Disorientation Belinda Hall 10.07.2019 6:30 PM (Harvard Law School)

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Title

Disorientation Belinda Hall 10.07.2019 6:30 PM (Harvard Law School)

Date

2019

Place

Cambridge, Massachusetts

Source

https://issuu.com/hlsdisorientation/docs/disorientation_sample

extracted text

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2019
Disorientation is designed with love by a collective of 2Ls and 3Ls who remember the conflicted pride, anger,
disappo int ment, isolation, frustration, and exhaustion of experiencing HLS fo r the first time as a person of co lor, a
woman, an immigrant, a first -ge nerat io n col lege student, a membe r of the LGBTO community, and/or a person
general ly invested in liberation and solidarity work.


2019
Disorientation is designed with love by a co llect ive of 2Ls and 3Ls who remember the conflicted
disappointment,

p ride, anger,

isolation, frustration, and exhaustion of experiencing HLS for the first time as a person of color, a

woman, an immigrant, a first - generation college student, a member of the LGBTO community, and/or a person
generally invested in liberation and solidarity work.
This guide is meant to supplement the in-person event on 10.07.2019 at 6:30 PM in Belinda Hall .
Note: All images within computer screens are clickable links to relat ed media.
The authors of t his guide are the thousands of students, staff, and facu lty before us who bent a nd attempted to
deconstruct t his extraord inarily powerful inst itution bui lt on the desec rated land of the Massachusett people and
funded with the b lood money of slavery - historically by chattel slavery and stil l today by the forced labor of
incarcerated

peop le and detained immigrants.

Keep in mind that Disorientation focuses largely on the law school. There is a wealth of additiona l history and current
work at other Harvard schools. For examp le, refer to ...
- The "Secre t Court " beginning in 1920 that
investigated homosexual activity at the College,
ultimately expe lling 9 students and causing the
suicide of Eugene R. Cumm ings at 23 years old.
- The massive College st rikes of 1969 which
protested Harvard's role in the Vietnam War as
morally bankrupt. About 400 police in riot gear
were called to campus by Harvard President
Nathan Pusey. Between 250 and 300 people
were arrested in the raid, and near ly 75 students
were injured. Many students were expelled and
later readmitted. Demands were met: ROTC was
removed from campus (temporarily), Harva rd
established an Afr ican American studies
program (now t he Department of Afr ican and
African American Studies), and Harvard bui lt
low - income housing on Mission Hill.
- The Great Harvard Pee- In of 1973, organized by
Black lawyer and activist Florynce "Flo" Kennedy
(p ictured) who remarked : "If you had to give
the world an enema , you would put it in
Harvard Yard . This ha s got to be the a sshole
of the world. " Female College students dumped
ja rs of symbolic pee on the steps of Lowell Hall
to protest that women taking exams there had
no access to restrooms.

attiirvard

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harvard's expansion
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A protest flyer from 1969
reads "Harvard University is
the biggest landlord in
Cambridge. Harvard is a bad
landlord. It buys up buildlings,
lets them run down, and then
tears t hem down to make
room for its own expansion."

Belinda Sutton 's 1783 Petition (full text)
The folJowmg,s a transcNptionof Belinda's Petltion to the Mllsuchusens Ge11eraf
Cou'1.
, FebflJ8ryI 4.
1783 (Ongmalmanuscnpt..MassaehusettsArctnves) You can also v,ew Imagesof Bef1ndaSutton s
1783 PotibOnnn<I,~la:ad documonts
Commonwealthof Massachusens

To 111e
Honoureblethe Sene,e end Houseor Rep,esenui11ves
In Ge<lere1cou" assembled
The Petition of Be•nda an Affrican, humbly shows:

That seventy years have rolled mvay. since she on the banks of the Rio de Volts received her

e,clstence-the mountainsCovere<Iwith 6Picyror06l$, the valleys with the ~cheSIlruh•.
sponlBneously prcdoced ; joined lo that happy lompera:turo of air to excludo @xces-s
: would have
yielded her the mo6I oonll)leetfelicltv, had neeher mind rece<vedee~y lrrc,resslonsor the cn,env ol
mon. whose faces we1'9like-the moon, and who6e 8owaand Arrows wore rike the thunder and the
lightningof 1he Clouc!s- The ldee ol these, the most dreedfulorell Enemies filed lief lnfeni stu.-s
with horror. and her noontidemomentswith ev,I apprehen,5.ions!
- But her w'frightedim8gination,In its
mosl alarmingextension, never representeddtsttesses equal to whet she hath since really
experienced- lor before she had Twelvevears et1joyedthe kagranceof her neuvegroves,and e'er
she reallzr,d, 0,.a1Europeansplaced thecrhappill05J In the yellow dual whid'l 5he carekt-uty marted
with her Infantroo1Steps
- even when she, In a sacredgrove
, w,theach handIn 11181
or a tender Parenl
was paY'ngher devotion, to the gr8::JtOn&awho mada all things- on armed bond ol white m~m.
drlvmg manyol he< COUnl/ymenIn ChelnS,ran Into the helloWeclShade•- OOUldthe Tears. 111e
Sighs
and supplication$.bur&tingfrom TorturedParerrialaffection, have bUlted the keen edge of Avarioe.
silo m,ght have been rescued lrom Agony, which many of her Counrry·sChildrenhO\'ofelt bu! whJch
none hath ever described, - fn vain she lifted her supplicaiingvoice to an insultedfather, and her
gulltlGS$hands 10a dishonourG<I
Oaltyl Sile was ravishodfrom 1hvbo$0ffl ot har Country, from thu
arms of her frleods -wh i'8 the advaooedage of her Parents, 1enderin,g
lhem unfit for servitude, cruelly
_,ated ho<lrom thorn loroverl
scenes W'lllchher ,meoinatlanhad neverconceiveoor - a noaungWorld- 111e
&pc)(tlngMonS\ers
of the
deep - iiod tho familW meetings of Billows and clouds . stJOve. but in vain to divert hor melanchoUy

anentlon, from thtee hundredAffrieensIn chains. sufferinglhe mos1excruclallngtorments: end some Of
lhem rejoicing. that the pan.gsof death came like a balm to their woonds.

,.

/



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.,

CHARLES
HAMIL TON HOUSTON
1

"A lawye r s either a social engineer
or a parasite on society."
Charles Hamilton Houston was the grandson of
a formerly enslaved man who escaped with a
broken foot and became a conductor on the
Underground Railroad. Hamilton Houston grew
up to serve during WWI and was nearly killed, not
by an opposing force, but by white soldiers
under the US flag - 'The hate and scorn
showered on us .. . convinced me that there
was no sense in my dying for a world ruled
by them ." He became the first Black editor on
the Harvard Law Review in 1922 and later
engineered the lega l strategy that led to the
unanimous 1954 Supreme Court decision in
Brown v. Board of Education. He trained future
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshal l who
remarked "[w]e owe it all to Charlie."

CHARLES

OGLETREE

"Childhood dreams of the improbab le
are the very key to who I am today .''
Charles Ogletree graduated from HLS in 1978 and
started teaching at HLS in 1985. In 1990 when
Derrick Bell took an unpaid leave of absence to
demand HLS hire a Black female professor Ogletree
offered to join him on unpaid leave even though he
lacked tenure at the time. His clients have included
the survivors of t he 1921Tulsa massacre, Tupac
Shakur, and Anita Hill.
,

~ ,.,.~

L

,

Cl ick the image to the left to learn more about the Charles
Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at HLS, 11
founded by Ogle tr ee in 2005. Ogletree also founded the ,~~
Criminal Justice Institute at HLS in 1990.
At one point, t here was a Charles Hamilton Houston
Professor of Law position at HLS, but the professorship
since vanished , for undisclosed reasons.

has

"It' s not wo rth wh ile t o be fu ll of w isdo m if
we lack co urage. "

PEDRO ALBIZU CAMPOS
Pedro A lbizu Campos

was one of the first Puerto

Rican st udents at HLS. While at HLS, he learned
worked
students

in solidarity
fighting

and

with other international

for independence

from colonial

regimes in India and Ire land.
He graduated

in 1921 w ith the highest GPA in his

class, an achievement
give the valedictorian
towards

that earned him the right to
speech. However, animus

his mixed racia l heritage

(his mother was

African and father was Spanish) led to his
professors delaying two of his f inal exams in order
t o keep him from graduating

on t ime .

Immediately

Albizu Campos

afte r graduating,

returned to Puerto Rico to fight for the liberation
his home from US colonialism.

He was imprisoned

years and died as a result of these efforts.

Alianza's Community and Activism
Committee seeks to build a network of
act ivists in 2019-20, its inaugura l year. The
Committee bui lds upon decades of
advocacy at HLS to:

1 Hire Latinx 2
professors .

Increase working - class Latinx
represen t ation among the
studen t body .

3 Support
and aid
4
Drive legal
efforts of solidarity
scholarship
for other communities
of color.

in support
of the broader Latinx
community.

Interested students should emai l
alianza@mail.law.harvard.edu

In 1970 t here were f inally enough students
to form a Latino student group at HLS. In
1979- 80, two prevailing Latino groups
me rged t o form Alianza (Alliance).
In 1989, Al ianza staged a protest (one of
many over the years) at a facul t y meet ing,
demanding HLS hire a Latino p rofessor.
Alianza's Ana Maria Salazar exp lained:
,..._

of
26

"The message [fr om HLS] is,
'It's okay fo r Lat inos to be
stud ents, but th ey a re not good
enough to be professors ."'
It wasn't unt il t his ye ar , 2019 ,
3 deca d es aft e r th e Alia nza
p rot ests and a cen t ury af t e r
Al bizu Ca mp os gr adua t ed ,
th at t he first and only Lat ino
p rofe ssor w a s g ranted te nure
at HLS - Prof essor An dr ew
M anu e l C respo , w ho is w hit e
an d Pue rt o Rica n.

This is true despite t he fact that there
are ove r 55 million Latinos in the US,
nearly 20°/o of the overall population .

I

of co lor at HLS, w ]e

"[As students

rea Iized that we were not just
unhappy

but in many ways

unchallenged.
place

Unchallenged

by a

that had no idea about,

apparently

and

littl e int e rest in, how to

de sig n it s curriculum
systematically

to

expose

the complex

stude nts t o

li ves of people

like

those with whom I had grown

up."

I

GERALD

P. LOPEZ

Lopez graduated

from HLS in 1974. He grew

up in East Los Angeles
manual

and started

labor jobs at 14 after

and his older brother
HLS, Lopez found
coursework
programs

himself

died

disappointed

At
by the

going to classes his

focusing

founded

his father

was incarcerated.

and stopped

2L year, instead

working

on the new clinical

by Gary Bellow.
Yale's annual Rebellious

"I always

thought

the idea w a s,

Lawyering conference is the
largest student - run public interest

you go back to some neighborhood
with a bunch of poor people
fight

like shit. Otherwise,

conference

and

in the US. It began in

1994 after the pub lication of

why be

Rebellious Lawyering by Lopez.

a lawyer?"

RebLaw connects law students,
attorneys, and community activists

In the 1983-84
became

academic

the first

Latino

HLS. A l ianza wrote
urging

offer

si len t until after
He accepted

visiting

professor

at

cons id er making

a

to Lopez, but HLS stayed
he had already

a position

left campus.

at Stanford

instead.

together. Registration fees,
transpo rtation, and housing can be

a let t er to administration

that they seriously

permanent

to learn, strategize, and bui ld

year, Lopez

provided. Interested students
should email

harvard.lawandsocial
change11gmail.com

"It's not about asking, it's about

demanding.

It's not about convincing

those who are currently in power, it's
about changing

the very face of
power itself ."

"The struggle against patriarchy
racism must be ...

and

inextricably

intertwined."
,

KIMBERLE CRENSHAW
Click on the image to the
left to watch footage of
Crenshaw expla in her role
as a student in the 1981
protests.

Click on the image to the
left to watch footage of
Bell and student organ izers
speaking during the
protests of the 1990s.

DERRICKBELL
"I live to harass white folks."
"However self-sufficient

we may

fancy ourselves, we exist only in

relation - to our friend, family, and
life partners; to those we teach and
mentor; to our coworkers,
neighbors, strangers; and even to
forces we cannot fully conceive of,
let alone define."


The first annual Critical Race Theory

(CRT) conference at HLS was organized
by students in Spring 2019. Students
interes t ed in being part of the
revitali zation of CRT at HLS for the
second annual conference should email
fhernandez @jd20.law.harvard .edu

RITI
THE
TEXT

TEXT

••••••••••••
TEXT

• •









TEXT

Bell returned

to HLS in 1986 .

In 1989, new Dean Clark announced

that

close the Public Service

Office

saying that "students
low - paying
served

public

Placement

facing

high tuition

serv ice jobs would

by economic

Harvard Law
Notifies Bell
Of Dismissal
For Absen ce

he would
at HLS,
costs and

be better

help than by counse l ing ."

~••l'tletff"IY_.T'-'

BOSTON. June 30 - Derrick Bell.
the Harv•rd 1..aw SchCOIrrolessor
who tool< an unpaid leave o absence
1wo years ago 10 pro1- the school"s
!llllure 10 hire. In hi& wotds. ·•a wom •
an or color," rece ived notice today
that his teaching days there are over
l)ecause or 1he un iversity's two.year
IIm It on leaves or absence.
In a lenu from Rober t c . Clark,
1be law school dean, Mr . Bell was told
that his rolusal to return 10the school
would be considered a resignation,

elfectlve July 1.

Mr. Bell, Harva rd's first black um•
ured law professor, had asked lhe law
sd>ool In February lO extend his
leave or absence, on the grounds tha1
~

After

Black students

protested

as the first Black professor

for representation

in faculty,

at HLS i n 1969. Bell helped

leh l nr ••r ..J lAlVU l af conscience."

Derrick

to found

Bell was hired

Critica

l Race Theory

whi le at HLS. In 1980, Bell left HLS to serve as dean of the Univers ity of Oregon
School

of Law - but he resigned

American

woman

In 1981, a group
"Alternative

that

he had chosen

of HLS students,

Course"

HLS administration

after

the university

to hire an Asian -

to join faculty.

led by Crenshaw

(HLS '84), organized

on race and law to boycott
as a fa i led attempt

refused

a mini - course

to appease

students

an

on race offered

demanding

by

a discussion

of race and law.
Bell returned

to HLS in 1986. In 1990 , HLS h ired 60 tenured

Black women.

Bel l took an unpaid

leave of absence,

h i red its f i rst Black female

professor.

HLS decided

fire Bell instead.

About

to effectively

Students

for Inclusion

students

of color who recognized

progress ive alternat
consciousness

(SFI) a student
ive to affinity

in their ability
and action.

group

led by

the need for a
groups , which

to engage

- none of them

not to return

until HLS

two years of fai l ure to make progress,

for Inclusion

Students

constrained

After

vowing

professors

are often

in necessary

political

"[A]II the men on the panel
fondly

reminded

felt to return
revealing
three

us how they

' home ,' fondly

stories

about

the ir

years at law schoo l ....

was my turn.
memories
personal

No empowering

came to me. I had no
anecdotes

profound

It

for the

senses of alienation

and isolation

that

ca ught in my

throat

every tim e I opened

my

mouth.

Noth ing re so nated

there

f or a black woman,

even after

my ten years as an im passioned
civil rights

attorney."

LANI GUINIER
Lani Guin ier is the daughter of Jewish civil
rights activist Eugenia Paprin and Ewart
Guinier, a Panamanian - born, Harlem-raised
labor activist and scholar of Jamaican
descent.
Guinier knew she wanted to become a civil
rights lawy er from the age of 12 after she
watched NAACP LDF lawyer Constance Baker
Motley escort James Mered ith onto the
University of Mississippi campus as the
school's f irst Black student. In 1981,Guinier
followed in Motley's footsteps by becoming
an assistant counsel at the NAACP LDF and
eventually heading the NAACP's Voting Rights
Division. In 1998 Guinier was hired as the
first Black woman professor at HLS.
Guinier is the author of Becoming Gentlemen,
which studies how women are failed by
trad itional law school pedogogy.

Lila Fenwick

lmelme Umana

First Black woman

First Black woman

graduate

of HLS President of the Harvard
(1956} Law Review (2017)

MARGARET E. MONTOYA
"There' s an exorcism that
happen s w he n yo u cr eat e
Blac k and Brown space on
campus - There are real de vi ls
at HLS. White space didn't ju st
happen, it was curated ."
Margaret Montoya traces her ancestry t o copper mining and rai lroad working families who have
been in New Mexico since it was controlled by Spain and Mexico. In 1978 she became the first
Latina graduate from HLS but she notes that the concept of being "first" is fluid because "there
are still places at HLS untouched by Lat ina hands." Montoya didn't realize she was a "first" until
two decades after she graduated.
to "LatCrit ." Her best-known artic le, Mascaras, Trenzas y
Grefias: Un/Masking the Self While Un/Braiding Latina Stories and Legal Discourse, focuses on
resisting the cultural assimilation that often comes with higher e d ucation.

She went on to become a contributor

Both Professor Montoya and Matsuda returned to HLS during the Belinda
Occupation / Reclaim, in solidarity with new student organizers.

-------_:..--

MAR I MATSUDA
CRT "is w hat happen s when you take your hands
off your eyes in the scary movie, and start
laughing at the absurdity of the premise."
"Under standing how law w orked as an
ideological system , what lies it told , how the lies
seduced , how they were resisted , was our
II
wor k.
Matsuda got her LLM from HLS in 1983 and 15 years later became the
first Asian woman to be get tenure as a law professor in the
country (at UCLA}.
Matsuda is an artist, a ga rdener, and a contributor to "AsianCrit ,"
noting that "[w)hen it comes to fighting racism, we can't do that without
centering anti-Blackness ." She warns against Asian communities
embracing exceptionalism and becoming a "racial bourgeoisie."





rHUFFPOST l

This Morning at Harvard
Law School We Woke Up to
a Hate Crime

-

Mii:t,,l• !-t:111
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0 0 0
This morning at Harva rd Law School we

woke up 10 a hate crime.

The hallways of Harvard Lllw School e1el1ned with portraits of

On November
covering
portrait

the faces

19th, 2015 , black tape was found

of every Black HLS professor

that t here were no cameras
identify

In response,

students

professors

Expli c it , emboldened

surrounded

with

students

witnessed

Cambridge

assault

an unarmed,

behind

of pool of blood

Throughout
7 received

naked

Police

on the street

the 2018 -19 academic
racist,

sexist

messages

Student

Department

Black Harvard

on both

Weekend),
officers

Co l lege student,

in front

positioned

to

the perpetrator.

the portraits

of Black

notes of love and appreciation.

BLSA
bruta l ly
leaving

of Hast ings.

year , HLS students
f rom an anonymous

i n Section
emai l, such

as - "you know you don't belong here ... youre [sic] just here
because of affirmative
action." Administration
refused to seriously
i nvestigate
until the affected
refuses to allow the students

whose

acts of racism at HLS are not uncommon .

Cl ick the images to the right to read the BLSA statements
of the recent i ncidents described
below.
HLS Admitted

hm med

hangs on the walls of WCC. HLS administration

claimed

On April 13th , 2018 (during

t"Vtt ry

students applied pressure, and sti l l
to see the inconc l usive report.

--

-



Reclaim
burden
ourselves
spite

assumed

uthe

of educating
and others

in

of th is institution

and not because

of it."

The Apartheid

divestment campaign

Solidarity Committee

from 1972 to 1989 was organized

(SASC). Actions included building a shantytown

by the Southern Africa
in front of University Hall

(which remained in p lace for several months), hunger strikes, forcing the cancellation

of a gala dinner

for Harvard 's 350th anniversary ce lebration, and 'pop and stops' - actions where students would
materialize,

flood into offices of Massachusetts

Hall, hand flowers to secretaries, and say "we'll be

back later." Harvard never agreed to the demand of complet e divestitur e of its $400 million of

South African related stock , unlike divestment at other schools like Yale and Columbia.

Harvard Prison Divestment Campaign
HPDC is a student abolitionist and repara tory just ice init ia tive with 3 main demands:

1- Disclose
Harvard has the largest academic

3 - Reinvest

endowment

in the World

{near ly $40 bill ion) but ba rely 1% of its total endowment
holdings have been disc losed.

Reinvest the divested
communities

from the capture,

from al l corporations
caging, control,

profit

and survei llance of humans.

Even just looking at the little which has been disclosed, we
know that Ha rvard is profiting
exp loitative,
CoreCivic,

from infamous ly crue l,

a nd mass ive pr ivate prison operators

organizers
approaches

by the

and into the

academic

institutes,

concentrations)
that significantly

complex

of funded

{e.g., centers,

2 - Divest
Total divestment

d i rect ly impacted

pr ison - industrial
creation

funds into

projects

departments,

and

that emp loy scho lars and

to teach and research
to eliminate

structural

creative
social

harms in ways that do not rely on prisons
and po lice.

such as

GEO Group, and Tokio Marine Holdings .

Interested students should email harvardpdc11gmail.com

Justi ce fo r Palestin e organizes an annual trip
to Palestine (Occupied

West Bank) for HLS

'

students over Spring Break. The tr ip focuses on
international

law vio lations against Palestin ians,

as well as Palestin ian resistance and culture.
Interested students shou ld email

HLSPalestin eTre kegmail. com

..... - -

LexisNexis
...~

..,.

~

... Westlaw and lex isNexis are the pr imary legal databases

used both in legal education

and in the

lega l profession and are given special access by HLS to market their products to students. However,
the parent companies of both databases

are constructing

using to identify, locate, deta in, incarcerate,

As part of several contracts total ing roughly $30 mi llion,

Thom son Re ute rs (W estlaw ) provides various services to
ICE inc luding rea l- time jail booking data, a license - p late
scanning database, a nd access to the Consolidated

lead

Evaluation and Reporting (CLEAR) system, which con t ains a
host of public and proprietary

records and which is built to

interface with Palantir's infamous FALCON system.

the dead ly data infrastructure

and deport undocumented

that ICE is

immigrants.

RELX (Lexi sNex is) supplies law enforcement
other person-specific
information

data including commerc ial

and j ail booking data t o ICE that

allows the agency to conduct rapid electronic
searches for information
undocumented

related to

immigrants.

In solidarity w ith #No TechForlCE, HLS National Lawy e rs Guild (NLG) is launch ing a national
campaign to pressure both corporations

and

to end their contracts with ICE and to call on law schoo ls to

terminate their contracts with Westlaw a nd lexisNexis shou ld they continue to work with ICE.
Interested studen t s should email HLSGuild email.law .harvard. edu

The living wage campaign from 1998 to 2002 , in which hundreds of College
studen t s slept in tents on the Harvard Yard and nearly 50 st udents occupied
Massachusetts Hall for 3 weeks to demand better working conditions for
Harvard jan itors, securi t y guards, and din ing ha ll workers. Nearly 1,000
Harvard affiliate

supporters regularly marched to apply pressure . Cl ick on

the image to the right to watch "Occupation:

A Film About the Harvard

Living Wage Sit - In" on Vimeo, narrated by Ben Affleck .
In 2016, dining hal l workers with UNITE HERE Local 26 (including those at
HLS) went on a 22 day strike. Of around 750 total din ing services
workers, only 14 reportedly broke t he strike and returned to work.
Thousands of students and faculty supported the effort by jo ining the
p icket line and bringing food to t hose striking without pay.
The final version of the agreement

reached set year - round employees'

salar ies at $35,000 per year, provided stipends to offset summer layoffs,
and required that the University cover healthcare

HARVARD
WORKER UNIONS

copayments. The 20 16

con t ract w ill last unti l 2021.

HARVARD UNION OF CLERICAL AND
TECHNICAL WORKERS(HUCTW)
APPROXIMATELY5,000 HARVARDEMPLOYEES
PERFORMINGOFFICE, LIBRARY,LABORATORY,
AND OTHERTECHNICAL JOBS

UNITE HERELOCAL 26
DINING HALLWORKERS

SEIU 32BJ
CUSTODIANS

AREA TRADES COUNCIL
HARVARDMAINTENANCE
(EX: PLUMBERS,
ELECTRICIANS, CARPENTERS,
MECHANICS, DRIVERS,LOCKSMITHS)
IURV.lflO C.llt.DUU£ STUOUlt!i U>IJOn Ull!TED .lttTO l\mtU .IU

The Labor and Employm e nt
Action Proje ct {LEAP) works to:

HGSU-UAW
A unlionofstudentworitersat H,11rvard
Unlverstty

1
2
3

HARVARD GRADUATESTUDENT UNION (HGSU)
GRADUATEAND UNDERGRAD
UATE STUDENT WORKERS
(EX: RESEARCHASSISTANTS,TEACHING/COURSE ASSISTANTS
)

HGSU brings together students and student workers across Harvard to
build a more j ust and equitable

university commun ity . HGSU is currently

work ing to secure fair pay, comprehensive and affordable
protections

healthcare ,

aga inst discr imination and harassment, and support for

immigrant and internat ional students in their first union contract.
Interested students should email rsandalowash egmail.com

Support workers on campus in
figh t ing for j ustice .
Educate the HLS community about
workers' rights and labor issues.
Foster a community of HLS students
interested in pursuing careers in
workers' rights advocacy and the
labor movement.
Interested students should email
se ba stianb spitz @gma il.com

The syllabus at wv~.alternativelegaleducation

.com

is a suggestion of readings organized around the l L
Curricu lum aimed to cha llenge various assumptions
underlying the law.
Subjects include: Torts, Contracts,

Property, Responding

to Law and Economics, Crim inal Law, Consti t utional
Law, Legis lation and Regulation, Administrative
International

Law, Corporations,

Students interested

Labor, and Immigration.

in helping to expand upon this

project can email HarvardLPE @gmail.com

I kYvc1rrl

Law,

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.

CA RI NG F O R MYS E LF I S N OT
SELF-INDULGENCE,
IT IS
SELF-PRESERVATION
, AND THAT IS
AN ACT OF POLITICAL WARFARE."
II

Audre Larde

'' l ' M N O T I NT E RE S TED IN CO MPETIN G WITH
A NYO NE . I HOPE WE ALL MAKE IT . "
GOOD

BONES

BY MAGGIE

SMITH

LIFE IS SHORT , THOUGH I KEEP TH IS FROM MY CHILDREN .
LIFE IS SHORT, AND l'VE SHORTENED
MINE
IN A THOUSAND
DELICIOUS , ILL-ADVISED
WAYS ,
A THOUSAND
DELICIOUSLY
ILL - ADVISED
WAYS
I' ll KEEP FROM MY CHILDREN . THE WORLD IS AT LEAST
FIFTY PERCENT TERRIBLE, AND THAT ' S A CONSERVATIVE
ESTIMATE , THOUGH I KEEP THIS FROM MY CHILDREN .
FOR EVERY BIRD THERE IS A STONE THROWN AT A BIRD .
FOR EVERY LOVED CHILD, A CHILD BROKEN, BAGGED ,
SUNK IN A LAKE . LI FE IS SHORT AND THE WORLD
IS AT LEAST HALF TERRIBLE , AND FOR EVERY KI ND
STRANGER , THERE IS ONE WHO WOULD BREAK YOU,
THOUGH I KEEP THIS FROM MY CHILDREN . I AM TRYING
TO SELL THEM THE WORLD . ANY DECENT REALTOR ,
WALKING YOU THROUGH A REAL SHITHOLE , CHIRPS ON
ABOUT GOOD BONES : THIS PLACE COULD BE BEAUTIFUL ,

RIGHT ? YOU COULD

MAKE THIS PLACE BEAUTIFUL .

PEOPLE'S
PARITY
PROJECT

We are law ~cudentsor9drutm9
nationwide lo end

how the le-gsfp,of~s.lon-"nd IM l.,w lts.t"t(-~n.,blti~
harass.mcnr,discnmm.iuon and other inJustscc:s...

People's Parity Project has two main projects:

{l}Combating coercive contracts which affect
victims of sexua l harassment ( non-disclosure
agreements,

non-compete

arbitration,
(2) Combating

agreements,

forced

c lass- action waivers} .
harassment and disc riminat ion

against judicial clerks . Interested students should
visit www.peoplesparity.org

"l eav ing block ch ild ren with th eir pare nts to suffer ongo ing mol tr eotme nt
hurts those chi ldren, and sends the m on to adu lt lives cha racterized by
poverty, substance abuse, unemployment, and a high likelihood tha t they
will in turn vic tim ize t he next generation throu gh ma ltrea tment of their
children ." "[ l)t is ex tr emely unlikely t hat ou r soc iety w ill an ytime soon
devote more th a n lip service a nd limite d resources to p utt ing blacks in a
soc ia l and econom ic posit ion whe re they a re capab le o f providi ng good

II

--

II

homes f o r all the wa iti ng b lack ch ild ren."

ALAN
ELIZABETH

DERSHOWITZ

BARTHOLET
HLS Felix Frankfurter

HLS Morris Wasserstein
Professor

Public

Interest

of Law and Facu lt y D ire ctor of

the Child Advocacy

Program.

White Savior

Emeritus.
lowering

Professor

Extreme ly passionate
the age of consent

definitively
Mult if aceted:

children

cards . Bui lt a

innovating

with Black people

surv ivors of sexual abuse

career
about

off of arguing
what's

best for Black people.

about
but

not a pedoph i le .

Extraord i naire. Col lects non-white
li ke Pokemon

of Law,

Splits

his career

between

new ways to victim - blame

the ethn ic c leansing

and cheering

of Pa lest i n ians.

on

II

--

II

ADRIAN

VERMEULE

HLS Ralph S. Tyler, Jr . Professor
Constitut

of

ional Law. Trump's pro bono

attorney.

--~

- -.:!

-

"It was not wi thout reason that my dear fr iend Richa rd John Neuhaus called
the pro- life movement th e most brood-based, th e mo st d iverse, an d the
most susta ine d express ion of gra ssroots civic p artic ipa tion America hos
ever seen."

MARY

ANN GLENDON

HLS Learned
Dolores

Hand Professor

Umbridge's

"clima t e of hysteria"
sexual abuse

the pro - life moveme nt the most broo d - based, the most d iverse, and the
mo st susta ined express ion of g rassroots c ivic part icipa tio n Ame rica hos
ever see n."

BRETT KAVANAUGH

Tired of the

around

in the Catholic

exposing
church.

of the courageous,

select

who dedicate

lives to condeming

other women
de · ·

"It was not wit hout reason that my dear fr iend Richard John Neuhau s called

sister.

of Law.

their

Part

team of women

for their reproduct

iv e health

Item sets