Disorientation Guide @ UM 2017-2018

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Title

Disorientation Guide @ UM 2017-2018

Date

2017

Place

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Source

https://issuu.com/radfunum/docs/disguide_web__1_

extracted text

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WHATIS A DISORIENTATION
GUIDE?
This disorientation guide is a resource for new and current students at the University of
Michigan to share and learn alternative perspectives about the University and what it
means to be a part of the campus and Ann Arbor community. Drawing on a rich history of
similar guides from campuses across the country , our Disorientation Guide exposes the
cultures at our univers ity and in our city that are co mp licit in systems of oppression;
we hope that this zine speaks to the experiences of those of us who live under and within
these systems. We invite all students to engage with this publication , to share it, and
constructively critique its contents. We hope that the Disorientation Guide encourages
students to build power and fight for our rights!
The University of Michigan has a troubled history - ranging from the dispossession of
indigenous land to endowment investments in both fossil fuels & the Israeli occupation
of Palestine. UM also holds a beautiful, though equally comp lex history of radical
activism and student organizing. Students for a Democratic Society (SOS) was formed
at UM in 1960 by students opposed to the state of postwar American politics , and led the
way for student anti-war and anti-oppressive organizing across the US. They most notably
published the Port Huron Statement in 1962, wh ich is now used as a model for student
social justice organizing the world over. Gay Liberation Front, led by Jim Toy, worked to
secure the first queer & trans resource center on a college campus , and Gayle Rubin led
the Radicallesbians to fight misogyny and homophobia on campus in the 70s. Black
Action Movement led mobilisations in the 70s and 80s to vindicate the rightful place of
Black students at UM. We see these struggles carried on by countless students , faculty,
and staff to this very day.
So where do we fit into this history as current students at the University of Michigan? If
you 're just coming to the University, you might be feeling a sense of awe and excitation
for the next period of your life. You may be anticipating 'success ' to come from your time
spent at this school, and to secure a six-figure job somewhere down the road. However,
we should all be at least aware of the dynamics at work in our own community, no matter
where you're at in life or what your aspirations are. At best, we should be fighting for our
collective liberation and creating a campus culture rooted in demo cracy, justice, and
equity .
Being a student -activist is a tough position to balance. We hope that the Disorientation
Guide sheds light on the ways that students practice dissent. Dissent and radicalism at
the U is defined by working intersectionally to provide an analysis of how hierarchical
relationships and oppression works in our communities. It also is defined by acting
against these systems in ways that are not sanctioned by the powers at be. At a University
where the white supremacist hetero- and cispatriarchy are still at large, dissent and
radicalism must be subversive. Th is work is not only critical, it holds the pow er to
be tra nsformative. This Guide showcases how we can build power as students against
dominant culture while having fun and building meaningful relationships!
The Disorientation Guide is a tool for students old and new to start on the path toward
consciousness, discussion, action, and (ultimately) radicalization. Instead of gradually
becoming aware of the ways in which UM is an oppressive institution and avenues
to join activism, this guide provides alternative perspectives and pathways for further
engagement. We invite you to interact with the Disorientation Guide in whatever way you
wish , we hope it will bring students together and to mobilize our collective power, love,
and solidarity!

1

TABLEOFCONTENTS
MANIFESTO

........ 3.

DEAR FRESHMEN

........ 5.

A CALL FOR STUDENT POWER

........ 6.

RAD ACTIVIST'S SYLLABUS

........ 7.

WTF IS A UM REGENT?

........ 9.

#GTFOWEISER

........ 11.

HOUSING ACTIVISM IN A2

........ 13.

A RADICAL DECLARATION

........ 15.

REVOLUTIONARY YOUTH ALLIANCE

........ 19.

ALT. LEADERS AND THE BEST

........ 20.

QUEER NIGHT AT RICKS

........ 24.

WHY FOSSIL FUEL DIVESTMENT?

........ 25.

TERMS FOR CHANGE

........ 26.

CONTACT RADFUN

........ 27.

f

.

'

'.

2.

MANIFESTO
Interested in radical activism, exposing
back to being a productive body for the
umich for the fraud he is, and making
University. Trying to live outside of the
the complacent student population
dorms? Consult the Dean of Student's
of Ann Arbor uncomfortable? Care
website on "Off-Campus Housing"
about anti-racism, housing rights , and
to find a place where your landlord
affordable college education? Want to
or management company can screw
occupy university places, unfurl banners, you over. Trying to solve our problems
squat, use art in activism, create modes in th is individualistic way ignores the
of radical education in public space, and interconnectedness and societal nature
make a scene?
of our oppress ion. We are not saying
that students should not use University
resources , but rather that if we don't
We are a group of current and former
students working to change our elitist
take collective action these problems will
campus culture and climate through
continue to plague students and only get
direct action, education and the
worse. Don't let U of M make you feel like
creation of subversive spaces. In this
you're a problem (sucking time and money
manifesto, we attempt to shed some
out of the institution) that must be treated
light on various problems that impact
by 'experts', rather than a human with
students and citizens of Ann Arbor.
complex experiences and needs.
Attempts by the university to improve
campus climate aren't working because
We are working to challenge the narrative
that we hear so often of a 'liberal' Ann
umich does not care about students
to the extent we deserve to be cared
Arbor and UM, and continue the inspiring
about. U of M works to exploit students, legacy of radical activism on campus.
making itself rich, famous and sexy at
All the heinous forms of oppress ion
the cost of our mental health, equity for
experienced in other communities are
marginalized students, and access to
felt every day on our campus and in the
an affordable housing and education.
city as well. We've seen this through the
The City of Ann Arbor and many of
our classmates do not seem to care
either. Neither the University nor the City
want to see us co-organizing to claim
our place as the rightful holders of our
education and society.
How does the University trick students
into thinking it cares about us? For one,
it encourages us to see our oppression
as individual problems rather than
as being interconnected and caused
by the way in which our campus and
society are run. Frustrated with hearing
racist or homophobic bullshit spewing
from your professors or classmates?
Report them to the University and listen
to defensive administrators explain
why they can't take disciplinary action.
Having problems with mental health? Go
to CAPS, sit under a sun lamp while you
wait for short term care, and be sent
to an off campus therapist who won't
accept your non-existent insurance to
get better right away so you can go

3.

OT231IVIAM
critique of rac ism at UM prov ided by
Black Act ion Movement in the ?Os and
80s, as well as f ram # BBUM (Being
Black at t he University of Michigan)
and Students4Justice in recent years.
Consistent student and resident
organizing against sexism, gender
violence, homophobia, transphobia, and
classism also attest to the fact that
dominant culture continues to exist on
our campus.

ed
y20·
cret Life
idd novel

But why does the oppression continue?
Maybe it's because we're a part of the
legacy of the United St ates of America:
a nation founded on settler colonialism,
genocide, and slavery. Maybe it's
because the University's administration
and city off icials have assimilated
to a neoliberal, corporate model of
governance. Maybe it's because there
are students at the University who refuse
to challenge, and in fact, reproduce, the
very systems of oppression that impact
their peers. It's up to us to demystify
the air of Ann Arbor as a progressive
wonderland and continue to expose its
insidious underbelly.
The University and administration are
not the only issue. The University of
Michigan is a place where oppressive
systems are perpetuated not only by
the individualistic , capitalistic University
structu re that brands its inclusivity
and diversity (that only t he privi leged
may afford) but ALSO by the majority
of inac t ive peers, faculty, co-workers ,

etc . that do not push back when others
are tokenized, exot icized, harmed, and
silenced . Some of these folks cannot
show up and fight back because they
have to work, commute and take care of
a myriad of other respons ibilities-and
this too is part of the problem. We all
need to be ab le to do community work: to
fight for ourselves and to solidarize.
Of course, there is a massive
contradiction inherent to being a student
against hegemony at UM. How can we
be opposed to an inst itution from which
we gain so much privi lege and chose to
attend? How can students justly crit icize
something that benefits them so much in
the long run? First of all, we must escape
the cultural Stockholm Syndrome in
which UM firmly holds us. The University
does give us power, yes. This power is
immense. But this is not the power to
remain complacent and complicit. No,
this is the power to critique, f ight for our
rights, build power among communities,
and create our liberation . As students, it
is our position to use the privilege and
resources that the University af fords us to
build a better world.
We need to collectively change the
way we think, act and interact at t his
University. We need to change the ways
in which we understand the University, as
a part in a capitalist system that exploi t s
the most marginalized popu lations in our
communities and around the wor ld. No
one will do it for us. If not us, then who?
If not now, then when? It is our work to
build alternatives to the current sta t e
of student culture, focused on cathartic
acts and shallow liberalism , and replace
them with f un and subversive act ion &
meaningful care for our communities!

WithLoveandRage,
TheDisorientationGuide
Editors
4.

~ ~

~

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university " " " "' """' diversity """"" '""' initiatives are a sCa MII I - do not trust
the university if you want to engage in real activism that doesn 't exp loit
and burn you out
do n't let the un ive rsit y



toke nize

and use you fo r free

labor

you aro worth moro than offering your critical reflection of the universi ty to the university so they can take
cre d11and do nothing
the diversity equ,ty & lnctusiOn (DEi) plan ls a facade , and a passive response to student concerns
regarding systemic oppression and tho university's involvement In more than questionable ventures

~e

3~ ~
~
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~

tho DEi student advisory boar d solicited applications from students passiona te abou t changing
campus only to let them know it was " NOT " a pai d position , ask yourself this - what makes sense
about asking poor students to tal k abou t ho w being poor at an elitist ,nst,tuuon In an unaffordable
c11y affe cts them and ,nstead of pa ying them telling them ho w it should be an honor for them to
serve on the advisory bo ard ?

'

~Jill-~
··
~ 4? .
t.a •_.

'-;i O (/)

~

· ,

~

THAT IS eXPLoi TAt iOn!I! You don 't owe u of m SHIT .

H

If the un,vorslty really cared about "diversity , equity & lnclusiOn" they would pay you for your labor ,
denounce fascist students and w hito supremacists (befo re being begged and spoon fed by us ), and
d ivest from Israel in short , they w ould act ually listen to us instead of pretending to care about
something ot her than profit

Ul

~

-

~

~

A CALLFORSTUDENT
POWER
& ACTION

FROMTHEMICHIGAN
STUDE
NT POWERNETWORK

There are three types of power in the world:
economic power, militarized coercive
power, and the power found in people and
communities. The ruling class might have
control over the first two , but what about the
latter? In an era of unprecedented rightwing
populism, you might say that the ruling
class holds power in the people too. But cut
through the trumpisms and rallying cries of
neonazis the world over, and you see quickly
that the power that comes with building
meaningful relationships and engaging
groups of people is one that students and
young people have an opportunity to build
and use for justice, peace & equity. Power
in people is the only conceivable position
we can leverage to build the just world
we 're fighting for without compromising
our values.
Historically, college campuses have served
as organizing hubs for social movements. As
students, we have enormous opportunities
in our access to resources , knowledge,
and collective space. We have the privilege
to move through the world with a sense
of idealism, to experiment with ideas and
to imagine a new world. Harnessing our
collective power is a strategic path to
creating that world. In order to do so we
must recognize our place within multiple
communities - connecting community
members, faculty, and hometowns. To make
real headway we must build transformative
relationships among one another. At
the UM, this means that we must reject
complacency to the economic & militarized
powers of our governments and our
university administration. Students should
conspire with other residents and activists
in the area to win victories that are mutually
and equitably beneficial. In this way, we can
be responsible for our student community
and those we come from.

Not all students at the University believe in the
possibility of the just, peaceful, and equitable
future we struggle to build. In fact , we clearly
see that this is the case from recent alt-right
and zionist student activities on our campus
(e.g. racist and antisemitic flyering in Fall
2016 , and continued student zionism partially
organized by Hillel). Overcoming the alt-right
and zionism is hard to envision if we can't
see that the white supremacist , cap italist ,
patriarchal structure that feeds fascism in the
US also spurs colonialism in Palestine/Israel
and the silencing of students of color at the
U. What we have in common as concerned
students can help us construct a collective
frontline so that we can take back our voices
and fight oppression here and everywhere .
As students we are exploited by predatory
loans. Our struggles for racial justice are
hijacked by fluffy bureaucratic plans (the
DE&I plan at UM being a prime example} , and
are made to believe that we're the natural
subordinates to their 'unquestionable' power.
Our administrators continue to marginalize
staff & students of color and queer & trans
folks in the University, while trying to convince
us that we 're well taken care of in the web of
'student life,' and then use poc students to sell
the UM brand for personal monetary gain. Our
local officials collaborate with big deve lopers
and landlords to make it nearly impossib le
for students of low-income backgrounds
to find affordable rent near campus. They
make us believe in them more than ourselves
with chants of "GO BLUE" and "Victors for
Michigan". They thrive off of us thinking that
we cannot match their might. In turn, we have
to realize that we are the ones that give the
University its mandate. The powers that be
cannot function without us - politicians in our
2-party system know this, as do our campus
administrators. As students , now is our chance
to prove that we know our power in people
too. It's in our hands.

Tojoin the MSPNin buildingstudent poweracross the
state visit facebook.com
/ rnichiganstudetpower

6.



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IS A UMREGENT?
If the University is a corporation, the regents are its corporate board. They are tasked with
making sure the machine runs efficiently , making sacrifices where needed for the bottom line.
In this context, we as students must play the dual role of both product and consumer.
The board consists of eight regents in total, two of whom are elected to an eight-year term
every two years.They are elected officials who have control over policy and budget decisions
at our university. They are the powers that be. According to the Michigan Constitution of 1963,
the Regents have "general supervision" of the institution and "the control and direction of all
expenditures from the institution's funds."
If you are a Michigan voter, you (could) have voted on them. Now they get to sit in meetings
and decide how many thousands of dollars to increase your tuition next year and what
subsequent pay raise Schlissel might take (he's a non-voting board member). So who are
these people anyways? They are lawyers , corporate business types , board members for
national nonprofits, and wealthy alumni. While well educated, most do not have a background
in higher education or administration. These are nevertheless the people making decisions
that affect our everyday lives on campus.
The most pressing concern we see is the amount of power invested in a group that most
students are not aware even exists, and is not representat ive of the students and faculty
who are impacted by their decisions. In a Michigan Daily article* written days after the 2016
presidential election , students reported not caring about the regents' activities, and expressed
little desire to know more. As members of the student body most directly affected by the
board's decisions we find this highly concerning.

We have seen socialjustice
campaigns appeal directly
to Pres. Schlissel, but in
reality, it's the regents
who determine how policy
decisions will be made. Even
the 11niversity president is
chosen by the board. They're
the man behind the curta.in,
with Schlissel as their
figurehead.
*

"Following decisive regents electio n, students
say Board lacks transparancy "
www .michigandaily.com/sec tion/administration/
students-unaware-boa rd- regents-say- lack-t ransparency-exists-adm inistration

9.

DENISE
ILLITCH

RONWEISER

lllitch is the president of lllitch Holdings which
privately manages Little Ceasers, the Detroit
Red Wings, Detroit Tigers, the Fox Theater
as well as 2 billion in property investments in
Detroit #gentriflcation. lllitch holdings boasts
$3.4 Billion in combined revenue from these
properties.

Owns Mckinely Properties , based in Ann
Arbor worth over $500 Million. Mckinely
owns many commercial and retail properties
downtown A2.

lllitch may be sympathetic to some social
justice causes, however her form of support
leans toward white saviorism in the flavors of
charity and philanthropy.

Major fundraiser for the Republican National
Committee and the Trump campaign.
He was named to Trump 's inauguration
committee in November and has remained a
head flgure in the RNC.

College affordability advocate, though she
voted for the latest '17 hike in tuition.

True #RossSchoolofBusiness capitalist and
#CorporatePhilanthropist

MICHAEL
J.BEHM
Democratic lawyer and current chairperson
of the Board of Regents
History of charity in Flint and in the STEM
field through the Level Playing Field

KATHERJNE
E. WHITE
Democrat from Ann Arbor with a varied
history which includes engineering, (patent)
law, governance , and military work.
One of two people of color on the UM Board
of Regents.

ANDREA
FISCHER
NEWMAN
Republican who has studied at UM and
Georgetown, formerly complicit in the Reagan
administration.
Long history of government affairs work for
large multinational corporations , particularly for
airline companies.
Only regent opposed to the latest increase in
student tuition.

MARKJ.BERNSTEIN
Bernstein is president and managing partner
of The Sam Bernstein Law Firm, PLLC.
If there is a potential (semi) ally among the
Regents, Mark Bernstein may be it. He has a
history of legal civil rights work.
Former Board of Trustee member at Michigan
Hillel with ties to zionists.

SHAUNA
RYDERDIGGS
Democratic dermatologist from Grosse
Pointe who has multiple UM degrees.
One of two people of color on the UM Board
of Regents (both happen to be women of
color).

ANDREW
C. RICHNER
Republican lawyer and politician from Grosse
Pointe Park who was a delegate during
the Republican National Convention that
nominated George W. Bush in 2004.

10.

Postedon Sun, Dec 16, 2012 : 12:03 p.m.

GOPoperative RonWeiserof Ann Arbor in hot
water over remarksabout Detroit voters

"There'sno machine to go to the pool halls and the barbershopsand put those
people on busesand then bus them from precinct to precinct where they vote
multiple times; Weisersays in the video. "Andthere's no machine to get 'em to
stop playing pool and drinking beer in the pool hall And it does make a
difference."
He added: "Obamahas hired a lot of people to help him get that vote out. But if you're not from
Detroit, the placeswhere those pool halls and barbershopsare, you're not going to be going at 6:30 in
November.Not without a side arm."
Democratsand others said Weiser used racist stereotypesto bash Detroit.

11

Source: Ann Arbo N
of
r ews WWW
-ann-arbor-in -h t
,
.annarbor.com/n
/i
o -water-over-remarks-about-;wts ~op-operative-ron-weisere ro,t-voters/

elected
Michigan's

Ul'iliver.sit~
annual

il'ilvest
fossil

PROSPECTIVE
REGENT

- Opposesunionizingby
students for living wages
- Aims to run U-M like a
business,not a school
- Fundraisesfor Trump

divest
from fossil fuels
invest
i n our future

Student campaign against Weiser from the 2016 election. Weiser was
elected, despite the student opposition to his regent candidacy.
Design cred it: Eva Roos

12.

HOUSING
ACTIVISM
IN A2
A BRIEF
HISTORY
In recent years more and more new 'luxury' student apartment complexes have been
built up in Ann Arbor, rents elsewhere are rising, and students and community members
are being pushed out of the city where they work, study, play and live. Students from
the 1% (or maybe even the 10%) are forking over thousands of dollars a month to live
in cinder block towers , while more and more folks are pushed into precarious housing
situations from rising rents and unethical landlords and management companies screw
over their tenants (edit: serfs?) with our government's approval.

These housing problems are not new in Ann Arbor, and have existed before the recent
increase in mid- and highrise apartments. The Ann Arbor Tenant's Union (1969-2004)
was born out of a rent strike to gain support for the 1978 Truth in Renting and Fair
Rental Information legislation--a law regulating landlord practices. For decades, AATU
provided invaluable resources to student renters to avoid legal conflicts with their
landlords and to fight for their rights . AATU organized more rent strikes and advocated
on behalf for tenants, anti-racism, women's rights , disability rights , and environmental
protection . They released newsletters to share information about Ann Arbor housing
and even published How To Evict Your Landlord: An Ann Arbor Tenant's Primer (1989).
Even though AATU was funded by CSG , it was targeted by University administration
(including VP for Student Life, E. Royster Harper) and in 2004 it lost its funding and
dissolved. Today, no alternative to AATU works in our campus or city. Where do we go
now if our landlord is using us, and who's there to counter the pressure of the housing
developers and management companies in our local government? No one, though we
need it now more than ever.

13.

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14.

A RADICAL
DECLARA
110~
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ABUSE
Al'O11-£~CESSITY
a=

LP

BY THEANONYMOUS
SPARK
Goals of this Section:
1. Educate the reader on domestic abuse
2. As an educated reader, IF YOU SEE SOMETHING WRONG, SPEAK THE FUCK UP

Domestic abuse is real.
"Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other
abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate
partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, threats, and emotional or
psychological abuse. The frequency and severity of domestic violence varies dramatically."

Domestic abuse happens everywhere: on campus and off campus.
"Domestic violence is prevalent in every community and affects all people regardlessof age,
socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or nationality.Physical violence
is often accompanied by emotionallyabusive and controlling behavior as part of a much larger,
systematic pattern of dominance and control. Domestic violence can result in physical injury,
psychological trauma, and even death. The devastating consequences of domestic violence can
cross generations and last a lifetime."

Victim-survivors are real. Their actions and feelings are valid.
"One of the most common questions people ask about victims of domestic violence is, 'Why don't
they just leave?' People stay in abusive relationshipsfor a variety of reasons including:
• The victim fears the abuser's violent behavior will escalate if (s)hetries to leave.
• The abuser has threatened to kill the victim, the victim's family, friends, pets, children and/or
himself/ herself.
• The victim loves his/her abuser and believes (s)hewill change.
• The victim believesabuse is a normal part of a relationship.
• The victim is financiallydependent on the abuser.
• The abuser has threatened to take the victim's children away if (s)heleaves.
• The victim wants her/his children to have two parents.
• The victim's religiousand/or cultural beliefs preclude him/her from leaving.
• The victim has low self-esteem and believes (s)heis to blame for the abuse.
• The victim is embarrassed to let others know (s)hehas been abused.
• The victim has nowhere to go if (s)heleaves.
• The victim fears retribution from the abuser's friends and/or family"

I distinguish between the term vict im and survivor:
• A victim experiences domestic abuse. Victims can experience trauma.
• A survivor is recovering from domestic abuse. Survivors can experience post-tr auma.
Victim-survivorscan distinguish these words as they please (these definitions are only pertinent to
me). Victim-survivors can describe themselves however they see fit; they need not use either word.

15.

I am a survivor of domes tic abuse. I am a student. My father was my abuser. I found that t here are
few consol idated resources for victim intervention on camp us or off campus in Mich igan {I will define
intervention below). One reason (among many) I felt that I co uld not exit the relationship was my lack
of awareness of options . My father capita lized on isolation and manipulated my ideas about "the real
wor ld". What really helped me get out of the relationship was my significant other repeatedly reminding
me of the (reality ofj opt ions available to me. At t hat point, I had seen abo ut th ree different therap ists
and I direct ly to ld them abou t the abuse I experienced . I sought advice and help , but they were
neut ral absorbe rs of informat ion. They co unseled me on how to "dea l wit h it." They we re comp licit in
th e perpetu ation of my abuse. Fortunate ly, with the support of my S.O., I gained the confidence to
separate from my father. The process was messy. I needed to meet with at least 5 different peop le
across campus and the city in order t o ensure persona l safety and to ensure that I continued schoo l
with sufficient aid. There is a clear need for a domestic abuse intervention center. There is a need for
increased camp us awareness of domes tic abuse (beyond and including sexual abuse).

My definition of an intervention includes:
• The victim can deny any step of interventio n
• Advoca te(s) asking explicit permission to engage the vict im w ith any step of intervent ion
before any attempt of engagement
• Advoca te(s) respecti ng the c hoices of t he victi m
• Advoca tes(s) practici ng c lear communicat ion skills
• Advoca t e(s) speaki ng personally o nly with the victi m
• Advoca t e(s) p roviding a safe space for the victim
• Advoca te(s) consistent , repeated emphasis of support to the victi m
• Advoca te(s) consistent , repeated renounceme nt (anti- support) of the abuser
• Advoca t e(s) reviewing t he victi m's abusive relationship w ith th e vict im
• Collective identification of t he abusive tact ics of the abuser
• Advoca t e(s) emphasi zing optio ns and resources for t he victim
• Advoca t e(s) wo rking intricately w ith t he victi m on a separat ion plan
• Survivors require the same amount of respec t and safe space as descr ibed above

t'ou said, Angel.

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16.

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In general,there is a need for proactive advocates. Advocacy requiressignificant
emotional labor and training on victim-survivorcollaboration(see below resources).Those
near the victim-survivor can make a difference. If you observe domestic abuse, you
can and should personallyreach out to the victim using the above guidelines(of course,
be wary of how much energy you can devote and rememberthat you are not obligated
to provide all of the above if you are unable}.If you'd like to help, but find you are unable,
communicate this to the victim-survivor! If you're on campus, start by encouraging them to
contact the SexualAssault Preventionand Awareness Center (SAPAC)!Accompany them
there! Support them as much as possible! Seek resourcesand education yourself (SAPAC
provides these too)! Speaking up and TAKING ACTION in the face of injustice fuels
change for the better.

Advocate's Resources:

• http://www.wikihow.com/Help-Your-Friend-Who-ls-Being-Abused
• http://www.wikihow.com/Recognize-Signs-of-Domestic-Violence
• Skills for Successful Collaborations: A Skills Building Curriculum in Negotiation,
CollaborativeMindset, Strategic Thinking and Meeting Facilitation"Day Piercy, The
National ResourceCenter on Domestic Violence, 2000.
• Jill Davies & EleanorLyon (1998). Safety planning with battered women. Thousand
Oaks London- New Delhi:Sage Publications
General Resources:

• SAPAC:University of Michigan Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center
promotes healthy relationships, teaches non-violenceand equality, supports survivor
healing, and fosters a respectful and safe environment for all members of the University
of Michigan community. SAPACprovides educational and supportive servicesfor the
University of Michigan community related to sexual assault, intimate partner violence,
sexual harassment,and stalking. We are committed to fulfillingthis mission in a culturallysensitive, empowering, and empathic way to University of Michigan students, faculty, and
staff. We serve all racial, ethnic, religious, class backgrounds, sexual orientations, and
gender and social identities. www.sapac.umich.edu
• National CoalitionAgainst Domestic Violencewww.ncadv.org
• Empowerment Guides from WomanSafeHealth,an excellentAnn Arbor health center
http://www.womansafehealth.com/guides.html

17.

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20.

PRISON
CREATIVE
ARTSPROJECT
In 1990 two intelligent, passionate women
with life-sentences, Mary {who also happens
to be the lead Plaintiff in Glover v. Johnson, a
1979 landmark class-action lawsuit that won
equal educational and constitutional rights for
Michigan woman prisoners, past, present and
future - look it up!) and Joyce , strategically
seeded what has become a multi-dimensional
organization that focuses on bringing creative
arts - and thus , compassion, connection , and
humanity - to incarcerated people in Michigan.
Mary and Joyce were asked by a student in
the RC, Liz Boner, if they would like to take
a social-justice oriented theater class at U of
M while students with Buzz Alexander , and
they said yes - within the walls of the facility.
Buzz readily agreed and within the year their
two-person class had grown into The Sisters
Within- a talented, vivacious, dedicated
theater troupe led by incarcerated women
and facilitated by PCAP members, which still
continues to create and perform incredible
plays at Women's Huron Valley. From there,
Buzz and Janie Paul - a professor in the
School of Art and Design - continued to grow
PCAP to be what it is today. When Mary was
released after 26 years of incarceration she
joined the PCAP team "on the outside" and still
serves as an integral part of the organization as
the program coordinator (and, let's not forget ,
co-founder), where she currently works at the
helm.
Today PCAP has grown to be a family of
hundreds of members and alumni associates
that provide creative-arts workshops in adult
and juvenile facilities in Michigan, ranging
from creative writing to theater to music (new
this year!!), and annually puts on the largest
art exhibition of prisoner-created work in the
country, showcasing drawings, paintings ,
and sculpture from artists in every facility in
Michigan. Additionally, PCAP organizes the
Linkage Project, which connects formerly
incarcerated youth and adults with PCAP
mentors who provide re-entry support and
help the artists grow their portfolios, publishes
a wonderful literature journal of writing by
incarcerated authors , and instructs PCAPaffiliated classes.
In an essence, PCAP's objective is simple:
bring joy, enhance and celebrate creative
skill, and connect people who could not

21

otherwise become connected. Yet in doing this ,
PCAP is inherently working to humanize the
criminal justice system- a massive apparatus
that deprives people of their humanity , limits
connections, and removes more than 2 million
people from society each year. However, the
main problem is that the criminal justice system
is not broken; it is working exactly how it intends
to work. It is no coincidence that the majority of
the prison population is African American and
Hispanic people (for example, black men are
six times as likely to be incarcerated as white
men) or that the private prison corporations like
the Corrections Corporation of America make
billions of dollars in revenue each year. It is also
no coincidence that prisons tend to thrive up in
poor, rural, working-class white towns that are
desperate to improve their economy. And it is
certainly no coincidence that the "war on crime"
began just as the African American community
was gaining rights during the civil rights area.
Thus , PCAP operates with in a complex system
but the work it does brings everything back to a
human-to-human level. In PCAP workshops , the
leadership is not one-directional. It is interchange
of ideas and creativity between facilitators and
artists; it is through our mutual connection and
care for one another that our art is able to come
alive. PCAP simply provides a supportive space
for the artists to use their agency ; agency that
they already hold within them but don 't have
much opportunity to express within the walls of
their imprisonment.
The tendency to make art is a human
phenomenon. It is something that def ines us
as humans and is something that we all share
across cultures , borders, experiences , times, and
spaces. The work that PCAP does gives talented,
thoughtful, resilient artists the chance to be seen
as people - not prisoners - and it challenges us,
as their community, to review our perceptions of
the incarcerated. We would love to have you join
us in this experience.

orkshop facilitator training:
new
4·30PID
m
8·30
aro·
sept. lo fro
·
1405 east quad
W

...urru·ch qualtrics.com/jfe/
sign up a11
.
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form/SV _d9Xt3Yyl4dRhQ
pcapexeco@umich.edu

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TRUTHTOPOWER

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H3W09OT HTUHT
*W ORDS MATTER: . . at the ROOT of the
RADICAL means strik ing d ocate for radical
problem. Thi~ is why :et~e ~oot causes of the
. ·
which attac
·t· s
act1v1sm,
. our commun1 1e •
problems we face in

22.



IIAilf p1of~

JoMt '""''

Meet the IJea11s-~ .



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Here's a brief look at
n
sat b ind one of the mos t important
desks on campus during th e College's first 20jj' ears. by Matt N elson

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Dean 1875-1889
In add1t1onto being a beloved
teacher. Frieze was a recog•
nized musicianand composer
to whom credit is largely given
for the crea11o
n of the Choral
Union and the University
Musical Society.

CHARLES E. ODEGAARD
Dean 1952-1958
Accepting his posit ion at age
41, Odegaardwas the youngest
dean ever selected to head
the College. He served in the
Navy in World War 11,attaining
the rank of lieutenant commande,.

\ MARTIN L. D'OOGE
Dean 1890-1897
An ordained minister, D'Ooge
"ould, the University Senate
observed, "doubtless have
become a preacher of note
had not his scholarly amb1t1ons
and tastes detained him in the
, quieter walks of Academ,c hie."
,


ROGER W. HEYNS
Dean 1958 - 1962
Heyns wasgiven the Classof 1919
Award for Outstanding Teaching
1n1950.and hiscoursePsychol·
ogy of Adjustment was oneof
the most poP1Jlar
on campus.

RICHARD HUD SON
Dean 1897 - 1907
Born in England. Hudson once
worked in a Hamilton . Ontario,
telegraph off ice 10 help sup•
port his family while pursuing
his studies in his free time.

WILLIAM HABER
Dean 1963-1968
A native of Romania, Haber
was extremely involvedwith
public policy and served as
a member of the advisory
council that drafted the
nation's first Social Security
law. in 1939.

JOBNO . REED
Dean 1907 - 1914
Reed's chief scholarly contr1but1ons were 10 the f ields of
op tics and acoustics. but he
was also a lover of literature
and poetr y who championed
t he ancient classics.

WILLIAM L. HAYS
Dean 1988 - 1970
Regardedasboth an excellent
researcher and teacher, Hays
receivedthe HenryRussel Award
in 1960.the Umvers,ty's highest
honor for faculty at the early to
middlestageof their career.

JOHN IL EFFINGER
Dean 1915 - 1933
According to one faculty resolution. LSA"s longest-serving
dean had "a rugged honest y,
an almost 01sconcert1ng candor, and a blunt impatience
wit h sham and pretenseof
any sort."

FRAlflt H. T. RBODES
Dean 1871 - 1974
Rhodesreceived nearly every
notable awardand medal in his
field and also playeda s1gnif1cant role in t he development of
national science policy under
several U.S. presidents. He held
35 honorary degrees.

EDWARD R. KRAUS
Dean 1933 - 1945
Kraus recruited the renowned

chem ist K.as.tm1r
Fa1ans
., who
was of Jew1sl'idescent. to the
College from Germanydunno
the 1nihal r~se of the Nazi Party.

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BILLYE. FRYE
Dean 1976-1880
A tall, lankypresenceon campus
known for sporting bow tiesand
a fresh flower in hrs lapel. Frye
was namedU· M'svice president
for academicaffairsin 1980and
provost 1n 1983.

HAYWARD KENISTON
Dean 1945-19Sl
Keniston taught Spanish, F,ench,
and Italian. and he took leave
during the 1943-4 4 schoolyear
to serve asau ache in charge
of cultural relations at the U.S.
Embassyin BuenosAires.

BEHRTS. FRJEZE

W~

PETER STEINER
Dean 1981 - 1989
A renowned figure in both the
economics department and
the law school, Steiner con·
ducted research that generally
centeredaround the connections between economic analys1s and public policy.
EDIE N. GOLDENBERG
Dean 1989-1998
Goldenberg played a key
role in the federal govern•
ment's civil service reform of
the 1980s. While dean, she
helped to launch t he Michigan
in Washington Program.
SH IRLEY NEUMAN
Dean 188 8-2002
Neuman arrived at LSA
f rom the University of British
Columbia. A professor of
English and women's studies.
shewas committed to
Interdisciplinary research.
TERRENCEJ.lolCDONALD
Dean 2002 -2 013
An award-winning scholarand
a former GuggenheimFellow,
McDonald Is also a celebrated
teacher.Hecurrently serves
as director of the Bentley
Historical Museum.
ANDREW D. MARTIN
Dean 201 4 - pre sen t
With expertise in the study
of judi~1al decision-making,
Dean Martin 1sthe co-creator
of the Martin-Quinn scores.
which measure the ideology
of SupremeCourt Justices.

i

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ILWSTRATIONS
Char/leLayton

7

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23.




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•Not spo.nsored by Rick's

24.

WUY l>IVES'T?
Divestm ent is the opposite of

investment - it meansremoving
money from stocks,bonds,or investment
funds, often due to unethical or immoral
practices .
It's been done before. U·M has
divested twice_in the past, from
Soulh African Apartheid and tobacco
companies.

As an inst itution dedicated to resea rch
and education. it Is morally irresponsible



to profit f1'omclimalt! chang•.
Nt!Ulrality aids tht! oppr•ssor. Through inaction
regard ing the $ 1billi on invesied in fossil hlel companie s,
UM is siding with those who promote climate change.

l>I VESTMENT
Pl.6t:.E'5S AT VM

IGNORING
CAMPUS
CONSENSU

U-M is governed by l he Board of Regents. who are
respons ible for the general superv ision of t he
University and control all expenditures from the U-M·s
funds . The regen ts determ ine where the University's
bank account. or the endowment, is invested. The.reis
a three-prong precedent that signa ls w hen

FACULTY
SENATE
RESOLUTION

U- M Rege nts m ust create a com mittee to

consider divestme nt.

NOV 2015 - Majority supportto
create a committee to
consider divestment

THREE-PRONGED
UNIVERSITY
OFMICHIG
NINVESTS

PRECEDENT

MICHIGAN
DAILY
OEC2015 - Editorial board
position piece endorsed
divestment

There must be a
consensus on campus

surrounding the issue .
The activities of the
particu lar industr ies
must be antithetical to
the University's core
values .

INFOSSIL
FUELS

CSG
RESOLUTION
MARCH 2015 - Passed 32-2 m
support of creating a commit tee to consider divestment

FACULTY
LmER

These industries must
be uniquely responsible
for the problem .

100+ SIGNATURESfrom U·M
Faculty in letter of
divestment support to
President Schlissel

FOSSIL
FUEL
INDUSTRIES
...

25.

Design credit: Eva Roos

... Are uniquely responsiblefor
climate change - Fossilfuel
combustionhas increased 90%

since 1990. when it was responsible
for 76% of greenhouse gases.

WORDSMATTER
SOMETERMSFORCHANGE
DIALECTICAL
CHANGE:
The process by which the internal contradictions of existing institutions/
ideas create their own opposite through struggle to resolve those contradictions. The
resolution of this struggle creates a new institution/idea , which then repeats the process.

CLASSISM:
Discrimination or oppression against people on the basis of their lower socioeconomic
class status.

HETERO
NORMA
TIVITY:
relating to, or based on the attitude that heterosexuality is the only normal and natural
expression of sexuality. *see ricks

INTERSECTIO
NALITY:
he concept that when trying to understand the experiences of Black women , one can not do
so without taking into account that issues of race will intersect with racism thus giving them
a unique type of lived experience. The term was originally coined by Kimberle Crenshaw in
1989 for this reason and has since been expanded to also grapple with the idea of other parts
of a person 's identity impacting their lived experiences all at once by shaping the way they
.
.
experience oppression.

NEOLIBERALISM:
a theory of political and economic practices asserting that human well-being can best be
advanced by the expansion of free markets, free trade, and individual freedoms. The role of the
state is to create and preserve these markets, but not to intervene in them.

RACISM:
The belief that all members of a specific race are in some way superior in comparison
to another. Usually accompanied by the systematic oppression of one or more racial groups
through a variety of social , political and cultural systems of domination.

SEXISM:
Prejudice, discrimination, or stereotyping against people based upon their sex, again
generally enhanced by societal structures of oppression/domination

SOLIDARITY:
The value and execution of the connectedness of the common nature of all liberation
struggles

26.

CONNECT
WITHRADFUN*
*radical anticapitalist deviants & forum of united nonconformists

zine release party:
sat. sept. 9 @ 8PM
602 lawrence st.

initial gathering:
wed. sept. 13 @ 6:30
1432 east quad





'

disorientation mich iganword press.com
radfunUM@gmail.com
facebook.com/radfunUM

27.

Item sets