DGSU Presents The Disorientation Guide Fall 2017 (Duke University)

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Title

DGSU Presents The Disorientation Guide Fall 2017 (Duke University)

Date

2018

Place

Durham, North Carolina

Source

https://issuu.com/caseywilliams66/docs/zine_booklet

extracted text

60

This 'zlne was writte n, compiled, and distributed by
members of the Duke Graduate Students Union,
Fall Semester· 2017

DGSU Presen ts

the
dukegra.dunion org
fa&ebook com/dukegra.c1uatestudentsun1on /

DISORIENTATION
GUIDE

"!ti@dukegradun1on
em ail: dukegradun1on @gmail .com

Fall 2017

2

HELLO!
and welcome to the
Duke Graduate
Students Union
DISorientation Guide!
Within
thew pages,you'llfindinformation
abouta rangeof sul?jects
thatwethinkareimportan
t foryouto knowaboutas a Dukegraduate
student,and as a merrbe
r of the largerworkingcommunity
at the
university,
inDurham,
inNorthCarol
ina, andbeyond.
This'zineis the
resultof a lotof work,research,andhard-won
knowledge.
It's meant
as a primer,andis mostlycomposed
of stuffwewishwehadknown
whenwearrivedoncampus.
Thanksforpicking
it up!
Insolidarity,

--DGSU
the Duke Graduate Students Union
Fall 2017

59

THE UNION DIFFERENCE

If youshareourconcernsabout thewigsuesor anyothersfacinggradstudents,join
us andmakeyourvoiceheard!DGSUholdsregulargeneral
bodymeetingsandhas
working
groupsdedicated
to eachof theseiSl!Ues
. Weneedpeoplelikeyouto stepup
andgetinvolved
. If youareinterested
inleading
thechargeona specillcigsueorjust
hearing
more
, getintouch!Thepledgeoardbelowis a greatwayto keepup-to-date
onunionactivity.
Signit,tearit outandemailus at dukegradu
nion@gmai
l.comto find
out aboutournextmeeting.
Wewillcollectpledgecardsat allof ourmeetings
and
events.Youcanalsosigna pledge
cardonline
: bttpg//tinuurl
com/y8Qpw6q

x -------------------------------------------------------------Help build a better Duke.
We are the Duke Graduate Students Union, United ln our belief ln the dignity
and value of all graduate student workers. We are dedicated to Improving the
lives of all student workers and their families by raising awareness of our
working conditions and advocating for mea.nlngfUl Improvements to them. We
are part of a movement of faculty and graduate student workers lighting for a
voice on campuses across the country.
As graduate student workers we env1s1on a.untversuy community with:

CONTRACT AND WORKPLACE PROTECTIONS

Reliable procedures for addressing workplace harassment and d!scrlmlnatl on .
Stable work contracts without unilateral, unanticipated changes .
FAIR AND TRANSPARENT COMPENSATION FOR WORK

Removal of income caps and cont1nuat1on fees .
Regularity ln the pey schedule and stipends adjus ted to cost of living .
RELIABLE AND AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE ACCESS

Pro -family policies for parental leave and leaves of absence .
Full coverage and access to university health a.nd wellness resources.
Sign this pledge card to Joln ln building a better Duke by promoting these
principles ln your commun!ty. This pledge card Is not an obligation to become a
dues -peytng member of the Duke Graduate Students Union! It Is a commitment
to Joln your colleagues ln building a better Duke.

First Name ______

Last Name ___________

Department_____

Matriculatio n Year ________

Personal (non-Duke) e-mail _____

Phone#(_)-_-_

_
_
-__

in conclusion: SHORT-TERM FIXES TO
LONG-TERM PROBLEMS

Intandemwithourlong-term
effortsto makeDukea moreequitable
placeto work
andlearn,DG9Uis alsocommitted
to helping
gradstudentssecureimmediate
relief
whentheyllndthemselves
uithoutpay.If youare facingan emergency
andare in
needofquickhelp,herearea fewoptionsthatyourcolleagues
haveused!
• Daa1JD1wmm1yBe1ena._11aJ11mury............,.:r.ou.
Th1s Is a loan program otrered by the Duk e Graduat.e Sch ool. Grad students ca.n
apply lbr a loan of a maximum or $1,000 to be repaid In 12 month s at a 3 .5%
Interest rate. The peyments will be deducted from your stipend, either on the
1st or 20th or every m onth. lf you are graduating

1n under 12 months , you will

be requt.red to rep,a..vthe loan before gradua.tton. Students can take out up to 3 of

these loans while enrolled at Duke. The loan application requ!res a short.
description of your need, but there Is no requ!rement to sh ow receipts as proof.
The turn ·arcund time between appllca.tlon and disbursement Is unclear, but It
seems like you ca.nreceive the loan within a few weeks or applying via this UDk:
gradschool.duke .edu/sttes/defaultll iles/documentslform

3

JO

mckinney loan app .pdf

• DabCndl.&VnlollGndaa&e.--Aulnan&JlroCnm
Th1s Is a one ·tlme loan designed lbr grad students newly arrived on campus,
although It seems like returnlng students ca.n apply as well. You ca.n apply lbr
up to $2500 to be repaid over 12 months at 8. 75% APR. To be eligible lbr this
loan, you must become a m embe r or the credit union by establlshlng an account
that holds a minimum or $25 . You ca.n receive the mon ey 1n cash, chec k or
direct peyment, and loan repeyments ca.n be made ln·perscn, by mall, through
electronic transfer or via pa,yroll deduction. Apply In person at 2200 West Main
Street or via this liDlc dukefcu.org/Loans/Grad ·Studen l- Loan.aspx
• Gndaa&etl,Profealnal.__ComudlOM
Dab~l"lllld
Blnoe Its Institution In fall 2016, the One Duke Acoess Fund (ODAF) has
provided ove r $7,000 to graduat.e students In need or Immediate fUndlng lbr
!bod, teaching and research supplies, professional attire and travel ODAF opens
applications from the 1st to the 4th or th e month between August and Ma.v and
awards fUndlng via random se lection within five da.}'s. You then purchase what
you need out or pocket, submit your receipts and receive reimbursement lbr
those costs. Grad stude nts ca.n apply to ODAF once per m onthly cycle but ca.n
only receive assistance once each year. liDlc gpsc .duke .edu/access -fund/
• Gndaa&e a, Profealna1 .__
Commmlily Pum7
GPBC recently announced a grad student food pantry located at the GPBC
House at 306 Alexander Avenue and opening September 7th. It offers
ncnperlshal>le foods , chlldcare Items, school supplies and professional clothing.

Dukeolferntheseassistanceprograms
inlieuof payingitswork.em
fairly
. Whatdoes
it say thattheuniversity
hasestablished
a foodpantry foritsgraduate
students?Or
olfernus mul
tipleavenuesof debt ratherthanpayus throughou
t theyearandat a
living
wage?Theseare short-termfbcesfor a muohwiderproblemthat DGSU
is committed
to ending!Getintouchformoreinfoonhowweareworking
to solve
theseproblems
ratherthanrelying
onquickfixes.@

Contents
IntroductionjHello ..............................a
Healthca.re ...........................................4
Basics: What You Should Know [4]
New and Expecting Parents [6 ]
Mental Health (8]
Dental & Vision (9 ]
Chronic Conditions ( 10]
Fitness & Nutrition (ll]
ADA [ l2]

International

Students .................... 13

Basics: What You Should Know [ 13]
Helpful Resources ( 17]

PayGaps ............................................ 18
Basics: What You Should Know (18]
Our Stories (19]
Continuati on Fees .............................24
Basics: What You Should Kn ow (24]
What People Are Sa,.ytng (3 2 ]

Harassment and Assault .................33
Basics: What You Should Kn ow (34]
Filing Claims (44]
Finding a Voice (46]

Taxes ......................................... .........47
Basics: What You Should Kn ow [47]
Filing 101 (51]
Important cautions (54]
In the EventofanAucllt
(55]

In Gonclusi on .....................................68
Short-Term Fixes for Long •Term Problems (58]

Just so you know : The contents of this guide are not formal

I or legal advice! All informattonherein was compiled by peers.

I

chapter 1: HEALTHCARE
Pleaseremove
your!!hoeg
and
1-lelloand welcometo the
excitingworld of Graduate gffdownonthigbutcherpaper.
We'II gtart by gettingwme
StudentHealthcare
!
bagicinformationout of the

57

4

INSUM:
Five Major Takeaways
1.

If you can afford to hire a professional to do your

taxes for you , that's not a bad idea. If yo u can't
(and most of us can't) , you'll still be fine; you just
need to use care when fl.ling.

Graduatemudenmghare thig
~an withthe undergraduateg,
and itg degignmogtl
y serveg
undergraduate
needg.

dents are
enro lled in the
student h ealth
plan through
Blue Cross/
Blue Shiel ~
Thigmeangt
planoftenlac
crucialguppo
fortheneedg
workingadul
t
andfamili

~- ~
·

!l'l

...
.,.._.
~•
✓,

(OneofDGSU
'g core
demandg
hagbeenthatall
workem
at Duke
, webe
addedto theemployee
~an,which
incfudeg
benefi
tg likedentaland
maternnycare!!

2.

Ask your departmental pa.yroll representative to
set up tax withholding for your stipend funding as
well as your regular compensatory funding as
soon as you start getting paid by Duke.

3.

When you get your first stipend paystub , confir m
that it shows tha t federal and state taxes have
been withheld from that payche ck. If it does n't,
follow up with your payroll representative .

4.

Claim as income your stipend funding as well as
your regular compensatory funding when you file
your taxes.

5.

If you have taxes

rem oved from y our stipend
(which you should), then when you file your taxes,
you' ll need to do two separate steps to ( 1) claim
the stipend as income , and (2) indicate the tax
that you 've already had withheld from your
stipend.

Beatof Luck!

56

IN THE EVENT OF AN AUDIT:
Evenif you havescrewedup
someaspectof yourfax filing,
thelrul understands
that filing
faxes is com~icated,
and no
onewhoisn'ta taxprofessional
can actually
understand
all the
intricacies
ofdoingit.

Theymaydetermine
that you
owebacktaxesandintereston
those taxes, but that doesn't
makeyoua bad personor a
criminal.

5

Great.Now that we'vebeenover
vitals,now we can coversome
specifics.
Feelfreeto skipahead
to theinformation
youfeeldirectly
impacts
you.

In the next fewpages,we're
goingto coverthefollowing:

Takea deepbreath,takeit in
stride,andhirea professional
to
doii foryouthefollowing
year.
You can also flD4 more information about plan rates,
benefits, an d 11m1tations at these two sites:

,+

Student Blue
http ://studentb luenc.com /#/duke/we lcome

-+ Duke Employee Plan
https://hr.duke.edwbenefits/medical/medica
l-insurance/plancompa rison

55

6

NEW & EXPECTING PARENTS
Student Blue covers 80% of delivery and prenatal
care, but graduate students have paid upwards of
$3,000-5,000
with ins ur ance and depending on
delivery and emergency procedures needed.

Thisisbonkers
compared
withtheDuke
Basicem~oyee
heafthcare
~an, ".$75
co-payforthespecialist
firstvisit,then
professional
services
covered
infull"for
maternity
care,including
prenatal
and
postdelivery
careandfully
covered
well
.._
babyvisitsfor2 years.

___

IN THE EVENT OF AN AUDIT:
Don't freakout.
Auditsarenot uncommon,
and
they don't necessarily
mean
youdidanything
wrong.

Even if the IRS siws you
falled to pay sufficien t
ta.x, they will provide
you with the opportunity
and contact informati on
necessary to contest .

If you claimed your
earnings
as taxable
income and paid income
ta.x on them , explain in
writing that you did so.
Provide documentation.

Successfully getting through an audit may be as simple
as that, if you've paid the taxes you act ually owe !

7

54

&

IMPORTANTCAUTIONS

&

Tax law changes constantly . This docume n t was
prepared during summer 2017 and may become
outdated at any time .
Even if you have taxes withheld trom both your
compensatory
and non-compensatory
Duke
income, you may still owe additional taxes in April
(you'll just owe signifl.cantly less than if truces weren't
being withheld at all) . If you discover after your first
year that this is the case for you, you can consider
requesting additional truces be withheld from your
paychecks by 1llling out new W-4/NC-4 forms; or you
can just budget to be prepared to pay that money
wh en you file your truces each year .

Duke brings in a CPA every year to do a seminar for
grad students about filing truces. This per son often
seems to give a generaJized presentation designed for
grad students at any institution, and has in the past
not always evidenced awareness of Duke-specific
issues (like the fact that Duke students can opt to
have truces withheld from their non-compensatory
stipends) . Be aware that although thes e tax
presentations are sponsored by Duke , they are not
necessarily reliably specific to the needs of Duke
graduate students or your own circumstances .
If you have a professional tax preparer prepare
your taxes for you , choose someone reputable .
Relying on your law-stude nt BFF or the cheapest flyby - night part -time true preparer is not a good m ove.
Even trained, professional true preparers sometimes
misunderstand how to file graduate students' truces.

Lastly,
provides a
childcare
subsidy,
to
which parents have to
apply and that is not
guaranteed.

To apply for this subsidy, go to this website:

Whe
n I wasingraduate
school,
I got pregnant.
I didn'treceive
the supportI needed,and I
endedupleaving
theprogram.

herewerenoprote
Iknowpersona
lly
duatestudents
are
thatunionsare

53

8

FILING 101, continued
Duk e offers a llrn1te d number of a ppoin tments through
CAPS (Counseling and Psycho logical Services) .

One last thing: there is a
distinctionbetween"qualified"
and "non- qualified"
educationrelated expensegthat Duke
coversforyou.

"Qualified" expenses
are non taxable ~

' •.:

,:
~
CA PS informatio n:
https :// studen taffairs.duke .edu/caps /about -us
CAPS Referral Coordinator: (919)-660 -1000

According to the CAPS webs ite,
"CAPS is designed as a shon -term care clinic and, therefore , we
are limited in our ability lo provide care for students needing
long-tem1 or more open-ended care. I n addition, certain

specialized serv ices are not available through CAPS . These
include ADD/ADHD serv ices and Substance abuse treatment.
We do recognize that several our students will need longer term
or a more specialized type of care and we have a strong networ k

with area community providersfor these."

CAPS can also refer you to
local psyc h ological
se rvi ces.

The Student Blue Plan
includes office visits at a
$25 copay as well as
80% coverage of "other
service
rendered
in
office" and "Inpatient /
outpatient" care.

"Non-qualified" expenses are taxable .

Theoretica
lly,youare
gupposed
to distinguish
between
qualified
and
non-quali/led
education
expenses
goyoucan
deductthequali/led
ones
andreportthenonquali/led
onegas income
inthecourseof reporting
your 1098-T.

Luckily,
fheIRSseemsto care most
about uAiether
youare claimingall
of yourcompengatory
and stipend
earningg
agincome
andthugpaying
income tax on them; the IRS
doesn'tseeminterested
inpenalizing
gradstudentg
fornot goingthrough
this processof parsingquali/le
d
from non-qualifiededucation
expenses

9

52

FILING 101, continued
If youreceive
a 1O99
-Mlgc, seethis websiteforhowto uwTurboTaxto
reportbothyour non- compensafOl'!J
stipendincome
ANDthe amountof
taxesthat havealready
beenwithheld
fromit onyourtax forms(youhaveto
dotwo lll!p8ra
te stepstoaccomplish
this, unlike
whenyouenter a W-2}.

http ://www.gradstudentfinances.org/
how-to-enter-1099- misc-fellowshipstipend-income-into-turbotax/

DENTALAND VISION
The Student Blue pl8Jl does not include dental care
though a dental pl8Jl C8Jl be purchased through Blu~
Cross Blue Shie ld, which costs 139.91 pe r month for 8Jl
individ ual with no dependents. The copey is 17B 8Jld
the co!ns ur8Jlce coverage is 0 % for preventative care
8Jld 30% for basic service .
For more informatio n, see:

https:lfwww .bcbsnc.com/sapps/

shocoerserviceshu
idedse
lling/
Denta lRateQuote.do

For more information
on this service and to
find providers who
accept BASD<, visit:
·········-···-·

http://

www.basixstudent

el

biannual
routine

exams

fillings

biannual
routine
cleanings

sealants

spacers

x-rays

full or
part ial
dental
repair

anesthesi
a for oral
surgery

removal
of teeth

51

10

Duke covers a routine ,
an nual eye exam and
provides
up to $10 0
reimbursement
for
glasses or contact lenses
pe r benefit period.

@11

To get reimbursed you
must pa.yup front and
then fill out a form , which
you can find here :

https://
www.bcbsnc.com/
assets/common/
pdfs/forms/claims/
BE236.pdf

Find more information on dental at this link:

https ://hr .duke .ed u/ benefits/med i ca 1/dentalinsurance/plan-comparison

CHRONIC CONDITIONS
Graduate stud ents who incur substantive costs not
covered by their medic al plan can apply for aid thro ugh
Duke's Medical Expense Assistance Program . This
program only provides aid to stud ent s and n ot their
dependents . Before a student can app ly, they must first
determine their out-of-pocket expense s and submit
insuranc e claims. Awarded grants can be up to ss ,ooo.
Th e dean of the Graduate
School w!ll consider
exceptions . The application also require s students to
provide a one-page personal statement deta!llng their 1
illness and why these expenses are a hardship .
:

'-------------------------------------~

Medica l Assistance Program:
https://gradschool.duke.edu/fi
nancial-supportlmedical-expense-assis
tance-program
Forms:
https:/lgradschoo l.duke.edu/srtes/default/files/documents/

tormmedica
l expenseassistanceapplication.pdt

fl

If you get paid in whole or part
through compe n satory funds, Duke
sen d you a standard W-2 at tax
time. Enter that W-2 info into your
taxes like you would any other W-2 ; no
complications there.
If you ( also or in stead)

get paid
through
a non- compensatory
stipend , one of two things will h appen:
(a) If you have not requested taxes be withheld from your stipend,
Duke will probably send you a "courtesy letter" informing you of the
amount of stipend funding you received for the year. You MUST claim
thisas income, and you MUST pay incometax on it.
(b) If you have requested taxes be withheld from your stipend, Duke
will send you a 1099-MISC , which will indicate the amount of stipend
funding you received for the year, and l he amount of taxes lhal were
withheld from that income. If you also receive compensatory funding
(i.e., a W-2), the 1099-MISC income is separate from, and addrtional
to, the amount indicated on the W-2.

11

50

FITNESS AND NUTRITION
If you get paid
© whole
or part

in

through a noncompensatory stipend,
Duke provides the
option for you to request
that taxes be withheld
from your stipend.
Depending
on howgood,/lour
•departmental
payrollrep is,
youwi11probably
haveto take
the initia
tive to requestthis
option
yoursel(

Whenyoureceive
your
paystubs,
youshould
beableto
seethatfederal
andstate
taxeshave
beendeducted
each
month.

Youmayhave
to follow
upwith
your payroll
representative
as
manytimesas it takesto make
gurehe/sheactuall
y gubmits
yourpaperwork
ina timely
fashion.

If youdon't,followupwith
yourpayrollrepresentative
.

~

iK

Stud ent s who mlght bene fit from nutritio nal counseling
can visit Duke's Stud en t H
Nu ition Services for a
consultation,
follow -up
couns eling sess ion s.

OymFee Fight: A OOBUBuooessStory
Upuntn the fallof 2015, the
Graduate
gchoolcoveredgym
fees for studentsin the firm
fiveyearsof thePhDprogram

In lightof risinghealthcare
premiuffili,
the Graduate
gchoo
l
jidgedit wouldno longercover
those fees for studentspast
their thirdyear

Last year DGgucirculateda
petition, wrote editorialsin the
Duke Chronicleand staged
publ
ic gymclasses,in orderto
demonst
ratetheneedforaccess
to one of the primarytools
availa
ble to graduate
studen
ts to
care for their physicaland
mental
wellbeing
.

In April,
DeanMcClain
reinstated
the policy,
promising
that "PhD
students uA11
havefreeaccessto
the university's recreational
facilitiesduri~ their firm five
yearsat Duke.'

®
I

.-r

......,.,ai!!!ll.ee,~ .

49

12

Gym Fee Fight, conttn.ued
Thisadmini81ralive
decision
illu81rates
thepowerof !he
actionsthatwehave
takenCl/er
thepa81year. Still,inmo81
disciplines
!heaverage
degree
lakesmorethan5 yearsto
com~ete.

Evenatterthismuch-needed
policy
change,
hundreds
of
graduate
studen
t workers
pa81
!heirfrllhyearare81ill
excluded
fromgymaccess.

Thesamegroupis burdened
wrrhcontinuation
fees,healthinsurance
charges
, andthepressure
of finishing
a dissertation
whiletakingonextra
workhoursto paythesenewco81s.DGSU
willcontinue
lo advocatefor
changesto thisandotherpoliciesaffecting
graduate
studentworkers
. .As
of nowwe are happythat graduatestudentshavefree gymaccess
through
!heir 5th year.----

Disabled grad students must apply for accommodations .
See forms link below to request . There 1S a lengthy
process to acquire approval for accommodation requests
explained at the second linked site. If a student has a
temporary dlsabllity--a broken leg, fracture or sprain- they can contact Duke Student Health Center at (919)
681 -9355 to request temporary transportation services .
Students can also apply for a special needs parking pass .

--------------------------------------

AccommodationForms:
https ://access.duke .edu/students/regueslingno rms.php
Requesting Process:
https ://access.duke .edu/studentsireguestingflndex.php
Parking pass:
http://parking.duke .edunorms apps/Student Medical Need Parking Reguest1 .pelf

Jugtbecauseyoucan claiman
exempti
on on the federalform
doesNOTmeanyoucan claim
oneon!her-lorth
Carolina
form

BEAD THE
INSTRUCTIONS
on the North

Carolina NC-4
form carefully!
If you'refiling
as a single
person
, rris not recommended
thatyoutakemorethanone
federal
exemption
, evenif you
theoretically
could
...at lea81for
yourfirgtyear.

You can alwaystake fewer
exempt
ions thanyou're allowed
(whichmeansthatmoretax will
be deducted
fromyour paycheck
everymonth)

Onceyoufiletaxesforyourfir81year,you'lleitherget backextra
money
thatyoupaidbyclaimingfewerexempti
onsthanyoumighthave
beenelig
iblefor, or youmightactually
81illowetheIRSmoretaxes
thanweretakenout. Eitherway, claim
ing onlyonefederalexempti
on
reducesthelikelihood
getting
hit witha hugetaxbllwhenyoufiletaxes
foryourfirgtyear.

48

chapter2: INT'L GRAD STUDENTS
DISCLAIMER : JUS T A HEADS UP!

,,,,,.~

..

,, a non-compensatory \
stipend (for which no
service is required )

/ ~ompensatory inco~~ \
(received for teaching ,
TAing, RAing , etc.)

tuition remission .

ThismeansthatDukepaysyour
tuitionforclassesyoutakeas a
gradstudent,
butthatamountis
not taxable
income
to you.

International students make up 40% of the
total student body at Duke University!

vvvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvvvvv

tltltltltltltltltltltltltltltl
tltltltltltltltltltltltltltltl
tltltltltltltltltltltltltltltl
tltltltltltltltltltltltltltltl

It goes without saying that international
grad uate stu dents are a valued and integral
part of academic and community life at Duke.
If you get pa.id in

whole or part
through compensatory
funds, Duke will have you
complete forms for
federal (W-4) and North
Carolina (NC -4) .tax

withholding purposes.

The se form s determine
the amount of withholding
that will be withheld from
your paychecks
t o pay
taxes .

Despite
this,manyDuke
international
graduate
students
receive
conflictingor confusin
g
information
, which
canmake
livingandworking
intheUnited
Statesmoredifficult
thanff
needsto be.

The follou.ing
pages contain
somehelpfultips compi
led by
internat
iona membersof the
DGSU
, to makethingseasier!

13

14

THE BASICS, continued
I Taxes: Did you know ...
International
students pay
mor e truces on their noncompensatory
fellowship
than American students.

...Evenifyou
receive a small
award from a
department
within Duke ,
you still pay
these taxes .

47

chapter5: TAXES
DISCLAIMER:

JUST

This document does not const itute "legal
advice,· nor is it prepared by a lawyeror
acoountantin his or her capacityas such. This
document is designed o nly to provide peer-topeer, generalized tips for graduate students at
Duke to begin to understand their tax
responsibilitiestor Duke-related income.

Don't rely on this into in lieu of
oonsultingwith a tax professionalabOutyour
specificcircumstances,includingany special
taxation provisions that apply to certain categor ies of grant funding.

Failure to do so may
resu lt in a hefty load
interest ,

taxes on your
Duke stipend
and on your TA,
RA, or teaching
earnings.
Int'! students mlght be able to
recover their taxes through
tax -refunds. Tax treaties with
certain countries mlght allow
you to recover portions of
these taxes. Each country has
dlfferent rules so you should
inform yourself about the tax
tr ea tie s that might exis t
between your country and
the United States.

Youcanprepare
yourtaxeson
yourownthrough
a program
calledSprintax
. 1-lowever,
you
might
alsowishtoconsulta
prof~ionaltaxpreparer.
Bearin
mindthatthisservicecancolll
between
{250 upto{350.

~

(TheIR!sseemsto beregularly
auditing
gradllludents,
ooyoutakea

largeriskbyfailing
to fileyourtaxesorbyfiling
without
claiming
your
lllipend/earningsas income!)

15

THE BASICS, continued
Lastyear,I was sexuaffy
harassedby a facutymermerat Doo, Uriversity
. This
personis an iwedibleasset tomyresearch,
andit is difl'ictAt
domyrasearchuithout
his knowledge
ar.f support.
Wegrewcloseas cole,igoes,
but whenNSbehavior
became
romantic
ar.fsexual,
I feltuncomfortable.
I wanledtor,,t a stoptoij, but I was
u...-ried
becausehehadooroochpower
overthefutureof myresearchar.fmyWOO(
hereat Doo,_
I toldhimropoatodly
fhatI woounoomfortablo
andookcid
himto koopourrcbtionot-ip
professional.
Whenhisbehavior
escalated,
rx,ysically
and verbal
ly, I fileda CO!fjllai
nt
wijhOIEbecaJseI knewthatij wasunsafeforthismanto beoncall'j)US,
ar.fforme
ar.fotherwomento be forced
to WOO(uithNm.OnceI filedthec~int, theOIE
SIWto bothmear.f my harasser,andtAtimately
foundthat hisbehavior
violated
Ou<:e's
harassment
policy.

Thepeople
woo
I won<ed
uithintheOIEwereookir.f.I believed
thattheyreally heard
mewhenI toldthemwhathappened
tome.Butij didn'tseemliketheyhadthepower
todo anything
tochangemysituationI wastoldthattheywoodinform
myharasser's
department
of Ns cO!Wlf,but any disciplinary
action woodbe kept confidential
11.!iatever
discipline
hisdepartmen
t hasimplemented
is confidential,
ardallI'mallowed
toknowis thathehasnotbeenfired
. ThismeansthateverydaythatI amoncampus,
thatI gotomyplacaofresea-ch
ar.fWOO(,
I fearseeingthemanwoo
harassed
me.
I have
lostmonthsof WOO(fromtheemotional
turbulence
of theharassment
andthe

proceedings,
as wellas theoWJliUnity
toengageinspecial
arcMJal
pro_jeefs.1
stilldeal
wijhpanicattacki:and fear,ar.f he is stillemployed
by the sameumiersil)J
that
employs
me.I keptsilentaboutmysexualharassment
fornearlya year.I coudnt even
bringmyselfto tellmerrbers
ofmyfami1y,
mybiggestandstrongest
sourceof support
inanysituation,
becauseI knewthattherewasa goodchanceI woodhaveto·face
harassment
again-if not fromflis person,
thenfromsomeothersupervisor
in the
courneofmygraduate
WOO(
_

! ( For more info, visitthis site:
! https
:tMsaservices
.duke.edul
_j

categorylT1 /opt.php l

This tim e is called Optional Practical Training
(OPT) , and typ ical ly en comp asses 12 or 24

months, depending on th e subjec t of your degree .
In othe r wor ds, the months in which you use your
OPT for a summer internship/job
are deducted
from the 12 or 24 months you have available
after your degree to work in the -United States .

Thisoption,
however,
is only
available
toFlvisaholders
and
thejlb in question
mustbe
directly
relatedto thestuden
t's
researcharea.

"'-It.Al,_..,

Theapplication fee is .$410
and the waiting time for
approval
of an ap~icationis
typically
3 months.

16

THE BASICS, continued
-------------------------.
3

-~~~~:_::':<:!~u_k1_:~~.:.·.:.
___
...
' ---~

International
st u dents
need to get an American
driver 's license to buy a

Your drlvtng expe r ience
abroad ls not recognized
in North Carolina, so
you will be considered a
young/new driver by car
insurance companies .

45

FILING CLAIMS,

continued

Thestandardof a unanimous
vote ig perhapg the mogt
~ tr.a.
Depanment of
controvergial
partof the Duke acluoatlon ancl lta
UnivergityStudent Sexual
omoefor Clvll JUCJata
Migconduct
Policy.
blnrucu oolle&ea on
Wild IRUdard of proof
ahou14 1" met when
•~reportaof
aalljllaaaaJllt.

Durmg the first year,
rates can be as high as
$200/month
for state
mm1mum coverage

""ln1t they clo not
•,Peoify how many
meml>en of a hearinC
panel ahoulcl be in
a,reement tRa~

-~
w be

1b1mclnapona1ble

DukeUnivergity
hag required a
unanimoug decigion gince
2003 ." Duke,amongother
ingtit utiong, requireg a
"preponderance
of evidence."

••

Someaccountforthepolicy of
unanimous
votebycitingthelow
standardof evidencerequi
red
byharaggment
policieg
.

(This document should not
be relied on as legal advice.

FILING CLAIMS

17

4

Readers are encouraged to

read the policies discussed
here themselves.)

In the informal process, OIE and / or a department in consultation
with OIE will investigate and manage the complaint. This process
takes up to 45 business days and all parties are given the
opportunity to provide and review information obtained dur1ng
any investigation. If the respondent ls found to have violated the
University's Harassment Po cy, a recommendation regarding
appropriate disciplinary action(s) will be made to a responsible
official. Although OIE ls involved in consultation and veI'l1lcat1on
that reasonable sanctions are imposed, all responsibility for wha t
actions may be taken to reasonably remedy any negative
consequences following a violation of the harassment policy and
what actions can be taken to reasonably mlnim1ze the recurrence
of such conduct lies with the responsible official.
Once a claim is filed under the Sexual Misconduct Polley, the OSC
decides if there will be an admln1strative hearing or a hearing
panel to deliberate on the case. In the former inSta.nce, if the
respondent
ls deemed responsible
for the alleged policy
violation(s), a designee of the OSC will issue (an) appropriate
sanction(s). In a hearing panel, a three-person hearing panel will
resolve the complaint. The severity, persistence,
and /o r
pervasiveness of the alleged conduct ls evaluated from the
perspective of "a reasonable person similarly situated to the
complainant and in consideration of the context of the behavior."
No additional information is provided as to what the standard of
para.meters for "reasonab le" or "similarly situated" are.
A finding of responsibility by a hearing panel case must "be based
on a. una.nimous vote. Sanctions and suspension or expulsion
must aJso "be based on a. una.nimous vote, and a maJol'lty vote ls
required for all other sanctions. A responden~ or complainant
may appeal the panel's decision ~w'"'l'iiTormation
becomes
available or if there were )JX)Ce<lUI'al
errors . Another three person panel must decide ~ una.nimous vote to resolve the case
or send it back to the origt.naJ h earing panel.

Wri ting Help: Did you know...

Int ernat ional
students do not
have an ad-hoc
system for
helping them
with academic
writing.

-.


- --------------~l
Although
the Graduate
Schoo
offersESLclassesfocuood
on
academic
writing,thisis often
not enoughto learn to write
publishab
le papersin English
on

TheThompson
Writ
ingStudiodoesnotoffera specific
program
for
internati
onalgraduate
students,
so youmighthaveto consultnative
speakersin yourowndepartment
-who are alsobusywiththeir
writing-for helpor paya privateproofreade
r or editor. Forone
paperof20-25 pagesthiscancostupto ~100(ifnotmorel.

HELFPUL
RESOURCES:
Inter nationa l House (ihouse@duke.edu): Besides their useful listserv,
International House organizes regular trips to the OMV for those who want
to get a State ID/ Driver License/ Social Securijy Number. They also provide
discount codes for the International Tax program called Sprintax.
Payroll Office (finance.duke.eduipayroll ): Payroll can provide information
on federal and state taxes: they can also inform you if the US has a tax
treaty ~h your home country.
Visa Office (visaservices.duke.edu): Don't forget to get your travel
signatures when traveling outside the United States!

43

18

chapter 3: PAY GAPS
THE BASICS

THINGS TO KNOW,

continued

There are gignifican
t differenceg
betweenthetwo
policiegandprocedureg_
Student Sexual
Miscond uct Polley

Harassment
Polley

A comp la int aga;11st a student
l,dll

IH~

filed

actionable

ct!

dl l ',' \ 1llk:'

d l l d I~

up to tt1e point H1a1

H1e accusec1 sluc1e 11t gradua t es

2

r, student

n:av co 11!1dent 1al!v

cJ,scussan J llecJPcj v1olat1on ·:.1H1
n1nsp .-.110ser'.' t? 1n a
p ruiess1011al rolt">c1nc1c1re

cics1gnated as coni 1den t 1al
resources cons istent ·.-.1H1 T1tl,~
iX a11cJNurHl Ca rolina la ·,•,
0111v one comp lc11ntprocess
f>X 1S!S

Thenext fewpageswilllay
outthedistinction
betwee
n
informal
harassment
complaint
procedure
and
formal
harassment
compla
int
procedure.
They'
llalsolay
our the rocessof filing
both
types o comp
lain
ts.

f

1.

For all other non-studen t
respond ents, there is a statute

of limrtations of one year after
the most recent conduct alleged
to constrtute harassmen t. This
limrt can only be extended by
specia l exception by OIE. The
polic y explains that this statute

of limitationsis intended to
encourage compla inants to
come forward as soon as
possible after the offending
conduct and to protect
respondents agains1 complaints
that are too old to be
investigated effectively .
2_ Wh ile Duke Universrty and Duke
Universrty Heafth System will
attempt kl protect the
confiden tialrty of harassment
proceedings to the extent
reasonably possible ,
co nfidentia lrty is explicrtly not
guaranteed.
3_ A complain t can be filed through
erther an informal or formal
complaint process.

42

THINGS TO KNOW,

continued

B Harassmen t Policy
+ The Duke University Harassment Polley Is
perhaps more relevant for graduate students
during their long stays at Duke University as
It Is applicable to cases of misconduct that
are perpetrated
by persons other than
students .
+ Applies to misconduct In the relationships
between all persons who are enrolled at or
employed by Duke University and Duke
University Health System while they are on
university property or are participating In a
university-related
activity off-campus. This
can include, for example,
misconduct
between a student and teacher/faculty
member, or provider and patient.

gignificantly,
neitherpolicy
detailg
theprocedureg
or
gtandardg
forevaluat
ing
appropriate
ganctioM.

Insteadof comfortably
adjJsti
ng
to the intellectual
and social
rhythmsof graduateschool,I
had to grapplewith looming
anxieties
abouthowto payfor
myelectricityandfoodwithlittle
senseof theresources
available

I eventuallyand reluctantly
borrowedmoney from my
family
backhome,butI cannot
imagi
ne what my situation
wouldhalebeenlikehadI been
froma differentcountryor had
nofinancial
securitynet.

41

THINGSTO KNOW
Dukeshould
notbereticent
abouttheir
firnt-year
stipendstructur
e, norshould
theybeencouraging
studentsto takeout
(evenmorelloansinthewakeof aniniti
al
funding
gap: theyneedto ensurethattheir
graduate
students
, whocollectively
comprise
oneof themostimportant
courcecfortheunivercity
'c vibrancy
and
longevity,
arepositionedto flourish
from
themomen
t theyset footoncampus.

(A)Student
-+Appl!es

Sexu al Miscond uct Policy

to instances !n which any Duke
student
(undergraduate,
graduate,
or
professional) lS alleged to have engaged !n
sexual misconduct against a peer .
-+Ad.m!nlStered by the Duke 'University omce
of SWdent Conduct (OSC) .
-+Meant to address misconduct that occurs
within a student's career, from matric ulation
to graduation, on or off camp us, unt il the
accused student graduates.
-+A comp lainant may request, but ls not
guaranteed beyond the resources protected
by Title IX or North Carollna
l aw,
conll.dentlal lty in reporting or that the
unive r sity take no action !n response to a
report. The OSC may !ssue adm!nlSt r ative
actions
when it deems
s uc h action
appropriate,
including
restrictions
on
contact. If further investigation ls deemed
warranted , the case will be re ferred to an
investigator with th e Office for Instit utional
Equity (OIE) and reported to the Director of
Title IX Compl!ance .

40

THE BASICS, continued
+Why should we care about harassment?
First,ina timewhereworkersrightsare beingthreatened
at boththe
nationalandstate-political
levels,
unionswithcontractsand/ or duegsystemsare ableto providestudentswithcontractsthat mustbe
followed
and/ or legalrepresentation
outrude
of theuniversity
system.

Evenin ntle IX investigations,
the finaldecisionon how to
proceedwithfindingsultimately
restswiththeuniversity
and its
owninterests.

Most unions can make
additional
rerourcegavailable:
third-party arbitration
, union
representati
on, and community
supportsystems.

Witha contractor without,theability
for a wide-ranging
community
to I--'~
come together is often the most
powerful
leveragewhendeman
ding
an 11-fE
operatefor thebenefitof its
workersandstuden
ts.

-

+- -_,

Afterspending
someof that{100
on a Qrocerytrip, I foundout I
wouldn
t be gettingpaidby Duke
untiltheendof September
- over
sixweeksaway.Youcan imagine
mypanic
. Beforethen,I wouldhave
to payrentandutilitie!l,
buybooks,
coversomelingering
moving
costs,
makea few moregrocerytrips
and hopefully
get coffeeor drinks
withmynewcolleagueg
al Duke.
It alsooccurredto methaton tap
of waiting
an extramonth,
I wasnt
actuallygettingpaidfor my first
fewweeksat Duke-inAugust
,I
wouldwork(andlive,apparently}
forfree.

Intheend,I tookouta loanfromthecredit
union
, whichbarelytookme to September
30th. I was desperate
and gratefulfor the
loan,although
it seemedinsanethatI should
begrateful
to gointodebt.ButIhadto make
up for Duke's lack of transparency
somehow.Not everyonehas savings, a
credi
t lineor family
members
thatcan spot
themin a bind, but regardle!lSof one's
personalcircumstance!l,
Dukeshouldnot
su~ectits graduatestudentsto a funding
gapwhentheyfirstarriveat theuniversity.

39

THE BASICS, continued
After I was deniedsummer
fundingI appliedfor several
jobs, one of ILf)ich
I got.The
job, ILf)ich
also operatedon
b uke's pay scheduledid not
pay me until July 25th for
VJOrk
I beganinearly June.

+Why should we care about harassment?
depa
hadz
and

9everalyearsago,I wasolfered a supplemen
taljobinmydepartment.
I wasexcitedthat I wouldbe paide.xtra
moneyon topof mystipend
to doer!jOyable
work.My supervisor
andI cameto an agreement
of
howmucha monthI wouldbe paidto domyworkandtherewasan
understanding
I wouldhold thisjob for at least threeyears.We
contactedthepersonin charge of payment,
andI thoughteverything
was fine. I eaj:>yed
myVJOrk,
appreciated
the e.xtramoney,and fell
into thehabitofassuming
thepayschedule
would
worksmoothl
y...

The relationshipsgraduate/
professionalstudents develop
withfaculty and colleagues
at
11-lE
s areunique:

graduateVJOrkis intimatel
y
linkedto specificfields and
professiona
ls workinglongterminthosefields.

Graduate workers, research
assistants, and teaching
assistants are dependen
t on
professorsto open networks
andcareeropportunities
.

A threat to one of these
relationshipscan meana threat
to a graduatestudent'scareer.

The bleakestof consequences
can mean that a graduate
/
professional
studen
t is forcedto
makethechoiceof not reporting
andenduring
theharassment
or
dropoutof theirfieldaltogether
.

A unioncanolfermoreoptions
to studentsputinthispos1tion!

-----

38

7. Graduate / professional
stude nts identified the
offender's afflllation to
th e IHE most often as a
stude nt (82 .0% of femal e
graduate / p rofessio nal
stu dents , 85 .7 % of male
g r aduate/ pr ofessi onal
st udents, 82 .7 % of TGQN
g radua t e/professional
students).

8 . Grad / prof stud ents
frequently Identified the
relati onship
of the
offender to the victim as
teacher
or a dv iso r
(15 .8% of fem ale grad /
prof students) or a coworker,
bos s, or
supervisor
( 17.7 % of
female
grad/prof
students).

As timepassed
, I becamemore
and more busy with my
department
al responsib
ilniesand
also faced some personal
difficulties
that led me to not
takecare of myseW,
as I should.
fhig included pRyingAttention
to

myfinances.

Of course,I stroveto continue
producingexcellentworkfor
the department,and I was
working long hours at my
supplementa
lj:)b.A fewmonths
later,as I wasgettingmylifein
order,I r<>,a
lized that I hadnot
beenpaidforaRtheworkI had
done.

9. Sin ce enrolled In an IHE, 17.8% of graduate/
professional
stud en ts in partne r ed relationships
reported experiencing Intimate partner violence .

---------------------------------------·
The Utah Law Review performed a more recent

-~-------------------------------------~

inventory of three hundred cases obtained from
media reports, federal civil rights investigations by
the U.S. Departments
of Education and Justice,
lawsuits by students alleging sexual harassment,
and lawsuits by tenure -track faculty fired for sexual
harassment. Its two key findings wer e:

---------------------·
.....................
----------------------------------------·
:53 % of the cases involved
. •:: :· •

professors allegedly engaged
1n serial sexual harassment

- - -- - -

- - -- -- - -

When I inquired, it appeared that there was a
miscommunication
, and I had fallenthroughthe cracks.
Thej:)bthathadbeentakingupso muchof mytimehad,
forallintents andpurposes,
becomean unpaidintern
ship
that had taken me away frommy studies wnh no
compensation.
As soonas themistakewas discovered,
thedepartmen
t worked
withmeto remedytheerror,butI
hadto wanformywag
~es.
=- ---------<-4'1~ ~~~
Becauseof thegraduate
schoolrulescapping
howmuchextra
income
studentscanearn,I havehadto wait to receive
payment
inthesummer
or nextsemesterforworkI have
alreadydone.Despite
paygaps, I have
feltcompelled
to domy
workbecauseof myrelationshiptomysuperv
isor. Thiswasnot
a maliciousoversight
, andeveryoneworked
swiftly
to correctit,
however
, n didmakemylife harderduringan alreadystressful
time.Now
, I emailallof therelevant
partiesto remindthemthatI
amstilldoingmyj:)b. I alsocarefully
checkeachpaychec
k to
makesurethattherehave
beennomistakes
becauseif you
don't takerespons
ibilityforyour welfare,
nooneelsewill

;.:----------------------------------:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

37

24

chapter3: CONTINUATIONFEES
1-ley,tllanighere. The newg
aboutcontinuation
feegmight
real!~make your blood boil
(dont worry
, you'renotalone).
I recorrvnend
ligtening
to gome
angry ninetiegtuneg whilgt
readingfhig gecfi
on of the
DISorientation
Guide.

victims of even the most
serious inc idents say
they do not re por t the
event because they do
not consider it "serious
enough ."

o----w
..

s. Those identifying as Trans, Genderqueer, and non -

Continu ation fees/upper-yea.p tuition consist of the
S3,S60 / sem ester fee assessed to upper-level doctoral
stude nts beyond the five-yea.p funding cycle. For

conform!ng (TGQN) reporte d the highest rates of the
most se ri ous types of sexual assault
and
misconduct•: un~~te
s (1 2 .4 %~, followed by
un~
r~ :~
1'<:
l d .8%), and TGQNgr adu ate /
prdressio :,: f Teib ce.3
%).

students on a nin e -month cycle , the cost is S7,120 ,
while for students on a twelve-month cycle , the cost
is S 10,680 . This fee increases by about 4 % every ye8.P.

.,..l_ What costs or services are

I

these fees intended to cover?

None.
The Graduate Scho ol
has stated that these
fees go towards the
fell ows hip poo l for
stude nt s in yea.ps one
through five, with a
small port ion covering
adm!n!strative costs.

The {3,560 / gemesterig not
relatedto any regourcegor
gervicegutrtizedby fee-paying
gtooenfa
.

75.2% of undergraduate and
69 .4% of graduate/professiona l

students who identify as TGON
reported being sexually harassed.
Well more than half of female
undergraduates (61.9%) reported
being sexually harassed. Female
graduate/profess ional students
and male undergraduates (44.1%
and 42.9%, respectively) had the
next highest rates, and male
graduate/profess ional students
had the lowest rates (29.6%).

6 . Around 8.8 % of
female graduate /
professional students
and 2.2% of male
graduate /pro fess ional
students experience the
most serious types of
sexual assault and

36

THE BASICS, continued
+Wh
_____o___is
_____being
___________assaulted,
___________________and
________how
_________often?
_______

25

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTAKNOW,
~:Are

__

No.

of its kind, the
Association of American Universities constructed a
survey in spring 2015 of 27 inStitutes of higher
education
( IHEs). The survey assessed
the
incidence, prevalence , and characteristics
of
incidents of sexual assault and misconduct.•

---------------------------------------·
---...
-·--------------------------------------.
.-Out of a sample of 779.170
undergraduate . graduate ,
and professional students 18
years and older , 150,072
students responded. and the
data was weighted to adjust
for differential nonresponse

Graduate and professional
students responded at a higher
rate than undergraduates
(23.3% versus 17.4%). and selfidentified females responded at
a higher rate than males (22.9%
versus 15.6%).

theae the only fees upper-year graduate
students are required to~

Additional fees - a mandatory fee for Duke student
health services, an activity fee, a student services fee,
etc.-push this number up by over $1,000. Additionally,
students beyond their 6th year are required to purchase
insurance. The current cost of Duke health inSurance
plan is currently $2,950, although students may
purchase insurance through other providers. Assuming
they enroll in the Duke plan, the total cost for 7th-year
students is upwards of $11,000.

In the first empirical assessment

..

continued

t

Do all upper-year doctoral students have
to pay theae fees?

No.
Students

who receive

an internal grant are not
fe es . In the case of external
a bit more complicated . Some external
grants provide additional funding for university fees .
Others do not, so that students will pey-these fees out of
the grant money. (A student receiving a $20,000
external fellowship might pay $8,000 in fees and oth er
costs, leaving $12,000 for living expenses). Still othe r
grants require that the university waive fees as a
condition of the fellowship ; in these cases, the Graduate
School has historically waived the fees.

required
t--~~
~;-~:~_:...
_________________
-..:-::=:-----------------------------------Ji
grants, it's

to pay these

f-forearegomegelected
quoteg
fromthegurvey:
l . Average
rates of
nonconsensual
sexual
contact
by physical
force or incapacitation
across all 27 IHEs are as
high or sligh tly higher
than those revealed in
prio r surveys .

a.

A relatively
small
percentage ( 28% or less)
of even the most serious
incidents are reported to
an organization
or
agency (Title IX office;
law enforcement, etc) .

1tDW

Does the Graduate School grant fee waivers
in other cues?

No.

While the Graduate School will waive fees for doctoral
students receiving external fellowships (when this is a
condition of the fellowship), they do not waive fees for
any other reason, including economic hardship .

35

26

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTA KNOW,

continued

~Row
many students pay these fees out of
J( . pocket?
The Graduate
School
says that eighty -one
doctoral students (about
20% of the 425 upper year ,.doctoral~ udents)
pai~e
fees themsel es
in20¼4·

5.

It is unclear whether this
number includes students
payingfeesoutof an external
grant,as in theexample
above
;
I suspect
not.

./---

*------..~·Continuation
fees trap
upper -level
doctora l
students in a vicious cycle
of debt. In order to pay
these fees and cover costs
of living, students must
increase their teaching
load, apply for loans, seek
additional forms
of emp loym ent,
or a combination
of aJl three .

....causingstudentsto accrue
more fees, in responseto
whichthey willagainattempt
to findmorework.
..

Theneedto takeonunrelated

workprevents
upper-level
doctoral
studentsfrom
adequately
punruing
theirown
research,thusdelaying
timeto
degree
...

...whichinturnfurtherimpedes
theirownresearch,
etc.

THE BASICS, continued
---------------------------------------j---------------------------------------·
The introduction to Duke's harassment
ti=::j
j_policy states :
t::j
"Harassment
of any individual for any
reason is not accepta ble at Duke University ...In aJl
cases, harassment undermines the University 's
commitments to excellence and to respect for the
dignity and worth of aJl individuals," and
that these policies are "consistent with the
University's valuation of academic freedom."

Thereis no argumentthat
DukeUniversity
is correct in
thesestatements.
___
_

1-laral!!ITT\en
t in any formis
not acceptable,
as it violates
the dignifyand worth of
victims
.

A gtudent,
facultymember,
or employee,cannotef)joy
academic
freedom
if theydo
notalgoef)joy
gafetyintheir
placeof regearch
andwork.

34

27

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTAKNOW, cont1nuftl

THE BASICS

Wlly are the8e fees a particularly preu1ng
iuue for inlernational students?

International
llfudentg
alreadyhavea gmaller
pool
of funding
pogg1b
1litiegdueto the citizenghip
and
regidency
requirementg
of manyfellowltlii
pg.
Because inter national studen
are ineligible for federal stude
loans and legally prohibited fro
seeking wor k off-camp u s i
almost all cases, they have few
2. When person uses a pos ition of authority to
engage in un welcom e sexual advances, req uests
for se xual favor s, or other ve rbal or physical
conduct of a sexual na ture.

WhatjuaWlcatioD does the Graduate
School provide for fees?
The Gr aduate School h as suggested that continuation
fees ince nti vize students to qui ckly complete their
degrees .

Duke's policies and procedure s a.re mean t to
prote ct against :
PERSISTENTAND UNWELCOME
QUESTIONING,COMMENTS
, OR EMAILS

r=i
l.=J

BEJEJ

I~ II~-~

I

TheOGgufindgtheimputation
that gtudenw willonly work
hardif threatened
withoneroug
debtbothunfairto the talenw
andeffortgof Duke'
g graduate
community and factually
incorrect.

In reality,the effectof these
feeg ig e.xactly
the oppomte:
delayingtime to degree and
negativelyimpactingbright
younggcnolarg
at the startof
theircareerg_

28

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTA KNOW,

continued

:Are continuation fees a necesaary aspect of
the Graduate School's funding model?

chapter 4: HARASSMENT
AND ASSAULT

The Graduate School has stated that the contlnuation
fees assessed to upper-year doctoral students go
towards the financial package provided to students In
years one th r ough five-and thus that indebted
graduate students are Indeed a necessary aspec t of the
funding model.

~-----,
~-----,

Aga pointof ethics,theDGSUfin<Jg
it
inappropriate
to roggegtthatupper-level
graduategtudentsare regpongible
for
funding
theirlower-level
peerg

Further, the
approximate ly $500,000 In revenue from students
paying fees out of pocket represents only 2% of the
Graduate School's annual operating budget-a small
source of revenue for the institution,
but an
enormous burden for Individual students. More
significant, perhaps, is the revenue stream acc rued
through exte r nal grants which cover th e costs of
the se fees .

TheDGSUimagineg
theGraduate
gchoolfindg
it difficult
to aggegg
a per-head
feeof fl,12O
(or ~10,680 forgtudentg
ona 12-month
cycle)
to or9anizationg
wchagtheMational
~ence
Foundation
while charging
a muchlowerfeeto
individual
gtudents.
Buttherearea number
of
practicable
policy
in~iativeg
(modeled
one.xi81in9
policieg
at peeringt~tiong)whichwould allow
theGraduate
~ool to maintain
thigrevenue
gtreamwhile
enroringthatgtudentg
donot 90
intodebtor faceotherfinancial
difficultieg
in
orderto coverthecogtof fhegefeeg_

Trigger warning :: the following pages discuss the
prevalence of sexual harassment and assault at

institutes of higher education, lays out the process
of filing a claim for related misconduct, and
containspersonalstories fromgraduatestudents.

33

29

HAT} YOU OUGHTA KNOW,
"I currently
qualify
forg/\/APNext
yearI willqualify
forMedicaidand
may be homelessif my current
situatio
n pernisf!l.
Whata shame
that my PhD... is a pathwayto
poverty
. I hopethegradschoolcan
reconsider
thisfeethatcripples
the
poordicproportionately."

"I'vemanagedto avoidpayingthe fees by periodically
puttingmyaissertation
on holdto dedicateseveralhundred
hourseachfallof thelastthreeyearn,seekingout external
funding
.... If Iwasunlucky
anddidn'
t receivea compe
titive
dissertation
fellowship
this year, I couldeasilybe facing
professional
andfinancial
devastation
at thistime,whichis
alreadya veryvulnerablepointin any graduatestudent's
career.It's scaryto thinkabout."
"I face restrictions on loansand
immigrationrequirements that
requireme to be enrolledat Duke
at alltimes.Thatis allto say that
this situationis disconcerting
to
me. I-ladI beenawarethat I may
need to pay thousandsof dollars
after my 5th year of studies,I
would have reconsidered my
decision
to enrollat Duke."

thingsstan
d neveringo
conscien
recommend
t
ukeGrad

other universities

~Do

continued

aueu 8110hfees?

r-Yes.
A survey of peer Institutions suggests that other
universities assess fees, but also situates Duke as
something of an outlier. Occasionally other schools have
nominally higher fees but also have consistent policies
1n place which ensure that Individual students do not
pay fees out of pocket . While the Graduate School states
that it benchmarks fees against peer institut ions, these
policies are not captured by a simple compariSon
between nominal charges.
Official
Semeste r

Non -Reside nt Status

TA, RA, etc.

Rate
Duke

$3,560

$3,560

$3,560

Harvard

$1,433

$150

$0

$575

$0

$0

$1,710

$1,710

$0

MIT

$24,800

$1,240

$0

Brown•

$26,116

$0

$0

Emory*

$11,200

$278

$278

Columbia

$2,044

No data

No data

U Penn

$2,472

$2,472

No data

Cornell ..

$1,750

$200

$0

$8,011

$756

$40

Yale•
Princeton

Non-Duke
Average

• Note that Yale, Brown, and Emory have pollc1es m place that consistently
ellmmate or drast ical ly reduce the out of pocket :::ost to stu dents (llsted m
th e cha.rt). and these reduct ions a.re not contmgent on whether a student 1s
m residence or works for the university
• ~ Note that the offlc1al rate listed for Cornell 1s already a reduced tu1t10n
rate that students can apply for. even 1f they a.re not a non res ident or
workmg for the um vers1ty

31

30

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTA KNOW,

"
I

continued

:i= Is it the responsibility

What policies do other universities have
in place to emure that students won't pay
fees out of pocket?

J!(' absorb

Some un1versities cover fees for all students who do
not receive external fellowships. At others, fees are
waived for students providing services such as
teaching or TA-ing, for off-campus or non -resident
students, a.nd/or for those ma.king adequate progress
towards degree completion. For instance, Cornell
covers fees for all students performing services such
as teaching or TA-ing a.nd also reduces the fee to $200
for non -resident students. While the Graduate School
has cited Cornell's official semesterly fee as highe r
than Duke's, this comparison does not take into
account the existence of these policies .

i

Dou Dake have~
in place?

comparable policies
-

Notreally.
Some departments currently cover fees for 6th - and /or
7th -year students, but there is no coherent policy at
the Graduate School level. Likewise, some teaching/TA
positions cover the cost of fees in addition to direct
remuneration, but most do n ot. Upper -year doctoral
stude nts can teach a course for a salary of $6,000 only
to pay the whole sum right back to the Graduate
School.
There is no fee-waiver policy for non -resident students.
Doctoral stude n ts t eaching or TA-ing at ot h er
tnstitutions, writing th eir dissertations in other cities,
or doing research abroad will still pay the $3,560/
semester charge, in addition to other expenses.
-

(WHAT) YOU OUGHTA KNOW,

-

continued

of departments to

these fees?

At times, the Graduate School has agreed that
individual stude nts should not bear the burden of these
fees, but has suggested it is the responsibility of
individual departments to absorb them.

TheDQgUfindgthigresponse

.ItimRti!dijng forR mmherofre.<iRM!I'.

I

~ - - - - - - - ... ,

I ~l. Departmental budgets are largely determined by
the Graduate School itself .

'

\

2. While some departments indeed indicate that they
have covered fees histor ically (and will continue
to do so as long as their budget s permit ), no
department
has made t his a guarantee, as
departmental budgets change dramatically from
year to year. Students cannot make an informed
decision based on a contingent commitment
that can be rescinded at any point.
3. Funding discrepancies
between the arts and
scie nces-but also between the theoretical and
\
applied sciences-create
enormous inequities

,

among departments and disciplines.

f ;_

do we solve the

I
/

pro~?j

A olear, consistent policyat the Graduate School level would ensurethat
individual
gtooentgdo not bear the burdenof thesefees ag theyworkto
complete
theirdegreegin a timelyfacliion.
Oneoptioniga straightforward
policycoveringfees for allupper-year students,wchagtheonealready
in
~ace at BrownUnivern
ity. Anotherig a combination of fee waivers for
studentsperforminguniversity service anda dramaticallyreduced fee
for non-residentstudents, ag at Cornell
andµarvard.Finally,
theGraduate
School
couldgimply
followYale'g
leadand provide fellowshipsupport for all
6th-year students who need an additional yearto finishtheir work.

Item sets