which inspired a new generation of students to
push their administration to withdraw its investments from the private prison industry. Now, a new wave of students
is pushing for divestment from fossil fuel companies and Israeli apartheid.
We, as socialists, see that these issues of oppression are all interrelated because they all have the same roots
in the foundations of the capitalist system. The fight against sexual violence is part of the fight against transphobia,
which is part of the fight against prisons, which is part of the fight against racism, and so on and so forth. Moreover,
this fight is global, and there are revolutionary socialists fighting for justice all over the world; from Greece to South
Africa, from Egypt to Puerto Rico. Because the fight against oppression and exploitation spans so many issues and
regions across the world, we must develop political principles and experience that we carry outside of the gates of
Columbia and well past our graduation. We enter campus with a choice: Are we here simply to get a degree from an
elite school, or are we going to actually challenge the inequality and oppression that Columbia perpetuates? We
don’t look proudly at the institution of Columbia University; and yet, we have a vision of a world beyond
corporatized schooling in which access to quality education is available to all, in which the students, faculty, and
workers who run schools democratically design the institutions that they want to be a part of, and in which
education, inquiry, and scholarship are the uninhibited governing values that drive our schools.

lu
Co

A L U!
T
I
O
P

C A an d Y

5 YEARS OF SOLIDARITY:
began in 2012 to support Barnard dorm attendants and clerical workers who
were fighting against proposed cuts to benefits and maternity leave.

On October 19th 2012,  the
workers reached a contract that
met every one of their
demands. Student-Worker
Solidarity has been fighting for
labor justice since!
Since then, we supported workers in the Indus Valley restaurant who
fought against wage theft (     ); Worked along with UNITE HERE to
help Faculty House Workers win their contract; helped defeat unsafe
working conditions in John Jay Dining Hall and discriminatory treatment
of workers at the Butler Cafe; joined the nationwide Fight For Fifteen
Campaign to win 15 on campus; and supported the unionization efforts
and contract campaign by Barnard's Contingent faculty (successful!) and
Columbia Graduate Students (still fighting)

end the illegal yet prevalent occurrence of late pay on campus
stand with the Graduate Workers and pressure CU to respect their vote
fight against retaliation by Barnard administration against contingent faculty
work with USAS to get Barnard to affiliate with Worker Rights Consortium
educate ourselves and raise awareness about labor history and its importance

https://www.facebook.com/StudentWorkerSolidarity

what questions do you still have? what are you thinking about?
this is a free writing/drawing/thinking space

by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney
lrl\~NAI\D
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VID

What is a zine?
A zine is a self-published magazine , meaning its creation an d publication
are completely controlled by the person or people making it.

What goes into a zine?
Anything you want! A zine can have poetry, essays, photogra phy, drawings,
cartoons, or pretty much anything else you can imagine.

How do people use zines?
Zines aren't usually creat ed with the intent of making a profit. You might

associate zines with riot grrrls in the 1990s, but zines have been and are a
part of many social n1ovements. They can be a form of creation or rebel

lion or a way to get the word out about something you care about.

Zines, NYC, Barnard/Columbia, and YOU
Interested in zine-ing your <3 out? The Barnard Library is a great place for
it! Barnard has a zine library on the first floor of LePrak and an avvesome

zine librarian named Jenna Freedman .
The Barnard Zine Club compiles submissions based around one the1ne

each semester and puts out a zine, so come to meetings and contribute!
(We have oreos!)

join barnard zine club
website: zines.barnard .edu
email: barnardzinesubmissions@gmail.com
twitter/instagram: @barnardzineclub

feministzine fest
website: feministzinefestnyc.wordpress.com

••
I
7
J(_~

Co lumbia University is
founded as King's College
by a royal cha rter of
British King George IL

I
II
II
!)

Kang.Tung Pih. daughter of
Chinese political reformist
Kang You,vei, graduat~s
from Barnard as one of the
Hrst transfers and the first
,voman of color.

Barnard is founded
by Columbia University
Pres ident Frederick
Augustus Porter Barnard,
after the Board of Trustees
rejected Barnard's
proposition to make
Colu1nbia . co , ,\
ed. Barnard
students
~
could not
~ 1f;
attend
'
Columbia's
classes
until

1900.

/ .. '2-~ (.

I
f)
?.
iel
?.
iel

Faculty of
Politica l Science
admits wo1nen
to classes, ,vith
permission of
instructor;
authorizes the
awarding of
Ph Os to
women, despite
Dean Burgess's
oppos1t1on.

In the early 1920's n1any
Ivy League schools began
in stitu ting "unofficial
quotas" to lin1it adn1itance
of Je,vish st:udents .
Colun1bia's was the n1ost
severe and slashe d the
J e,,,ish populat ion fron1
40% of students in 1920
to 22% in 1922 wit11
parti cular discrin1ination
a&rainstSephardic ,uid
Eastern European J e,vs.
Quotas like these
reinained at Yale , for
exanip le, until the 1960's.

I
!)
I
!)

In reaction to \Vorld
War I. Columbia
starts the Core
Curriculum, a set of
class standards that
has been adopted
with "Conten1porary
Civ." intended to
"cultivate a critical
and creat ive
intellectual capacity
that students
employ long after
college, in the
pursuit and the
fulfill1nent of
meaningfu l lives."

a brie

co\oo.ia\ist

7,ora !'lea\e Hu rston, the \;rst
knO'"n b\ack student at
Barnard, graduates. \-\urston
,vorked in the ,t\nthropo\og,)'
Oepartf!'lent ,..,;th Franz Boas,

\n 1985, the 5/\.S won 11,eir
f,g\tt for di, ·estJ\,en\ fron>
south !'l.frica.11
t\.partltetdBarnai ·d a.ud Co\UU'\)ia \)oil>
di,•estec\ 11,eir resvecu,·e
cudo" ·n1euts frooi
corporations doiu~ busiuess
in south A.frica, inc\udiug
\B)o\. CBS, General
"\o\otors ford \-\otors, Coca
·co \a, che, ·ron , \'\ ohil Oil ,
\ \ onevwell, a,1d the
\.Vasl;ingtou Post-

co\\ecting b\ack fo\k\ore and
ora\ historV•


t\fter

5

even students

go on a ten day
hunger stri.kc (.'2007),
the program
previous\y kno,vn as
the ~\ajor cu\tures
serni.oar i.s adopted
into the Core
Cun-icuhirn and
transforrnecl i.otO
,vhat ,.ve no"" kno'"
as the G\oba\ coRE-

n
light of the
assassination of ML\<. and
tudeot frustration over Vietoarn, student 01
«us• ,« ,h, ,cbool'sacri•<\n,• •'"''"'

'•'°"'"

0

w\<h,h, \nsri••" [o<o,foos< j\o.lY"' (\OJ\),•
w"I"'"' ""'"h ,h\nk-unk ,Iii\\•"°""th ,h, U.S.

0,part"''"'of o,f,nse andpl••' to bu\\dllY"'

.

·\· . . uar\eS1uden1s for a Dernoerattc Soetet y
act tnes ,n i:-1
,...

S S)
(SOS)
,nd
,h,
s,u&,n•
,J,o·""'"'"'"
So««
Y
(
J\
f . d
\..:"gin eo\urnbi.a scrapptng the Gymp\aos
unite
, reS\.l su• [<on>,h•I OJ\, 712 ,wd<•"
,.d ;;,,s,iog
w«'
rt"ested; 'ihe
university ,vas put on
use as students
3
aught" l.,i.bcracion
\asses" on the \awn;
be Gratefu\ Dead
ga,·e a fi-ee concert-

eo\u.t-nbi.a announces
its p\an to c,cpand into
,vest Har\ern-

The C.Ore
Curr'icullilllisan educational modelbegun by C.Olumbiain1919. A distinct set

of ra:iuirements and experiences for all undergraduates at 00, the oore cultivates a
" ...critical and creative intell~
capacity that students employ long after oollege,in
the pursuit and the fuliillment of meaningful lives." (C.Olumbia'swebsite) While the
cu:rrtcullilll'sooncentration on western thought makes one apt for dinner :partiesand
intell~
foreplajy,it bas been both ertjoyedand critiquedby students since it's bnth.
Here are a handful ofstudent's thoughts on the oore.

My experience
leaving the core is not that it
need not be a project of indoctrinationbut
rather an exploration of where modernity comes
from. It's tempting to say "old white men's words are
meaningless" but any concerted understanding of power requires an inquiry into its origins. Marx's method emphasizes
this at its core, and he spent years and years researchingthe
veryUterah
.re and thought he sought to overcome throughrevolutionaryclassstruggle. Take th:~core:::as:
=_/
£.- ----a similarproject,ask where
capitalism and identityoppression come from.
It'll show you a lot
about how we ended
up in the wor1dwe
aretoday.



l

Tostudythecore
"\
without addressingthis
issue is to normalizea
systemthat benefitsfew
and oppressesmany.
Since the canon is already defined, to retro- ~
actively attempt to ,
insert others into it is
to try to mold the
ideas of oppressed
groups to those of
the oppressors, thus
reinforcing the oppressive hierarchy we are
'A,1
trying to destroy. There1
fore any attempt to preserve the canon while
opening it up to excluded
.....
..._ ___
,
groups is hypocritical because the
canon always has and alwayswill be de_.,. ...._
fined by the groupsin power.

The core has us racing fast

----

through thousands of pages of white men
musing about their idyllic lovers ~d eating
habits and bloodthirst. Not that I wasn't happy
to be reading"theclassics" or whatevercolonialist term they're using now, but for any
non-white and/or non-cis-ma\e person it
took a toll to be repeatedlydiscussing romanticized depictions of "barbarians "
and frail female characters. It isn't that
we shouldn't read books by authors
that we disagreewith, by no means.
But the lack of diversityof expenence
in the canon was miserable, and often
made me feel isolated in discussion,
especiallywhen it came to mattersof
class.
...So my advice to the next
generation of Lit-Hum
readersis this: speakup.
Speak up in class
when someone says
something that hurts.

The
Core Curriculum is an educational model begun by Columbia
in 1919. A distinctset of requirements and experiencesfor all undergraduates at CC, the core
cultivates a "...critical and creative intellectual capacity that
students employ long after
college, in the pursuit and
the fulfillment of meaningful lives." (Columbia's website) While the curriculum's
II'
concentration on western
~ ~~
thought makes one apt for
____
.,~
dinner parties and intet\ec~
tual foreplay, it has been
both enjoyedand critiqued by students since
it's birth. Here are a handful of student's
/
thoughtson the core.
_
1

~ ~::::::=====~
""'-::~'.<i

'l/}V£

-

l

Exceptforfrosci, I'm a big fan. It gets meto read books I wouldn't get around
to readingotherwise.
Ladiesand Gentlemen,for your Eurocentricviewingpleasure, I give you,
the Core Cumculum!!!

-~

.

It is vitally importantto keep in mind that the core is racist,sexist, classist,and the like not purely
becauseof choicesmade by Columbia's administration.Blaming Columbiafor the university'schoices
will not go back and re-writethis historyof exclusion.

some ways to get yr $$$$ 's worth
there are lots of reasons to try to save money as a student at Colwnbia. it's expensive to
live in New York, and it's expensive to go to these schools! here are some ways to try
to squeeze all the money-based value you can out of your tuition:
• sneak into dining halls (be careful) and bring Tupperware , or have a friend go in and
just get food for you*
• sign up for classes just to download a million PDFs from courseworks and read them
later
• utensils , salt and pepper , napkins from Ferris*
• you can watch so many movies from online databases (w/NYPL or UNI)
• free newspapers in John Jay
• be savvy w/ free bus to subway transfers
• if you take out a Federa l Stafford Loan and are on the Barnard Aetna student health
insurance plan, financial aid might pay for it (I don 't know why) (pay 4 insurance , not the loan)
• take classes with field trips (barbados! death valley! cruises on the hudson river!
special access to musewnsl new york archaelogical repository! state parks!)
• free department and student life retreats
• there 's free paper in the printers*
• there 's a pool and a sauna in dodge
• you are right next to 3 huge beautiful parks I go
• you can get textbooks at the library : ILL and BorrowDirect are your friends ; profes sors should be putting things on reserve and you can ask them to if they haven ' t
• there are free classes and teach -ins if you look (book -making! social justice!)
• there 's sometimes free department/ club swag beyond t-shirts!
• get a NYPL card
• you can sneak into big lectures if you just wanna audit one
• free safer sex supplies all over
• free IUD insertion for Barnard students (if you ' re on Barnard health insurance it
covers the cost of the IUD)
• sometimes it's cheaper to pay for a meal with points than a swipe
• free boxes in the mailroom recycling bins
• free packing tape in Barnard mailroom if you ask politely
• join free food groups on FB
• free short-term counselling at CPS and Furman
• find and build community' love and friendship are priceless
*some thoughts on "ethical stealing " ( even from a large institution): consider what you
can pay for and what things are worth paying for; consider that some departments have
smaller budgets than others ; consider that there 's not enough for *everybody* to steal
what they want ; consider that dining hall staff is just following orders when they yell at
you for taking extra food ; consider if you are in a financial position where you need to
steal.

share yr resource$ equitably!

Divest Ba171a1·d(01· Columbia
a just Tran.rition Divest for
&
Climate ju.,tice
lind u, on f.;1:1c-book fo r more' 1nfe>'
ban1.1rdd 1,c•,1{11ttnJ1ilc-om
ce>lu1nb1ad1vC',t
( , gm~al.c-Qm

- ..




.
. . . .. . .. - .. ..
..

.. . ... .



.'







...

-











. • . ..• .....- ..• •" .










·. ·.. - ....

-

• •





..













--

• •





Cli111atejttstice is a movement that understand climate change
not only as an environmenta l issue . but as an i ue of social
justice. Climate change doe sn 't affe ct everybody in the same \vay,
and tl1e people facing the most harm are tho e already suffe 1ing
sy temi c oppression , including antiblack raci sm , exploita tion ,
and imperialism. For example. sea level rise is displacing people
from isJand nations like Kiribati and, the Marshall Islands , who
have aJready suffered historie s of violent colonizatio n. Even in
\vealthy nations like the U.S., Black and bro\,,rn people (especiaJly
those \vho are i11carcerated and /o r undocumented) are
disproponionately killed or displaced by excreme \veatl1er evencs,
like hur1; cane s and heat \Vave . In gene ral, the \vealthie t peop le
prodttc e lhe most greenhou se ga emis ions , but their privilege
protects them from the \vorst effec ts of climat e chan ge and
pollution .



~




Divestment is the act of withdrawing finan cial
inv es tm ent s from a certain indt-t try or regime. Often
u ed as a tactic within a broader ocial movement,
dive tment ha hi torically been u ed to re ist outh
African apartheid, the tobacco indu try, p tivate prison ,
I raeJi-Pale tinian apartheid, Well Fargo, and the fo il
fuel indu try. Though it is highly unlikely that
divestment alone could topple any of the e giant , it can
weaken then1 by fighting the no1maliu1tion of their
harmn,I practices, while expanding pol iti cal and
finan cial opportuniti es for alternativ e syste m s.
photoby Snn,Vt'lasqun

What ll}e 've @on
In March 2017, Barnard' Board of
Trustees voted to d ivest from foss il
fuel compan ie that d eny c1imate
scien ce or do n o t try to miti gate
their effec ts on climat e chan ge.
While it's a big win for the
campaign, we are not yet do11e. We
\-V
ill continue to oversee the
divestment process to ensure the
college fully follo ,vs through.
Add itionally , ..clim ate denier s" has
ye t to be defin ed, and ,viii be
crucial in deciding Barnard 's future
.
1nve tn1enc .
Al o in March 2017,in re pon e to 5 year s
of student organizing for fos il fuel
divestment, Columbia announced that it
would dive t from companies making
more than 35¾ of revenlte from coal
prodtt ction.
However, the university rem a in s inv es ted
in oil and gas compani es that commitjust
as much, if not more, violence by
accelerating clima te change and poisoning
entire communities. In fact, Columbia
rema ins directly inve ted in Ph illips 66, a
company that will o,~n 25%of the Dak ota
Acces s Pip elin e if the project is completed.

-

1Vl1e1·e@e'1•eheadecl

Though CDCJ and DB will continue to fight for fttlJ divestment from
fossil fuels, \Ve are beginning to shift our focus toward r einv estm ent
in aju st tr an sition . The term just tran ition " refers to the
transformation of our current exploitative, fossil ft.tel economy into
new systems prioritizing equ ity and ecoiogical limits . Many Black
and brown people in Ne \v York are already building ajust transition
witl1 in titutions like work er-own ed bu sin esses, envir onm ental
ju stice organiz ation s, and ant i-ge n trific ation n etwor ks. As a $9billion instittltion that profits from the violent gent rification of
Harlem , Columbia is more than obligated to invest money in these
communities and their \vork . For more info on reinvestment , check
out our st.1mmer reinves t study at re inv estcu. tu mblr .com !

Columbia
STUDENTS
FOR
JUSTICE
:IN PALESTINE
is
a
diverse
group of students,
faculty
, staff , and community
members
from
Columb i a
and
Barnard,
organized
on
democratic
principles
to promote
justice
, human r ights,
l iberat ion,
and self-determination
for
the
Pa l estinian
people . We organ i z e in acco r dance
with
the Palestinian
Ci vil Society
call
for Boycott , Di vestment
, a nd Sanctions
(BOS) against
I srae l until
it
ends
the
occupation
of
Palestine
and d is mantles
its
apar theid
state.

......................
. . . . ..••...
•..•..•..•...•.•...
......................................
. ..
...........

.

JEW'ISH

VO'ICE

chapter
of
Co lumbia/Barnard
. a student
FOR PE~CE ~s
organization
that
a
nationa
END to
the
for
an

advocates
.
f Palestine-.
u
p
ation
o
ho
Israeli
ace
.
f
Je
ws
w
O
mmunity

we are
a c~ ri tze anti - racis~
in
str ive to prio
we
organize ,
our
work
as
and
protest
celebrate
,
together
.

-----3

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Together,
a campaign

JVP
l.n

'

SJP launched
February
of 2016 ,
&

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

APARTHEID DIVEST
which
calls
on
Columbia
to divest
its
stocks
, funds ,
and endowment
from
companies
that
profit
from the State
of Israe l ' s
vio la t io ns of international
law and
Palestinian
human rights
through
its
ongoing
system
of settler
colonialism
military
occupation
, and apartheid
.
To find

out

apartheiddivest
\

bit

more , check

out

. com

. l y /CUADpet

divestment

or go to
to sign
our
petition!

,

AHi
NEWG FR0/1

PALES
,I NA!



facebook.com/CUapartheiddivest
facebook . com/ColumbiaSJP
facebook.com/JVPColumbia
& on t witter
@ColumbiaSJP

GendeRevolution:

Barnard
@
Being Trans

.

and Columbia
Who to know:

Where to go for support
and resources:
@Barnard:
1. Barnard Center for Research on
Women (BCRW)
- Center for femin ist thought,
activism , and collaboration
between queer and trans scholars
and act ivists
2. Student Life
- Host LGBTQ+ panels and
meetups throughout the year with
queer and trans faculty/staff

@Columbia:
1. LGBTQ@Columbia
- Office within the Office of Multicultural Affairs that focuses solely
on queer and trans students at
Columbia. Host CU Out on the
Town events throughout the year.
2. Prefered Name Policy
- Feature on SSOL that will
change your name on ID cards ,
rosters , courseworks/canvas, and
school directories. Does not
change your name on financial aid
forms , federal documents , transcripts, or within public safet .
3. Medical Services
- Beginning and maintaining
hormone therapy. Coordinating
gender affirming surgeries.

1. Dean Alina Wong,
Barnard Student Life
(She/They)
- Actively pushes back
against gendered language
and polic ies at Barnard.
- Super student focused
2. Chris Woods, OMA
(He/Him)
Adv ises all LGBTQ+ clubc:.._
and QTAB: Queer and Trans
Adv isory Board and faculty/staff/student advisory
board to bring trans issues to
administration from student
and faculty/staff perspectives

Student

Organi

1. GendeRevolution
- Support and advocacy group
for trans , non-binary , and
genderquestioning students

2. Proud Colors
- support and advocacy group
for queer and trans students of
color; regularly hosts events,
workshops and meetings

3. Club Q
- Barnard-specific club for
queer and trans students

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what we've done:
potluck dinner/discussion of redistribution
(of labor/resources/$$$)
support for other groups ' direct actions
weekly -biweekly mtgs
ongoing reading list
"In honor of Asian
letter-writing to prisoners
Pacific American
Heritage Month (Joi),
planning teach -ins including:

THURSDAY
APRIL 13th
8:00 pm in HAMILTON 401

join APC for a teach-in
on the historical relationship
between Asian American
students and the neoliberal
university . We'll discuss the
decades-long struggle for
ethnic studies at Columbia
and other schools, thinking
through how "Asian American"
emerged as a coherent (?)
cat egory from Black nationalist-led
and pan-Asian grassroots
organizing that multiculturalism
has now been diluted, defanged,
and incorporated into the University
as "ethnic studies ."... "

priorities going forward:
how do we steal from the university & redistribute
wealth outside of it?
(especia lly for reparations to Blac k people
especially from liberal/leftist/"rad"
rich whites+ asians@CU)
critically interrogating azn-americans as settlers, capitalists,
oppressors in addition to oppressed subjects
considering whose voices are present, absent, heard
not reifying gendered racial capitalism, respectability politics,
or liberalism in our organizational practices
remaining critical of academia, nonprofits, reformism

Marxist Student Association
In the United States, millions
of workers and youth have
poured
into the streets,
outraged at the election of
Donald Trump and the farright
demonstrations
in
Charlottesville.

•N ,,

Mass marches and demonstrations show our strength ,
but that's only the beginning; working together, we can
accomplish much more.
Our generation is the first to have a lower standard of
living than the generation before us. Capitalism offers
no way forward, which is why the majority of our
generation is opposed to capitalism. But a better world
is possible!

YOU

In order to get there, the Columbia
Marxist Student Association aims
to study
the lessons
of
revolutionary history and theory to
inform how we can intervene in
history.

As students, it is imperative that we link up with the
working class since it is the only class in society that
can stop capitalism in its tracks.

''Without revolutionary theory, there can be
no revolutionary movement.'' -V.I. Lenin

''Life is beautiful. Let the future generations
cleanse it of all evil, oppression, and violence
and enjoy it to the full.'' -Leon Trotsky

''The philosophers have only interpreted the
world, in various ways. The point, however,
is to change it.'' -Karl Marx

If you're interested in our ideas,
we hold weekly discussions on
Mondays.
Facebook:
www.facebook.com / columbia.marxi sts /

Email:
Columbia.marxist s@gmail.com

Columbia University

South Asian Feminism(s) Alliance

SOUTH
SAFA
' s mission is to encourage dialogue and mobilize leadership and community
action against systems of oppression in the South Asian community. Our goal is to
provide a space for South Asians, Inda-Caribbeans and allies to come together and
find strength in our similarities
and our differences,
to learn about ourselves
as well as others , and to find solace in each other when the rest of the world
fails to accept us.
ASIAN
SAFAis a group for those who have dealt with misogyny and violence of all forms
(including
IPV or sexual violence)
rampant in their
homes, families,
and
communities. For those who have felt like their skin was too dark, their arms too
hairy , their voices too opinionated . For those who are queer, trans , or gender
non-conforming . For those who are not able - bodied or thin. For those who are not
on a track to becoming doctors, engineers,
lawyers . For those who have been
othered within our communities because of their race , caste , or religion . This is
a group f or ever yone who wish e s to challeng e South Asian ge nder no rms and think
c ri ti cally about the inter sec tion of one's multipl e i dentitie s .

FEMINISM{S)
Through group discussions , film screenings,
mentorship programs and more, SAFA
aims to cultivate
awareness of struggles faced by so many members of the South
Asian diaspora and folks at home, as well as to foster partnership and solidarity
between SAFAand other activist
and minority groups on campus. We urge anyone who
identifies
with our mission to come to a meeting and join us in making this
campus a more inclusive place .
ALLIANCE

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We a re a g rass r oots org a niz at io n wo rki ng to e nd
se x u al+
do mestic
vi o l ence i n o ur c ampus co mmunities
we envision
a world free of violence+
oppression.

bec a u s e

We recognize
that
sexual
violence
is
a manifestation
of
systemic
gender
oppression
which cannot
be separated
from all
to end sexual
other
forms of oppression
. Therefore , the fight
+ domestic
forms
of
classism,

violence
cannot be won without
eradicating
all other
oppression
including
but
not
limited
to
racism,
ableism,
colonialism,
homophobia,
+ transphobia
.

We seek
to foster
transparency
around
issues
of
sexual
violence
because
we believe
that
a bottom
up approach
to building
power is the only way to
achieve
justice
.

we us e di rec t ac t i on
to expose th e
viol ence our
i nsti tution+
lar ge r
soc ie t y normal i zes.

Our current
campaign
demands
more support ,
accessibility
, accountability
, funding,
+
enforcement
(SAAFE) to ensure
that Columbia
University
is an inclusive
educational
environment
where survivors
can thrive,
regardless
of their
identity
(including
but not
limited
to race,
sex, gender,
sexual
orientation,
socioeconomic
status,
immigration
status,
+
religion)
.

A major demand of our campaign
is for the creation
of a
rape crisis
center
that is physically
open 24/7 + staffed
with
professional
advocates
trained
in
cultural
competency.
We believe
that
these
changes
will
improve
the quality
of resources
for all
survivors,
especially
for survivors
whose experiences
don't
match traditional
narratives
and who come from marginalized
communities
.

////////////////

////////////////

The work we do is
al ways centered
on
the n e eds+
experiences
of su rv ivors.

////////////////

///////////

.

Want to get involved?
Sign up for our listserv@
http://noredtapecu.org/new-page/
or email
noredtapecu@gmai
l . com ! Our weekly meetings
are on Sundays from 7PM- 8PM.
Go to www. NoRedTapeCU . org

////////////////

to

learn

////////////////

more

about

our

work+

////////////////

for

info

on resources.

///////////

,

7

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''Brown is not a color,
It is a city,
a continent,
world
that
expands
beyond
Brown,
is not a color,
It's
a way of life,
A way of struggle,
A way to survive."
- Cherrie
Moraga

the

10

sea .

OUR
MISSION
IS10:
(ELEBRA1E,
EMPOWER,
AND
HIGHLIGH1
IN1ERSEC1IONALI1Y
AND
DIVERSI1Y
INALL
I1SFORMS,

ESPECIALLY
AS11PER1AINS
10lA1INIDAD
AND
(HICANIDAD.
WEAIM10PROVIDE
OUR
MEMBERSH
WI1H
ASAFE
AND
ENGAGING
ENVIRONMEN1
INORDER
10FULFILL
THEIR
EDUCA1IONAL
GOALS,
PROM01E
1HEIR
CUL1URAL
CONSCIOUSNESS,
AND
HELP
1HEM
BECOME
AC1IVE
INSERVING
1HE
NEEDS
or1HEIR
COMMUNITY.

Asian
American
Alliance
aaa@columbia.edu
WW\Vlaoebook.com/Coh1mbiaAAA

Who are we?
Fonnded in 1995, Asian American Alliance, or "Triple-A", is one of Cohunbi.a's oldest
APIA organizations. AAA strives to foster dialogue, create a sense of awareness, and seeks
to educate and address key issuei. that affect the APIA commun ity and other marg:ioalizP.d
identities at Columbia and beyond . AAA ' s core-member group ~rpically consua of stude nts
,vho ha"-e had varying levels of experience ~ politicalization and radtcaliz:uion . 'I1iis
means some members may be comfortable navigating conversations about anti-racist work
and participating in direct action, ,vbile others may be just beginning to work through their
identities . Our goal is to learn and unlearn as a onmrounity ,vbile working in tandem ,vith off
campus organ izations and on-campus student groups .

What



1S

a typical

AAAevent?

Our yearly large scale events are cultmeSHOCK (a charity perfonnaor.e showcase including a
fashi on show, student groups, outside performers ), and Crossroads (a high school leadership
conference for APIA youth ). These are held in the fall and spring semester respectively.
Some examples of our other events:
- Roots: A Place for Asian -Ameri can Storytelling (with Club Zaroana )
- Anti-Blackness Teach in for APIA
- Angela Davis x Yuri Kocbfyama film ~eening (with BO SS)
- APIA Civic Engagement in Trump's America

What organizations

have we worked with?

Committee Against Anti -Asian ,ri olence (CAAA V), Asian Ameri can Legal Defense an.d
F.ducationFund(AALDEF),NationalAs1anPacificAmerican,Vomen'sForum(NAPA"\iVF),
Adhik.aar, Chinato,m Art Brigade, Filipino American Democratic Cruh of NY, Min.lrn,'On
Center for CommlJllity Action, and many more!

Want to get involved?
If you are interested in jo ining the board to help plan events with AAA, consider applying to
be an OCM early September!
If you are interest.ed in attending our programs, what ~re do as a club, any opportunities
aronnd the city to take action, but not in the event-pl.aiming aspect of the club, feel free to like
us on Facebook and join our newsletter for regular updates on what's going on.

BARNUMBIA
SURVIVAL
GUIDEFORSTUDENTS
WITHDISABILIT
IES
Being a student with a disability means you will have to work harder than most (if not all) of your
classmates . This is not due to any fault of your own, but issues that arise from dealing with institutions.
Barnard and Columbia, as well as the city of New York, were not built for you and that may make every
step you take a challenge. This guide aims to make this process easier by identifying a few key actions to
take upon your arrival on campus. You will have these tools and the help of other students to get beyond
these hurdles.

Barnard Services:
Office of Disability Services (ODS)
If you are a student living with disabilities you should register with ODS now, even if you have not
previously needed accommodations, rather than wait until you might need their services because it takes
time and documentation to be approved for services. Documentation from doctors and therapists of your
disability is required. Only 3-4 people in ODS take care of over 400 students on campus.

Accommodat;ons:
Academic : ODS can provide academic accommodations to help you in the classroom including extra time
on tests and extra excused absences . You will need to meet with your professor to 'prove' your disability.
Residential Life: ODS can provide housing accommodations to make life easier on campus such as a dorm
with AC, a single, a building with wheelchair access, or having a service animal with you on campus. Res
Life has more control than ODS in housing accommodations.
Furman Counselin2 Center
If you are a student living with mental health issues you must register with Furman. The intake process
can be taxing as you must share details of your mental health history to determine whether you need long
term or short- term counseling. The office will give you referrals but there is also a network of students to
offer therapist recommendations.

Student Services:
BarnardStudentNetworkfor DisabilityAdvocacy
This student-created (non-university affiliated) Facebook page connects you to other students dealing
with similar issues on campus . This is a place to ask for support, ask for recommendations, speak to the
student health representative, be part of a greater community of people that want to help or just vent
Barnard Pay It Forward
This student-created (non -university affiliated) Facebook page connects students who need someone to
help run errands for them with students who are willing to help. This is for anyone who is unable to get
out of bed that needs something from the store, not just students with disabilities (medication, groceries
etc.). Students may post in the group either asking for something or offering to get something.
Campus and the city of New York
- Both campus and New York City may be difficult for students with mobility disabilities. Barnard and
Columbia have very old buildings and (crappy) elevators (especially Milbank and Hamilton). You must
leave early to get to class on time and it would be wise to inform your professor of your situation because
you may be late for class. There are tunnels under Columbia that provide access to parts of Columbia for
wheelchair users.
- NYC's public transportation system is not ADA compliant providing full access to people with mobility
disabilities. The 116 th subway line 1 stop on does not have an elevator (96th Street has an elevator).
Community Advice:
-Avoid taking general education requirements that will be challenging for you until you are more
acclimated to college life.
-It is important to advocate for yourself but also important to be able to ask for help from a friend, faculty
member, or member disability advocacy community. Dean Grabiner, the freshmen class dean, is an
incredible resource and good person.
-School may knock you down; it is okay if you don't have the strength to get up again . Some students find
the need to take a lighter academic load or to take a semester or year off.
-You are not weak for taking time to work on your own health; it is an incredibly brave and important
thing to do. You are attending a school that does not fully accommodate you and that takes a toll . You may
have a different college experience but that doesn't mean it won't be a good one. No matter what anyone
says, your disability absolutely does not mean you do not deserve to be here. There an entire community
here excited for you to join us!

UndoCU
Unless you've been living under a rock, you're aware that the undocumented immigrant community has
been Trump's and most targeted and most profitable scapegoat since day one of his campaign. Through
sensationalism of the most hateful order , the Trump administration has led the dissolution of any
discussion of immigration into a baseless yet firebrand decree of dehumanization , while his opponents ,
the Democratic Party, and third party politicians retort with plans to control , and regulate immigrants
through a tired liberal narrative of the meritocratic , multicultural American dream- with no room in
between for the actual self-determination of all immigrants.
The Undocumented Student Initiative (we prefer UndoCU) exists to untangle these constrictions from all
sides. We are the first undocumented student group at Columbia University , and our main objective is to
protect and dignify the humanity of every undocumented person. We not only question the broken
immigration system that produces the conditions of our collective subjectivity, but we critique the white
supremacist settler colonial structure that is its root. Therefore , UndoCU is an intersectional movement
that prioritizes solidarity with marginal ized communities and the destruction of white supremacy.
Following the 2016 election , UndoCU , with cooperation of Movimiento Cosecha , staged a walk-out in
demand that undocumented students be protected and Undocu has since then become a prominent
activist group on campus. We ensured Columbia would do its best to become a sanctuary campus ,
secured summer housing for at-risk students , educated the campus community at numerous speaking
events , and have been featured on the Columbia Spectator , Mic.com , Democracy Now! ,
and-regrettably - Fox News.
Having only formed in September 2016 , UndoCU is a young movement that cannot spare to build slowly.
During the Trump presidency , we do not possess the privilege of time . Our upcoming campus challenges
include: abolishing the use of the word "illegal" in reference to immigrants or immigration in general ,
chang ing the manner by which the university labels undocumented students from "international " to
"domestic ", creating an undocumented student resource center, and undocumented student scholarships.
On a broader scale , the DREAM Act , the HOPE Act , and preventing the dissolution of DACA will all be
our priorities as the American populace seems to not be tired of dissecting and devouring the humanity of
immigrants. In the event that the federal position on undocumented immigrants becomes even harsher ,
we stand ready to resist , and we expect our allies to do the same.
Why should you join UndoCU?
If you are undocumented , because we love you and you matter.
If you are an American citizen , because this political system considers you human above all of us, and an
informed political education requires a rooted understanding of this construction.
If you are neither , because we believe in your humanity as much as most Americans don't believe in ours.
Despite common pro-immigrant narratives , we have intersectional leadership and make sure that
non-white , non-cisgender , and non-heterosexual identities are surely prioritized here.

0

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Are you looking for a community
where your background, experiences ,
and identities are valued? Want to
make friends with the coo lest kids on
campus? Join Mujeres!
Mujeres provides an organization of
cultural support and leadership
deve lopment for Latin:x students and
allies at Barnard College, Columbia
University. We promote awareness
and pride in the diverse Latin:x culture and heritage. We discuss
everything from self-love to the decolonization of food , hold bake
sales, and host an annual Mujeres Empowerment Dinner. Come say
hi at our weekly general body meetings EVERY WEDNESDAY!
FAQs:
• Do I have to self-identify as a Latina or as a woman to join?
NOPE. Everyone is welcome!
• Is Mujeres for Barnard students only? No. While our
meetings are held on Barnard ' s campus , any student from the
University is welcome .
• Why should I join? Because co llege is a time for self-growth
and our Mujeres family is here to support you as a student ,
individua l, and person of color on this campus.

Meeting topics are dec ided by YOU! Suggest your ideas at our first
general body meeting in September . We ' ll keep you posted on the
date and time of our first g-body meet ing soon . In the meant ime ....




Like Mujeres on Facebook
Fo llow us on Instagram @barnardmujeres
Connect with us through email at muje res@barnard.edu

Mobilized African Diaspora (MAD)
In 2015 , follow ing a string of racist incidents , black student s at the Uni versity of Missouri gained
national attention after they launched a campaign to end the culture of anti-blackness on campus
and demand that the president of the university resign. In response , a group of black students at
Columbia University , later named the Mobilized African Diaspora (MAD) , began to hold
meetings and planned a rally in solidarit y. After the rally, MAD continued to hold meetings and
crafted their first official list of demands.
Since it's inception , MAD has operated under a radical Black queer feminist lens, striving to use
intersectional dialogue to co,nbat violence inflicted upon Black queer folk, as well as uplift their
voices. We utilize an intersectional approach because the liberation of queer Black women
signifies freedom for all, as their freedom necessitates the destruction of all systems of
oppression. Toda y, MAD serves as a producti ve space for Black students at Columbia Uni versity
to organize against racis1n and use our privilege as students of this institution to fight against
gentrification and Columbia 's role in furthering anti-blackness.
When it comes to action , our members have dedicated impressive amounts of time and labor to
ensure that Columbia not only feels our presence , but acknowledges and respects our demands.
This involves many forms of action , but one of the most important is staying in tune with the
concerns of the Black community on campus and in the surrounding area in order to inform our
goals and missions. Last semester , for example , we hosted several grievance forums , where we
allowed our fellow Black students to share their experiences in a safe space. Understanding
Columbia ' s long history of overlooking and disregarding the voices of Black students , we find it
critical to provide such spaces. Our activism also includes teach-ins on issues such as eco-racism
and legal rights training , organizing rallies that center the black, queer , feminist perspective , and
launching ca1npaigns, like our recent TJBDA Y campaign , in which we dressed an on-campus
statue of Thomas Jefferson in a KKK hood and released a statement demanding that the
Uni versity acknowledge their persistent tolerance of a deeply rooted culture of white supremac y.
Despite what we have already accomplished as a group, we recognize that there is much more to
be done in order to reinforce and normalize Blackness so that our identities are not lost in the
shadow of this predominantl y white institution. We strongl y believe that a university's strength
lies in the ability to foster respect and and a sense of community among its different groups , but
here at Columbia , "diversity " is merely a facade- eclectic and complex for1ns of Blackness are
often suppressed , while Blackness that can be categorized , owned , and advertized is praised.
Resultantl y, we have crafted a list of goals and demands to improve the black experience and
hold the University accountable for its shortcomings.
We de1nand that the University eli1ninate the student contribution and improve financial aid for
minority groups. We demand that the University improve its Black faculty representation and
restructure the Core Curriculum to include Intro to African-American Studies and Intro to

Comparative Ethnic Studies as requirements. We demand that the University prioritize the
physical safety and mental heaJth of women, queer , and trans people of color. Laterally, we aim
to condemn and disassemble white supremacist , racist , heteronormative , and neo-coloniaJist
ideals that place restraints on Blackness and harm all black life. We also ai,n to improve our own
engagement with the Harle1n community, work against the University 's efforts to gentrify the
neighborhood and displace its primary and rightful residents , as well as continue researching and
uncovering the harmful systems and mechanisms that threaten to impede the fight for Black
liberation.
We understand the scope of these goals and the hard work that it will take to accomplish
them, and for that reason , we are always seeking new minds and voices to welcome into our
group. While we strongl y encourage that our members attend weekly meetings at a minimum ,
there is no set time commitment. MAD is a non-hierarchicaJ organization , hence all roles and
corrunittees exist horizontally and equally to each other. To get involved , follow us on Facebook
and Twitter, or emai l us at 1nad.columbia@gmail.co1n for information on upcoming meeting
dates, teach-ins , and other events. As a member of MAD, you can join us in the fight to
normalize the presence of othered groups in and around campus , as well as put an end to the
sociaJ, political , and economic disenfranchisement perpetuated by the University.

~~89.9

on the

dial

and streaming
wkcr.org~~~

online

24/7

at

Our nickname,
" The Or i ginal
FM," is somewhat
of a misnomer,
but
WKCR-FM is one o f the oldest
radio
stations
around.
We are
Columbia
University
' s student-run
radio
station,
fou nded in
1941 .
What we Broadcast
can be summed up by other
nickname:
"The
Alternative".
We have a history
o f featuring
mus i c and talk
programming
that
many cons i der commercial
l y non-viable.
(Not a
problem
for us: we ' re non-commercial
.)
Catch anything
from Reggae,
Hindustan
i, Celtic
, Cumb ia,
Indie
Rock, Non-Western
Classical,
Field
Recordings,
Exper i menta l,
Folk,
Carnatic
, Afro funk , Film Hits , Ethio-Jazz,
and Chuigushou
to Hip Hop on our "I n All Languages"
programs.
Check out our "New Music"
Department,
which played
an important
role
in the establishment
o f what is known today
as the New York
Downtown Scene , which fe atures
experimental
and avant-garde
.
programming.
Or tune in to Studio
A, our Arts Department's
weekly
live
li terat ure show, which highlights
poetry , prose
and experimental
work by queer
writers
and writers
of color .
KCR was one of the first
radio
sta ti ons to bring
Jazz to the
airwaves
and we have maintained
our reputation
as one o f t he
preem ine nt radio
stations
i n t he world
f or broadcasting
Jazz of
the past
and present.
Over the years
our station
has hos ted
icons
Charles
Min gus,
Dizzy Gillespie,
Duke Ell i ngton,
Sun Ra
and many others.

Our Latin Departmen t was the first
airwaves
and continues
to celebrate
chachacha
and bugalu.

to bring
genres

salsa
to the
such as mambo,

Like Hip Hop ? KCR's Sketch
Armstrong
and Bobbito
Garcia
Show is
considered
one of the most influential
radio
programs
of the
199 0 ' s dedicated
to underground
Hip Hop. Their
show gave
exposure
to artists
who would go on to become the biggest
names
in Hip Hop, including
Nas, Notorious
B . I . G., the Wu-Tang Clan,
Jay Z, Eminem and The Fugees.
The WKCR News Department
provides
a un i que take on local,
national,
and global
i ssues . Student
reporters
continue
the
tradit
i on of KCR' s award - wi nning coverage
of the Columbia
University
student
str i ke of 1968, and highlight
i ssues
relevant
to Columbia
and i ts surrounding
commun i ties
(eg.Harlem).
In
recent
months,
the department
has covered
many activist
i nitiatives
and demonstrat
i ons taking
place
in the g r eater
New
York area.
~~If

you

are interested
information
for

in becoming
a DJ , you can find
each department
at wkcr.org!~~

contact

the next few pages a re repr1~
• d w/ permission from the zine A Brief History of Civil Disobed

CC.UPATtoN

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9

GRADUATE
RKERS
OF LUMBI
The Graduate
Workers of Columbia - UAWLocal 2110 is
the union for research
and teaching
assistants
at
Columbia . PhD, master's,
and undergraduate
students
from across
all campuses and departments
make up our
bargaining
unit. _

--

In December of 2016 , after
four years of organizing
and campaigns at dozens of peer campuses,
we won our
union election
with massive margin (1602 to 623). We
immediately
prepared
to bargain
for our contract,
e l ecting
a bargaining
committee
and ratifying
a l ist
of barga i ning goals supporthas only co ntinued
ato qro w si nce .AA,,e= e.l_e.c.t io n: witbrPY@E 2; 000 woqe, rs ,
now ha vi ng asked t g be r,,ep,rJ/w,ente.d by GWC
-UAW
&ocal

9if

~ 110 .

Columbia ' s a dminis t ration , however , has spent
millions
of dollars
fil i ng groundless
ob j ections
to
our election
in a~ g ttem e t to den cl.. us the union
rights
we deserve
under the law . A New York labor
judge ruled that the objections
shou l d be "dismissed
in their
entirety,
" but Columbia's
admi nistrators
appealed
to the federal
level.
Now, they are waiting
for Trump - appointed
l abor judges , hostile
t o workers '
r i ghts on principle
, to help them weaken our union.
As graduate
and unde r graduate
empl oyee ; , we pla y a
cri €l ca i ro i e I n mai n t a i ning eofum
Cla as a

wor ld -c l ass f e s e a rch and teaching
university
. With u
o ective
bar ainin
we h~ve eXPerienced
e ario s
....
,---_.
1=..
und1n , a e payc eek ,,..unmanaqeable
rent i l ci::e ses, ttt
l l\'''
\
, I Ill
e a
ourselves \ 1 an
our
an wa'i.e
secu ~'i.~~ a.([ ack o])
ans arenc
~i{"fa~li'1t't~!1!l~ \ }>\; licies,
and

,,, ' ' ,tor

,

,

( tack)

~o _ professional~sm
ng recognize

con d i t ions are
consent
to set

t hat stems from our labor
no
·
as work.
If our benefits and working

secured , Col umbia will need our
the terms of our employment.
When we

are able
to communicate
and negotiate
.as _ equals
with
,Columbia,
an<L.as a result
live
more securel_y , we will
_be able to focus
more on quality
research
and ◄
teaching _._

If you are an undergraduate
teaching
assistant
(or
a..
,J. ./
.,,,
graduate
research
or teaching
assistant)
~~
in becoming active
in yo ur union , please
email us at
columbiagradunion@gmail.com
. We are always looking
for more organizers
to help make our union as strong
as possible - go to columbiagradunion
. org/#getinvolved
to get in the l oop.

THE
HARLEM
RAIDS
It was still early morning when residents of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses heard helicopters buzzing outside their windows. It
was June 4, 2014 , the
;· , ., day when police burst
, •through residents '
~ doors in what was then
the largest police raid in
city history. Later , parents
whose children were
arrested would recall police
. entering their homes
' without permits, handcuffing
innocent people, and taking their belongings as evidence. "The police that were in my
house were having a conversation in front of me about media coverage ," one parent said
after the raids. "That's not a good feeling , that you 're using me to get a promotion. " 103
people were indicted in the raid ; that day , police arrested over 40 people.
The Grant and Manhattanville Houses are New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA)
buildings located about ten blocks from Columbia ' s Morningside campus, and across the
street from the rapidly developing Manhattanville campus. The NYPD ' s justification for
the raid was the same as what Columbia
12s sr.'i
••••• ~'!,..
·••···· .•••••••••.••••••••
students heard from their own administration:
] Gant/ Manhattanville
safety. An email went out the day after the

' Housing Projects
raids informing students that it would "make
lS (<I
our city and community safer." The reality ,
~~"' s~/,le
s,
however , is that a persistent lack of resources
he RiversideChurch
for youth in the community is the reason for the
@
,I,
tj'
violence there , and that services , not
-~
incarceration , are necessary if the situation is to
~
lli
--=---,
improve. What 's more , it has become clear that ,.-----------...
'
'
!
Barnard
i
although promises of community investment
! College ~
were made to Grant and Manhattanville
'·· --...-.... --. residents when Columbia won approval to build , SI · Colur, bia r1
l. 1·ivers,ty
a new campus across the street from their
homes , the expansion has brought them only
band-aid so lutions and increased police violence.
' '.04''

•• ••••

• •• • ••••



There had been violence among youth at the Houses off-and-on over the past 40 years ,
but tensions had quieted in 2011, when Tayshanna " Chicken " Murphy , a nationally
ranked high school basketball player , was shot at Grant. In light of the resulting tumult ,
community activists stepped up their efforts to bring resources to youth in the area,
ideally in the form of a building between the Houses that could provide emergency
services, after school activities , and employment training to young residents of Grant and

Manhattanville. The Community Benefits Agreement promised $3 million specifically to
residents of Manhattan ville and Grant, but the West Harlem Development Corporationthe group responsible giving out grants from that pool of money- -has been slow to act.
The WHDC , mired in controversy since its director stepped down in 2014 when a large
grant went to his sister ' s nonprofit, has been more willing to give money to outside
groups that run small-scale arts or sports programming for kids. These programs aren ' t
bad , but they keep the money away from organizers who are actually from the Houses ,
and they don 't provide the core services--employment and crisis response--that would
actually stop the cycle of violence at the Houses .
Now, many of those arrested in the raids are coming back to a situation that has largely
remained the same , and in many ways has worsened. NYCHA decided in 2015 to
permanently exclude residents convicted of crimes , which means whole families may lose
their homes as a result of the raid. If they decide they want to continue living with their
children when they return from prison , NYCHA will take away their homes. What 's
more , the NYPD announced at the beginning of this summer that they would be carrying
out dozens of raids. The 2014 raid of Grant and Manhattanville is no longer the biggest
in city history: That title now belongs to a raid in the Bronx that indicted
120 people , arresting 88 in one day.


As students , we can't accept the argument that raids keep
us safe. They represent the worst possible response to an
issue of systemic racism and inequality. Far from
contributing to safe communities , police raids are the last
resort of a city that chronically under-services Black and
Latino neighborhoods. As our University expands to literally
become the neighbor of the Grant and Manhattanville
Houses , it is in the University's interest to heighten
surveillance in the surrounding communities. It is trying to
create a campus bubble in a place where real people have
lived--and , in the case of Grant and Manhattanville, been
ignored--for years. It is far easier to cast prior residents as
criminals who must be removed than to include them in the
" development " that Columbia promises to the community.
Mass incarceration is just one aspect of Columbia ' s broader effect
on the neighborhood: dispossession and displacement. The
University's outright support for the raids , coupled with its lack of
follow-up on the promises made to Manhattanville and Grant , sends a
clear message to residents: Columbia is coming to your neighborhood , but it is not here
for you.

THIS

IS

;dANH

\\Thereand ,vl1atis Maill1attanville'?
Manhatta11villeextends from \.Yest122 nd street north to vVest134u1 street and from the Hudson
River v.1est to the City College campus. It is hon1eto Manh attanville res idents that generally
have fe,ver eco1101nicmd educational opportunities than residents of Morningside Heigl1ts,
home to the most \.vell- endowed institution in Nev.1 York Cit11• 1'his dynamic is felt daily by
those v.1ho are effectively locked- out of our gated campus, but it is felt with addition al strengt h
on tl1e too frequent occasion that Columbia U11iversity flexes its wallet to shape the area in its
wl1ite-c olumned image.
Ho,v l1asColumbia used its econolnic advmtage to take advmtage'?
1960s - Columbia (CU)plans to build a gym in Morningside Park that would largely exclude
local residents . The plan becomes known as "Gym Crov.1. "
Also begins eliminating Single Room Occupancy housing in the area; by one estimate , .C.U.
displaced over 7,ooo residents in the decade before 1968.
1968 - "Gym Cro"v"scraped after week-long occupation of campus buildings by the student
Afro-American Society coordinated with the Harlem conununi ty
1990 - CU pt1rchases the Audubon Ballroom, where ~1Ialcolm X delivered several speeches ai1d
was assassinated, and tries to turn it into a laborator y. Co1n1nt1nitygroups protest the project
and succeed iI1 preserving the landmai·k.
1991 - ~1villeCommunity Board 9 stai·ts ,-vork on a rede velopment plan; it is certified in 2005
2003 - CU submits plan for $6.7billion expansion into Manhattanville tl1atwould require the
acqt1isitionand demolition of all but three buildings il1the 17-acre project area.
2006 - Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC) enter s contract with Alee King Rosen &
Fleming, a planI1ing and engineering consttlting firm, to determine \.vheth er Mvillesuffers
from "urb an blight" (precondition for use of eminent domain). Both corporations had been
previouslv contr acted and paid bv CUil1relation to tl1is project.
2008 - ESDC deems neigl1borhood "blighted." Nick Sprayegen, owner of 'fuck -It -Away
Storage, and gas station owners Gt1rnamSingh and Pai·minder Kaur, sue the state.
2009 - The New York State Supreme Court, Appellate Division rules that eminent domain v.1as
illegal in this case because it was for t l1e benefit of an "elite" private institution
2009 - ESDCappeals to Nev.1 York State Cot1rt of Appeals, \.vhich overturns tl1e ruli11gin favor
of Columbia
2010 - U.S. St1preme Court decides not to hear the case, giving Columbia tl1e green light to
give the store ov.1ners market rate compe11sationand take tl1eir properties.
2014 - NYPDexecutes early 1norning raid at ~1ai111attai1ville
Hotises. Residents had tried to
collaborate with city officials, lav.1 enforcement , and CU for a yeai· to stem gang violence in a
way that might not obstrt1ct the futures of so many young people. CU boasted of raid in an
email and is believed to have assiste d in the surveillance that led to the arrests.
2016 / 2017 - ManhattaiivilleCampus opens

1

ATTANVILLE,

u_

S-

A-

CU ManhattanvilleExpansio11

'fhe expansion uprooted a community to •,vhich it returned little in terms of oppo1tunities for
education and employ1nent. Having learned from previous efforts to upr oot the neigl1borhood
(Gym Cro\.v),Columbia created a fund for local programs and initiatives il1 \Vest Harlem, but
"vithout also implementing a stru cture for the dispersal of these funds, money has been
difficult to access and in t l1e end, it won't do enot1gh to help the comn1unity. As Columbia
faculty and students start looking to live close to th eir l\1ai1hattanville cainpus, tl1ey\.\Till
price
long-term residents out of the ir homes and properti es and break up long-standing social
networks. In fact this l1as started already in these early days of the ne"v cainpus.

MovingFo1"\vard
We need to build a means of communication between Columbia University stude11ts, to whom
the university administrator s listen much more often than comn1unity residents , and those
residents "''hose needs aren 't being met in a community which Columbia directly exploits.
Past Sh1de11tEfforts
CAGE(Coalition Against Gentrification) - frequen t 1neetings \.vitl1 members of the commU11
ity,
led the protests against the expansion
Citv News at the Columbia Spectator - published articles exposing Columbia's interactio n \.vitl1
the community and made this news accessible to students and co1nmunity 1nembers; some of
these stor ies "''ere picked up by larger news orgailizations
Furtl1erReadi11g
'"fhe Radiant University," Steven Gregory
"Under stand ing Columbia U11i
versity's Expansion into \Vest Harlem: An Activist's Guide"
City News (old coverage) on the Columbia Spectator
"Ties that Bind: Checking 011tl1e Manhattanville Community Be11efits Agreement , six years
later," 1'he Eye, 'fhe Columbia Spectator
"Organizing Against Gentr ification U.," SocialistWorker.org

re:claim magazine

calling writers & artists!
re:claim is a publication at Columbia that works to center the voices, well-being, and liberation of
Black people, people of color, disabled and neurodivergent people, femme, queer , gender-nonconforming and trans people , migrants , workers , and all marginalized identities in both content
and in leadership. We strive to embody values rooted in histories of organizing, anti-oppression
politics, creative resistance , and freedom of expression for those who have been historically
silenced.
We started up in the late winter/early spring of 2016 as a staff consisting predominantly of
people of color, women and femmes in conversation with people doing organizing of all kinds.
For many of us, helping to build re:claim came in response to the hurt we have experienced at
the hands of mainstream campus media, which routinely excludes Black people and people of
color from its ranks, and demon izes activist groups. We do not purport to be "objective" (and
maintain suspicion of those who claim objectivity), but instead aim to create, solicit , and honor
content rooted in our own experiences and communities. re:claim publishes first-person
narrat ive, news , creative writing , and visual art. In the coming year , we specifically want to
prioritize group structures that challenge the burdens of labor placed on marginalized groups as
a "default" in organizing and publishing spaces at Columbia , addressing this within our
publication as well as in our larger communities.
Please reach out to reclaim.at.cu@gmail.com or any of the folks listed on
reclaimatcu.wixsite.com/reclaimatcu if you are interested in getting involved! We make decis ions
by consensus using a non-hierarchal structure. Recognizing that people have different
capacities for and ways of contributing labor , time, and energy , we strive to make involvement
as accessible and accommodating as possible. On-boarding involves a brief conversation with a
couple current committee members just to make sure we're on the same page. We'd love to
have you!

What We've Published
Why I'm Occupying a Building at
Columbia : Love, Power , and Climat e
Justi ce by Iliana Salaza r-Dodge
"We must believe that we can change for the
better and that we deserve better. In addition
to symbolically taking down the fossil fuel
industry and other villains of our capitalist
economy , we must use this moment to
redirect resources towards the creation of the
beautiful. "

Dreams and Visions by Thando Miam bo

Senior Interview: Kevin Chen and Rachel
Poir ier by Claire Zuo
"' I think there are several things embedded in
activist groups and activist identity that don 't
really get accounted for. Who 's bearing the
brunt of the emotional labor, what does the
leadership look like, how are these
configured? ' --R.P.
What do we want? In care it's easy to lose
sight of that -- it's easy to lose sight of what
we actually desire , so that people end up
feeling burnt out , exhausted , bearing the
brunt of this. "'-K.C.

"Our Cry : Gynnya" by Rosalyn Huff
{Content warning : This piece discusses anti-Black
violence, death and misogynoir .]

"Our men are stolen from us every day.
We rally . We riot. We rage.
We are stolen , too .
They retreat.
'Say her name!' Her family cries.
'GYNNYA!'
Our men fail us every day.
We fuss. We fight. We forgive.
We never fail.
They forget. "

Urgent: Letter from Eyricka King at
Franklin Correctional Facility
{Content warning: physical abuse, sexual assault,
anti-Blackness (specifically anti-Black state
violence), transmisogyny , state violence}

"They are denying me medical treatment. ...
Please contact everybody , the news stations ,
call the facility ... . I wrote you 3 different times
since th is happened only to get the mail
returned to me shredded up in pieces .... They
only care once you have people from the
outside call in."

Read/listen online :
• "Why Students Need the #RighttoRe cord" by Brandee Blocker
• "Velvet: A Play list" by Charlen e Adhiambo , and more ..... .

How Barnard Contingent Faculty Won Their First Contract
By Gerard Di Trolio
• Reprinted from In These Times

Th e contingent faculty at Barnard College
have won their first contract, adding
another victory for precarious academic
workers across the country .
Barnard Contingent Faculty-UAW Local
2110 (BCF-UAW) is made up of about 200
adjunct professors and term faculty,
predominantly ,.vomen. It was certified back
in October 2015 and had been negotiating
with Barnard's administration since
February of last year.
In December, after getting nowhere, union
members voted by an
overwhelming majority - 89
percent - in support of a strike .
A strike date ,.vas set for
February 21, and a tentative
agreement was reached with
just five days to spare. On
March 26, BCF-UAW
announced that a five-year
contract had been ratified by its
membership. More than 90
percent voted in favor.
"I think it's a strong contract . In some ways
we had to compromise and there's room for
improvement but we have a very good first
contract and it creates a foundation for us
moving forward," says Siobhan Burke, a
Barnard graduate and adjunct lecturer of
dance, who also sits on BCF-UAWs
bargaining committee.
The main issues for members were ,.vages,
benefits, workload and job security .
Adjuncts will now get $7,000 per
three-credit course, instead of the current
average of $6,000, and that will increase to
$10,000 over the course of the contract .
Full-time term professors will have a

minimum salary of $60 ,000, rising to
$70,000 within five years.
Adju ncts will also have access to healthcare
for the first time, with those teaching six or
more credits in an academic year receiving a
50 percent contribution from Barnard for
medical insurance costs.
And in the area of job security, adjuncts will
have access to some severance and be able
to receive multi-year appointments . They
will also receive earlier notification of their
teaching status and course loads, under the
ne,.v contract .
"We are pleased that the
Barnard Contingent Faculty
union has ratified its first
contract, which reflects the
College's deep respect for union
members' significant
contributions to our
community . We look forward to
continue building a strong
partnership with our
contingent faculty, to ensure
our students and our academic program
flourish," Provost Linda Bell said in a
statement.
Mobilizing membership

BCF-UAW's victory ,vas in large pa1t due to
its mobilizing strategy.
"At each key step of the ,.vay- particularly
organizing the strike authorization vote and
preparing for a strike - we reached out to
our members through phone banking,
email, social media, informational meetings
and one-on-one conversations on campus .
Because many adjuncts juggle multiple jobs,
it's a challenging group to organize . They're

pt1lled in many dir ections. So staying in
contact , keeping people inform ed and
maintaining open lin es of communication
was esse ntia l," says Burk e.
Barnard went to significant lengths to have
contract negotiation s go its way. The college
hir ed notoriou s union busting law firm
Jackson Lewis, and a federal m ediator was
brought in, showing how fraught th e
negotiation s were.
Burk e cautions that how Barnard respe cts
th e contract remain s to be see n.

"Will th ey try to create new job title s that
ar e ot1tside th e recognition clause of our
contract? And find ways around the
contract? Based on th e process we \-vent
through , I wouldn't b e surpris ed ," she said.
Student support

Another major factor in BCF-UAWs victory
was th e role of stud ent activism. When a
possib le strike was on th e horizon , Barnard
student s mobilized to pr ess ure th e
admini stration through th e Student-Worker
Solidarity (SWS) organization.
"In January and February, we start ed door
knocking in th e dorm s and gathered mor e
than 700 signatt1res on a stud ent petition.
At th e sam e tim e, we encot1raged student s
to get th eir parents to call th e president and
provost of th e college," says Meghan
Broph y, a Barnard student and SWS
memb er. "It was a good way to talk to

students who didn't kno w what was
happening or who were only reading emails
from th e administration. I think we learn ed
a lot of practical organizing skills from that
experi ence, and it help ed us rememb er to
really see ,-vhat information we needed to
publicize mor e."
The group also spear h ead ed a ntrmber of
actions like having stt1dent s lin e th e hall s
that Barnard' s bargaining team had to tra vel
down to reach the negotiating table ,
organiz ed marche s and helped to circulate a
petition among altrmni.
"The admini stra tion tri es all th ese
divid e-and-conqu er tactics like pitting
financial aid and campus programs again st
living wages and benefits for contingent
faculty. We want to shov.1 ,.vewill be unit ed
and not divid ed by all th ese tactics," said
Broph y.
The iron y behind an elite women's college
trying to ston ewall a bargaining unit that is
predominantly women was not lost on
student s.
"When Barnard says that it advocates for
women, especially women in th e academy
and high er edt1cation , th ey're spe aking
about a very specific sub set of women ," said
Becca Breslaw, a Barnard stud ent and SWS
m emb er. "There are a lot of lead ers that
ha ve come out of Barnard that th ey push for
us that represent this corporate feminist
appea l rath er than advocating for all
women, especially working -class women.

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Women's College vs. Women Workers
Don't be fooled by their progressive rhetoric. Even the most "socially conscious" university
administrator is still a boss.
By Meghan Broph y
*Reprinted from Jacobin Maga=ine

Debates about cultural appropriation and
free speech at elite universities have
consumed both the Left and Right latel y.
While some college administrators have
acquiesced to student demands around
these isst1es, with many incoming student
orien t ation programs incorporating the
language of social justice and
int er sectionality, the tmderlying class
dynamics of these schools remain
unchanged. Amid left-sotmding rh etoric
from the top, workers at these elite colleges
con tint1e to run into barriers when
organ1zmg on campus.
Barnard College, a wome n's libera l arts
college where I am a stud ent, exemplifies
the ab ility of progressive rhetoric and class
inequality to coexist. From its Social Ju stice
Institute to its Zine Libr ary, Barnard
showcases its feminist crede ntial s,
marketing itself as an institution dedicated
to "ad dr ess[ing] issues of gender in all of
their complexity and ur gency ."
In recent years, Barn ard has hosted
commencement spea kers such as She1yl
Sandberg and Hillary Clinton. It even
awarded a Medal of Distinction to Lena
Dunham. Yet at the same time, Barnard
adm ini strations past and prese nt have come
int o confl ict with workers on campus.
Whether by attempting to cut back on office
workers' and dorm att endants' health
benefits in 1996, a move that sparked one
ofthe lon gest strikes ever to take place at a
college in the United States, or by hiring a

notoriotlS anti-labo r law firm to negotiate
with its newly orga nized cont ingent faculty
union in 2016 , Barnard, like many other
colleges, is riven by the class divide beh-veen
adminis tr ato rs and campus workers.
These conflicts sugges t that rather th an
prodt1cing a more egalitarian institution,
Barnard's social justice rh etoric is part of a
limited brand of liberal, "lean-in" feminism.

"Barnard Cuts Women and Children
First"
In 1996 , about 165 office workers and
dormito1 y atte nd ants,the majority of ,-vhom
were women of color, carried out a
success ful six-month str ike following the
adminis tr at ion's pro posal to reduce their
health benefits.
Originally organized in 1972, Barn ard
workers in UAW Local 2110 (th en Distr ict
65) were among the lowest paid workers on
campus in an increasingly unaffordable city.
In an interview with the New York Times ,
Local 2110 Pr esident Maida Rosenstein
describ ed man y of th e st rik ers as "single
mothers who ba r ely make it paycheck to
paycheck." Barn ard wante d to add health
care prem itlIDSto their list of expenses .
Durin g this time, sympathetic faculty moved
classes off campus and studen ts organized
to support the strikers. Workers at Yale,
who were on strike at the same tim e, held a
joint rally with Local 2110 in New York City.
The Student Strike Committee stage d

demon strations and eventuall y, a sit-in in
solidarity with th e striking work ers. In
respons e, Barnard ~rithh eld th eir diploma s .
With th e ongoing strik e and suppr ession of
stud ent activism in support of it,th e 1996
gradttation becam e a site of struggl e. During
th e ceremon y, both strik ers outsid e th e
main gat es and stud ents in th e attdi ence
held prot est signs.
As Jttdith Shapiro , a renown ed feminist

anthropolo gist and Barnard 's pr esident at
th e tim e, began to speak , stud ents unfurl ed
a bann er reading "Anti-Work er=
Anti -Woman , Contract Now."
Eventuall y, Barnard mthdr ew its health
care propo sal and conceded to the striker s'
demand s. But th e school ha sn't chang ed. As
recentl y as 20 12,th e admin istration sought
to freeze pay and reduc e mat erni ty leave for
th e sam e group of workers, leading to th e
creation of Barnard and Columbia 's Unit ed
Stud ents Against Sweatshop s local,
Stud ent-Work er Solidarity.

Faculty Fight Back
On Equal Pay Day,th e pro vost of Barnard
College discusse d her research on th e
importanc e of women-led firms in closing
th e gend er pay gap. Yet ju st a few month s
earli er, Barnard Conting ent Facttlty- abottt
two thirds of whom ar e women- set a strik e
deadlin e dttring th eir fight for a fair first
contract.

Organiz ed and certifi ed in 2015, Barnard
Conting ent Faculty -UAW Local 2110 began
yearlong negotiation s mth Barnard College
in February 2016. Like man y oth ers in th e
gromng acad emic pr ecariat , Barnard 's
adjunct s and oth er non -tenttr e-track facttlty
were fighting for demands such as high er
minimum per cour se pay, access to
affordabl e healt h and retir ement benefits, a
grievance proc edttre , and job secttrity.
Whil e Barnard 's pr esident was bttsy writing
an op -ed for th e New York Times about
bod y imag e, cosmetic surg ery, and aging
amon g her '1iberal, femini st -leanin g, highly
educat ed peer grottp " on th e Upper East
Side,th e anti -ttnion law firm Jac kson Le,-vis
handl ed negotiation s m th th e conting ent
faculty on behalf of th e admini stration.
Frustrat ed by months of th e administration
stalling , conting ent faculty voted to appro ve
a strik e deadlin e by an overwh elmin g
majority of 89 percent in Decemb er. In a
campu s-~ride email ,th e administration
impli ed that a strik e would contribut e to
stud ents ' post- election distr ess .
Mean~ rhile,th e law firm th ey retain ed wrot e
that Obama- era anti-di scrimination laws
were "aggr essive" and that Tntmp wottld
"return to traditional th eories of
discrimination. "
Stud ents organiz ed rallies and went
door -to -door in dorms to petition in support
of prof essors. With stud ent Sttpport rapidl y
gromng ,th e admini stration att empt ed to pit
living wages and benefits for adjunct

professors against financial aid and campus
programs for students .
Ultimatel y, Barnard Contingent
Faculty-UAW Local 2110 reached an
agreement a few days before the strike
deadline. Their first contract- which
included the highest minimum per course
pay for adjuncts of any college in New York
City- was ratified in March 2017.

Not Just Barnard
Th e problem is not confined to Barnard or
its administration. While one Barnard
student correctl y called the school "a
women's college for the one percent " in the
Columbia Spectator,these patterns extend
far beyond one college in New York City.
This kind of anti -worker liberal hypocris y is
nothing new on college campuses. Likewise,
the ascendance of corporate "lean in"
feminism-prominentl y displa yed in the
Clinton campaign and in much of the
mainstream women 's movement-is not
confined to campuses.
Elite uni versities may try to hide it behind
the progressi ve language of their brochures,
but their place in the system at-large hasn 't
changed . While man y college presidents
criticized the Tnlillp administration in
graduation speeches this year,the y've also
been eagerl y awaiting Trump 's National
Labor Relations Board appointments in
hopes these appointees will overturn the
board ruling that allows graduate workers to
.
.
organize unions .

A few months ago, a dean at Yale who has

touted her commitment to supporting
students' "multifaceted identities " made
headlines for publicl y calling New Have n
residents ''\.vhite trash " and "low class folks."
When housekeepers at the Harvard -owned
Doubletree Hotel were or ganizing a union in
2014, as Sarah Leonard and Rebecca Rojer
have detailed, Sheryl Sandberg couldn 't find
time to meet with them when she was on
campus to speak. Harvard's first woman
president fought them every step ofthe ,.vay.
The list goes on.
Elite uni versities ' administrations can
accommodate a particular brand of identi ty
politics and progressi ve rhetoric. That
rhetoric does not threaten their bottom line
or tight grip on control of the campus. But
when univ ers ity ,.vorkers engage in some
old-fashioned collecti ve action on the
job,these administrator s suddenly drop
their intersectional commitments-or, even
worse, use that progressive rhetoric against
those workers .
Don 't be fooled by their progressi ve
posturing. Even the most "socially
conscious " college administrator is still a
boss .

- Worried
publicly
thatstudents
frompublic
highschools
wouldn't
bereadvf B d
Assured
students
thatBarnard's
adjuncts
didnotneedhealthcarebecause
manyhave~'hu:,~~~s
\
onWallStreet"
- Selectively
suppressed
studentspeech
I
_ failed - _Wrote
oneoftheweakest
responses
totheMuslim
ban

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~e:;~~~~~e:~~~;~a~hse
::h::~~~;i~!li~~udd:::~u:n~~:mented
students,
nsea ofprov1d1ng
leadership
onanyoftheseissue S
dh
.
.
topicslikebotox,
a performance
thatwasrightly
fou!d'~~P~~~ng"e;n~a~;.nal
pl~tt~,rbm
toopineon
theBarnard
alumnae
community.
rsmay1ng
Ymembers
of
1

ButBarnard
hasa New
President!
What
We
Know
'
1

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Oneofherfirstemails
totheBarnard
studentbodywasinresponse
toCharlottesville.
Thisresponse:
- failedtohonestly
name
, address,
andcondemn
thewhitesupremacist
ideology
thatledtothe I
murder
ofoneindividual
andtheinjuring
of19others.
- failedtoexplicitly
defend
therightofstudents
ofcolortostudyandlivefreeofallfonnsofracism
.
- failedtostatewhatBarnard
willdo,inthefaceofourongoing
political
crisis,tostandforracial
justice
.

WBAR was started

in 1991 by three Barnard studen~s
who wanted a new
ro ressive
radio space on campus to play rock n . rol~, punk, and
pDIYg music· . B'k'
riot grrrl
i in ••< K'll , one of the most influential
..
bands of the decade played a WBAR concert,
as well as musicians
Daniel Johnston,
Ari up, Gang Gang Dance and many others.

-

II

Postcrypt
Art Gallery
is a fully
undergrad-run
art space located
in
the basement of St Paul's
Chapel,
dedicated
to giving
all artists
a
place to show their
work . PostCrypt
is concerned
with art as direct
action,
and in the past have held shows that respond directly
to
acts of marginalization
and the immediate
political
climate .
Current
to pics of interest
include
the implications
of having a
body and the idea of a souvenir.

The Society
for the Ad
(SA'O'P') is
a comm .
vancement of Under
interest
in rorn unity of Columbia Unive r~Presantad
Fil!IID•Jr:ars
the scenes . p
oting diversity
in rnect· rsity
students
Wit h an
ia, both on screen
and behind

The Columbia
Queer Alliance (CQA) is a sfuden+
or9aniza+ ion for q_ueer and +rans sfuden+s.
CQA reco9nizes
+he diverse
infersecf;ons
of
;den+ if ies , back9round
s and needs of our
communify , and remains
commiffed
q_ueer and
+rans liberafion
hand-in-hand
wifh anfi-racism
anfi-sexism
and anfi-imperialism.

,

[ima9e descripfion
: +he CQA 1090.+he le++ers
'cq_a' in curly fon+, f;lled in wifh rainbow
colors ,
wif h a Columbia
crown on fop of +he 'q_' and a
hear+ offer +he 'a']

cq_aboa rd@col umbia.ed

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Why is it that we have all the technology and n1eans to
produce i1n mense wealth- enough food to feed everyo ne 4 meals
per day , enough homes and construc tion materials to house
everyone , the capacity to provide education and healthcare for
all- and yet, in the U.S., the top 1% controls n1ore than a thi rd of
the nation' s wealth? Why is it that 66 1nillion children still go hungry
each year , that millions of people are home less , and that the overw helming
~
n1ajority still do not have access to qua lity schools and medical services ?
The reason is that the system we currently live under --capitalism --is
fundame ntally based on exploiting the n1any to 1nake profit for the fev,. Under capita lism, a
minority ruling class directly profits off of the labor of the majority , the working class , 1,vhois
forced to sell their abi lity to work in order to survive. Capitalism is responsible for countless wars , end less poverty ,
and 1n ass exploitation and oppression for the sake of profit; and as a capita list institution, Col umbia is comp licit in
al 1of these processes.
Columbia is not simply an intellectual island in which indepe ndent inquiry is allowed to flourish. Its
administratio n directly benefi ts from maintai ning capitalisn1 and the inevitably racist, sexist , classist , and
homophobic conditions that arise fro1n it. Coltm1bia is a place where students are mo lded into the next generation of
bosses, politicians, and CEOs who have a stake in main taining the status quo. Its primary functio n as a capitalist
institution is far more corpo rate than educational: it exists to train the I% to rule and rep roduce intellectual workers
and research for profit at the expe nse of students, worke rs, neighboring residents, and the global community at large .
Co lun1bia's actions have made this evident througho ut the course of its history . Columbia ' s admi nistration
is current ly hard at work disp lacing hund reds of Harlem residen ts for the sake of its expansio n into Manhatta n ville;
supporting the oppression of Palestinians bot h thro ugh its investments and by supp ressing anti -Israel speec h by
students and faculty ; funding the destructio n of the planet; and worrying about its reputatio n rather than
guaranteeing rights and resources for survivors of sexual violence (just to name a few exan1ples). This is all in
addition to v.1hat Columbia students already know--that Columbia extracts exorbi tant fees well over the median
family incon1e fro1n students , while paying its president millions of dollars per year to chastise student activists and
act as Colu1n bia 's respectable , liberal figure head.
Whi le Bolli nger gets paid an outrageous salary , it is actually the workers on this can1pus--fron1 custodians
to professo rs, support staff to TAs , most of whom are woefull y underpaid --that allow Coltm1bia to function. As
students , we also occupy a uniq ue space within the corporate institutio n that is Colu1n bia, and that position gives us
the power to make a real change , especiall y when we can collaborate with worke rs on crun pus and people in the
comn1unities arou nd Columbia.
All the issues n1entioned above are embedded within contexts outside of the university , but we can still
1n ake a dispropo rtionate impact by acting aga inst the profit-driven motives of the administration . We're the ones the
university is meant to accon1modate , we' re the ones who uphold their rep utation, and we're the ones who often pay
(either through tuition and/or donatio ns as alumni). As stakeholde rs in a capitalist instit ution , we don 't only have the
power , but also the responsibility to fight against its opp ressive policy. As you can see in Columbia ' s own history of
student activism , studen t movements ca11 often lead to change on a larger scale; just think of the Boycott ,
Divestment , and Sanctions moven1ent agains t aparth eid South Africa , which inspired a new generation of students to
push their ad1ninistration to withdraw its investments fro1n the private prison industry. Now, a new wave of students
is pushi ng for divestment from fossil fuel compa nies and Israeli apartheid .
We, as socialists , see that these issues of oppressio n are all interrelated beca use they all have the same roots
in the foundations of the capitalist syste111.The fight against sex ual violence is part of the fight against transphobia ,
which is part of the fight against prisons , which is part of the fight agains t racism , and so on and so forth . Moreove r,
this fig ht is global , and there are revolutionary socialists fighting for j ustice all over the world; from Greece to South
Africa , fro1n Egypt to Puerto Rico. Because the fight against oppression and exploitation spans so many issues and
regions across the world, we must develop political principles and experie nce that we carry outside of the gates of
Col umbia and well past our gradua tion. We enter campus with a choice: Are we here simply to get a deg ree from an
elite schoo l, or are we going to act ually challe nge the inequality and oppressio n that Co lumbia perpet uates? We
don' t look proudl y at the institution of Col umbia University ; and yet, we have a vision of a ,,.,orld beyond
corporat ized schooling in v.1hich access to quality education is available to all, in which the students , faculty, and
workers who run schools democra tically desig n the institutio ns that they want to be a part of, and in which
education , inquiry, and scholarship are the uninhibited gov ern ing values that drive our schoo ls.

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neutralor cut off from lhe rest of the worfd-in fact, they1re hierarchical
andundemocratic
institutionsthat operatefor profitandperpetuatethe
samelnequa
Jltiesthat structuresociety outsideits gates.

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TheColumbiaadministrationstayssilentas Palestinesolidarity
activistsand pro-Palestine
facultymemberson campusare
blacklistedandthreatenedby ZionistMcCarthyistorganizations;
it opposesthe democraticandhistoricvoteof graduatestudents
to torma union; It policesand displacesits neighborsin Harlem
.

:.a-~ -.

~
Classof 2021,you will begin yourtimeat Columbiain thecontext
of anemboldened
far rightthat is growing in its capacityfor
viotenceand its confidenceto imposeits raclst,sexist, ableist,
lslamophobic
, anti-LGBTQ,
andanti-working classagenda.We
haveto makeIt clearthattheyarenot welcomeat our school.

Nooneis coming to saveus- not the politicians, not lhe university
administrators, not thestate. We-students
, oppressedpeople,
1 workers
andallies-haveto saveourselves
. Wehaveto organizeourselvesinto a ......,,...,
movementlhat canfight backagainstattacksas wellas putforwarda
vision of a radically differentworldin whichhumanneed,justice,and
democracyareplacedaboveall else.Andweneedyou.
Weentercampuswith a choice:Arewehere
simplyto get a degreefroman elite university, or
arewegoingto actuallychallengethe inequality
andoppre:ssion
thatgets reproducedhere?

f

a

1nternalf
ona1
socialist
oruanizanon
fB:Barnard
COiumbia
soclallSIS
co1umbla.1so@gmalLcom

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RS
ampus

eet t

~

Join us on our 5th year and let's
end the illegalyet prevalent occurrence of late pay on campus
stand with the Graduate Workersand pressure CUto respect their vote
fight against retaliation by Barnard administration against contingent faculty
workwith USASto get Barnard to affiliatewith Worker RightsConsortium
educate ourselves and raise awareness about labor history and its importance

Save the Date!!!
Picnic: Hang With Us Sept 9th, 12 PM John Jay Lawn
Button Making+ Open Meeting: Why We Organize a nd
How to Get Invo lved Sept 13th, 8:00 PM, Diana LL2

Labor Party

6~



1

Since then, we supported workersin the IndusValleyrestaurant who
fought against wage theft (-- ); Workedalong with UNITE HEREto
help FacultyHouseWorkerswintheir contract; helped defeat unsafe ;.:
workingconditions injohn jay DiningHalland discriminatorytreatmentj
of workersat the ButlerCafe;joined the nationwide Fight For Fifteen /
Campaignto win 15on campus; and supported the unionization efforts£
and contract campaign by Barnard'sContingentfaculty (successful!)and ColumbiaGraduateStudents (stillfighting)







ITY:
raisers

arty Like We Fig ht Sept 16th 9:30 PM

{Details Tentative, keep track on bit.ly/fightndparty]
Five Years of Solidarity: Labor History Teac h-I n and
Anniversary Ce lebra t ion Oct 19th, Location TBA

~ Let's Connect at bit .ly/SWSFall17 ~
https :// www.face book.com/StudentWorkerSo Iidarity

-

what questions do you still have? what are you thinking about?
this is a free writing/drawing/thinking space

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theMorningside
Heights
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focused
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activist
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Wewilldiscuss
movements
ranging
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ofthe
1960s
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expansion
totheorganizing
happening
on •
1
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