UChicago Disorientation 2010

Item

Current View

Title

UChicago Disorientation 2010

Date

2010

Place

Chicago, Illinois

Source

https://issuu.com/uchicago_disorientation/docs/disorientationzine_forviewingo

extracted text

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Introduction
An Activist History of the U of C/Hyde Park
7 Years of Campus Politics
Student Arrest Incident 201 O
Pedagogy & Learning Spaces
Language & Race (a glossary )
On Being an Ally
Sexuality & Gender (words & links)
Gender Assignments:
A Transgender Campus Survival Guide
Femin ism is not Dead
Worker Solidarity @ the U of C
Investment@ the U of C
On the Possibilities of Student Life
Safety & Police (& alternatives) in Hyde Park
Bursting the Bubble: How to get out of Hyde Park
Living Creatively & Communally in HP
Off-Campus Housing & MAC Properties
Community-Supported Agriculture in HP
Map of Hyde Park/Woodlawn
Neighborhood Map of Chicago
Transportation in/around/o ut of Hyde Park
2 Wheels for Realz (Why Bikes are Great)
Consent is Sexy
In the Name of Better Sex Everywhere
Surviving @ the U of C
Dealing with Sexual Assault
Seven Lessons of School
Questionable Authorities
The Left is Dead , Long Live the Left
Getting Your Tuition Back
Do Academics have Political Responsibilities?
Radical Faculty@ the U of C
Activist Organizations @ the U of C
The Depoliticization of Activism
Research Websites ... Know your shit!
Radical Reading List
What kind of UofC do you dream of?

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Thanks to all the folks
who helped make this
Disorientation Guide
possible through your
writing, ideas, and
support.
Edited by Eliot Fiend,
afiendstra@gmail.com
Front cover by Rachel
Tredon and back cover
by Eliot Fiend.
DisO 2010 contributors
include .. .Bex - RickyCaro - Mister Malic
Muffin - Mark - zee Greg - Tones - JoryChris - Hannah - Daniel
- Craig- Luis - T.Rex Tmo - Rachel - and
Eliot.

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Special thanks also to
the Madison lnfoshop
(makers of the UW
Madison DisO zine),
NYU, Inc. (the folks who
made the 2008 NYU
DisO), the makers of the
Fall 2009 UofC GSU
bulletin, Crimethinc, and
the Hampshire College
DisO zine crew for
inspiring us and lending
us bits and pieces for this
z,ne.

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And finally, thanks to
everyone who takes the
time to read this zine! We
are so thrilled and
excited to be able to give
this to you and we hope
you 'll appreciate it.

... ... 67

Anti-copyright : All

.. . ... 68
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materialsin this zine for
which the authors have
legal copyrightcan be
freely copied and
distributedwith no need for
prior permissionfrom the
authors, except where
otherwise noted .

W©OOll©~@®
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an introduction
welcome to our heavily-guarded fortress! you ' ll find that it' s not quite the paradise
depicted on all the brochures you got in the mail ... there is a lot of good learning to be
had here , but also a lot of fucked up shit that goes on that you don 't hear about in the
classroom or during o-week .... which is what this disorie ntation guide is for!
over the course of four years , you ' ll likely bump up against the question "What am I
doing here?,, again and again. many of you are here because of the strangeness and
intellectual eclecticism that claims to define the U of C; others perhaps the promise of an
elite education ; and others because it was on your list and you got in. inevitably these
reasons will change as you encounter reality and you might feel a little ... disoriented .
we ' re here to help that process along and help you through it.
we put this Di sorientation Guide together as a testament to the diversity of lives that
happen here-not the kind of colorful diversity you're sold on an admissions pamphlet ,
but the ups and downs of living in Hyde Park , slowly dying in the Reg, finding modes of
surviva l and resistance , and allowing our creative and angry vo ices to flourish. one of the
reasons we decided to make it, while talking under the warm eves of the Reg in bitter
january , was to connect you to a history of stude nt activism and to some of the current
struggles facing the U of C community. students today are stand ing on the shoulde rs and
legacies of radical activists-from the sma ll group of women who provided underground
abortions in Hyde Park in the early 70s to the 400 students who occupied the admin
building in '69 to more recent campus campaigns against Coca-Cola and Taco Bell,
revision of the assault policy , underpaid campus and graduate stude nt workers ... the list
goes on. as students , we have power , and it' s up to us to use that power for goo d .
hopefully this Guide wi ll be a first step in the direction to em powering you rself as a
student and human being in your 4 years here , and to come out with the abilities to think
clearly and begin to address some of the problems in your communities .
in these pages , you'll find valuable information that the questionable authorities would
rather leave under the rug. we also wan t this guide to be a source of hope. by
understanding the history of the UofC , you are better equipped to under stand the impact
you can make in you r few years here.
another uchicago is possible, if you rise to demand it.
in love & solidar ity,
eliot & the disorientation crew
disclaimer: this is the frrst disorientation guide , and is undoubtedly radically incomplete. there are
many voices that are not represented here and awesome stuff that isn 't on the map. all of which is
to say that this is the beginning of a conversation and hints of a roadmap for radical exploration and
self-empowerment. sorry for any small errors, misquotes , etc. the crew who put this together was
trying to write from our experience and knowledge rather than a position of grandiose authoritywe hope that in future years , you and some other kids will get together to make a ne;v
disorientation guide to reorient the frrsties in this fast-changing world .

0
1681 - French explorer LaSalle traveled along the southern banks of Lake
Michigan and encountered the area called by the nearby Mascoutins tribe
"Checaugua ."
1695 - Potawatomi left the overcrowded traditions near Green Bay, expanding
south along Lake Michigan, joined by Abenaki and Algonquin refugees from King
Phillip's War. Potawatomi village formed at what is now Chicago.
1770s - Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable , a man of mixed African and European
heritage born in Sait-Domingue (now Haiti), settled in what is now Chicago ,
married a Potawatomi woman, and founded the area's first trading post .
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1795 - After the Northwest Indian War, in exchange for $20,000 in goods, the
Native Americans turned over to the US government the future site of downtown
Chicago and other Midwest territory. The treaty of Greenville established the
"Greenville Treaty Line ," a boundary between Native American territory and
land open to white settlers (who disregarded the line).
1833 - Chicago was founded near a portage between the Great Lakes and the
Mississippi watershed with a population of around 200 . Potawatomi were forcibly
remove a. ·~c111cago'is "a'Fi'ench renaeririg of the wo ra shikaaRwa , meaning
"wild onion/garlic" in the Miami-Illinois language.
1850s - Paul Cornell, a businessman and abolitionist , purchased 300 acres of
land between 51st ·and 55th street. Several houses were used as stops on the
Underground Railroad. Dutch farmers arrived in Woodlawn.
1861 - Hyde Park Township established, extending from 39th to 63rd , later
extended to 138th aRd as far west as State Street.
Mc!Y 1-4, 1886 (the first May Day)- Haymarket affair/riot began as a rally in
support of the eight-hour work day; bomb thrown at police and resulting gunfire
resulted in deaths of 8 police and 50+ civilians dead/wounded. Eight anarchists
were tried for murder, 4 executed although the prosecution conceded none ?ad
tlilrown the bomb.
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1871 - The G~e 9t Fir9i pestroys a third of the city, including the entire central
business district. South side expands quickly as rich & poor leave city center.
1889 - Hyde Park and Woodlawn were annexed to the city of Chicago , creating
much of the "south S'ide" in the process.

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1889 - Founding of the Flull House by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr , the
first settlement house in the US; offered comprehens ,ive civic , cultural -;-reG_!J
eational ,
1
and educational activities.
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1890 - First May Day demonstration in Hyde Park

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189 2 - Foiunding of th 1
e U iversity of Chicago 1~Marion T1
alb1
ot
sociology/anthiropology profess or fro m Welles l!ey, is the first Dean of Women at
UChicago an - 01
ne of nirne female faculty members.
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189 3 - Hyde Park hosted the World's Col1
umlbian Exposition at tihe prresen
location of Jalckson Park drawing 27 .5 million vis itors and 20,000 new residents
and entr:epreneurs (a1
nd parake etsl). lln the s1ubsequen1t building b oom
evelo~ers land caped Jackson Park, crea ed he IM.dway ex anded the El
east aJ01
ng 63rd , and co1
n tructed large apa ments and he'tels.
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1894 - Pulllman Strike - 3000 employees of Pullman Pa ace ear Co. 1,n Hyde
Park went on stri1ke in resiponse to wage reductions, 125 00 0 Amencan Railway
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Union workers joined strike in solidarity. Broken

p by 12 000 US Armytroops

and US rmarshals~
1894 - Mary !McDowell took charge of the UChicago Settlement
program near the stockyards started by the Christian Uniron of
h e ext 2 decades s e secured inde e dent
ding, se Q a
programs that served im 1g a ts arna packinghouse wo rkers in
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supp0

cago 1
S,ettleme
ttleme t . use .

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895 1

House. a small
Chicago. Over
space and
he vicinity.

ILeaS:Jue.
an all-fema1l
le gr oup,1w1a formed to
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190,2 - Un~versity Senate vo ed a appr 0 ve the segnega 10n of th1
e sexes i the
c assroom 1unti l thi1
r:dyear. Objections po1
ured in and he deb a e c 0 nl1
inuea for
ever1
al year un ·1 he policy wa,s changed a few years ater.
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1916 - Ida Noyes Halllll01
pen1ed as tihe center of women's life 0n camp us ,
in1cluding wee ·ly da1
acing bou1
rs.'
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1910 -~970

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New em ·ployment 0 pportunities in
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gw

(d

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n

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-191

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·
.
lo op -,

ck

ustr;y;and
fri1
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sa s to
e
yde Park

. ican
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liltJr1ngthe red s .· · - f' ·
race riots
drowrning of
frican meri1- n teen who cr osse
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· ort _.

lhicago pre cip1
it _
· n i vi'sible line a ,_

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separatin . c
ma
ated beaches. 7-day. o gy of shoo ·ngs arsons
and t>eati- .. mosll1
y e ic WH1tesattacking african-american people·
tie
black belt area) r:esu - · - 38 deaths, 537 i ~uries, and approximately
10
residents (most Afr1eaD
can) left hameless. The grand ·ury rndieted 17/
black peo i,
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192 1 - Ge
a doctora
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the fi~st AfriGan-Ame r cla women fo receive
dies at he U of e~,
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om . e

1923 - Thie C hica!Q0 Real Estate Board' launch1ed a drive urging wlhite
1omisi1n11g not o sell/lease their pr1O1perty to non1homeo 1
wners to s1
ign a covenant pi1r
whites .
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1'924 - Clare1
nce Darrow resident of Woodlawn1known1as the "attorn ey of the
d,amne ,d to ok on 'the cas ,e of Leopold and Loeb the teena ,g1e,sons of two
wealthy Kenwo od fa1
milies , who w ere accu :sed of kidnapp ing and kJiHingBobby
1
Franks , th1eir 14-year old nei ghbor . Labe ed 'the, crime of the century/ Darrow
en,courag·ed tih,e boys to pllead guil'ty t 0 avoid the dea _h pen1alty.
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1933 - Proposed rn:erg1ing of UofC a1nd Northwestern in o Th e Univ 'ers1ties of
Chic ,ago' by UC Presid len Hutc :hins because of the De·pression . Lo ts 0 f
0 ppos1
ition from students 01
n both campuses ulti1m,ately shiut down the proposal.
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1933 - 19 39 - Peace , St11ikes
and anti -war pro ests , aire,
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org1anized 0n campus
by stud en· an d faculty .
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1'937 - In the Memo11ialDay
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Ma.ssacre . the Chicago police

depart 1
ment O'pe,ned fire on a
parade of unarmed striking steel
workers an,d their famillies at'the
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gate of the Republic Steel Co . in
south Ch1icago . IF'ifty people ·
were s~
hot. of whom ten 1,ateir
died: 100+ others were, beaten
with clu1bs. No police were
prosecuted .
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194 0 - In the Hanslber1
ry v. Lee case featured in nA Raisi11
n 1in1thre Sun1n by
Woodlaw 1
n resident Loirrai1
ne Hansberry , the Supr,eme Court h1e ld that the raciaUy
restrictiv e housi11
ng covene,nt could ! b e contested in court since it was sh10wn that
ne,arly ha.If of neighborho od landowners did not support the covenant.
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1942 - Fi st controUed n cllear rea,ction (release orf en1
ergy fro m1the nucl1eus of
the ato m) 0ccu 1
rred in S,tag1g Fielld ,overseen lby Enrico Fermi.
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1942 - Bayard Rustin , a non-vi1olent civil rights activist and gay, m1an, was
refused! a haircut at a lba1
rber sho 1p in1Hyde Park and c0 nducted a spon1taneous
sit-in that tur ined into a large protest until 'finally the barb1
er acoeded 1
and cut
Rustin1's hair .
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1945 - After the quad club refuse ,d me,m1
bership to ternured black proJessor
Allison Davis and rum1
ored pacifist Go rdon Dupee a group lled by the o,ean of
Social Sciences Robert !Redfield sought to am,en d he Quad Club co nstit1
u1tio1
n to
accept women and e1
nd discrimi 1
natory miembership. 'The amendments were
d,efe ate ,d 182 to 85 and Redfield an,d oth1ers resign ed. The next daj 17
employ ees walke d out at l unch protesting the cl1
ub's racism Withou fanfare ,
Quad Club 0 pened its door,s to wome ,n and minorities s00 n after ~
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1'948 - Restrictive housing co1
venants rendered une1
nfoirceable by the S1upreme
Court cas e Shelliyvs~ Krae mer.
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1I950s - 60s - Urban renewal of Hyd e
Park in1i
ti ated by UC,hicago team1
ed up
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with the newly-Jormed South East
Chicag10 Commissio n, designed to
r,emove"blight" a1
nd prevent "whit e
fll1
igh1t," resultin1g in the demolitio 1
n and
redevelop lment of blo1
cks of 1
decayed
housing and 0 th er buildings . This meant
that the substandard housing primarily
occ ,upied by poorer black people and
other minorities disappe ,ared a1
nd the
res1dents c ould no long1er afford to live
tlhe area. The U of C's "urban renewar·
effort also resulted in the d,emolition 0 f a
nu1
mber of cultural ce,nters on 5:Sth
street in Hyde IPark and an1artists '
colony on 57 h1and Stony,. Also call ed
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negr0 removal" by ,some. The U of C's
urban re1
newal effort establish 1ed Hyde
Park-S01ut'
h Kenwood 8S an avowedly
middJe-cllass arnd irel ctantl1
y interracial neighborhood~
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11951 - Cicero R·ot - 2000-500 10 white residents! attacked an apart iment building
housing a single black family. National! guard and po Ucefoirce c.alled in~
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1,952 - UofC Sigma Chi1chapter (Omi ,cro1
n 0 micron) disbands in pr otest of he
flr,aternity's "white·s, only" membership requI1rement.
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1955-1960s - First postindustrial crisis as maJor meatp ,acking companies beg an
to cl,ose down~
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1955 - Leo Despres civil rights champ elected aide ma1 of Hyde Pa1rlk till
1975. He a.rgued passionat el y Jor c 1vi1I rights , fair/open ho,using racial
integration1 and histori1c pre,servation 1. Known as ''the liberal c onscience of
Chicag10••and nthe l1
on1
e Negro vot 1
e on City C ounci1' (de 'S pite being wlhite).I he
was, Jor 1
ma1
ny years t e lone ailderman in1op,p,osition to Daley the Elder and the
Democratic maichiine in th e City Co uncil~
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1959 - Ulndler the threat of the U of C's buHdozing Woo dlawn, Sa1
ul Alinsky Rev.
Arth1ur Brazier, and ILeon Finney co-fo u11
nde,d thre Th e Tempoira1ry Woodlawn
Organizatio n (later the Th e Wo 0dlawn Organization), a grassroots coalition of
churches , businesse s , and civi c a,ssociations u11
nited ag1ainst the U of C's plan
and working to empower Wo,odll,awn res,idents and ad1
va ·_ce "black selfdetermi1n,a iion1/' Tlhey, 1
allso f01
uglht againistslumlords, exploi,itative local merchants,
schoo ll over c owding ,, mad e efforts t0 g et residenrts 1
in1
vo1lved in 1h19, c'ivill ights
movements and challenged May or Daley,•s political mac hine by r egistering tens
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o,f t hous11
ands of black voters,.
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1960s Formation o the IBl:ackstoine Rangers (Black P Ston1e Nation) , a gIang
headed by Jeff Fort ("Angel ..) and Eugene nCh1
ief B 11''1:ia1
1rston . 1
Unlike many
oittler gangs this gr ou p of 12-115 year o!ld boys startea organizi gin Woodlawn
111
by 1965 allying several g angs as the 'Ran ge r Nati on {headed lby the Main 211)~
1Tlheyh:ave been cred1
ited wit lh k eeping relative peace · on the Sou h Side in 67-68
followi g he assa1
ssination of MLK aAd attempting to 1
make 1,asti1
ng pea ce o
de crease gaIng1fig1h in g. They became politicized and g,iot i1
nvolive d with the Black
Panth ers · by 69 , they w,e,re up to at lIeast 8 000 memb,ers, on the South Side
members in Blackstone area~ They were also the first stre et 0 fg1aniza:tion1to s,et
up clubs in other citi e 'S, in clud1ngM1lwauke,e Cllevelan1d and Gary by 19 67 . They
worked cl osely wit1
h TWO .
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960s - UChicago and TWO reach an agree 1m1
ent r1
estr cti:ngl Uni,verrsity
expansion1of th e s1
ou1
th campus,
sta1biliizi g relationship between
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TW'01Woodlawn1a ·1d the Univers1
ity.
1 962 - Membe,r,s of stud lent gover ,nment
and the l0 cal chapter of the Congres s of
Ra cial 1
Equ1ality (CORE) occupie d area
ou1
tsid:e th e president's office to charge
the U 0 f C 'With disc11iminatorypractices
l'n manag1
ing its off-campus hou1sing ~➔
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966 Don Rose sets u1
p the Hyde Par k-Kenwood1'Voices, featuri 1
ng a W'eekly
column from local Ald erma1
n Despres and arti'cles by and about !Hiyde Parlk
radicals socialists, peace activists SD S rioters, Cuba s1
ugar cane cutters, and
communists . llt campaigned ! stirongly again1
st the Ch1cago Poll ce's uRed Squa ,d u
th e S ection dedicated to gath ering in elHgenice on communists a1
nd radicals,
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May 1966 - 6 st1
uden ,s fr0m "Students Against th1e Ran lk a group protesting
IPreside1
n Beadl le's annou1
ncem1ent that the 1
university wouldl re lease mal e
stu1
d ents' class ra,nki1
n1
g to1th e s 1
ele ctive service dlraft boards~ sta,ged a we 1
eklong
sit-in a the Quad C,llub an d a hunger strike,. Anothe :r 140 stu dents fasted in the
main quadl to sh1ow support . 0ver
400 s1
tuden1ts pa1rti cipate in sit-in in
the a1
dmin building lasting 6 day·s.
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May 1967 - 1120 ,students ta1
ke
over admin1building for a "stu dy-in
resulting of the suspension of 58
s ude1
nts,~
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1967 - T hie Women•s Radical
Action ProJect (WRAP) the
un iversJty's firs women's Hberati0 n
group formed to diicuss poHtics
leairn about self-deiiense land create art through classes c offeehouses, and

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consciousn Iess-ra1s1n- sessions.
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1967 - Thie Wood lawn Or ganization1received a $957 ,Q01
0 War orn Poverty ' grant
fr om the government to set up a Y'OUthproject utillz1ng existing gang ,structure
(p imarily the networks of the Rangers and l East Side Disci1p1e,s gan gs) to set up
job trai·ning centers ., Seve rall job trarining cente,rs wer e set up and th1e pr ogira1
m1
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was led b,y head gani:Q memlbers . Aroun1
d this ti1me Jeff Fort takes s0 le
leadersh1
1pof th e s ree - organ1
ization of the Rang ers (ren1amed Bla,ck P ~ Stone
Natio n) , whose n1umbers ha d r each ed over 50,000 members .
1968 - Wes · s1de riots follo wing ,a1
ssassinatio n of Mlartin1Lutheir Kin g . The Sout1
h
Side remaJnedl relati1
vely peaceful possibly becau1se of the R,angers ,
neverthe less , a rash of ars,ons destro yed a 1
re,po1
rted ,362 abando rned build :ings
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~aa and

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1968 - Federal i1nvestig,ation begins in o th1e Woodlawn1Oirganizatio1
n's Job~
triaining proJect.
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Nov ember 1968 - !Members of SOS and the Hyde P ark Area Draft Resisters '
Un1ion demo instrated at a c1v1c d1
inner in h101nor O'f presi:dent Edward L evi ,spurr ed
by the fact t at tlhe mai n speaker . McGe orge Bundy- was president of Ford and
former national secu rity adv1,s01
r to Presidie n,ts K,ennedy and J oh1
nson ..Openly
Marxist and feminist professor Marlene Dixon opted to stand alo 1
ng1sid1e
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Si'tudents .
1969 - For 'IW'O weeks 40 0 st iudents occupied
UCh cag 0 admin build1
ing protesti 1
ng the university 's
decision1rnot to reappoi ,nt Marlllene Di1
xon (➔) beca,use
o·f lher le'ftist polit ical views an d !because she, was a
woman ~In February tihe 111clh1ckensh1
1'guerrilla brigade
barricaded a grouIp 0f admi1n1istratoirs inside th e qua d
club and walked aro,und tooting kazoos singing and
ch anting ..611' (the number of stu dents already
suspe1
nded.) O n February 24 , 10 0 students g1a1h ered
at the presiden S house demanding ' the dis cipl inary
com1mittee accep a coll ective defense T1
hen 70
marched to the quad cl1
ub and taunte ,d guests , took
food and win1
e , cursed vario 1
us fa culty and he ldl
moc ,k 1
m1eetings. In a final protest on th1e 28th
suspended undergr,ad uR1
abbi" J eff Maso n led a
b lock-llo n,g processio 1
n to th1e quad club blowi ng a
s,hofa r and cha,n ing "amn1esty now" a,nd 'walls, fall
down ~' In March , 42 students 1nvol1
ved were
expelled 81 suspend ed and 3 placed ! on
pro bation In May . 60 professo,rs sto od in silent 'Vigil
outside th1
e Quad Club 1nh1opes of rreduc1
ng the
pun1i1
shments , t 0 no avail. ➔
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11

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1969 - Jun1ior professor arnd SOS founder Richard !
Flac ,ks wa,s atta cked in hi offic·e by an 1
unkn1own1
assailant and n1ear1
ly beate ,n to death1.
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0

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1969 Hl1story profess or Hanna Holborn Gray Is appo 1ntedfirst woman
pr esid1
en1
t 0 f th1e, U1
niv ersity 0f Chicago (and first president of a major research
un1ver,s1ty in the US)
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1969 - O pening of the Woodlawn S ocial Services Center at
61st and Drexel which co1
mbined job training professional
educa' on1 c hildcare, healith cliln1
c and legal serv1
1ces.
Served as :an important resource for stre1
ngt:henin g re lations
betw ,een Woodlawn and! the U 0 f C.
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(:- 1969-1973 - 1
UofC stude·nts an d other Hyde Pa1
rk
com1
mu1nity membe1
rs offer cournseliing a1
nd arr,a1
nged over
11 ,00 0 abartion1s ,and la er periormed un1
d ergrou1
nd
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albortions under the name of th1e abortion counseling
'S erv i c,e of the Chi 1
ca1go Warne 's liberati ion Unio n, la er
known as JAINE.
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1970 Gay Liberation1Front's
first gay dance pa1
rty is hosted
a th1e UofC c·amp,1
us (in Pierce l) I
followed by an other that drew
over 600 Q1ueer people, and a
third ! that drew 10 00. ➔
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1970 - Annual W,ashington
Prom is replaced by the first
Lascivious ] Cos u1me Ball. ..alnd
.
""''
180 members of Studlents for Non-Violent Actio n toolk p art in a co-ed slkinny dip
1n he ld a N1oyes poot
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------~,.

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1970 s- 1980s - Disappearance ot the Union Soc
city's ind:1
ustrial base .

ard arn sow

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_

.

1973 - A group of Hyde Park women establ 1shed he Rape Acti 0n Gro1
up
Hotlllne.
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1974- 1
u 1niversity Wormen's Center 0penedl and feminist groups 0 n camp us
multiplied.
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1974 - First anrnual lesb11an1writ ers' C,0 nferen ,ce orga1
n1zedat UofC b·y activist
Marie J . Kuda and pulp n ovelis Vallerie Taylor .
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1976 Jeff IFort foirme - h1ead of the Bl ackstone Rangers gets 0 ut of prison, ]
where he was !heavily influenced 1by the Nation of lsl a1m Upon his release he
rena1med the Rangers~B1
I,ack P. Stone Nlation o the Moorish Temple of Ameri'ca
(or IMloes) that spread l out across LA NYC, an1d Delroit.
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1980 - FaJlure of local in1it1at1
ives to desegregate scho ols lied to fed1eral and state
in ervention res ultin1g In ,a decr e e and co urt-mandated desegregg1ti1on plan,;
nonetheless , by the 90s, 2/3 of whit e s ude1
nts in Chicago att ended pri1
1vate
schoo ils .
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1980 - Madd1
ie Butler founded WECAN(Woodla ·wn Ea st C ommunity and
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Neig'lhbors Inc) a neighlborrhood and citywiide advoca,te for rescuing at-~iskand
abandoned buildings and adv oca ngIfor affor dable housing .
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1985 - Women on he U ofC campus org ianized the university's fiirst sor 0rity,
A l pha Omicron Pi.
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1986 - S,ix pub lic housin ,g high-rises referred to as t h1
e lakefro 1
nt Properties were
closed for renovation an d tJhe families that liv ed there Wer e dispersed across th1e
city and promised a home post-renovation1s . 2 buildings were remo del ed and
reopened i1n 1991 but the Other 4 were demolis lhed resut ·ng in pro ests from
activist Ipublic housing residents.

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1988 - Jeff Fort !head of the Rangers i's, c ,0 nvicted 1
of 1
plotting aga1
inst the US
gov ern1 · en1t for his involveme1
nt wi1
th Libyan Black natiO alists Jeff Fort went o
Jail and the B:la,clk P. St one Nation spHntered up 1
into several different gangs with1
no cenitral leadership.
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19910s -TWO and Woodl ,awn 1
Community Development Co P~1team u1
p o
d,ev elo1p 63rd 1
str eet ,bu1
Ildi1ng expen 1
sive ho1mes and lapart · - ntsi.* *
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1990 - N orth Ken1
wo od-Oakl ,an d des ig ,ated as a, "co ·seirva ·on a ea / ' dedicated
to salvaging existin 9 buildings and renewing neighbor 00d abric (in contrast 101
'slu1m1and blighted areas ..), by the city 0f Chicago.
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1996 - After ,a decade of ca,mpus organ121
1ngJ faculty
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c~ eora Ausl!ander ,
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Lauren Ber lant 1 and El iz ,abe'th H elsinger) established the Center: fo r G1
ender
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Stud1ies.
1996 - C ontrovers1
y over a nearly completed extension 0 1
f th1e El 'into W oodlawn
forced l the CTA to ear i1
t down. Its iremoval served ! as a cataly,st for investment
and d evelopmen1t ,on 63rd .
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1997 - C ollege app1roved tIhe undergradl1
uate concentr lation 1
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e der studies ~

19918 - The U O'f C adds se.x ual orientation to its non-discrim1nati0npolicy.
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1999 Presi dent Hu1
g10 Sonn enscein announced plains to relax the l:JC's famed
core cuririculum from 21 .o 15 required courses . Co nfroveirsy led to i
resigna ,tion in 200 0.,
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1999 - Green Campus Initiativ e (GCI) formed in anticip 1
ati1on o pe ding
co1
nstruc.tion1projects., aimed a encouraging s ustai1
nable bt.nld1
1
ng [practices ~
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2001 - The !Experimental Station 1
is .born from the as lhes of a fire th1at destroy ed
1

a complex used for socially conscious art projects; now the hom3 of Blackstone
Bikes and Backstory Ca,fie, among other non1pro lit pr0Jects and festi1vals i
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2'002 - Stu1
dent ..800 t tlhe 1B ell' 1
c,ampaign organ1iz ed aglai st Ar1
amark 'S campus
contract with Taco Belt M
. e rs of the Anti-Sweatshop Co,alition tabledl in front
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of T'aco Bell (in Hu ch) eld a Tow n Hall forum and collected s ignatures and
g ot Taco 8,elll ooted ...i0llow d by ,20 other 1
u1
nive1
rs· ies and h·gh sicho ,ol- ~
removin g existing iTac0 1Bel franchis,e .
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2 0013 - In resp onse to seveira anti~ay bi,as incicjen1
ts camRUS queer activists
successfullly ca1
m1paig1ned tor O-Week to inc!lude queer conten and fo r a
confidential walk-in servic e eaUed Op en Source (now held l as we ekly
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discu1ssion1groups)~

2 001
4 - Campaign forrgend erneutral b,athroo rms by queer a ctivists
@ the U o·f C resul,ts 1n1the dlebut of
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single-occupancy gender-neutral
restro ,oms aro und campus .
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2 004 - Some 100 S'tUdents, and
c·ommunity members demonstrated
to su pport Clemmie Carthans a
black SSA student wh ,o aJlegedlly
wa1
s assaulted lby two UCPD
o·fficers ~➔
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2005 - First Hydle Park nTake Back · the Night' rally fo cused ion endin ,g se ·xual
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assault, empo,wering people to feel safe in tiheir communi,ties, and solidarity' with
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survivo,rs
2 00 6 - U .S. federal courts ruled to :seize and auctio n 0 ft ihe Orrie,ntal l1
nstitute' s
colle·cti10 1of Persian artifacts (offic1ally ,owned by Ir.anb1
ut held lby the 0 1'Si1
nc,e
1930s) to compensate victi11
ms of 1997 Jerus ,alem bombirng,.
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2 0017 - U of C ad ds gender identity to its non-discriminatio rn policy .
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11

2007 - The Campai~
gn to K1
i1
ck Cok·e off Campus ,• s1
pearh1eaded lby Students
Organized and United with !Labor (SOUL) a,nd Environmental Con1cerns Org.
(ECO), campaigned t·o get Cok e products re moved from campus becaus e of
human rights,vio la·fio ns. No1
netlheless studen members 0 f Campus Dining
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Advisory Board vote ,d to keep Coc ,a-C,olla on campu ,s.

20 07 - f- ln1'SP ite of protestin1g1,sit-ins,
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and 0 rg,anizing by STAND (Students
T,aking Ac ·on Nlow: Darfur) and IL
Congressman Bobb·y Rush, the
Univeirsity of Chicago b ecame th1e fiirst
acade ,m1c institution 0 10 fficially r efuse
to dJvestfrom Sudlan ~
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10

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2007 - U 10f 1C recei1
ved anony rmous d1on1ation of
S ch ola1rships Jor underg1
raduates .

100 milliron and began Odyssey
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2007 - G1raduat e Students Un ited (GSU) was fo unded as a committ e e to begin
discussing 1and work1
ing1to unionize graduate student woirkers .
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u1c

2007 - Students , vote ·to support
partic ipa ·01
n in U- Pass r(unlimi ed CTA
rides) but th1e ad~minis trati on did not imp lement it.
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May 2007 - lnter-H 1
0US1e Council passes a res ,o lution impleme nting genderneutral -01
pen housing opt io n for undergirads, beginn ing wit a pi10t 1
program in
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January 2008 a1
nd av·ailabl e to ·first -years sta .rting in fall 2009
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2008 - The Hy1
de Park C 0-01p Market (in Tr as u1
re l1s land S curren1t location)
closes due to d ebt owed to the U of C~
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E- 20018 - L,aunch ing of the Milton
Friedman lnsti -Ute for Resea irch in
Economics , with a $200 illlio n
endowm ent and plan to iurth1e r sltrengthen
1
resea 1rch i n C0 nservative econ1
01mics . 1 isl
planned to take over fhe · CTS/S ,em Co-op
b uild1ng 0n ,58th ,& Uni·vers1ty . Zimmer~s
a1
nn10 unceme 1
n -spar1
ked au1tcry in1c·ludi1ng
a p ti ion/letter signed by 100 faculty .
20 08 - Open ing of the u1
c Office rof Susta in1ab1lity headed lby Ilsa Flan,agan
(formerly -he Sustainability Director tor Bank of America wh 1ch1invests in
mountaintop remova l.)
2008 - ll he Ad-H1
oc Woodl,awn Committee siecures funding 'from the U of C Uncom1mon1
Fund to start a sh,aredl space, of st ude1
nts and Chica1go South Side residents for
co llaborat ive work on art istic , educational and. commu1nity serv ice in1
iti1
atives
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2008 U of C p1
urchases Harper Cou11
rt (52nd & Ha rper) for $6 .5 1
milron with
plans to r ed evelop it.
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2008 - U of C's first Pri1
d e Fe stival . two week s of free eve,nts and pe1rforman1ces .
is organ ized by Queers &
Assoc i1
at e ·.
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2008 Open ing of 5710 S .
Woodl lawn , the home of the
0ffice of Multicult 1
ur1
al
S udies and the ILGBTQ
Programming Oftlce ..
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March 2009 - ➔ Westboro
Ba ptist Ch1urch , a viru lently
1

homophobic

and rac ·ist
11

giroup,1visits UChicago ( lhe
home of the devril... i.e.
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O lbama) and a huge counter - prot est/d lanc e party and rmocking signs dro wn them
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out .

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October 2009 - Student-organized QUE(E)RY. a one-day radical ! q1
ueer arts festival.

2009 - Opening of the UC Office of Civic Engag ement, meant o develop the
con1ne:ctio1
n between the UC as an1irnter ationall in1stitu1
tio1
n and the ' city's
emlerg1ing
1sta. us as a glo lball city/ h eade,d by Ann IMarie Lipi nski~
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May 2009 1- Univ ersity's free speech po 1iciescriticized by th1e Fo •undation for
lndiv1
id1
ual Rights in Education.
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Maly 2 009 Studlents sticker over a housan1d copi1es of the MaJoon and Illa nch
,an "undercover skanks·· p ride camp aign 1nresponse to Maroon writ er Luk.e
Dumas' arti1
c1
lle about fema l!e students asl uskanks' and ''tram1
ps~ Tlhe M:aroon
editors issu1
ed a public apol 0 QY~
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-

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0

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May 2009 1
Following the publishi1n,g of a satirical article in the Maro0 n, Steve
Sa.ltarelli andl sev ·era l o her Uo fC stud ents (mostly white men1
) founded the group
Men lln Power which aimed to provide a pre-professional plattorm for men to
'get them ahead .. i1
n b usi1n1
ess, law health care caree1
rs, acces s _o 'W0 men and
jo bs; as well asl to disc 1
uss issrues of "reverse s1exism. Outcry by feminists
q ueer~ a1
nd m.en of c oloir co1
mmuniti es and indivi duals made 'tlhe national nrews;
MiP refused t1
0 make a n1ondis crimin1ation statement pa of the 1ir mission.
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11

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200 9 - The 61st stree garden, 1
near the Exp erimental Station orn 6,1st andl
Bla cksto n e was :shut d own by the UC i n order to lbuild a temporary pairkin g lo
Jor the construction Oi'f lh e new Chi cago Th eological Seminary building in1spite
of stu1dent and commun1ity protests . The
University 1
put in $20 0 00 o set up a new
garde n at 62nd and Dorc1
hester .
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~

2009 - Stu de nt involveme rnt (SOUL.
Aramark Worker-Student Alliance, SOS.
Jew islh A cti1on, and Graduate S udents
U1
nited) in1rallies and action s helps to
s,ec1
u1ire a 10% r,aise for Ar,almark wor lkers
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la

after a pr otracted effort to negotiate a
contract with1Aramarik.



rO

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Q

a

a

0

0

d

a

D

Octo ber 2009 - Chica .go loses bid to host
20116 Olympics
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1

O cto ber 2:009 - Stude1
nts p otest at llecture by form,er Israeli PM Ehud Olme ;
a1
bo ut 2·5 prot es -ers 1
were 1
pulled from the audienc e by t lhe ponce. P res~Zimmer
sent out an e mail calling th e disruption 1a "distuirbing 1ru1,pt1
ure n effectively
shu1tting down t 8 dlissente rs· ight to1p otest.
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11

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201 D - UChi1
cago S U1
dent of color arrest ed in the A-Level foir "criminal trespassH
a:nd uresisting arrest~.. After be,ing told to quiet down, l ibraria 1
n1s called the po lice
land th e stud lent was put in a chokehold and wr est led to the groun:d. Allegedlly he
refused t0 s,how ID witnes ,ses say he was n1' asked~ The even~ res ulted in a
seri1es of ope,n forums a1
nd in1creased convers,a,tions 1
about rac1snfon campus
but little attempt to addfess a long history of racial profiling by the UC PD . (for
more i'nfo see the stud ent arrest -• pag e 1nthi s zin e.)
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April :2010 - A·fter ·ye,ars of lobbyiinig by th1e Worlking Grou1p on th e Sexual Assa1
ult
Polllicy, a stu1dent referendum & SG vote to reevaluate sexual assaulrt po 1icy, in
particular to chang e po,licy that charges ar e addr essed w1
ithin de 1partment of
person accused .
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May 2010 - IUndocum ,ented
stu dents rally 0n Bartlett
Qua.d for scho larsh1ips an1d
public support for immigratio n1
reform1; ,organized by UC
Coaliti on for Immig1ra nt
IRights, Immigrant Youth
Ju ,stice Lea gu e, and
Movimiento Estu diantil
Chicano de Atzlan . ➔
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May 2010 - Bishop Arthur Br,azier , with the suppoirt of the U ,of C , organizes the
Woodlawn Chiildren·s Promis,e ,Zone , modeled after the, Harlem CPZ,, to qualify
for Ob,ama's fedlera ll Pro1
mis,e Nleighlborhood Program and aii1
m:ing to i1
mprove
academic ·, extiracurri cular , and summer le,arnin1
g opportunities for Woodlawn1
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students ,.,
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July - August 20 1O - Students and Hyd e P,arkers coHaborate ,on ·the first ever
UoifC Diso ,ri entation zine , an alternative orientati 'on/activ ·ism/resource guid e for
inco min1g u 10 fC stude,n1
ts .
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1

to .6e
continue6
...
(tij-is
u:p
part's

to 1>ou)

uGra.desare a problem. On the m.ost general level, t ,hey 're an explici t
acknowledgment that wha it you're doing is insufficiently interesting or
rewardin 1g for you to do.it 0 n your own . Nobo dy ever gave you a gr ade for
lear:ni n lg how to play, how t ,o ride a bicycle, or how to .kiss. One of th 1e best
ways to destroy love for any of these .activities would be through the use
of grades ,, and the o,oerc ion and judgme ,nt they represent. Grades are a
cudgel to bludgeo ,n the un17\7illinginto doing what ,they don t want to do, an
important in str11ment in inculcat ,ing children into a life long subservience to
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whatever

auth ority happens to be thrust
1

over them~

rir

-Derrick Jensen in WaJJcin_g on Water

Be experimental,
think experimentally,
embrace the awkwardness

of the unmapped life.
- La u ren

Berlant

13

7 YEARS

OF CAMPUS
(a report

POLITICS

of ma j o r ca mp a ign s)
2002 - 2009

2002

Campaign:"Bootthe Bell"
Organization:
Anti-SweatshopCoalitionOater re-named Students Organizedand
Unitedwith Labor,SOUL)
Goals:Workwith the Coalition of ImmokaleeWorkersto boycottthe TacoBell franchiseat the Universityof Chicagocampus,due to the business'sabuse ofits workers.
Tactics:High profile events,meetingswith administrators,coalition-buildi
ng
Result Successfullypressured the Universityto not renew its contractwith the Taco
Bellcompany

2004

Campaign:SaveGrovePare
Organization:
Student-TenantOrganizingProject (STOP,later re-named Southside
TogetherOrganizingfor Power)
Goals:Workwith low-incomehousingresidents to prevent the University'sacquisition and demolitionofthe GroveParc's504 publichousing units south of campus
Tactics:SaulAlinksy-stylecommunityorganizing
Result Successfullypressured the Universityto back down on its attempts to acquire GrovePare; created a grass-rootstenant organizationthat existsto this day


2007

Spring Campaign:Killer Coke

Organization:
SOUL
Goals:Participate in nation-wideStudentsAgainstSweatshopcampaignto pressure
universitiesto stop purchasing Coca-Colaproducts through its dining contractors,
due to anti-unionpracticesby the Coca-ColaCorporation in Columbia
Tactics:
Teach-ins,directactions
ResultCampaign unsuccessftL
l

Fall

Campaign:SaveDarfur
Organization:
StudentsTakingActionNow-Darfur (STAND)
Goals:Pressure the Universityto shed all investrnentsrelated to the Khartoumgovernment in Sudan,wl1ichwas accused of canying out genocideagainst the people
of the southern regionof Darfur
SlVIIWfllR
Tactics:
Teach-ins,directactions
ResultCampaignunsuccessful

2008

sds

Campaign:
Aramark-StudentWorkerAlliance
Organization:
SOUL& Studentsfor a DemocraticSociety(SOS)
Goals:Workwith Aramarkworkers at the Universityand with TeamstersLocal743
to win workers a better contract
Tactics:
Jointmeetingswith workers and students, coalition-buildi
ng,rallies
ResultDebated;the campaigndid providea means to connectstudents with people
in the work place
Campaign:Stopthe MFI
Organizations:
Committeefor Open Researchon Economyand Society(CORES),
SDS,GSU
Goals:To stop the Universityfrom establishinga "MiltonFriedmanInstitutefor Research in Economics.
Tactics:Coalition-building,
ralljes,educationalevents,debate in facultysenate
Result·The administration agreed to minor changesin the Institute'splan
from GSUNews, Fallf4<)09.

Student Arrest Incident 2010
Where it stands now
Overview
In February of 2010, a University Police officer put a student in a chokehold and
wrestled him to the ground in the Regenstein Library . The student was charged
with criminal trespass and resisting arrest, and spent the night in jail. For many,
the arrest highlighted issues of decades of racial bias and improper use of force
by the UCPD, and exposed fractures in the University community around
communication and collaboration.
In response, after several public forums , the administration admitted that several
"procedures " had failed to operate correctly , including perhaps the Library,
UCPD , and the Dean on Call program. Pressure from students , faculty , and staff
mounted as President Zimmer did not make a statement on the incident.
For more info , check out the Chicago Maroon archives along with the official
statements at the below locations:
http ://csl.uch icago .edu/pdfs/Report on Regenstein incident 0/4204-2-1 O.pdf
http ://cs l.uch icago .edu/pdfs/Commun ity Forum Update 03-02-201 O.pdf
http ://www .chicagomaroon .com/2010/4/9/shooting-blank

The Alliance for Student and Community Rights is a loose group of students
and others who came together following the public forums regarding this issue.
To facilitate conversation amongst the students planning action around the
recent episode of police violence and racism in the Reg , individuals formed a
listhost: studentarrest@googlegroups.com. Peep their demands here :
http ://sg. uchicago. edu/blog/alliance -for -student -and-community -rights -demands / .
We encourage you to get involved.
Ad Hoc Committee of Campus and Student Life, Student Government, and
the Alliance for Student and Community Rights. Long name , complicated
task. VP for Student Life Kim Goff -Crews founded this committee following
several open forums on the subject. Made up of faculty , admin, and students , this
committee is working to "monitor and advise the process moving forward on
institutional changes related to the student arrest. " Public forums reporting on this
work should be forthcoming , but that doesn 't mean your voice shouldn 't be heard
in the meantime . For more info , contact the co-chairs , Karen Warren Coleman
(admin) and Toussaint Losier (PhD student).
Check out the Common Sense Guide for the Administration 's take on what
students need to know about Safety and the UCPD .
http ://co mmonsense.uchicago .ed u/

So What's Next?
It's up to you. Incidents of a similar nature have occurred in the past , and clearly
there is a need for transformative , systemic , and collaborative change.

Pedagogy and learning spaces
We live in a white supremacist classist heteropatriarch y and the dominant institutions in society
reflect these power structures. This is obviously true of the University of Chicago. It' s less obvious that
the same holds of every classroom and learning space at the U of C- but unless we actively oppose
classism , racism , and heterosexism in these spaces , they' ll be characterized by these structures as well.
The power structures in educational spaces have been written about a lot. In educational spaces we
get taught our class and race position. In less privileged locations than Hyde Park- but not far from
Hyde Park- that ' s manifest in the school-to-prison pipeline and the school-to-military pipeline.
How do these structures come into the U ofC classroom ? In some ways these structures define who
and what ' s kept out of the U ofC classroom .
The U ofC is not open to the community where it's located. Our classrooms are closed to all who
don ' t meet exacting admissions requirements that don ' t test talent or intelligence - they test how well
we 'v e been prepared. The supposed meritocrac y of academic elitism is a huge lie. We ' re not the "best,"
most ofus are just the most privileged.
But no matter who we are before we get to the U of C, in the classroom we have to conform to the
white , male, cis, middle-class image of a student. Too many professors don ' t see students as whole
people : they see us as academic subjects . They don ' t see our whole selves : they see the parts that
participate in the intellectual , academic game. That game doesn 't have to be so limiting , but historically
it's been predicated on exclusion , and practicall y it denies the multiplicity of our identities and histories.
I can only speak from 1ny experience taking 1nostly humanities classes at the U of C. The first
lesson in the writing seminars that accompany the required core Humanities class is: don ' t say " I. " Don 't
write subjectivel y. Don ' t bring yourself into your writing. Learning to write like this is important , but
needs to be kept in context. Charles Bernstein says:
I can think of few more valuable survival skills [than expository writing]. "But if
one learns to dress as the white man dresses one does not have to think the white
man dresses best. " And again the danger is that writing is taught in so formal and
objectified a way that most people are forever alienated from it as Other. It needs , to
use Alan Davies's terms , to be taught as the presentation of a tool, not mystified as a
value- free product.*
This is not only true of expository writing. In general , the humanities class is alienating. Students are
often rewarded for aggression and any personal response to assigned material is looked at askance by
professors and classmates. Though intellectual criticisms of texts and ideas are encouraged , emotional
reactions are regarded as out of place in the classroom setting. In office hours , I tend to try to build a
more persona l connection with a professor ; but these attempts are often met with awkwardness and
redirections to academic questions . In most classes , in most papers we write, in most academic
interactions , we can ' t bring in our emotions , or our bodies , or our histories. Are you invisible or gone?
How can we fight this? We can continue bringing our whole selves into the classrooms and fight to
make them spaces where our whole selves can be heard. We can create alternative educational spaces in
discussion and study groups , and working in the surrounding community. We can teach and learn skills
and experiences that are bey ond what's usually taught in a classroom.
There is a lot to be said for impromptu , unorganized , unplanned educational experiences , but we can
also learn through better-organized pedagogy. I was inspired by the wealth of pedagogical styles at the
workshops and assemb lies at the U.S. Social Forum in Detroit this past June. In some workshops we
participated in break out discussions , or we paired up and talked through a question or our experiences on
an issue , or we filled in timelines on big shared pieces of butcher paper and had impromptu
conversations. The workshops were usuall y diverse on the levels of age, race, class, gender , and
orientation , and we tried to learn from each other 's different experiences. Maybe another reason these
workshops were so great is that they weren ' t oriented around an abstract academic idea of education , but
to action outside the classroom.
Another education is possible!

* "Writing and Method ", Content 's Dream: essays 1975-1984 , (Los Angeles: Sun & Moon Press , 1984),
225.
16

Hyde Park has a long history of tense race relations,
forced gentrification and "urba n renewal"and a
troubled relationship between tbe University and
the rest of the communities of HP & Woodlawn.
Walking into this as a white person raised in a
mostly-white middle-class community, without
much experience or knowledge about the subtle
ways racis,11and dassism manifests itself in our
thinking and education, I absorbed the warnings
and fear placed in me during 0-Week. I walked
down to my dorm on 60th every day without ever
walking further south. It \vasn't U11til
I got involved
with feminist and anti-raciscorganizing and co
educate myself about white privilege that I
began to understand a little better the .streetsof
HP and ho\V history has forged the present.
I can't count how many times at tl1isschool I 've
beard people say they are "color-blind" or
becon1e defensive \vhen their racist behaviors
are pointed out. Who say, My friend is totally fine
with being called that, he jokes about it all tile cinlc.
The U of C bas bad an active, vibrant, and oftenfru.~cratedhisto1y of efforts for change made by
students of color and white allies sun-ounding issues
of race, ethnicity, genr.rilication,housing, nationality,
and anti-racist struggles. Ne\V issues, injustices, and
continuing struggles will undoubtedly emerge
during your years at the U of C.

-----

li1 addition to our radical history, here's some
working definitions to help you find your footing
in these discourses. These dcfini tions are
bon-owcd 6-om Hampshire College's
Disorientation zine. They are not the sole or
authoritative definitions of these useful terms.

LANGUAGE
&RACE
abriefglossary
ofterms
race: a social construction created by European
whites based on the false belief that biological or
physical characteristics determine one's abilities,
behavior, opinions, belief, etc. Racial categories are
produced socio-politically via power relations and
social practices. ~fh erefore, even though race is
commonly understood as a "social construct," this
system of categorizations continues to be perpetuated
by white privilege and internalized racism among
people of colo1~

ethn icity: A social construc t which divides people
into smaller social groups based on charact eristics
such as shared sense of group membership , values,
behavioral patterns, language , political and economic
interests, history and ancestoral geogra phical base.
nationality: the status of belonging to a particular
nation by birth or naturalization. A person can have
more than one nationality or be nation-less.
citizens hip: Legal membership in a political community that grants legal rights to political participation
and protection by the state. In the US specifically (as
with some other nations), this relationship of citizen
vs non -citizen creates an underclass of individuals of
varying statuses with fewer rights, or without the
ability to exercise their human right~.

wh ite privi lege: The unquestioned and unearned set of advantages, entitlements, benefits, and
choices b estowed on people solely b eca use they are white. Generally most white people who expe rience such privilege do so without being conscious of it.

institutionaJ rac ism : The network of institutionaJ structures, policies, and practices that create advantages and benefits for white people, and discrimination, oppression, and disadvantage for peopl e
from marginalized racial groups.
prejudice: a set of n ega tive p ersonal beliefs about a soc ial group that lea ds individuals to prejudg e
people from that group, or the group in general, regardless of individual differences among members
of that target group
racis m : The systematic subordination of members of marginaliz ed racial groups who hav e relatively
little social power by members of a dominant racial group. This subordination is supported by the
actions of individuals, cultural norms and values, and institutional structures and practices of society.
gen tr ification: The buying and renovation of houses and stores in det eriorated urban neighborhoods
by upp er- or middle-income families or individuals, thu s improving prop erty values but often displacing low-income families and small businesses.
internalized rac ism: The p ersonal conscious or subconscious acceptance of the dominant society's
racist or Eurocentri .c views, stereotypes, and biases of one's own ethnic or racial grou p by peopl e of
color. It manifests itself insidiously through patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving that may
result in feelings of inferiority or self-hatred, hostility or violence toward other people of color,
feelings of superiority over people of the same or other marginalized raci .al groups, pla cing higher
value on or targeting members of a group who appear more "white,",and beliefs thatlracist institutions are fair.

who1sana11rr
whyshouldl be one?how
canIbeone?
An "ally" is membe r of the dom inant or majority group (straighUwhite/cisgende r/
American /male/etc.) who works to end oppression by suppo rting and advocating
for a historically oppressed or marg inalized group (quee r/people of co lor/poor/
tran sgende r/i mmigranUdifferently abled /etc. ).
.
t
There are all sorts of allies . However , being an a~ly is n? as
simple as declaring support for a group. R_ather , ,t requ1r;s
hard work and commitment to understanding system s o I
o ressio n . You need to learn how to listen . You need to earn
-1+--:~·--~ · Lt:~onstantly educate yourself . And you have to learn to be
s.i.;\.j

patient becaus e you will be uncomfortable.

Sothen,II tf'ssuchbardwork,whysbeoJd
I be80 aJIY?
Because even though as a white person you might not be the
object of racism, racism affects you. And eve n thou gh sayi ng
"that's so gay'' might seem harmlessly funny , it makes so meon e
else feel uncomfortable and unsafe . And a community, or even a
conve rsation, full of lots of unsafe and uncomfortable people
can't be that much fun to be a part of ...plus we are no longe r
equally free to speak and learn from each other.
Being an ally is also important in a student context-not just for activists and organizers , but
for students who are committed to •open dialogue .• Becoming an ally means working to understand how language creates safe/ unsafe /open/closed discusslons ... a classroom is not an
egalita rian place where all can speak freely unless we work to make it that way .

Plus, we all need allies sometimes . If you learn to support those around you ,
you 'll fi nd that they will learn to support you back.

in ter sec tion al ity

lntersecliona lity is a sociological theory suggesting that-and seeking to examine ho•w-Nvarious socially and culturally constructed categories of discrim ination interact on multiple
and often simultaneous levels , contributing to systematic social inequa lity. lntersectionality
holds that the classical models of oppression within society, such as those based on
race/ethnic ity, gender , religion , national ity, sexual orientation, class , or disability do not
act independently of one another ; instead, these forms of oppression interrelate creating
a system of oppression that reflects the "intersection" of multiple forms of discrimina tion.

doIhave
tochoose?
Allof usarenotjustonethingbutmanyintersectingidentities
andmembers
in manygroups.
Asstudents
andactivists
, recogn
izing theintersectionality
ofvariouskindsofoppression
meansbreaking
downtheideathatasananti-racist
activist, LGBTQ
issuesaren't "yourissuesn
or asa queeractivis
t ableism
doesn
't affectyourwork. It'simportant
to includeconversat
ions
aroundbeinganallyandinterse
ctionality
inourmovement/o
rganizing
- notonlybecause
it is challenging
andbroadens
ourcommunities
andunderstandi
ngs, butbecause
it is part
of working fora betterworldfor everyone
onthemargins
ofour community
.
"I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when her shackles
are very different from my own ." (Audre Lorde)
18

~For we hnve, built inr.o 11
/1of &U, old blueprints of expcctnuon nnd ro8ponse. ol d s tructUJ"O$
of oppr11S$ion.
and these mus t be a/ re rod a t the san10 time as we alter the living conditions w hich are II result of those
BtnlCUln!S . For the DUISlllr'Btools will never diBnUIJ)t/ 0 the m1tSter's bouge , • • Audre Lorde

WhiteAllyChecklist
- I make sure race/(anti)racism is a part of the discussion (in meetings,
classrooms , personal conversations , etc.)
- I continually educate myself a.nd others about racism.
- I try to learn anti-racist language and keep up with it when it 's changing.
· I demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the issues of racism.
- I .recognize my own limitations as a white person doing anti-racist wo1·k.
- I rea lize "it's not about me. " I can be objective and avoid over-personalizing
issues that POC raise .
- I can identify racism as it 's~happening.
- I attend to group dynamics and power structures ..
- I support and validate the comments and actions of people of color and other
allies (but not in a condescending way).
- I can accept leadership from people of color.
- I can share power with POC and work side-by-side with them on projects.
- I listen carefu lly so that I am more likely to understand the needs/demands/
experiences of POC.
- I can debrief with peopl e of color and am open to being critic ized.
- I can be present with people of color when they need to vent feelings about

racism.
- I can relax, socialize , and be at ease in a space where P OC are the majority.
- I can discuss things with POC and take their ideas seriously.

The following are some problematic areas where a lot
of white people get st uck. Do you ?
- When POC point out racism as it 's happening , I feel personally attacked.
- I rely on people of color for education about my own & institutional racism .
- I believe in "rev erse racism. "
- I feel guilty about being white.
- I speak for people of color and attempt to explain their position s.
· I prefer to spend time & energy dealing with my personal feeling s and issue s
about race, rather than moving the anti-racist agenda forward.
- I want to talk about the anti-racist work I'm doing to POC to validat e myself.
- I have been told I act in a racist manner , but I think I'm being an ally.
- I want to use my privilege to ''help " people of color.
- I believe I und erstand th e strugg le of people of color.
ch eck out th ese r es our ces & m or e info on being a whi te allY,
http://allywork.solida1-itydesign.net/suggested·r eaclingl - reading list
http://www.paulkivel .com/re sources .php - "Guideline s for st1·ong white allies "
''.Age, Race, Class, and Sex" by Audre Lorde (available online)
"Un~acking the Invisible Knapsack " b~ Peggy McIntosh (also o~e)
http- l/www.cwsworkshop.org/ ...t hese w1llget you started ; ther e's lots more out there!

transgender - umbrell a term that refers broadly jo people who
dev iate from the ir assigned gender or the binary gende r system ,
including intersex people , trans sexua ls, cross- dressers , transvestites,
genderqueer people , drag queens/k ings, tw o- spirit peop le, and others;
trans people do not nece ssar ily choose to alter thei r bodies hormon ally
and /o r surgically and may or may not identify os FTM/MTF
which originated In medical/psychological
t ran ssexual - an olde r term
indivi dua l who seeks or has had
communities, typically ref erring to an
sexual reassignm ent surgery (SRS)
gender non - conforming - individuals whose gender expression is
different from the social expectat ions based on the ir assigned sex
genderqueer - a term used b
l~etw~en gender s or as neith:, 5:;ie individual s who identif Y as
ent,fy as trans or pursue Physlcalncnhor woman i may or may not

anges
cisgender - ind ividual s who identify w ithin or as their birth ass igned gender and present with a co ngruent gender
expression (i.e . a non - trans pe rso n)
transman/FTM - a transperson assigned female at birth who
identifies on the mo le spe ctrum/hos mole gender ident ity

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queer (adj. ) umbrella term used by individuals to describe their
sexual ident ity and/or gender identity that does not fit the binaries
of gay/straight/b l or ma le/female, or anyone whose sexual
orientation or gender identity doesn 't match society's expectations;
originated as a derogatory word and is be ing reclaimed and used
as a statement of empowerment by some people and hos dlf f erent
mean ings to different peop le

he
him
his

heteronormot ive - a way of looking at the wo rld with the
assumption that everyone Is heterosexual and looks at the
world In a heterose xual way

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gender express io n - how one expresses oneself , In terms of dress
and / or behaviors that society characterizes as " masculine" or
" feminine ;" may al so be androgynous or someth ing else altogether
Want to be an ally to LGB, queer , and trans folks ?
There's too much info out there to print here ...check out these links !
How homophobia affects straight people : gsanetw ork .org/files/resources/StralghtA/fy .pdf
The Cisgende r privilege checklist : queersunited.blogspot.com/2008/08/cisgender-privilegechecklist.html
- So you wanna be an al ly?: mnomedenlmp.wordpress.com/2010/05/11 /guest-pos t-so-youwanna-be-an-ally-huh /
Obe rlin Co llege definitions , resources for trans folks & allies : www.oberlin.edu/mrc/Workshops.
Trainings/Tr ans101.htm/
20
Ways to support LGBT people : www .uakron .edu/groups//gbtu/a/fies .php



A Transgender Camp11sS11rvival G11ide
by mali c mo xie
After my first year at UChicago, I went from dykediva to transfabu lous, smashing
through the gender binary and escaping with only a few cut s a.nd brui ses. Here' s a
surviv al guide for my transgender and gender-variant sisters, brothers, and ot hers who
continue pave the way for genderbenders on campu s .

The Name Game: Changing Your Name In the Classroom and On line
Faculty : I either emai l my professors before class begin s and ask them to use
my preferred name and pronoun, or I just mention my preferred name during
introductions on the first day. When the Samanthas ask to go by "Sa m" and the
Benjamins become "Bennies ," my switc h from [girlname] to [genderfabu lous
boyname] generally goes unnot iced.
CNet ID: Even if your CNet ID is a name that you no longer use, you're
stuck with it unless you chang e your name "at the University level." Although it is
possible to do thi s, I 've never heard of anyone doing it success fully, so if you're stuck
with name you don't like on the Chalk site, you can at least change your UChicago
email address to reflect your most fabulou s se lf. You can learn how create a "CN et
alias" by going to this webs ite: http ://itservi ces .uchi cago.edu/do cs/email/aliase s You
can cre ate a pointer that allows you to re ceive ma il at pref er redal ias@uchicago.edu in
addition to yo ur regular cnetid @uchi cago .edu . Unfortunately, yo u can't use your alias
to log into any other system (so your CNe t ID will be the sa me on Chalk).
Think Like A Tranny : Counseling
From my exper ience, it seems like many of the folks at the Student
Counseling and Resource Center are well- intentioned, but the therapi sts I have had
were not exactly up-to-date on trans st uff. John McPherrin runs a Coming Out
support group and one of my tranny friends had a good experie nce with him; he's
perhaps the mo st queer & trans-fr iendly therap ist at the SC RS (although he's a
straight cis guy). If you're see king a trans-friendly therapist (to discuss gender identity
or anything else), try one of Chicago's LGBTQ-specific coun seling serv ices like
H oward Brown Health Center (www.howardb rown. org) . Ask about their special
program for folks under 24! If yo u don't have in su ran ce, you can pay for therapy
visits on a sliding scale (stude nts with no source of in come can pay as little as $10 per
. . I)
VlSlt ..

Livin' It Up: Gender in the Dorm s
Open Hou sing (a hou sing policy that allow s yo u to live wit h people of any
gender) fina lly be came a hous ing option at UChicago in 2009. You will not be
assigned to Open Hou sing unle ss you elect to do so on your housing form. Thi s cho ice
is available in all H ouses, except those traditionally designated as single-gender.
Open Hou sing is usually not offered to first-year student s, but I've heard that
fir st-year transfolks can make a case for their preferred housing opt ion. For more
information about student housing, visit housing.uchicago.edu
Big Strong Tranny: Going to the Gym

21

On ce people started reading me as a fourteen-year-old boy , go ing to gym
be came really stre ss ful! Un sure about usin g the men' s locker room at both Ratner and
Henry Crown, I opted for the women' s locker room ... where I wa s promptly asked to
leave. Ratner has bathroom s on the second floor that are us ually uno ccupied.
Unfortunately, the bathrooms are gendered , but they still create a safer spa ce to get
dre ssed. Henry Crown also ha s wheel chair-a ccessible bathroom s on the first floor
(a lso gendered) that you can use for the same purpo se.
Pis s Like A Tranny: Gender-Neutra l Bathroom s
Given the city 's ridi culou s building code s a.nd the old sc hool building s on
campu s, UChi cago has few gender-neutral bathroom s . You can fmd a list of the
gender-neutral bathroom s that do exi st here:
lgbtq. uchicago.edu /re sour ces/uchi cago. sh tml
On-Campus Re so urces:
Pronoun Hoedown (student-led tran sgender di scuss ion group)
Queer s and Associate s (LGBTQ student organizat ion)
Tran sgender Support Group (at the SCRS on Frida ys )
COM I N G SOON: tran s.uchi cago.edu
Off-Campus Trans-Affrrmio~ Re so urces:

















Genderqueer Chi cago: genderqueer chicago.blogspot. com
The N ew Gender blog: www. chi cagonow. com/blog s/new-gende r
GenderJUST: www .gende1ju st.org
Tran sformative Ju stice Law P roje ct: www.tjlp.org
Affinity Community Servi ces : www.affinity95.org
Amigas Latina s : www .amiga slatinas.org
Broadwa y Youth Cen ter: www.howardbrown.or g
Chi cago Dyke Mar ch Collaborative
Chi cago Gender So ciety: www. chi cagogender. com
Chi cago Women 's Health Center: www. chicagowomen shealth center.org
Gerber/Hart Library: www.gerberhart.org
Howard Brown Clini c: www.howardbrown.org
Midwe st GenderQueer: www.midwe stgender q ueer. com
Tran sAction s : www.t ran saction sch icago .org
Tran sgender Oral Hi sto ry Proje ct: www .transoralhistory. com

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22

eminismis not e
I am a Third-Wave Feminist at the University of Chicago.
I see gender as a cultural / social institution that should be questioned .
I believe that the patriarchy affects all people negatively by creating a power
paradigm that forces one "gender " to be the oppressor and another "gender " to
be the oppressed.
I am aware of issues affecting women of color that were overlooked in past
feminist movements.
I am not okay with the current state of society, and want radical change in the
economic sphere, political sphere, and social sphere.
Third-Wave feminism helps me identify all forms of oppressions and gives me the
tools to overcome them . It has reaffirmed my identity as a person and an agent of
positive change.
I am a Third-Wave Feminist at the University of Chicago. And I am not static .

My views are constantly evolving as I enter different communities on campus
and in the city.
My beliefs are changing as I become more aware of my identity as genderqueer.
I choose to be exposed. I choose to step outside of the gothic walls and practice
feminism through words , art, political action , flyering , campus-wide speaking
events .
I choose to speak out aga inst harassment of women in the street and rape culture.
I choose to recreate a masculinity that is
not violent or objectifying. I choose to
reclaim femininity as empowering.
I choose to see beauty in difference , in
confusion , in flux and movement.
I am a Third-Wave Feminist at the
University of Chicago and I am not alone .
The fight is good. The warriors are
collective .


••



~

Solidarity.
Jory from the Feminist Majority at the
University of Chicago

join us in fighting the patriarchy & unlearning sexism ...come get invol~ !
joi n femmaj @lists.uchicago.edu or come to a meeting: Tuesdays @ 6, 571 OS Woodlawn

Worker Solidarity

at the University

of Chicago

by Daniel Benjamin
Not all stud ent s ar e middl e class . But as studentsat the University efChicago,we'r e co nsu1ners
of a luxury pr oduct. And as with all luxur y pr oducts, th e peo ple ,,.,h o work to cr eat e our
edu cati on and stud ent lives ar e 1nade invisible. Capitali sn1 stru cturall y keeps th e living co nditi ons
and stru gg les of th ese peo ple hidd en t o th ose fortunat e enoug h to be be nefitin g fro1n th e sys tem,
often at th e ,,vork ers' ex pense .
G ettin g involved in \.Vork er so lidarit y supp ort s th e stru gg les of th e ,,;ork er s abroad and on
ca1npus ,,.,h o ar e th e ba ckbone of stud ent life. It's also a \.Vay to perso nall y brid ge th e divide
betw een \.vork er and s tud ent. Brid g ing it on th e leve l of sympath y mig ht rnake us indi viduall y
feel bett er, but it does n't co mpar e to th e political act of s tanding t oge th er in so lidarit y.
What is so lidari ty? Here's one definiti on: Stand behind me, don't divide me, and don't decide
for me. "Standin g behind and in so lidar ity \.Vith a move ment is about list enin g to and s upporting
th e needs of th e 1nove 1nent , in th e vari ous and co rnplex ways th ose needs ar e arti culat ed, \.vhile
ta kin g car e not to use th e pri vileges of our locati on to speak on behalf of th ose move 1nent s."* As
a form er stud ent ,,;ho ,,.,a s in volved in ,,;orke r so lidarit y, and is curr e ntl y in volved in ot he r
so lidarit y movement s, I can speak to ho\.v thi s is a constant stru ggl e but also an inspirati on.
Wh en \.Vork ers and oth ers as k us t o stand behind th em and s upport th e1n we ha ve th e opportunit y
to mess ,,.,ith th e pos ition that capitali sm defines for us as stud ents, as middl e-class- but also as
U.S. citizens, as ,,.,hit e, as cis : ,,;hereve r \Ve may have pri vilege . W e usually can 't remove our
pri vilege, but thr oug h so lidarit y, we can leve ra ge it in ord er t o dis1nantle it.
W ork er so lidarit y at th e Unive rsity of Chicago ha s historically pr ocee ded on t, ,;o front s . On
one front , stud ent s ha ve parti cipat ed in move 1nent s supp ortin g int e rnati onal work er s' right s.
Campai g ns ha ve s upport ed Coaliti on of Imm okalee W ork er s (CI\ V), a farm\.vork ers organizati on
based in F lorida , over unfair \>
vag es and \.vorkin g co nditi ons for th e ,,.,o rk ers "vho pick th e
tomat oes \.Ve eat; th e W ork ers Rights Co nso rtiu1n, which 1nonit or s th e conditi ons in factories that
pr odu ce Uni ve rs ity merchandi se; and oth ers . Parti cipati on in int ernati onal \.Vork er solidarit y ha s
allo\.ved stud ent s to think and see g loball y but act locally.
Th e seco nd front of "vork er so lidarit y is more dir ectly local: it is s upp ort for campu s \>vork ers .
Th ey ar e dinin g hall work ers, clerica l staff in th e vari ous depart1n ents and ins titut es, se rvice and
maint enan ce ,,.,ork er s, hos pital ,,.,ork er s, graduat e s tud e nt "vork ers . Man y but not all of th ese
work ers ar e r epr ese nt ed by can1pus uni ons: T ea1nsters Local 743, SE IU Loc al 73, Graduat e
Stud ent s Uni ted. Th ey mak e th e da y-t o-da y life at th e Uni ve rs ity poss ible.
Stud e nt s ha ve parti cipat ed in fair co ntra ct camp aigns t o supp ort cle rical, ser vice, and
maint enan ce ,,.,ork ers in 2007 , and Aramark \.Vorker s in 2008 -2009 . At ti1ne of writin g Local 743
work ers ar e in nego tiati ons, and stud ent s and \.vork er s ar e org anizin g toge th er to fig ht for a fair
contra ct. Th e U niver sity ha s impose d hour cuts on se rvice and 1naintenan ce ,vork ers and is
ins istin g on n1rth er, unpr ecedent ed ,vage cut s, crying poor at th e ver y moment that th ey thr o\.v
money int o th e neo-lib eral Milt on F riedman Institut e, needless ly r epa ved quad s, ne,,., buildin gs
that e ncr oach beyo nd th e Mid way int o W oodla \>v
n , and a ne,v librar y. As th e co nsum ers, s tud ent s
ha ve th e po\.ver to say, \>Ve,,;ill not s tand for thi s! From th e Stud e nt s Or g anizing Unit ed with
Lab or (SOU L) "vebs ite: "In its actions, if not in its rh etoric, th e admini strati on ha s decided that
certain memb ers of our campu s communit y ar e mor e va lued and valuabl e th an oth ers . By
supp ortin g th e contra ct ca1npaign, ,ve can show th e Uni ve rs ity that ,ve refuse to accept such a
definiti on."
You can ge t involved ,vith th e co ntra ct campai gn by checking out th e SOUL ,vebsite,
ht tp:// uchicago .us as.org/ .

* Defi'ning T er1nsin the Age efImperiali.sm·ChallengingAlleged "Strategic Solidarity."

Stat e1ne nt by
Arab Arnerican Uni on M embers Coun cil, Arab Reso ur ce & Or gani zing Cent er, Break th e Siege ,
Break th e Silence Mural Pr oj ect, Fr eedo1n Ar chives, Int ernati onal J ewish Solidarit y Net, vork ,
Left Turn , Pal est ine Edu cation Pr oj ect, Youth Solidari ty Net work.
< http: / / ,,.,,,.,"v.leftturn .org / ?q= node/ 728>
24

UChicagoand A

RK

Questioningwhere our food comesfrom
by Craig Johnson
Aramark is the food service company contracted by the University to run dining
halls and similar services on campus, such as BartMart (Maroon Market). On a
very basic level this means that many of your dining options and decisions are
presided over or influenced by Aramark rather than a UofC administrator; decline
in food quality , rising student dining fees , and increas ingly unjust working conditions
for dining hall workers are largely its responsib ility. One of Aramark's trustees is
also a trustee at the University , and the company maintains an office on campus
inside Bartlett , to your left when entering the building from University Ave.
The regular contract negotiations between Aramark and its employees have
historically involved student organizing in solidarity with the workers and their union ,
Teamster 's Local 743. During the last such campaign of the 2008-2009 school year,
students from various activist organizations on campus formed a coalition called
AWSA , the Aramark Workers /Student Alliance , to coordination efforts to assist the
union in its negotiations . Major contract demands involved securing a wage
increase for workers that kept up with inflation , addressing issues of harassment
and other complaints against management, and the company's policy of cutting
workers' hours desp ite their seniority . Alongside the union's negotiating team and
the dining hall workers, students waged a campaign that involved teach-ins, rallies
with workers at the Ad min Building and Bartlett , and large displays in and around
Bartlett demanding an equitable raise . The student campaign culminated in an all
day sit-in/sing-in /teach-in outside Aramark 's Bartlett office, during which a large
group of students spent their day informing incoming students about the situation
and putting pressure on the Aramark managers with their numbers and noise. At t
he end of the day, students entered and occupied the office . The campaign and
negot iation were successful, winning the workers much of the ir demands , most
importantly a wage increase higher than Aramark 's proposed 1%.

where's my tuitiongoing?
Currently , the University of Chicago 1sone of very few top-level American Universities
without a system to ensure that its investments are socially responsible or advisable - most
unive rsities have a committee or office tasked with evaluating companies based on some
established criteria to determine if they are acceptable to receive University funding . The
UofC continues to invest in companies that do untold harm to society and the environment,
such as HEI. a hotel company engaged in union-busting activity , Arch Coal , a mountaintop
removal coal mining company, to name only ti..vo.It even refused to divest from apartheid
South Africa , and in the early 2000 's refused to divest from the Darfur region in Sudan
despite large student and faculty support on the issue . Ultimately, this means that your
tuition dollars are going to businesses that exploit and harm their workers, destroy the
environment, and are in general poor corporate citizens .
The latest student action regarding investment was a proposal submitted by the RSO
Students for a Democratic Society (SOS) calling for a Soc ially Responsible Investment
Committee to evaluate University investments and prevent further investment in
objectionable compa nies. More information on the campaign can be found ~OS
's
website , http ://sds.uchicago .edu , including the text of the proposal itself .

Selections from

On the Possibilities of Student Life:
Crimethinc. for College Freshmen
assembled by the Crimethlnc.

Gleeful Ludie Throng

Crimethlnc. for college freshmen?! I thought Chrimethlnc. was all
about dropping out of school, quitting your job, and living on the street
eating dumpstered bagels as you fought the cops with slingshots and spraypaint!
That sounds suspiciously like the kind of daydream you have when you aren't satisfied
with what you're doing with your life, and can't imagine what you could really do differently; and the
problem with such daydreams is that they paint the desired life as something so different, so
impossible, that it becomes an alibi for doing nothing. Revolutionary activity, exciting activity, fun
activity is a lot closer than you may be
ll!IS IS.I.~ -F~T
ready to admit to yourself, even if you
~m or MrTIME!
aren't an urban guerilla.
j,
Many ofus are students. Let's be
straight about this. Whether we want to
drop out but aren't yet sure of ourselves,
or we really think the degree will enable us
to do the things we want (without ca.c;hing
in our privilege to stomp on others), or we have other reasons , we're enrolled, and putting a lot of
energy into being college students. So it's probl ematic that when we think of being a revolutionary,
all our examples are so far from our own circumstances (beyond the middle class guilt of that old
oxymoron, the "student activist"); after an, any image that makes us feel that "life is elsewhere "
from where we are is ultimately our enemy . This little pamphlet is an attempt to offer some leads
on revolutionary pursuits for the college student who doesn't want to watch the revolution from afar
while he completes his psy chology homework.
Lots of us in college are paralyzed by the fear of the unknown - whatever it is that awaits
after college, which we can't quite imagine, which all the "responsible" people in our lives have never
ceased t.elling 11swe have to be ready for, or else, and doing well in college is our one cha.nee to "stay
on track" for that. The alternative, of course, is unthinkable.
Youknowaswellaslthatthis
is a myth, but you have to get to a point
where you can feel that knowledge, so
· '
"--..---__, ~
you won't have to struggle with the
~vl~,1 ~ l

7~---~r00RRWNG
,

1

~

,,.~

every time you want to do something
~
""'1..~'
I=:~,;,
that deviates even marginally from the
..::::: ~~ __
aforementioned "track ." You have an
idea of what you want to do, however vague, even if it's just a blurry sense of what you think is right
and wrong. You can be miserable ...if you focus on "achievement• in the limited sense ...or you can do
something good for yourself, for others ...by concentrating some energy on the things you know
matter. Remember, whatever you do right now will lay the precedent and framework for what you'll
be doing later - should it be things you believe in, or things you do out of fear?
Finally, the most valuable resource college life offers you is simply connection to the lives
of others, especially people you would never interact with otherwise. College is one of the last places
you 'll be brushing shoulders with people with totally different backgrounds and interests .
Remember, in grade school you were all together, even kids from different economic backgrounds.
By high school some had dropped out, others had been sent to institutions or drug rehab or private
schools. After this, you'll all be isolated in your various lines of work, even if yours is "activist" or
adven-turer. Take advantage of this chance to shake up the lives of people who wouldn't be thinking
about sweatshops or sexism or passionate living otherwise. Don't be shy - see who you can meet in
existing organizations, and better, start your own dis-organizations. Get creative ...interrupt
meetings of the Self-Knowledge Symposium to shout out more ambitious demands, then invite
people to your own meetings, held around a campfire in the woods ... set up a table in the center of
a,.-,;-cwt., 111
, r ~ OR
"Nf-t.~
tlGitlOl Li= 11,
campus to give out literature, Food Not
I """" ~
'LS'
V.'a '«\.OE '-1. .>.'ST
~ U
"lllG I►.< lll'l'. .
CIAS'""'
'8>-' r---c-1 «>.'6.,. 0. ~rs
<:uss
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Bombs bagels, and hang out with new
114
1
~~
~~f',~~,._
---..,-friends.

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.

-

-

26

POLICE

AND

SAFETY
BY

C A RO

C·O

&

IN
E LIO T

HYDE

PARK

F I E ND

Heykids,
So,welcometo the UofC.Bet you'vebeen talkedto death aboutsafety in the city, safety in HydePark,
and howto use "commonsense,"as thoughyou didn't have any beforeyou got here.
We'renot sayingthat safetyisn't important,becauseit's pretty fuckingimportant.I liketo knowthat
I'm safe when I walkaroundmy communitybut you knowwhat? Noneof the safety servicesofferedby
the UofCmakeme feel safer. Notthe bigblueemergencypoles,not the persistent policecars roaming
aroundthe neighborhood,and not the opportunityto have a policecar accompanyme homewhileI'm
walking.I've realizednowthat the constant policepresencegoesa.ga.inst
my feelingsof safety, and that
my initial fondnessfor the blue emergencylightswas becauseI was madeto feel that I was not capable
of beingindependentand findingmy ownways of keepingmyselfsafe.
After havinglivedin HydePark for abouttwo years, I've foundthat most of the ways I keepmyself
have nothingto do with campussafety services,and that my methodsfeela wholelot, wellsafer than
Universityof Chicagomethods.For one thing,I feellikekeepingyourselfsafe shouldbe empowering
.I
likeknowingthat I can be responsiblefor my ownwell-beingand can supportthe well-beingand safety
of my friends and neighbors.I don't like feelinglike I can't take care of myself,that my well-beingis
dependenton the policewatchingout for me. Whatif the policearen't there when I need them? Whatif
my callingthe policecomesat the expenseof someoneelse? Whatif my callingthe policecomesat my
ownexpense?Thepoliceare ill-equippedto handlemany sensitivesituations,like those involving
mentalhealth or sexual abuse.Andas longas groupsof peopleare oppressedor marginalized,they will
be the chiefvictimsof policeviolence,and the policeserve to perpetuatethat oppression.(Take,for
instance,MauriceDawson'srecent arrest in the library for "beingtoo loud"whilebeingblack,which
broughtto lightthe harassment manystudents and nonstudentsof colorhave facedon campusat the
hands of the UCPolice.TheyassumedMauricewasn't a student and he was forcedto pleadguiltyto
resisting arrest.) Thepolicedon't provideproactivesolutionsfor our communities
...they just create an
atmosphereof fear and mistrust.
Notto mentionthat these police-freesafety methodshave led to somepretty rad friendships.
[one] Makefriendswith yoursurroundingsandyourneighborhood
Whenyou're familiarwith the streets you're walkingon, have adventuredoff campusduringthe day,
you're less likelyto get lost or scared. Evenwhen it's 3am and you're drunk.Promise.
[two] Makefriendswith that kid at the partywho lives kindanearya
Arrangingto walkhomeat night with someoneelse is a great way to keepyourself feelingsafe
withouthavingto wait on the safe ride or campusbus system.You'llget orientedto the neighborhood
faster, too. Otherperks:friendsor friends-to-beare way moreentertainingthan the radio on the safe
ride.
[three]Makefriendswith yourneighbors
In a dorm,this often isn't a huge issue. But new apartment--dwellers
often don't knowthe other
peoplewholivein their apartmentbuilding,especiallyif those peoplearen't also UofCstudents. If your
neighborsknowwholives in your apartment,they knowwhodoesn'tlive in your apartment.Try talking
to your neighborinstead of callingthe policeif they're havinga loudparty-they mightdo the samefor
you next time or invite you in. Sointroduceyourselfand start buildinga networkof trust withinyour
community.That can includethe peoplewhohang out outsideyour apartment,that you see at the park,
whoworkat HydePark Produce,or chillon the sidewalkon 57th street. Youmightbe surprisedby how
friendlyand willingto helpor just say hellomost peopleare.
[four]Don'ttolerateracialprofiling
Racialprofilingmakes everyoneunsafe.If you witness policeharassment,try to ask the personbeing
harassed what their name is and documentthe time and placeas you are able.Getinv~iyedwith the

StudentArrest Ad-HocCommittee(see more aboutthis on the StudentArrest page).Learn more about
howto be a white ally to peopleof coloron the Allypageof this zine.
[five] Takea self-defenseclass

TheUofCoffers tons of kinds of martial arts and self-defenseclassesand groups.In my mind,the
majorreason to try this out is not becauseyou'llnecessary needto kicksomeonein the chest anytime
soon,but becauseit is empoweringand may giveyou the confidenceto feelsafe, empowered,and in
control(and healthy!).It's a goodworkout,a goodway to meet friends,and goodfor your sense of
security.Checkout someof the manyRSOsand Ratner/HenryCrownclasses that offer martial arts
and self-defenseclasses.
[six] Recognizethe diversity of your communityandthat you are a memberof that community

Oftenat this schoolHydeParkers are dividedinto twogroups:"students"or "commun
ity members."
Usuallythis rhetoric veils the distinctionadministratorsor the Maroonor the Policeis trying to make:
"white"or "black,""middleclass"or "workingclass." And,maybemost damaging,it suggeststhat
students are students beforebeingmembersof a community,whetherHydePark or Woodlawn
or the
street you live on. You'llprobablyhear sometimeduring0-Weekthat goingsouth of 60th or west of
CottageGroveis "unnecessary"or "dangerous,"and that "basicallyeverythingto do is on the North
side"-this kind of thinkingkeepsus afraid, stuck in our little Universitybubble,and disconnectedfrom
the placewe live.Fuckthat! Recognizingthe diversity of our neighborhoodand that we are all members
of it is an importantstep to feelinga sense of belongingand safety. Themoreyou get involvedin HPwhetherthroughgettinga communitygardenplot,volunteering,tutoring, doingcommunityservice,
teachinga class at the Woodlawn
Collaborative,
workingoff-campus-thefaster you willbeginto
experiencethe richness and uniquenessof this communitybeyondthe UofCbubble.
Evenif you think policeare necessary as a last resort, buildingcommunity-based
alternativescan help
makesure that conflictsdon't get to that point.If you feel unsafe or are the victim of violence, you
shouldreach out for supportandhelp-to friends, R.H.sor R.A.s,the Deanson Call(Universityofficial
trained to respondto emergencysituationsand informedaboutservicesavailableto students on
campus;they are available24-7 and there's a speciallytrained SexualAssaultDean-on-Call.
Theycan be
reachedthrough the UCPDat 773.702.8181 or 123 froma campusphone),and to the policeas a last
resort.
ChicagoCopwatchis a networkof peoplethat observeand documentpolice(mis)conduct,videotape

policeactivity,and educatepeopleabouttheir rights and aboutpolicebrutality.Thereare groups
operatingin Pilsenand on the North Side.If you're interested in volunteering/copwatching,
to get help
filinga complaint,or to find out more,call 312-772-2COPor emailcontact@chicagocopwatch.org
.
(NorthsideCopwatchis (312)-623-1602/ aforjcopwatch@gmailcom
.)

g
SH0 f

a transitory
Q exper imental
proje c t space

in Hyde Park

ThelostOp Shop,o15266S. Harper
, endedon August16bu1wolch ou1
f0<futureOp Shopsin HydePorkor emonlouro.schoeHer@gmoil.com
to find out more.Checkout www.theopshop.org
for posteventsond info.
About the Opportuni\t Shop

The Op Shopwascreatedlast yearby local aro~t.Ur3torLauraShaeffer,v.oo en,;isionedUbliZlng
otheMllse
e"1)1Yurban spaceson a tl!~ora,ybasis to creates,tesof cOOTriJnay
InvolvementandarDSIJc
l!!XchangeThe Op ShopIS lndej)endentot anyllSlJIUDOl'I,It ISself f\Jndedand manageden11rely
by
volunteers.
Thefi~ t Op Shopwas locateda1lhe formerMacRealtyolices ai 1516E 55111
Street In December2009
II tookthe shape of an altemabvega&e,yspace,aeannga platfoimfor locala111sts
and pro,;idinga
nch programrt eventsand -ksnops The secondOp Shopwaslocatedat the forrrer Hoilywood
VideoStOre auhe comeror 53111
andLake Pari<duringApnVMay,
201D In addiuon10hostll'lg
freeldonaaonbasedevems.dassesand petforrmnces.1deasof~awe reuseand the buildingof
neweconomeswereexploredWithpro1eassuchasa comnJ11ity
run thriftst0re.a Resourcecenter
comerand a GardenExchangecreatedby the a111st
co•ecwe CreamCo

I/

Each Op Shop 1sur-.quein 1tsscope,conceptand context \l'oAla
t lhey all have Inconman Isthe desire 10 tJ~
expand and builduponour ideasof COf1tel1l)orary
art and corrmulll l engagemenl
(} 28

burstingthe bubble:

how to get outside of hyde park
by Mark Hopwood
"Don 't go south of 61st, 1vest of Cottage Grove , or north of 47th, and 1vhatever you do, don 'tfall asleep on
the #55 and 1niss the red line station. " If you' re new to the UofC, you might have been offered this advice already . If
you haven't, you probabl y will soon. I must have heard it at least half a dozen times in my first week , with various
additions : the alarmist ("yo u'll get shot") ; the sociological (" it's , like, a total ghetto") ; the official university line ("it ' s
an urban area"); and the disconcertingl y frank ("that ' s where the black people live"). Most people probably feel at least
some discomfort about being offered this kind of advice - do I really want to live in a bubble? isn't this kind of like
racism? could it really be that bad? - but most people end up following it al l the saine, perhaps understandab ly: no-one
likes getting shot, and the south side does seem like kind of a scary place. What are you supposed to do?
The reality is that the moment you step into Hyde Park, you ' re stepping into a neighborhood whose history
has a fair claim to be among the most complex in the who le nation. The basic lines of the story are easy to tell : in the
30s and 40s , overcrowding in the " black belt" jus t north and west of Hyde Park led African-American families to move
into traditionally white neighborhoods on the south side . In many areas - Englewood for example - this led to race
riots , white flight, and economic crisis as slum land lords exp loited black homebuyers and local businesses moved out
en masse. The UofC, horrified at the prospect of the same thing happening to Hyde Park, used eminent domain to
acquire huge chunks of land and spent the 50s and 60s planning and executing a massive "urban renewal " project that
demolished hundreds of buildings and displaced tho usands of white working-class and black residents. To get a sense
of the scale of the changes , walk down 55th street and try to imagine v.1hat it might have been like with twenty-two bars
on it - before urban renewal , that's what you'd have seen .
The story of urban renewal (or " negro removal ", as it's still known to many on the south side) helps to
make some sense of why Hyde Park feels like such an artificial bubble at times - it' s because it is an artificial bubble,
created by a large and powerful institution acting aggressively to maintain a small and privileged community with
boundaries enforced by a huge private police force. The question with which many students find themselves faced,
however , is more practical : what do you do if you find yourself part of that privi leged community but you don ' t want to
live inside the bubble? One option is to get involved with one of the many student clubs and tutoring programs that
offer a chance to get outside of Hyde Park and give something back to the co,nmunity . There ' s a lot to be said for this
option - with the current state of the Chicago Public Schools budget , most local schools are grateful for all the help
they can get, and college students tend to have the right kind of skills to be useful tutors and mentors - but there are
also some questions that many students who have taken this route find themse lves asking. If the only availab le way for
students to get invo lved in the community outside campus is to give something back to those "less fortunate" than
themse lves, is that breaking down the barriers set up by urban renewal or is it actually helping to reinforce them ?
I should make myself clear : as someone who has volunteered in local high schools myself, I'm not saying
that other students shouldn't do the same. What I do want to suggest is that there ' s another option. You won ' t find it
advertized on the university website , but over the past decade students have been working together with local residents
to resist further displacement of low-income people of co lor, disp lacement that is being brought abo ut not by the blunt
instrumen t of 60s style urban renewal , but by the more subtle forces of gentrification. As the university continues to
expand south, residents find rents going up, low-income housing being threatened with demo lition, and vital services
being "consolidated" into facilities way across town. The more that students and local residents think of themselves as
two separate communities , the easier it is for the city and the university to set them against each other , but when the
two groups have organized together , the results have been spectacular. In 2007 , a long campaign to save Grove Pare, a
subsidized housing complex a few blocks from campus , won a major victory after students and residents occupied the
offices of the Department of Housing and Urban Develop,nent downtown. Today, the complex is undergoing a badlyneeded rebuilding , but due to the success of the campaign , all 504 subsidized units will be retained. Mo re recently , the
same coalition of students and residents worked together wit h patients at a local mental health center to prevent it being
closed down , and after another occupa tion - this time of the Mayor's office - they got their way and the clinic
remained open .
As one of the students involved in some of these cainpaigns , one of the most important things that I've
learned is not to trust received notions of who is " less fortunate " than v,,hom. The kind of problems facing residents on
the south side are problem s that, on the broader scale, we're all facing : lack of affordable housing , unemployment ,
crime , etc. One of the reason s, I think , that we ' re made uncomfortab le by living in a bubble is that we know it's not real
- to think that we can insulate ourselves from such problems by setting up barriers is a form of denial , one that the
"community serv ice" model can have a tendency to reinforce . To come back to the point at which we started : it' s true
that Cottage Grove can be a dangerous place at night, and I'm not suggesting wandering around there on your own at
one in the morning , but it' s a dangerous place for everyone. Getting to know the people the other side of 6 1st who are
sometimes scared of going there too, and understanding that getting outside of the bubble means recognizing that these
are our problems , not someone else ' s, is one way of responding to that helpful piece of advice you got when you
arrived - i.e. by refusing to follow it
Resources :
Southside Solidarity Network - http://southsidesn.wordpress.com/
29
Southside Togethe r Organizing for Power - http://www.stopchicago.org/

BEYOND FIRST YEAR:
LMNG

CREATIVELYAND COMMUNALLY IN HYDE PARK

it's early on in your first year. you may be exc it ed by your house, your new friends,
traditio ns, and free foo d. awesome! many of t he things learned in the housing system
are great : comm unal accountability, eating together, weekly house meetings , and a
collective spi rit. you don't have to leave those behind when you move out! by t he
end of the ir f irst year, most folk are out apartment shoppi ng with new budd ies.
(only 25% of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th years live in campus housi ng). & there are ways to live
creatively and communally in hyde park above and beyond the university housing
system! let's take a gander ...
FORMAL CO-OPERATIVE Ll VJNG
WHAT IS A CO-OPERATIVE HOUSE lAKA CO-OP)
in genera l, a co-operative is an econom ic enterprise controlled by the people who use it.
It' s a democratic organizatio n whose earn ings and assets belo ng to its members. co- ops can
be all sorts of thing s: credit unions , g rocery stores, farm s, bakeries, bookstores, and of cou rse
group houses. (the only co- opera tive business I know if in hyde park is the seminary co-op
booksto res)
co- operat ive houses are usually big beautiful structures w ith lots of history, lots of bedrooms,
some bathrooms, and a big industri al kitchen (whic h means you won 't have to buy all your
splces&ski lletsl)
some main features of co- op livin are:
+ a family of friends who are commi tt ed to the func ti oning of the house . you can have
anywhere from 10 to 20 roommates, with as many ages and occupations . there is a lot to be
learned from having so many different people around , and no other way to live w ith such a
diverse crowd as in a co-o p.
+ a system for making sure everyone is responsi ble to th e house : every one has a turn to
cook, chores are rotat ed, and there are designated amounts of house maintenance hours
every member must put in .
+ house meetings once a week . meetings are usually a good dose of the hilarious 1 tediou s,
and practical, but always help keep th e house together .
~ these meet ings are democratic : every member of the co-op has an equal voice . some houses
choose to make all decisions by consensus , meaning every member must agree before an Issue
is passed .
+ there are certain members who take on extra respon sibil it ies lik e keeping the books,
ordering food , and handling new member ship applications . the se position s usually rotate
every season or so, In order for anyone who's Interested to get a chance to be an organizer.

CO-OPS IN HYDE PARK
as for co- op erative group liv ing , you're in the right neig hborhood for it! the Qumbya
Housing Cooperative has three house s in hyde par k: Bowers, Concord , and Haymarket ,
wh ich have in the range of 12- 20 members and are pretty sweet. please check out their
detailed website for more Info : qumbya .com

INFORMAL CO-OPJ:iRATNE LlVIN ( D .l .Y. SI'YLE )
WliA 'l' 1S CO i .1.ECTNE UVlNG/
ideo logically similar to a co-o perative in their belief in egalitarianism, respect, and active
communication , but legally quite different. in hyde park , collective houses are still owned by a
landlord ; folk s pay rent to a person or com pany who can hike their rent to kic k the m out.
(as in the case of t he baohau s. please avoid MAC property management if you Gan!) but
because of thi s, starting a collective house is way easier! you Just have to get a group of
dedica ted people and flnd a place to mak e your own. a collective house could be a group of
people living with some common goal In mind , lik e food , politics, musi c, art, etc . collective
spaces aim to be mor e th an a liv ing space... often they'll ho st events , or. be centers for meeting
other fo lk and organizing and creating .
30

I lived at a house called the faux -o p in madison this summer, where we didn't have assigned
responsibilities or regular house meetings ; the primary way we showed our commitment was
through care of the house, belief in shari ng meals, nouri shing each other through good food ,
and doing projects around the house to make it a living breathing community (literally, as
there was a huge garden, stuff fermenting everywhere and mushrooms growing in the
basement!) we spent a lot of time inhabiting public space but had our rooms for when we
needed alone time. the house hosted music shows, activist road shows, workshops, and parties

··BUT THAT'S Al.L TIIB WAY UP IN WISCONSIN. ZEE. WHATS 1HE
SCENE DOWN HERE TN THF. HP? ?!'"
alright, legit, here's what i know:
the baohaus- a graffiti - covered anti - racist and queer & tr ans- friendly collective house that
hosted frequent couchsurfer s, potlucks, ski llshares, and parties at 5 5th & hyde park. began in
2008, closed in august 2010 but reopening in a new apartment upstairs.
the shtetl - a beautiful two - floor apartment on 54th&harper which has part.les and shows
occasionally and is mostly students. the shtetl has been a commune on and off over the past
5-10 years and is sometimes more active than others .
the pepperland - y'know that building next to powell's with 'The Pepperland" stamped on the
f ront doors? well that place has a shitload of history; for the past SO- odd years, different
communties of uchicago student groups have been living there and takfng advantageof its
sweet architecture which lends itself to a build Ing- wide community. before MAC kicked them
out in 2008, it was ult im ate frisbee kids. since MAC decided to capitalize on this organic
community by renovating it and putting that goofy-ass logo up, I don't quite know who is
moving in .
?????- these are ju st a couple examples of the nebulous commun ities I can th ink of. I know
there are many other gro ups of awesome people who make the choice to live collectively
(moomers and the roots collective , to name j ust two .) start yr own! maybe you'll be in the disO
manual in the years to come.

COMMONlCATlON

TIP'Z FROM MY Jna>ERIENCE

dang . communication is the most important factor fo r a functioning house. take some tips
from the consent pages of this manual; learning good consent in a sexual situation was the
platform from where I learned to communicate well with the rest of the world . lcnowing your
desires , stating them in a non-aggressive or coercive way, and respecting the le_gitimacyof
others' decisions is important in any context.
I currently live with two other people In a studio, which we call the roost. it's intense. we have
no priv ate space. all emotions are on display in the public sphere of our home . this can cause
all sorts of anxiety , usually able to be cleared up by a question, but these questions can be
really hard to ask. like when one person is cleaning , does everyone have to clean? or when
I am feeling quiet and want to wr it e in my journal , anothe r persoh might start thinking "oh shit,
are they mad?are they writing about how last night I didn 't come home 'til midnight and
I missedthe dinner they made?"I learned to immediately confront any questions I had like
that. somethinglike whey are you mad, or just quiet?"or Mareyou cleaning spitefully or because
you want to?"Is a good placeto start. it can suck, becausesometimes I Just don't feel like
talking, and I don't want people to feel entlded to know my emotions, but In such a small
place, the way I feel has a pretty direct effect on the moods of my housernates. talking can be
annoying, but nothing ruins a house like a roaringly tense silence.

"WITHOUT COMMUNITYTHERE IS NO LIBERATION,,.
BUT COMMUNITYMUST NOT MEAN A SHEDDING OF
OUR DIFFERENCES,
NOR THE PATHETIC PRETENSE THAT THESE DIFFERENCES
DO NOT EXIST,"
( -AUDRE

31

LORDE)

OFF-CAMPUS

HOUSING

AND MAC PROPERTY

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campus housing . Or
y-------' maybe you are
already dreaming of the sweet
communa l house or cozy studio you
want to set up as soon as you get out
of housing. Regardless, you'l l hear
sooner or later about our friendly
·
· monopo Iy,
ne1
g hb or h00 d hous,ng
MAC. Here's a brief intro .

MACPROPERTYMANAGEMENT

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MANAGEMENT

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MAC Property Management (the
11
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management arm of Antheus Capita l
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LLC, an investment capital organ ization
based in New Jersey) manages over 3000 apartments in more than 70 HP buildings
and is one of the largest non-UofC landowners in Hyde Park as well as a major
renter to students.
0

Many students have complained about MAC's poor communication skills,
rudeness, rising rent costs, being non-responsive to work orders , losing security
deposits and other paperwork , and other substandard services, but many agree
that MAC is doing a better job than K&G, the prior near-monopoly on HP housing .
Generally , the feeling is that it's up to tenants, and tenan ts who know their rights,
to make sure things get done and the proper seNices are provided. The
maintenance seNices have improved somewhat in the past few years since MAC
moved in and took over tons of apartments in poor repair from K&G in 2006-2008
(now they have an on-cal l maintenance service). Also, MAC is now bu ilding
condos in a couple places as well as hopefully continuing to try to provide
affordable housing , though it's not thei r highest priority .
MAC has no competit ion in HP, so there 's little motivation for them to improve the
qua lity of the ir work . The a lternative for off-campus housing is to seek out a nonMAC apartment (see the map above) , ren ted out by a land lord who might own
only that building or perhaps a few in Hyde Park--of course , small landlords have
the ir quirks and pros and cons , too, but many are more flexible, friend ly, and
available than the MAC organization. Or, you could consider living in one of the
Qumbyq co-ops, which are not MAC-owned.
For more info, check out the Maroon archives or the Hyde Park-Kenwood
Commun ity Conference's page on MAC Properties and its impac t on
HP/Kenwood (http: //www.hydepark.org/neighborhood/
AntheusMAC .htm .)
And know your righ ts as a te nant/ren ter ! To see the tex t of the Chicago Residentia l
Landlord and Tenant Ordinance , check out the Center for Renter 's Rights
(http://www .renters-rights .com/html/chicago.html)
and
http://www.depositlaw .com/CH ICAG0%20RLTO.htm for the full text .32

nity - supported agric
munity Supported
iculture (CSA) programs connect local farmers and consu m
farms are
ually small enterprise , often family farms , gro\ving food sustainably and committ<
h , higb qualili)' food. Farms offer a certain number of"shares" (usually a box offruit/vegetab lfs{'iber ) of their
harv
at the beginning of the season. The farmer then delivers periodic (,veek.ly or iw·eeJu
y) boxes /
shares htaining the best of what's being harvested Many CSA farms also offer oppo
cs to go visit
the t
and meet the farmers , further con necting you to your food and where it co es m CSAs are
~
the farmers and an exciting ,vay to try ne,v stuff and buy local and organic
real people ...
nd definitely less expensive and bjgher quality than what you can buy in a
ry store.
Here

e some CSAs that have pick-up location s around Hyde Parkl There are TO
o other CSAs ,vith
pick-up locatio ns all over Chicago and many that do home deliveries for
all fee.
Check out the Local Beet's CSA guide (,~ .tbelocalbeetcom/20 10/02/u/2()JO~sa-guide/)
or Family Farmed (familyfarmed.org) for more resources. Happy
ting !

Edible Alc hemy Foods Co -Op - ediblealchemyexchange.weebly.com
Local , alJ-organic , sustainab ly-grown produ ce (fruits and vegetab les) share
every other week. No,v offering an all - frujt share. Also ha s bulk foods, eggs, hon ey, & more !
no sub scription required - pickup in pilsen and @ 5491 S Hyde Park Blvd (H yde Park)
Angelic Organics (Caledonia, IL) - angelicorgarucs.com
Weekly vegetables, fruit, and he rbs from a1200-member CSA biodynamic farm located
in n orth-central IL. Also has lea.ming centers ia Caledonia and Woodlawn and offers
classes and ,vorkshops at the Wood lawn Collaborative (64th & Kim bark ).
20-week sh ares -June - October - pick-ups on Saturday at 5400 S. Ken,v ood or 5600 S. Woodlawn
Genesis Cro,vers - (Sajnt Anne, IL) - genesis-growers.com
Uses n atural methods , no pesticides , herbicides , or syn thetic fertilizer ..Eggs available
for extra M edi um or large share s available,
April -De cembe r or by seaso n - p ick-ups on Wednesday aL 5615 S. Woodlawn
Videnovich Farms (Bridgman , MI) - vide novichfarms .com
Family farm that offers veggies, fruit, herbs . Offers 22-,veek full -season (May-04~1
subscriptions as well as su mme r, fall , and ,vinter options.
Pickup Wednesdays at the Hyde Park Art Center (5020 S. Cornell) Grass is Greener gardens (beloit , WI) - grassisgreenergardens.com
Subscriptions for wholesome, fresh, free-range all -natural chicken. lamb, pork & beef.
Honey, yogurt, eggs, and cheese also availa ble . Smal l/medi um /large shares available .
Six-month subscriptions - monthly delivery - pickup on 3fd Tuesda ys in H yde Park.
Gro,\'ing Home Chjcago (Marseil le , IL & urban farm in Englewood ) - growinghomeinc.org
Provides job training an d tranSitional employmen t for home le ss and low-income people
in Chicago . Offers week ly share s of organic vegetables. Ra,v honey, ,vorrn castings , pasture -raised
chicken eggs, and cookbooks also ava .iJabJe. CSA pr ofits go to,vards our job-training program .
May-November - pickup Wednesdays at 1516 e. 53Cd st
33

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for cool people
35

hyde park/woodlawn/southshore
map for cool kids- the index

Grocer Y stores
.--&_a_fi_e_w_p_la_c_e_s
-:-th:-a-:-t38· Open Produced
are off the map...
39.Treasurelslan
40 Zalesk·1& Horvath
- Early to Bed
. queer&
women-friendly
sexShop
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B
onne
Sante
www
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arly2bed.com
4
42.A NaturalHarvest
- BrownElephc:rlt
Resale
Store
.
43.Aldi
benefits
HIV/AOSpatients
howardbrown
.org
44. Dominick's
- Chicago
women
·sHealth
45. Hyde ParkProduce
Center
- ch1cagowomens
46. FarmersFood Basket
healthcenter.org
47.Green's Foods
- DillPickle
FoodCoOperative(theonlyco-op
48.AmarrFoods
grocerystore,nChill49.ReemFood Market
dillptcklefoodcoop
.org
50. SamsFood Market
- Chicago
l))derground
nd51.HarperFoods
Library
- t..ndergrou
Ubrary.org
52. Moe's Foods
- Bibhoteca
Popular
- blblio
53.FreshwayFoods
tecapop
utarp,lsen.wordpre
54. H&DGroceries
.com
Bookstores
_Latif Groceries
- Southside
Corrm.inrty Nt
55
16.Powell'sBook Store
Center- soothsidecorrm
56. One Stop Food & Liquor unitya
rtcenter.com/
17.57th Street Books
57.Southshore Pantry
18. SeminaryCooperative
58.CrandonSuper Market
Museums & Cultural Cente rs
59. VillageFoods
19.DuSableAfrican-AmericanHistory Mus. 60. Walid HusseinGrocery
20. South ShoreCulturalCenter
Bike Shops
9. Litt le Black PearlWorkshop
4. BlackstoneBicycle Works
4. Experimental Station
61.BikeClinic- S on 71stE of Paxton
21.Hyde ParkArt Center
62 DJ'sBikeDoctors
14. Renaissance
Society
63. Wheels& Things
22. Museumof Science& Industry
64. TATl Cycles - N of 53rd at Ellls
23.OrientalInstit ute
Community Gardens
24.SmartMuseum
65. 62nd & DorchesterGarden
25. BlackstoneLibrary
66. TranquilCommunityGarden
26. Court Theatre
67. Hyde ParkNeighborhoodClub Garden
11.Reaenste1nSpecialCollections
68. 55th & WoodlawnGarden
Housing Co-O ps
69. BrickyardGardens
27.Baohaus
70. Good NeiahborsGarden
28.Bowers House
71.Angelic OrganicsLearning/Education Garden
29.Concord House
72.WECAN/Woodlawn CommunityGarden
30. HaymarketHouse
73.Growing PowerJacksonParkFarm/Ga
rden
31.Moomers
74.God's Little Acre
32. The Roots Collective
75.Snell-Hitchcock UncommonGarden ProJect
76. 6900 S.DanteCommunityGarden
Commun it y Centers
77.7000 S.Merrill Community Garden
33. AKAramaCommunityServiceCenter
••New community gardensopeningsoon in
34. WoodlawnCollaborative
Washington Parkand at 72nd & hgleside1
••
35.Hyde ParkNeishborhoodClub

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~:~t~eeta ~a~ke5t(Sat. 9-2)
·
2. Hyde ParkFarmersMarket (Thur. 7-1)
3. South Shore Farmers Market (W ed· 7-1)
Coffeesho ps
4. BackstoryCafe
5. Beanie'sCoffee & Tea
6 & 7. !striaCafe
8. Third World Cafe
9. Little BlackPearl
10.HallowedGrounds
11.Ex Libris
12.Div School Coffeeshop
13.ClassicsCafe
14. Cobb Coffeeshop
15.RegentsCup

~

36. W.E.C.A.N
. HousingResourceCenter
37. 5710OMSA/LGBTO Student Center

other: 78.Resource Center (re~ hng drop-off)
79.DrawersIntimates (sex toy shop)

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In addition to what you've already heard,
here'sour brief guide on getting around
and out of the city.

QJ

ACTA Map makes a good adventurebuddy.

0

....

You can see it o nlln e (tr ansitchicago.org) or pick up a copy at most
El stations . Although slow and not the most reliable , the CTA is your
second best friend (after your bike!) for getting out of Hyd e Park, or to
schoo l in the winter.

Getting to and from campus:

C:

::,

Learn where the closest 170/ 171/ l 72 stop is. In the evenings, th e
shuttle-shortbuses tha t leave from the Reg are useful if you can
remember the routes .There's a nice Iii U of C map too that you can
pick up at the Reg.

Saferide/The Drunk Van - (773) 702-2022
RTATripPlanner- tripsweb.rtachicago.com
will give you the best CTA route from A to B

CTABusTracker-ctabustracker.com
this nifty tool uses GPSto show you when the bus will actua lly arrive

Google Maps - maps.google.com
allows you to search for routes by public transit or by bike!

Getting out of Chicago:
Megabus - megabus.com
cheap bus (if you get it in advan ce) to other Midw est cit ies

Metra - metrarail.com
goes around Chicago as well as out to t he subu rbs, to the Ind iana
Dunes, to Indiana and Wisconsin ...ther e are some good camping
spots that are accessible by Metra

Amtrak - amtrak.com

(I)

tend s to be a little more expens ive than the bus, but goes
everywhere!

SouthwestAirlines - southwest.com

QJ

leaves from Midway and often has cheap flights

Greyhound - greyhound.com

....

prices va ry ...always an adventure

Van Galder - coachusa.com/vangalder/
set-pr ice bus that leaves several times a day fo r Madison, WI

38

2 Wheels 4 Realz!
You should totally get a bike.
There are plenty of good reasons to get a bike. Do you prefe r to be places quickly? Are
you environmentally-aware? Do you prefe r the feeling of wi nd through your hair to
that of aching feet? Do you find walking terribly pedestrian? (ahaha HA, hy sterical).
If you even bothered to answer these questions, you' re we ll on your way to bicycle
enthusiasm. The Hyde Park bicycle , well u sed, is a majestic too l, and its user anything
but. Imagine practically instant transportation at your fingertips, free and easy, 24 / 7.
Imagine ... rnagnificence. Wi th this handy guide, you ' ll be ready for the road. I wish
you many safe, convenient , and exhilarating rides.

Dick Zacharias
Third-Year in Mathematic s in the College (bitt in Ro1nethis qu.arter. see yo1,Lin the
winter !)
Rule 1: Wear a Helmet If, You k-now, You're Into That
I really don't know what the law is*, but I know that if I were interested in
giving maybe-illegal legal advice, I'd mention something about it being completely
unenforced. I do know that autanobiles hate bikes, that bikes have a tendency to
suddenly explode, and that your skull, unlike factorials, does not divide well. You
don't have to be an MD-JD with a concentration in self-preservation to know that
helmets are superb. But go ahead and figure it out for yourself. Hot tip, huh.
*The law is almost certainly that you have to wear a helmet.
Rule 2: Don 't Ride On Sidewalks
Even though you're the cool new first-year on a bike , this is not about you. The
world is not about you. Remenber Copernicus? You are not at the center of thlngs. In
particular, we need to focus on the others: the walkers. You know what loves to run
out from corners? A large group of children . You know what suddenly walks out of
apartment building doors? Grandma. You know what, frustrated by your rudeness,
cfecides to stick a branch in your front wheel as you tumble into a very relaxing coma?
Sidewalkers.
So be a pal. Stick to the street.
And of biking on the Quad? This is a judgenent call, though you should al ways
tend toward not at all. The rule-of-thumb goes like this: If the path is wide enough and
the traffic is low enough that you can very easily bike without getting closer than Yao
Ming to a pedestrian, go nuts. Stay away from skinny paths, especialfy during the day.
There's no shame in walking your bike, since everybody who sees you together knows
you' re going to ride it all night long! ... from the Reg to your tiny double in Pierce.
Regardless, the name of the game is emJ?,athyfor the bipedal from the bi-bikepedal. As one recent grad used to scream at bikers nearly every day, "HEY ! LAST
TIME I CHECKED IT WA S A SIDEWALK N OT A SIDEBIKE! "
Rule 3: Two Wheels Shouldn't Pick On Four
Have the time of your life on your bike . Go to the Point (early and often).
Transport groceries from Hyde Park Pro. Don't bother with the drive-thru McDonalds
because they won't allow it, but head to Walmart at 3:55 AM for some processed
doughnuts and dirty magazines. But whatever you' re up to, do not endanger, irritate,
or even involve drivers. Sometimes this behavior is even technically illegal (riding
against traffic), but in general, it's just not in the right spirit.
Your near-suicidal inability to gauge danger should not come between anyone
else and his/ her shiny new rims. Want to bike after snow£ all? Make damn sure you' re
alone on the street. Did you leave a ding on somebody's fender? Leave an apologetic
note too with your name and ntnnber under the windshield so the owne!W.ron'trniss it.

Remanber, drivers are prone to serious jealousy of your freedrn1 and ease and lack of
insurance prenua. Be sensitive to that.

Tip: Attend Critical Ma ss
Around 6pm on the last Friday of each month, thousands of cyclists (depending
on weather) converge on Daley Plaza in the Loop for this superb experience. A
political statement, a revolution, a goofy good time, or otherwise, this 2-3 hour bike
ride tours mobocratically through 6its and swaths of the whole Windy. It is not
physically exhausting for the evenrnildly fit, and you can certainly break off
wnenever you like . And it is free . I thoroughly encourage you to find out for yourself
the excitement and joy of cycling en swarm. Be back in time for Off-Off or spend the
night on the North Side.
Tip : Get Your Bike At Working Bikes
Don't bring your expensive bike frornhaneunless you're interested in being a
ceaseless worrywart. Buy something inexpensive here. A great idea is Working Bikes,
a co-op located a short bus-trip away by CTA on the West Side. Working Bikes
constructs bikes from donated parts and sells them in order to fund a primarily
volunteer operation getting the ones they don't sell out to poor people in countries
around the world. More importantly, they have a large and varied selection of very
cheap bikes . Be sure to check the website for the right days of the week to visit, and get
there early for the best selection.
workingbikes.org
Important a ccessories you might like are a lock, flashing lights for the front and
back of your bike if you'll be biking a lot at rught and want the added safety, and a
helmet.
Note: Besides Working Bikes, Blackstone Bikes (below) and Craigslist are superb
options for used or cheap bikes and accessories.

Tip : Get Your Bike Fixed At Blackstone Bike s.
Blackstone Bicycles is a another co-op, this time run out of the Experimental
Station at 61st St. and Blackstone in the Woodlawn neighborhood that oorders Hyde
Park to the south. They don't always have the resour ces to do the job on the double,
but they're certain to do it well and to treat you with respect and genuine concern and
friendliness. Don't believe me? They've been running a free after-school clinic for
years that teaches children in Woodlawn to work as bi cycle mechanics before
rewarding them eventually with their own custom-built bikes. These folks are good
folks. They also have a limited retail selection, and since they' re so close to campus,
it's worth checking whether they've got anything before heading elsewhere .
experimentalstation.org/blackstone
Note: There is also a crabby guy who works on bikes in his shop at 55th and
Kenwood . Despite his crabbiness, he is rumored to know his way around a bicycle
with some agility. Other bike shops exist in and around Hyde Park, and you should do
your own research at chicagobikeshops.info if you' re interested !

Tip: Lock Both Your Front Wheel And Your Frame
It's pitiful when you see a frame locked to a pole lacking a front wheel. It's way
worse when you see just a front wheel locked to a pole with no frame or ba ck wheel.
You don't have too much to worry about in the way of locking your back wheel,
although ifJour tires contain any platinum or your chain is diamond-encrusted, it is
not unfiear of. The U-Lock is the generally accepted standard of protection, al though
some choose a thi ck wire-lock or Eadlock/ chain. Many dorms ana buildings offer a
£lace to store your bike inside , although this can be a hassle for some. Your bike is safe
auring the day. I parked my bike on a tree next to the sidewalk every day last year all
three quarters and never en countered a problem, but bike theft happens .
Tip: Ride the Lake Shore Path
It's right where you'd expect to find it. It runs really far north an@south, and

you can use it to get downtown (although expect to spend some time at that, since the
win d really whips at you and it can be arduous at tin1es).Keep to the right and always
look behind you since there's someone faster coming up on your right or your left or
someplace . And take advantage of this while the going is beautiful! Autumn in Chicago
lasts 4 days, before which it's beautiful and after which it's windswept and frosty.
Tip: Use The CTA To Tran sport Your Bike Elsewhere
Need to get someplace far away fast but know you'll want to bike around once
you get there? Economicall y-sound transportation, meet economically-sound
transportation. The front of almost every CTA bus is equipped with rack to hold two
bicycles, and it comes at no extra cost. There are two different kinds of racks, one that
is red and the other that's yellow. They're both easy to use, but sometimes people get
very nervous under the fressure of holding up a wnole bus and screw it up, so try
looking for the videos o how to use them online at the CT A website (yourcta.com) if
you like. Always remEmberafter you've taken your bike off the rack to lift it back up,
or the bus driver will shoot leaden arrows at you. And be courteous!
Tip: Look To The Bike Ambassadors For The Official Deal On This Stuff.
They' re the information tube from Daley and they'll tell you the real deal about
what' s legal. Some of their advice is pertinent and interesting. They have a website
and whatever. They'll even give you stylish advice on what to wear . But you'll be fine
without 'm1.
Tip: If you aren 't ready to buy a bike , rent one by the day from the U of C.
The U of C just started a free bikesharing program called
Recycles! You can register online at
www .univer sitybikeshare. com and borrow a bike for the
._.
":"day. The bikes you'll rent from the University aren't exactly
...-:-:,
.~~
~;~~~
1961 Gitanes, but they certainl y suffice. Actually, they'd
~~., ~\ \ ~✓,~~
probably suffice for a romp down some alpine path;mountain
I~ .
~)
1
bikes are crazy overkill in flat, flat Chicago. Anyway, eco\;~~
'~•~
transport for free on rental sounds good to me. Pickup s
.available from the Reg, Ratner , and elsewhere on campus.

t,S\

~->;..,

put thefun between your legs... ridea bike!

wonderine
whattodowithallthoseoldtextbooks?

consen



1s sex

At a school where we pr ide ourselves on our awkwardness and whe re the myth
that "the only t hing that goes down on you is your GPA," it's hard to talk honestly
abou t sex . Actually, it's hard regardless to talk about sex and consent. For many
peop le, college may be the beginning of explorations of sex and sexuality (perhaps
as well as drinking , drug use, and relationsh ips)...which is exciting! So in figuring out
how to be a great lover, consent is key. Wouldn't It be awesome if you and your
partner(s) were really into everything t hat you were doing together at every
moment? We all want to feel respec ted, cared about , a nd listened to ...and you're a
great lover when you ask someone what they 're okay with and respect that.
Casual encounters are often the places where consent is most important , and most
easily forgotten . You don't know each other super well yet , so it seems hard to ask
questions about histories or even to bring up protection ...we're taught t hat we
should be suave and seduct ive as if that's the opposite of honest and explicit
about our desires and boundaries . But by the time you gear up for "a big talk," it
might be too late . Talking about sex can be really hard ...when were we ever taught
to talk about it honestly? What language do we use? How do we not feel
embarrassed? But really , it 's our bodies a nd our lives and it's something t hat 's
supposed to be cool and fun and amazing , so why shouldn't we talk about it?
And remember ...sex is allowed to be funny! We are bodies-we all fart , vomit, make
strange noises , shit , smell funny, pee , ejaculate , spit and drool. ..some of us bleed ,
some of us snore , some of us scream "I 'm famous" when we're coming. Sex means
sharing our bodies with someone else ...including things that the media does not
think of as "sexy," that are supposed to be totally private (as if you're the only one
in the world that farts), and that we 're never to ld are part of sex . But they are ! Sex
is funny and can be playful and explicit as wel I as int imate and intense-laugh off the
shame and have fun!

Consent is the act of of uerbal agreement people make if they want
to haue seHual contact. It means two (or more) people deciding uerbally
to do something w ith ea ch other.
Consent al so means ...
...you are never entitled .
... communi cating!
...hitting on them before they 're drun k .
... knowing your own boundarie s and asserting them .
... ask ing "is thi s OK?" or " do you lik e thi s? " throughout .
... neuer assuming that j ust be cause they had seH with
you before , they want to do it with you again .
... enjoying and re spe cting your self and your partn er .
... stopp ing r ight away i f your partner say s so.
here's three golden rules of consent that haue helped me out ...
Na means no, maybe means no, sllence Is not consent.
Consent ta one seHual act does not Imply consent ta other acts.
Consent can be withdrawn at any time .
42

- How do you define consent? Ho.ve you ever talked to your partner (s} or friends a.bout it ?
- Have you been with people who define it differently than you do?
- Have you ever been unsure about whether or not the person you were being sexuc1( with wanted
t o be doing what you were doing? Did you talk about it? How do you feel about the choices
you made?
- How do you define sex? Does it always Involve penet rat ion? orgasm? your having an orgasm?
- Do you think t alking ruins the mood? Do you th ink consent can be erotic?
- Do you check rn as th ings progress or do you assume pri or consent means everything Is okay?
- Do you assume th at if someone is affectionate they are probably sexually interested In you1
- Have you ever tried to talk someone into doing something they showed hesitancy about?
- If someone is promiscuous, do you think It' s less Important to get consent?
- Co.nyou sense when someone Is not ·interested in you? Do you stop or just keep tr yi ng?
- Can you recognize when your partner does not want to have sex?
- What do you do when you r partner says "stop?"
- When you have sex, are you prepared t o get a sexuall y transmitted Infection (STI )?
- Are you prepared If your partner gets pregnant? What would you do?
- Have you ever been tested for STis?
- Who bought the condoms the last time that you had sex?
- Do you stop to put on a condom during sex or just wait until your partne r says sotneth lng?
- Have you ever had an orgasm dur ing sex and stopped before your partner had one?
- Have you ever had sex and not had an orgasm while your par tner did?
- Do you know where the clitoris is? What about the g-s pot? Do you know where the prostate is?
- Have you ever accompanied your partner t o an 013--GYNor
appointment ?
- Do you ever feel obli gat ed to have sex? t>o you ever f eel obligated t o inito.te sex?
- Do you ever talk about sex and consent when you're not in bed?

sec



IS

is consensua ?

Keep these other consent pointers (a.k.a.pointers for having better and
more communicativesex) in mind,u
1 Pavaltent1cnlo ll1eper,;onycu•~w1lhlEv,1n,r vrtfrc re:iUyanJ~ o really lurnr,clen or tx,lh If ycu ccn'I
t-:11
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y(,(t,,.:.With s~n-. to dl cJ1g~ ~ clcJ,;,
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...-.....,.... -

for those who lose their words
somewell-tested ways to askfor and give consent
·oo you feel likemakingout?"
·can I k.iss you?·

k. f
t
as Ing Or COnsen

·wna1abol.11._?·
"IsII okay 1f1...i
·
·Whal do you thinkor lmy slowly laklf'\gyour shirl off wil 1 my Ieethl?"
"Are yoo comfortable with.-?·
·May I please!removeyour pants1?·
·what are you up ror?·
·oo you want me to...?·

"Hey.whal do you lhinkor you andmelmaking-oul Ina Cobb bathrooml?"
·Hdveyou ever done_.?
Would yru like to rry it with me?·
·rdreallylik.e to_whatdo you th1nK?
.
"You seemquiel are you sure?·
·rmnot sureif rmready:
·1would love to !slowly lick your clil I?Do you want me 10?·
·1don·1knew ir Iwant to:
·11would reallylurn ~ on lo._.W
OJldyou llke lo lry II?"
·1thinkrve had too 1TIJchro drinit·
"Whatwoold you lil~eme to do?·
·rmscared·
·oo youlikeII wnenL?.
·No lhank.srNybe saneolher ln--ne.
:
·w ould you be up for doing thrsto me?·
·rmuncomrorlable:
·WhalcanI do thatreallyturnsyou on?·
"That hurts:
·ooes this feel good?.
·1don't want to do thisanyrnore:
·could we try this?·
·rm oot up for Iha! but I'd lovo to do lhfsInstead·
·1reallylikeyou•.how canI show you that?"
·rm not up for that.maybesane other time:
·wnat do youenjoy tne most? CanI do It?"
·111ke
you.but rmnol readyror thal tonight:
·1dOfl·tknow you well enoughyer_.fdlike to get to k.nowyou better first:
·No rrnrot interested:
., dool like Iha,_.
·could you try __ instead?'
'Thisisn·1working for
·, changedmy mind."
·yes. thalwould be awesome:
·1feet the sameway as you:
RnhonestNomakesan honest Yes possible. If you
·1want you to.:
really respect your partner's "no"s(including ambiguous
no's...s-ee the list aboue),that meansthat when they
·1feel800d about this:
(or you) say Yes, you're really sayingyes! If our ability
·1am ready to.-·
to say "no''is taken away, as it is in situations of assault
·1like this."
coercion, then our "yes"es are also deualued.
·yes I would love to try that with you: and
Culturally, the mainstream idea is that men wiUalways say
·1want that too:
"yes" and womenwill always say "no"- wJIJch
takes away
·rrnso gladyouasKed
...pleasedo itr
eueryone's powers of agencyand consenf'.

saying no
(listen for these)

fuck yes!
(giving consent)

me:

& remember...

.cu

'

evetyth1ng
1sben

.
-.J

In thispo1,ucal
andtnstoncald1mate
. grea11ons
andcreaunga1tema1ives
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and radicalmodeol dismant~ng
sooa11z~unhealthyand oonngComfortin
sex cunurewhichcanofienbe10.ic,bla a're essenualThereISnowayto have
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consentand~I-care th ourselfandwhoeveryouareha111ng
s
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is d,seovenng
onewantsis noteasy- pano w I (consensually
of course
) to, andbeyond.our
whatit ISwe lil(eandpushingourseves hi modelspo1yamory
monogamy
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ThisISnot a discussion~ relation~
!c wno~e clo,1w11h
andhowwe
muttl-ftdehty
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negouatethesere1a11onships
ISindeeda 1~ess anddffierbasedon lfld1v1
duat
evolveandfluctuateTheintncae1es
:~:~odels workfor us are personalchoices
expenencesTherefore
, d1scovenng rtantdisclaimer
,s thatthesesuggestions
are
dlsunctlromthe issuesbelow M impo
son whicharealwayschanging
basedon the optn10ns
andexpenencesof onple
perse
fe~ttreetoigl\Ofethemandmo•
anyway Iftheydon'twork for youngntnow. ea
-= ~

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t sexcanbe a quitesubversive
expanswe.

..!I

be

on withyourlife ..,,--

Wi ►•

Role-Play

Roleslikebutchor remmeor top or oonomareawesome.outanyttunggetsbonng1f
not tweaKedor swnchedup fromumeto ume.II 1sveryeasyto sticilwrthwhat we're
goodal 0< clingto a roleor 1den11ty
outorhabit Role-playcanbe a great way to
challengeone'sn91dities
anddiscoverh«ldenperversions
m a safecontext.avalfing
oneselftheopportunity
to recervewhenprev100
sly being tne provioer1a~1ng
1ums
suclltngandbe,ngsuaed bitingandbeing1>men
slappmgandbeingslapped.nola1og
andbeingheld, fuckingandbeingfuckedThere'salsodrag propsandoutfitSB),,
lncorpora11ng
costumechangesworkswondersin the bedroomJust1mag1ne
wnal 111e
addrnon
of a mermaidoutfit a map,andkitchenutenstlcouldadd10yoursex hie
Story1ellrng
,s anolheraspectof role.playIt canget m1nca1e
Wllhscnptsor songs
heck, even a danceroutineThe1mponant
thinghere 1sthateveryone1sokaywnh
wherethestorygoes Thesegamescouldchallengepolmcalandsooalnorms1n
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andsmarty-panted
ways II rs1mponan1
to rememberthatthis1slan1asy
and
thal theserole.playscenanosset up safeconsensual
spacesIOffolks10go 1he<e
consciouslycnucally
. humblyandwith an openmlfld.

,_,!;augfiter

I laughalot dunngsex· froma
gJ
· _ __ ._
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.
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al myselfat an
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Joy Onemay lau h ~"'" •
unisonwithsexpartnersII is imponantlo rel! •
.
g """' or Ill
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8V1!anyinsecunlles
or anxieties that
caugtllup ing~1e~~ay bnng~P- Sometimes
I laughto relieve1ens10n
- notgetso
Y pe ormance Thereis a myththatwe shouldact a certainw
~nn~ se~ v1nle
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n
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lo thissexs~~~Y · s;,,:nr:IYJng
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andfgaspmgareall

• • • -•
e Ill 1macy
o theexpenence

ush1ngSelf L1m1ts

~-

--~--•



·

Sex can push us beyondcomfonzones Manythingswe aretaughtaredangerous
ot
scary,nastyor off-turuts
can be exploredsafelylfl a sexual s11uat1011
Personalstones
of abuse,neglect.sell-hatredandothefof lhe mynadof pnvates11\Jggles
surfa~ 1n
thisprac11ce
andwhat is goodlimit pushingformemaynot at allbe goodfOlyouin
yourproces
s. It 1s 1mpon
an1to go at ourown~s with boundarypushmgand not go
placesmappropna1e
to ourown expenences
any issuescancomeoui w1
consensual
boundarypushing
, power ynarrucs.stereotypes
to bede-bunked
, pain
th1eshol
ds, ideological
d1Herences
. and1heconceptof 1hecomfortzonem generalI
have hope that 1fwe holdenoughspacefor eachotherto expand~ se concepts
, It-en
maybe otherformsof social anden\/lronm
ental changecan manifest.

mental health @ the u of c
bytmo
So you feel like you ' ve wandered into crazy -town - a somewhat unavoidable position at
the UofC. What do you do about it?
Let 's start with the basics. The natural state of a UofC student is one of being totally and
utterly stressed out. If you ' re finding your self in a panic about getting things done on time or
having a social life and doing well in school or helping your parents pay for tuition without
working so hard you fail your classes , there are plenty of places you can get support. First stop is
always your advisor - for the most part the college advisors are knowledgeable and pleasantly
impartial. They are incredibly good at getting students to pare down their tendency to overload.
They will help you get done what you need to get done instead of what you think you need to get
done. If your advisor sucks (and they might for any number of reasons) , ask around for
recommendations and SWITCH. This is totally doable and can be really good for you. The
university also holds stress management , organization , and meditation workshops and some
individual sessions (through the Student Counseling and Resource Center). These gatherings can
provide okay remedies but will only give you a very general set of solutions. Most people who
have participated in these workshops have said that they provide a good introduction to techniques
and also routes to finding more long-term , in-depth support groups and solutions throughout
Chicago.
But if it seems to you that your feelings go
deeper than stress , what are your next steps? If you ' re
struggling with more than not being able to keep your
papers in order and you're 1nore worried about if you
can even get up in the morning ? The university has a
Student Resource and Counseling Center that provides
mental health services to the UofC community. If you
are looking for individual therapy sessions you can call.
If you do decide to go to the SCRS, you will go through
a gauntlet involving an intake survey and interview . A
good way to get the best out of the SCRS is figure out
EXACTLY what issues you are facing before that first
appointment. If you can speak clearly about what ' s
bothering you , the SCRS will be able to help you better.
They will give you a whole list of things that they think
could possibly be ailing you and it can be overwhelming , so knowing your feelings can really help .
There are a lot of attendant issues that come with visiting the SCRS. They are:
I. They will almost always suggest medication. They will be pushy about it, even if you are
uncomfortable with the idea.
2. They do not do long term therapy . After six months they will refer you to another doctor.
These are based on their understanding of you , not your understanding of you. Also ,
because the therapy is short term, you may feel as if it is kind of pointless , as you can 't
build a serious lasting relationship with your therapist
3. Their referrals are based on your mental health needs , not your monetary needs. They
will not look for alternate doctors for you based on your insurance or lack thereof. If you
have monetary restrictions, you have to let them know yourself.
The best solution to these problems is always self-education. Talk to your family about relatives
who have faced the same issues and how they have dealt with it. Research the kinds of medication
that has been suggested to you. Understand your insurance policy and what it covers . Look up the
doctors that you have been referred and decide what you would like from a doctor. 4&ometimes, just
knowing that you don ' t want to talk about your paralyzing fear of failure with some old dude who

wouldn ' t understand your issues with the patriarchy can make it much easier to choose a doctor. In
general (and this is hard when you ' re feeling discombobulated and defeated) , you have to be firm
with the SRCC. The mental health industry and its institutions have a way of shunting people
along without a lot of thought and you have to be willing to combat that. Stand up for yourself (it
will make you feel good)!
If you ' re not into one on one therapy there
are also group sessions available at the SCRS.
•'
Individual therapy can be extremely isolating and
\
sitting alone in a room with a person prodding you for
answers to increasingly personal questions , can make
some people feel like a freak. If you fmd that that ' s the
kind of response you have to individual sessions , you
should definitely consider group sessions. At the
moment the SCRS offers the following support groups:
Working and Mothering , Breaking the Procrastination
Habit , Coming Out Support Group , Dealing with Social

Anxiety , Dissertation Support Group , Relationships Group for Grad Students , Sexual Assault
Survivors Group , and Students of Color Group. If you find that these groups don ' t provide the kind
of support you need , think about putting together your own group . Once again , if you ask for
so1nething and are very clear about what you need, the SCRS will generally be willing to meet your
needs . Ask about starting a group for your specific needs and see what you can dol
Univer sity of Chicago , Student Coun seling & Resource Service Center:
5737 South University Avenue
Chicago , IL 60637
Phone: (773) 702-9800
Monday - Friday: 8:30am-4:45pm
Fax: (773) 702-2011
In emergenc y cases call during non-office hour s : x2 -3625 ((773) 702-3625) to talk to the oncall doctor.
What if you don ' t want to go through the whole SCRS thing or you do it and find you
totally hate it? What other resources are available to you around the city? You will have to go a
little farther afield , but there are many excellent ( often free or really cheap) alternate institutions
you can visit. And hey you can see more of the city on your way there!
Ho,vard Bro,vn Health Center
4025 N. Sheridan Road
Chicago , IL 60613
773-388- 1600
(awesome LG BTQA and addiction support)
Depre ssion and Bipolar Support Alliance
Group s
DBSA Greater Chicago (Northwestern
Memorial Hospital group)
Contact 1: Manny Silverman
Phone: (773) 465 -3280 or (312) 938-8585
Fax: (773) 465 -3385
Email: wecanhelp@dbsa -gc.org.
Website: www .dbsa-gc .org
DBS A GLBT Chicago
Contact 1: Bob
Phone: (773) 525-6589
Email: jlkwright@vahoo .com
Website: www .dbsalliance .org/ glbtchicago

DB SA Greater Chicago
Contact 1: Judy Sturm
Phone: (773) 465-3280 or (847) 359-4140
Contact 2: Dr. Manny Silverman
Additional Phone: (773) 497 -2711 or
dr_ decision @comcast.net
Fax: (773) 465-3385
Email: dbsa-gc@sbcglobal.net
Website: www .dbsa -gc.org
Coun seling Center of Lakeview
3225 North Sheffield A venue , Chicago
(773) 549-5886
The National Alliance on Mental Illne ss of
Greater Chicago
1536 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60642
(312) 563-0445
Circle Famil y Healthcare N "4-r'ork
(not just for families!)

Division Health Center, 4909 W. Division St.
#305, Chicago , IL 60651-3161
Hamlin Health Center, 1629& 1633 N.
Hamlin Ave . 2nd Fl., Chicago , IL 60651 -3161
Parkside Health Center, 115 N. Parkside
Ave. 1st Fl., Chicago , IL 60644- 3040

Austin School Health Center, 231 N. Pine
Ave ., Chicago , IL 60644-2333
Community Counseling Centers of Chicago
4740 N Clark St 1
Chicago , IL 60640
773.769.0205

Each of these centers provides different kind of services and its important to look into what they
offering before you decide to get involved. Remember , the key is always to do your research.
Of course , beyond all the official help you can get from
various places , often times the best support can come from your
FRIENDS. Sure , it can be a totally scary proposition to let your
buddies in on the issues your going through - you think they might
not know how to help you or they might freak out about being
faced with someone who they think is "mentally unstable. "
Maybe you ' ve told someone about your issues before and they
reacted badly. But remember , this does not mean you will get that
reaction from all your friends. If you are upfront and honest about
the issues that you are facing , the people who really love you will
be able to support yo u. Things are more likely to get contentious
when you don 't talk about what you're going through because yo u
can 't help what you don ' t understand!
In my own personal experience , it is absolutely vital that
you have 1nore than one person on your side when it comes to
these situations. Make sure you have a network and not a sponsor.
Different people have different styles of support and you will most
likely need certain kinds of support at different times . It also helps
your friends to feel like you are aware of their needs, because it' s a
lot to expect one person to help you out all the time. It can be an
incredible relief to fmd one person who you think really
understands you, but it' s good to remember that variety is the spice
of life (even when you ' re feeling a little bit crazy).
And last, but very certainly not least, remember not matter how strange or out of sorts
you feel, YOU ARE NOT A FREAK. You don ' t deserve to be sent to live with all the cuckoos on
Cuckoo Island , you are not a waste of space , and you are most certainly are worthy of love.
Society has taught us to regard mental illness as something deems a person totally unfit. THIS IS
NOT TRUE . What you need is a little love and understanding , especially from yourself. Take care
of yourself , own up to your shit , and you will feel a hundred times better.

***All of the pictures in this article come from the Icarus Project
website. "The Icarus Project envisions a new culture and language that
resonates with our actual experiences of 'mental illness ' rather than
trying to fit our lives into a conventional framework. We are a network
of people living with and/or affected by experiences that are commonly diagnosed and labeled as
psychiatric conditions. We believe these experiences are mad gifts needing cultivation and care,
rather than diseases or disorders." They are awesome folks and have a special page for college
students here http ://theicaru sproject.net/campu s and a zine called "A Student ' s guide to mental
health " available here http ://theicarusproject.net/files /a stud ents guide to mental health .pdf
48

If you or someone you know is
sexually assaulted ...
If someone you know discloses to you about a sexual assault , the way
you react is a crucial part of their healing process . The most valuable
thing you can do is validate their feelings , decisions and wishes . Here
are a few things to keep in mind .
Believe them. Verbalize it explicitly . You may be one of the few who do.
Don't make assumptions. No one experience is like another . Survivors
as well as perpetrators of sexual assault can be of any gender , race ,
creed , class and can have any other social relationship to one another
(sibling , spouse , neighbor , lover , teacher , hairdresser , etc). do not pass
judgment based on any preconceptions of rape , or of the relationship
between the perpetrator and the survivor .
It's not about you. It's totally understandable to have a strong emotional
response to receiving this news . If you become upset or angry to the
point that your friend is comforting you , or calming you down , you are
drawing energy away from them instead of supporting them . If you want
some help and support , Rape Victim Advocates offers free counseling
for friends , family and significant others of survivors .
Don't make decisions for them, tell them what to do, or challenge
their decisions. Let them reclaim their agency! Any decision they make
is the right decision because they made it. Encourage them to make
informed decisions , and be understanding and supportive of the
decisions they make .
Let them know they have options. For a survivor it may feel like doors
are closing all around them , but there are always options . Help them way
and balance advantages and disadvantages to certain lines of action .
Ask them about their desires and talk about the best way to obtain them .
SASETA- Sexual Assault Survivors Emergency Treatment Act
If you decide to go to the emergency room , SASETA 's got your back .
This Act outlines and protects certain rights for survivors during their
emergency treatment in Illinois . Sometimes ER staff aren't familiar with
treating survivors and don't know much about SASET A . Here are some
of the basic rights provided by this law, so that you can be prepared to
defend them if necessary .
• You should never receive a bill for any procedures , medications ,
or follow-up tests . If you're insured they will bill your insurance
company and that which is not covered by your policy is covered
by the state . Sometimes the insurance company bills the policy
holder for the remainder by accident . If you don't want your policy
49










holder to know I would suggest not providing your insurance info
to the hospital.
Minors do not need to have parental consent for medical
treatment or evidence collection .
You should be offered crisis counseling . Most Chicago hospitals
contract with RVA and YWCA for on call medical advocates and
crisis counseling . (they are the best resource , full of info . Ask all
of your questions!)
You should be given a private room (at least three walls and a
curtain) .
You should receive written and oral information about ST/ testing
and treatment , pregnancy and emergency contraception , about
all medication dispensed , and all follow-up visits and testing .
For the full law , go to www.icasa.org and search SASETA.

RESOURCES:
Chicago Rape Crisis Hotline: (888) 293-2080
24 Hours , free and confidential.
UChicago Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call: (773) 702-8181
The number listed above is for UCPD . You do not have to tell
them anything , but you do have to ask them to speak with a
dean-on-call. The on call deans have been trained by Rape
Victim Advocates .
sexualviolence.uchicago.edu/
I really like this page . Lots of info , well put together .
Rape Victim Advocates: (312) 443-9603
RVA provides free and confidential services to survivors of sexual
assault or abuse and their significant others . Their services
include medical advocacy , legal advocacy , and counseling (free
up to 16 sessions) .
YWCA: www.ywca.org , (312)762-2775
Offers free and confidential medical and legal advocacy , and
counseling for survivors (no session limit!) .
Porchlight Counseling Services: (847) 328-6531
Porchlight offers free counseling to survivors of sexual assault at
college . Based in Evanston , they contract with counselors
throughout the city .
From experience: I would suggest going over Provident Hospital at 500
e . 51 st street . The staff I met in the UChicago ER were incredibly
unfamiliar with SAS ETA . Also , if you are a UChicago student they may
have your insurance info on file from prior hospital or sec visits .
50

oow
JJ@moo
,r/£Wrt:i@rn
@/£,r,r@(from Dumbing usDown)
The first lesson I teach is confusion. Everything I teach is out of context. I teach the un-relating
of everything. I teach dis-connections .... Even in the best of schools a close examination of
curriculum and its sequences turns up a lack of coherence , full of internal
contradictions .... Confusion is thrust upon kids by too many strange adults, each working along
with only the thinnest relationship with each other, pretending , for the most part, to an expertise
they do not possess .... In a world where home is only a ghost, because both parents work ... or
because something else has left everybody too confused to maintain a family relation, I teach you
how to accept confusion as your destiny.
The second lesson I teach is class position ... .The children are numbered so that if any get away
they can be returned to the right class .... My job is to make them like being locked together with
children who bear numbers like their own .... If! do my job well , the kids can ' t even imagine
themselves somewhere else , because I've shown them how to envy and fear the better classes and
how to have contempt for the dumb classes .... That ' s the real lesson of any rigged competition like
school. You co1ne to know your place.
The third lesson I teach is indifference ... .When the bell rings I insist they drop whatever it is we
have been doing and proceed quickly to the next work station. They must turn on and off like a
light switch .... Bells inoculate each undertaking with indifference.
The fourth lesson I teach is emotional dependenc y. By stars and red checks, smiles and frowns ,
prizes , honors, and disgraces, I teach kids to surrender their will to the predestinated chain of
command.
The fifth lesson I teach is intellectual dependenc y ... .It is the most important lesson , that we must
wait for other people better trained than ourselves , to make the meanings of our lives .... [Only], the
teacher can determine what my kids must study , or rather, only the people who pay 1ne can make
those decisions , which I then enforce. If I' m told that evolution is a fact instead of a theory, I
transmit that as ordered , punishing deviants who resist what I have been told to tell the1n to
think .... Successful children do the thinking I assign them with a minimum of resistance and a
decent show of enthusiasm .... Bad kids fight this, of course , even though they lack the concepts to
know what they are fighting , struggling to make
decisions for themselves about what they will learn
and when they will learn it. .. Fortunately there are
tested procedures to break the will of those who
resist ~it is more difficult , naturally , if the kids have
respectable parents who come to their aid, but that
happens less and less in spite of the bad reputation of
schools. No middle -class parents I have ever met
actually believe that their kid' s school is one of the
bad ones. No one single parent in twenty -six years of
teaching.
. 5\
The sixth lesson I teach is provisional selfessor1e

b,Ke ace
esteem .... The lesson of report cards, and tests is that
repairs an d
service ! children should not trust themselves or their parents
but should instead rely on the evaluation of certified
refu rbished & used bikes
:~
officials. People need to be told what they are worth .
fo r sale!
~,og'
ov\'C\ '(\ t,.
The seventh lesson I teach is that one can 't hide. I
Ob-1/0 ,,
-~e'I 0 v'
"o/unte
,s seek,ng
. oc'~ \\\,;,
'I ~ \
teach students they are always watched , that each is
-oerlt;
~v0'1;
ers,
under constant surveillance by myself and my
e,O~
colleagues ... .The meaning of constant surveillance
6100 s. blackstone
www .experi mentolsto lion.org/b tockslone
and denial of privacy is that no one can be trusted ,
ope n tues - so t l -5pm - clos ed sun & mo n
that privacy is not legitimate.
51
soturdo s 9-noon bike sale

our
sooo!

some

(atleft)President
- RobertJ. Zimmer
presldent
@uchlcago
.edu/ rzlmmer@uchlcago
.edu
773-702-8001
Provost-1homasF.Rosenbaum
provost@uchlcago
.edu
773-702-8810
(atright)Peanof theCollege
JohnW.8oyer
Jwboyer@uchlcago.edu
773-702-8578
(atleft)VPof Campus
Life/Peanof Students Deanof Students
Kimberly
&off-Crews
SusanArt
kgoffcrews@uchlcago
.edu
773-702-8809
773-702-7770
art3@uchlcago.edu
VPforCivicEngagement
AnnMarieUplnskl
annmarle@uchlcago.edu
773-834-0379

VicePresident
andSecretary
Pavld8. Fithian
flthlan@uchlcago.edu
773-702-2305

AssociateVPforCivicEngagement PlrectotCivicEngagement
SonyaMalunda
ArnoldRandall
smalunda
@uchlcago.edu
arnoldrandall@uchlcago
.edu
773-702-4588
773-702-8422

Trustees
You
Might
Want
to
Know
...
c

for more Info on the U of Board of T,vstees.check 0111http://t/1Js1ees
.uchlcago.e<fu/
- Sekhar Bahadur, Deutsche Bank (Vice-Chairman, Global Banking)One of the largest financial institutions In the world, estimated at holding
more than 1.5 trillion Euros in assets. They have $2.6 million, or 50,000
s.hares of 'trading positions or positions held on behalf of clients' Invested
in defense contractor Elbit Systems, Israel's largest publicly traded defense
firm that supplies the Israeli milltary and provides components for the
Apartheid Wall in Occupied Palestinian Territory.
Thomas J. Pri12ker(Chairman of Global Hyatt Corporation Hyatt hotels are under fire by local unions for dismissal or long-time workers
and for culling back on hotel workers' wages and benefits despite Hyatt's
Cnalrman
oflheBoardofTrustees:
Andrew
M.Alpenvas
an
rising sharevalues. The hotel chain Is nonunion. Also under fire because of
investment
banker
atGoldman,
Sactls,andCanpany
fct 21yearsand
President
ofNYC's
Economic
Oeveloment
Corpora1ioo
for4 years
. Heis ties with Doug Manchester, a Hyatt owner and key funder of the lnitlative to
ban gay marriage In canromla,
now
chalmlan
olEQAPat1nels,
LP.
anasselmanagement
firm
- Joseph Neubauer (Chairman & CEO of ARAMARK Corporation)specializiog
~ global
macro
andcurrency
s1Jategies
, andCXtector
ofthe
Targetedby unions for paying poor wages, minimal benefits, and toleration or
UNDevelopment
Corporation.
Inresponse
toJoeBonni
's resk}lation
,
unhealthy conditions and poor-quantyfood, Aramark has also been critleizec
/\lpefreitera1ed
lhatstuden
t riasms
iotheboan1
wt never
haveavote
for setting up monopolies on the campuses they sui!PJy. They've also been
at thetablebecause
theyarenotsufficientfy
~accused or lraud, over-billing, driving up state budg'6nleficlts , poor service.
sendhimaloYeoole
ataalper@uchlcago.edu!
and serving tainted food to schools and universities.

Platypus: 'TJ1eLeft Is Dead! Long Live tl1eLeft!,,
Vicissin1dec;
ofhisro1icalconsciousnessandpossibiliriec;
fore111anciparo1y
socialconsciousnesstoday
By CJ11isCutrone - rep1inted1,vith pe1111ission
definite historical distance , we are dedicated to
approaching the history of thought and action on the
"The tradition of all dead generations weighs like a
Left from which we must learn in a deliberately nonnightmare on the brains of the living. "
dogmatic manner , taking nothing as given.
- Karl Marx, The 18th Brumaire of Louis Napoleon
Why Marx ? Why now ? We find Marx ' s thought
(1852)
to be the focal point and vital nerve center for the
funda1nental critique of the modern world in which we
"The theorist 1vho intervenes in practical
still live that emerged in Marx 's time with the
controversies no1vadaysdiscovers on a regular basis
Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century. We take
and to his shame that l11hatever ideas he might
Marx's thought in relation both to the preceding
contribute 1vereexpressed long ago - and usually
history of critical social thought , including the
better the.first time around. "
philosophy of Kant and Hegel , as well as the work by
- Theodor W Adorno, "Sexual Taboos and the Law
those inspired later to follow Marx in the critique of
Today" (1963)
social modernity, most prominently Georg Lukacs ,
Walter Benjamin , and Theodor W. Adorno. Hence ,
ACCORDING TO LENIN, the greatest
Platypus is committed to the reconsideration of the
contribution of the German Marxist radica l Rosa
Luxemburg ( 1871- 1919) to the fight for socialism was entire critical theoretical tradition spann .ing the 19th
and 20th Centuries. As Leszek Kolakowski put it (in
the statement that her Social Democratic Party of
Germany had become a "stinking corpse " as a result of his 1968 essay "The Concept of the Left") the Left
must be defined ideologically and not sociologically ;
voting for war credits on August 4 , 1914. Lenin wrote
thought , not society , is divided into Right and Left : the
this about Luxemburg in I 922, at the close of the
Left is defined by its utopianism , the Right by its
period of war, revolution , counterrevolution and
opportunism. - Or, as Robert Pippin has put it, the
reaction in which Luxe1nburg was murdered. Lenin
problem with critical theory today is that it is not
remarked that Luxemburg would be remembered well
for her incisive critique at a crucial moment of crisis in critical ( Critical lnquby , 2003).
Platypus is dedicated to re-opening various
the movement to which she had dedicated and
historical questions of the Left in order to read that
ultimately gave her life. Instead , ironically ,
history "against the grain " (as Benjamin put it, in his
Luxemburg has been remembered - for her
1940 "Theses on the Philosophy of History "),
occasional criticisms of Lenin and the Bolsheviks!
attempting to grasp past moments of defeat and failure
Two lessons can be drawn from this story: that
on the Left not as given but rather in their unfulfilled
the Left suffers , as a result of the accumulated
potential , regarding the present as the product not of
wreckage of intervening defeats and failures , from a
historical necessity , but rather of what happened that
very partial and distorted memory of its own history ;
need not have been. We struggle to escape the dead
and that at crucial moments the best work on the Left
hand of at least two preceding generations of
is its own critique , motivated by the attempt to escape
problematic action and trunking on the Left , the
this history and its outcomes. At certain times , the
most necessary contribution one can make is to declare I 920s-30s and the l 960s -70s. More proximally , we
suffer the effects of the depoliticization - the
that the Left is dead.
Hence , Platypus makes the procla1nation , for our deliberate "postmodernist " abandonment of any
time : "The Left is dead! - Long live the Left! " - We " grand narratives " of social emancipation - on the
Left in the l 980s -90s.
say this so that the future possibility of the Left might
Platypus is concerned with exploring the
live.
improbable but not impossible tasks and project of the
We take our namesake from the platypus , which
suffered at its moment of zoological discovery from its reemergence of a critical Left with emancipatory
social intent. We look forward to making a critical but
unclassifiability according to prevailing science. We
think that an authentic e1nancipatory Left today would vital contribution towards a possible "return to Marx "
for the potential reinvigoration of the Left in coming
suffer from a similar problem of(mis)recognition, in
years. We invite and welcome those who wish to share
part because the tasks and project of social
in and contribute to this project. I P
emancipation have disintegrated and so exist for us
Platypus is a project for the self-criticism, selfonly in fragments and shards.
education, and, ultimately, the practical reconstitution
We have organized our critical investigation of
of a Marxian Left. We regularly hold public events,
the history of the Left in order to help discern
1eek/y reading group for selfand organi=ea bi11
emancipatory social possibilities in the present , a
education. Check out http:// p/atypusl9 J7.orgl or
present that has been determined by the history of
defeat and failure on the Left. As seekers after a highly contact gregg@ uchicago.edufor ,nore info about the
Platypus Society @ the U of C.
53
problematic legacy from which we are separated by a

Getting Your Tuition Back!
This place is expensive-about $200 per hour of class , if you crank
it out. Luckily, there are lots of ways to make your experience worth
it-both in experience and $$ terms. Check out some of the legit
and not-as-legit opportunities below.

Registered Student Organization Funding
Annual A/locat ions is the way Registered Student Org.s get funded for the following
academic year. The funds can be used for projects done every year and events that
are already planned for the following academic year . They are due at the beginning of
May of each year . Big budget events usually apply through Ann.All.
Student Government Finance Committee provides small grants for upcoming RSO
projects . Budgets are due by noon Friday of each week to the ORCSA Advisor via
email , and are defended Tuesday at SGFC meetings. Some quick and dirty
recommendations: Apply 3 weeks before your event. Have a marketing plan. Don't
say you're expecting a large community/non-UofC presence (they prefer to fund
students to attend). Co-sponsor . Talk about the broad range of students who might
attend your event.
Uncommon Fund is a $40,000 pot of money that allows all students (undergrad and
grad) to submit proposals for ANYTHING . This includes events, capital improvement
projects or anything else you can imagine! We are looking for creative, innovative and
unique proposals. BE CREATIVE! Past projects include a community garden , a renta-bike program , and a circus .
Reimbursements refer to money you spent to support a student organization 's event ,
like paying for food out of pocket or buying plates . Try to get everything paid up front
via purchase orders, but hold on to any and all receipts to get back the money you
spent.

Arts funding
University of Chicago Arls Council Summer Fellowships are designed to support
students undertaking original creative projects over the summer . (Such projects might
involve adaptation , choreography, sculpture, painting , drawing, multi-media , music
composition , script-writing , or translation. ) Generally, projects should be intended for
production or performance during the following academic year. Stipend: $1,500.
Student Fine Arls Fund looks for original ideas for the creation and presentation of all
sorts of visual and performing arts , for proposals that bring the arts to more of the
campus community , for programs that leverage partnerships among student groups,
academic departments , and/or cultural organizations. The Student Fine Arts Fund will
assist in the implementation of imaginative projects with grants up to $1,500 .
University of Chicago Arls Council looks for original ideas for the creation and
presentation of all sorts of visual and performing arts , for proposals that bring the arts
to more of the campus community , for programs that leverage partnerships among
student groups , academic departments , and/or cultural organizations , whether on
54

getting your tuition back - grants, funding, & tricks @ the U of C
campus or off. UChicagoArts will assist in the implementation of imaginative projects
with grants normally ranging between $1,500 and $15 ,000.
The Smart Museum of Art, the Renaissance Society, and the Oriental Institute are
always free , and you can get into lots of amazing art museums and hot spots in
Chicago for free with your student ID. Check out artspass.uchicago.edu.
Court Theater often provides discounts for students.

Summer Internships
Human Rights Internships are $5000 grants to do 10 weeks of human rights work
with an organization anywhere in the world. Applications are due in early November.
Summer Links is an 11-week , intensive internship program coordinated by the
University Community Service Center. Summer Links pairs 30 undergraduate and
graduate students with full-time positions in non-profit and public sector agencies
throughout the Chicago area. This internship includes a $4000 stipend and
subsidized housing.
Summer Research Opportunities Program/McNair Scholars Program is an early
intervention program designed to prepare undergraduate students for graduate-level
research , strengthen knowledge and interest in applying to doctoral programs toward
the end of increasing the representation of minority faculty in higher education.
Stipend: $3000.
Summer Action Grants offer undergraduate students the funding to work or intern in
the United States . The average grant amount is $1,500, but can be up to $3,000.
Check out caps.uchicago.edu and stop by the CAPS office to gain access to the
posting s of internship and funding opportunities on this site. Many will not apply to
you , but you 'd be surprised at what internships pop up-working with a circ us,
community organizing jobs, and Peruvian hedge funds have all been posted.

Health
The Office of LGBTQ Student Life offers free, anonymous, rapid HIV testing once a
quarter. The SCC offers some testing, but it requires and appointment and is not
anonymous.
The University offers free flu shots every year, which can come in handy when the
winter hits.

Research
Norman Wait Harris Fund is administered by the Center for International Studies ; will
provide $1000 co-sponsorship grants .
The Women 's Board funds from $3 ,000 to $20,000 for projects that improve the
quality of life at the University. Only a few RSOs can do it, but several working
collaboratively have a better shot.
55

getting your tuition back - grants, funding, & tricks @ the U of C
Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture predominantly funds graduate
students in research.
Richter Grants support research under the guidance of faculty members. The
maximum award for each component is $1,000. Forty to sixty awards are made
annually. The Fund also provides grants to students who wish to pursue internships
with not-for-profit organizations.
Ruth Murray Essay Prize is awarded for the best essay written by a University of
Chicago undergraduate or graduate student in the area of women's studies, feminist
criticism or gender studies.

Travel and Language
Check out Frogs.uchicago.edu for official fellowship/scholarship info. Don't let the
advisors talk you out of applying for something-just go for it.
A variety of Travel and Language Acquisition Grants are available at
sitg.uchicago.edu. For example, the FLAG program offers awards of $3,000 to defray
the costs of intermediate or advanced language study abroad.

Free Food
It's everywhere , and often of better taste-quality than the dorms. Get on the free food
listhost at lists.uchicago.edu . One PhD student has gone nearly 2 academic years
without paying for food!
Restaurants in the Hyde Park area often offer UofC student discounts, from 10 to
25%. Make sure to ask.
The Div School Cafe has some of the cheapest coffee on campus-and it's delicious.
Try Cobb Cafe especially after 4:30pm , when they give away the remaining hot food.
Make sure to hit up the RSO Fair for free snacks and a bunch of goodies like staplers
and stickers.

Sports & Athletics
Ratner Athletic Facilities are some of the best facilities in the state. Take advantage
of your free membership

Join an intramural sports team or start your own-you
equipment and have fun in the process .

get free access to some great

The Point is free all year long, and open for running , biking, swimming , and all other
sorts of activities.

Printing
There are many sneaky ways to access free or reduced printing across the
University. Scout out the best prices early-hint: They 're NOT at the Reg. You have
no idea how much you'll save. RSO's often get funded for printing cost~'for marketing

getting your tuition back - grants, funding, & tricks @ the U of C
and other costs, so keep track of a few print codes. Kinkos on 57th st will give HUGE
discounts to RSOs and University students who seem like they 're affiliated with
RSOs, again, know the codes or ask at ORCSA for how to best take advantage. And
remember to print double-sided!

Books
Perhaps the highest unanticipated expense of your college career. Try to get your
syllabus asap, or write down titles at the bookstore and then search online to try to
get deals. Upperclassmen might have the books and be interested in selling, check
marketplace.uchicago.edu. And don't be afraid to check out an older edition from the
library-for a lot of classes, the information doesn 't change that much from the 10th to
the 12th edition.

Powell's Books on 57th street has free books in a box, plus cheap used prices.

Furniture
Late September and early June are the best times to go dumpster diving! Lots of
students end up throwing out lots of amazing furniture and other deals-go on a hunt
of your own to help furnish your new space.

And the Rest
Have a project you need funded? Try talking to staff at the University's various
centers-they might just make it happen! Want to bring a speaker on Cuban issues to
campus? Try with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Department. Want to
start a zine on queer life? The LGBTQ Office of Student Life might help print it. Be
creative in who you reach out to, you never know where you can find allies and
funding. And the best way to get your four-years ' worth out of the University of
Chicago is to prioritize projects that inspire you, take on issues that excite you, and
make friendships that challenge you.

donate your old books and textbooks!
ENRICHING LIVES THROUGH
READING, WRITING, AND THE
FABULOUS POWER O F
USED BOOKS.

http://www.open-books.org/
We're located at
213 W. Institute Pl.
Chicago & Fran klin (Brown/Purple)

Open Books is a nonprofit social venture that operates an
extraordinary bookstore, provides community programs, and
mobilizes passionate volunteers to promote literacy in Chicago.
- offers literacy programs for stude nts from all over Chicago
- run by 3000 volunteers and has served over 4000 students
Used book dropoff at our store (lOam- 7pm) or pickup available!

''00 ACADEMICS RAVE POLITICAL RESPONSIBILITIES?"
(survey)
Selected answers from GSUmembers printed below.
This is reprinted from the GSUNews bulletin , Fall 2009 issue.

Academics and intellectuals often live lives of privilege accorded by their
education and status. With all privilege comes responsibility. In the case
of acaden,ics, accepting this responsibility n1ay 111eanusing their gifts and
training to challenge orthodoxies of thought that maintain social control.
American academics have a particular responsibility to instituti ons of
higher learning in this regard, given that their colleagues often provide the
"expert opinion" essential to the successful coercion of their countrymen
and women into support for policies creating untold rnisery for people the
world over.
2. Academics are faced with a choice: to beco1ne intellectuals, or to become
experts. If they become intellecttta ls, their work ls fundamentally engaged
with a polity- its social value depends on its insertion into public debate.
But if acadernics becon1e experts, their work becornes fundamen tally disengaged - their social value depends on their ability to refrain fron1 public debate and n1erely, at best, "apply" their knowledge to projects whose
premises remain un-debatable .
3. Acade1nics have a particular responsibility to direct their teaching and
research in directions that benefit society. Otherwise the enormous an,ount
of public and private money that pays for our work is alJ being thrown
dow11the dra in. 'l'he research grants, the tuition pay1nents and financial
aid, the private donations, the tax breaks we get for being non-profit. ..what
is that but theft, and abuse of the public trust, if it does nothing but produce
useless research that means nothing to anyone? Obviously some academic
fields are more immediately useful than others, but there is no excuse for
total withdrawal from the world. Those who are j ust out
for then1selves ought to get jobs in the for-profit sector
instead.
4. Academics do have political responsibilities - to the
wretched status quo. Our academic guilds, from the humanities to the social sciences, are less arranged to produce liberatory knowledge than to clothe existing institutions in the trappings of respectab le society.
I
5. Don't all citizens have political responsibilities?
1.

6

C)
"The academy is not paradise. Bul learnin g is a place where
paradise can be created. The class room , with all its liinitations ,
remains a location of possibiljty. Tn that fieJdof possibility
.> we have the opportun ity co labor for freedom
to demand of ourselves and our
com rad es, an openness of mind
and heart that allows us to face
)e, ty even as we collectively imagine ways to 1nove beyond
boundaries , Lotrru1sgress.This is education as the practice of freedom."
- bell hooks, Tea ching to Transgress: Education a,; the Practice of Freedom
58

People To Know
some awesome faculty, staff, administrators, and allies at the U of C
A list of faculty , staff, and other UofC affiliates who have, in the past, been allies to (or
points of contact for) student activists around issues of race, sexuality, gender, labor
rights, and human rights. Many of these people are also on this list because their classes
and teaching styles encourage nontraditional, often interdisciplinary ways of thinking. Their
title and research~ob interests are listed as culled from their public profiles. They are listed
in no particular order, although some are grouped by organization. As with many other
resources in this zine , this list is radically incomplete and limited by our experience (so we
apologize for any errors). But when you're looking at classes , an amazing professor is
usually more important than a theoretically interesting topic. Make it your goal to expand
this list!
Lauren Berlant - Professor of English and Gender Studies
the legal and normative production of personhood in the U.S., citizenship, feminist,
queer, and Marxian theory, literatures of the US 1[Jh and 2(/ h centuries , African
American studies , cinema studies , popular culture, affect theory ; gender studies ;
pedagogies of normativity; cultural studies
Bruce Lincoln - Professor of the History of Religions in the Divinity School
Interests : issues of discourse , practice, power, conflict, and the violent reconstruction
of social borders. His research tends to focus on the religions of pre-Christian Europe
and pre-Islamic Iran, but he has a notoriously short attention span and has also
written on a bewildering variety of topics.
Leigh-Claire Laberge - Assistant Professor in the Humanities , Harper Fellow
finance and literature, politics within the university setting, and the aesthetics of
globalization.
Joe Masco - Associate Professor of Anthropology & Social Science
science and technology, U.S. national security culture, political ecology , mass media ,
and critical theory.
Jo Guildi - Mellon Fellow in Digital History at the U of C
digital methodologies and the history of information revolutions.
Noa Vaisman - Human Rights Lecturer
human rights and anthropology, doctrines of mass-murder, and human rights and the
new science.
Ann Boyd - Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies
performance , improvisational dance, movement , viewpoints, gesture and shape,
theatre, constraint-based composition
Candace Vogler - Professor of Philosophy
practical philosophy, practical reason, Kant's ethics, Marx, and neo-Aristotelian
naturalism.
Heidi Coleman - Director of University Theater , Director of TAPS , Professor of TAPS
the integration of theory and practice , in both artistic and programmatic arenas.
Leslie Danzig - Professor of TAPS
clowning, physical theatre , ensemble theatre
59

people to know - rad faculty. staff, allies, & and administrators @ the U of C
Luis Manuel Garcia - Lecturer in Ethnom usicology
music history, ethnomusicologylmusic anthropology, critical theory, gender &
sexuality studies, crowd/group theories, dance studies, and affect theory.
Ken Warren - Professor of English, Committee on African America n Studies
american and african-american literature from the late nineteenth century through the
middle of the twentieth century, politics and social change.
Christine Stansell - Professor in Histo ry
women's and gender history ; Antebellum U.S. social and political history ; American
cultural history ; History of human rights and post -catastrophic societies.
Moishe Postone - Professor of History , Committee on Jewis h Studies
modern european intellectual history ; Social Theory, especially Critical Theories of
Modernity ; Twentieth-Century Germany; Anti-Semitism.
Robert Pippin - Professor of Philosophy, Committee on Social Thought
issues in political philosophy , theories of self-consciousness , the nature of conceptual
change, and the problem of freedom.
Loren Kruger - Professor in Eng lish Language & Literature , Comparative Literature,
Theater & Performance Studies and African Studies
theater studies, cinema, literature, cultural history and theory. Theater: US, African,
European , Africa: South Africa, especially culture, history , contemporary social life
William Mazza rella - Associate Professor of Ant hropology and of Social Science
mass media , globalization , public culture and consumerism , critical theory, commodity
aesthetics, and post-coloniality in contemporary India.
Linda M. G. Zerilli - Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies, Director of the
Center for Gender Studies
political theory , feminist and gender theory, gender and politics
Cathy Cohe n - Professor of Political Science
american politics, although her research interests include African -American politics ,
women and politics , lesbian and gay politics , and social movements.
Malynne Ste rnstein - Grad uate Advisor for Literature in Czech Literature
iconic language, gender and citizenship in the arts, and the prevailing dialectical
concerns of surrealism , questions concerning the intersection between art and
literature, film and politics , Russian literature , shit.
Omar McRoberts - Associate Professor of Sociology
the sociology of religion, urban sociology, urban poverty, race, and collective action.
Mario Small - Professor of Sociology
urban poverty , inequality and culture, migration, higher education, and the sociology
of knowledge.
Kristin Schilt - Assistant Professor of Sociology & Gender Studies
gender , sexualities , culture, and ethnographic research methods.
Bertram Cohler - Professor of Psychology
lives over time and within context , using both narrative and counted data
perspectives ; sexual idenity, developmental psychopathology and family process,
family and personality development, aging , self and family.
60

people to know - rad faculty. staff, allies, & and administrators @ the U of C
Agnes Lugo-Ortiz - Associate Professor , Latin American Literature
nineteenth-century Latin Amer ican literature, and in nineteenth- and twentieth-century
Caribbean cultural history, relationships between cultural production and the
formation of modern socio-political identi ties.
Wendy Doniger - Professor in the History of Religions at the Divinity School, Department
of South Asian Languages and Civilizations , the Committee on Social Thought
hinduism and mythology, cross-cultural expanses ; literature, law, gender, and
psychology.
Raul Coronado - Assistant Professor of English
latinalo literary and cultural history, from the colonial period to the 1940s. Coronado's
work emphasizes the contemporary, social meaning of writing.
Deborah Nelson - Associate Professor in English
late 20th-century American literature, gender studies, American ethnic literature,
poetry and poetics, autobiography, photography, and Cold War history.
Ramon Gutierrez - Professor of History & Staff at the Center for the Study of Race, Politics
and Culture
chicano history; Race and Ethnicity in American Life; Chicano/Latino Studies; IndianWhite Relations in the Americas; Social and Economic History of the Southwest;
Colonial Latin America ; Mexican Immigration.
Don Kulick - Professor of Anthropology
language and gender/sexuality, transgender issu es, prostitution, disability,
psychoanalysis and social science, humor, the species boundary.
Martha Nussbaum - Law Professor
ancient philosophy, ethics and the philosophy of literature.
Adam Greene - Associate Professor of American History
modern U.S. history; African American history; urban history; comparative racial
politics; cultural economy.
Marcelle Medford-Lee - Coordinator for the workshop on the Reproduction of Race and
Racial Ideologies, PhD student in Sociology
ethnography, contemporary urban immigration, immigrant neighborhoods, ethnic
entrepreneurs, race/ethnicity, and black West Indian immigrants.

Center for Gender Studies - 5733 S. Univers ity Ave
Contact: Gina Olson - Assistant Director for Programming and Administration at CGS
Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture
Waldo E. Johnson, Jr. - Associate Professor at the Schoo l of Social Se rvice Administration
& Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture
family research, male roles and involvement in African American families , nonresident
fathers in fragile families, and the physical and psychosocial health statuses of
African American males
LGBTQ Office of Student Life - 571 O S Woodlawn Ave
Jeffrey Howard - Director of LGBTQ Office of Student Life
Kathy Forde - Director of LGBTQ Mentoring Program, Senior Adviser, Bias Response
Team Member
61

people to know - rad faculty. staff, allies, & and administrators @ the U of C
Religious Life
Elizabeth Davenport - Dean, Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
provides leadership for spiritual life on campus ; directs spiritual and performing arts
programs at Rockefeller Chapel ,·and serves as liaison to campus arts organizations
for the Office of Campus and Student Life.
Office of Multicultural Student Affairs - 5710 S. Woodlawn Ave
Rosa Yadira Ortiz - Assistant Director of OMSA, Life Series/Crossroads
Ana Vazquez - Deputy Dean of Students in the University , Director of OMSA , Bias
Response Team Coordinator
University Community Service Center - 5525 S. Ellis Avenue , Suite 160
Trudi Langendorf - Assistant Director UCSC , Lead for CSTLC and SummerLinks
Open and respectful attitude toward building relationships with students. Coming from
a background in social justice, she is a role model, mentor and friend to the students
she works with at the University Community Service Center.
David Hays - Assistant Director of UCSC, Chicago Studies
Wallace E. Goode , Jr. - Associate Dean of Students & Director of UCSC
From folk museums and community theatres to soup kitchens and AIDS service
organizations , Mr. Goode has a nearly encyclopedic knowledge of Chicago 's
community organizations.
Student Counseling and Resource Services - 5737 S. University Ave
The Civic Knowledge Project - Walker Museum
The community connections branch of the Division of the Humanities.
University of Chicago Police Department
JoCathy Roberts - Crime Prevention Officer and community liaison
Independent Review Committee for the UCPD (Contact: Belinda Cortez Vazquez)
Office of Campus and Student Life
Disabilities Services - disabilities .uchicago.edu
Belinda Cortez Vazquez - Interim Associate Dean of Students in the University
Student Affairs , Bias Response Team Member

for

Administration &tc.
President Zimmer (5801 South Ellis Avenue, Suite 501 , president@uchicago.edu)
He claims to make time to meet with student groups about their concerns. Take him
up on that offer.
Karen Warren Coleman - Associate Vice President for Campus Life and Associate
Dean of Students in the University and co-chair of Ad-Hoc comm ittee formed in
response to Student Arrest Incident 201 O
William Michel - Executive Director of the Reva and David Logan Center for Creative and
Performing Arts
Toussaint Losier - PhD Candidate in History and co-chair of Ad-Hoc Committee formed in
response to Student Arrest Incident 2010, Graduate Liaison to the Board of Trustees
Frank Alacron - Undergraduate Liaison to the Board of Trustees
Allen Linton - Student Government Community/Government Liaison

62

organizing organizations
There are lots of social justice organizations on campus. They all have their own flavor
and issues. The best way to figure out what works best for you is to dive in! Go to the
RSO fair , the UCSC, or your friend down the hall to find out what's cool.
Check out the Social Justice Coordinator at the UCSC!! They get paid to know
things/people! Also check this out! http://sj uofc.wordpress .com/ for more groups etc . This
list is incomplete and we know it. .. but hopefully it'll help you get started.
Potluck Project: This group hosts potlucks for social justice oriented students. They're
great to meet people and see what's going on .
Email: skortchmar@uchicago.edu
Listhost: potluck_project@lists.uchicago.edu
Southside Solidarity Network : These folks work on issues of the relationship between the
university and the southside of Chicago. They've got a lot of history and great
connections .
Email:
Listhost: souths idesn@lists.uchicago.edu
Website : http ://ucssn .blogspot.com/
Students for a Democratic Society: Not your parents ' (or grandparents'!) SOS! SOS is a
multi-issue, radical organizing group focussing mainly on campus issues like Investment
and the Milton Friedman Institute. They push organizing across issues and building
student power.
Email: craigjohnson@uchicago.edu
Listhost: craigjohnson@uchicago.edu
Website : http ://sds.uchicago .edu/
Students Organized and United with Labor (SOUL) A Chapter of United Students Against
Sweatshops (USAS), these folks mainly focus on labor solidarity with workers on campus
as well as international solidarity with workers around the world. They've also got great
national networks with other activists in USAS.
Email: lgrove@uchicago.edu
Listhost: Soul@lists .uchicago.edu
Website : http ://uchicago.usas.org/
Green Campus Initiative: GCI is the only active environmental group on campus. Their
main thing is campus sustainability but they are open to more activist or service oriented
ideas (in the hopes of reviving the defunct activist (Environmental Concerns Organization)
and service (GAIA) groups).
Email: wgu@uchicago.edu
Listhost: gci@lists.uchicago.edu
Website : http ://envirocenter.uchicago.edu/gci/Home.html
Woodlawn Collaborative : This is an institution building project that aims to create a shared
space in Woodlawn for Arts Education and Activism. There are many programs (and
room for more !) house in their space in First Presbyterian Church and it's all coordinated
by a joint committee of students and community members!
Email: cgreim@uchicago.edu
Website : http ://woodlawncollaborative .org/
63

The Feminist Majority works to spread awareness of issues and challenges of living in a
sexist and patriarchal society. Embracing a range of gender identities and ideological
positions, its members work cooperatively and nonhierarchically to organize events and
facilitate open discussion on gender, feminism, sexism, transfeminism, masculinity, and
human rights.
Contact: whilke@uchicago.edu and jgifford@uchicago.edu
Email list: femmaj@lists.uchicago.edu
Website: http ://femmaj.word press.com/
Queer and Associates is the largest queer organization on campus. They have a long and
colorful history of current members and numerous alumni working together to create queer
community on the UofC campus. Their goal is to empower the queer community on
campus through social events, activism, coalition building, and outreach/educational
programming.
Contact: jgifford@uchicago.edu
Email list: qa@listhost.uchicago.edu
Chicago Students for Immigration Reform: With immigration organizing accelerating
around the country (Chicago is a hot spot!) this group is doing what they can on the
student end by making awesome demands to the university.
Email: cagustin@uchicago.edu
Students for Justice in Palestine: Palestine is one the major injustices of our time, so
there's organizing around it. SJP works to raise awareness and when necessary, disrupt
things like when Ehud Omert came to speak on campus.
Email: nadiai@uchicago.edu
Listhost: sjpalestine@lists.uchicago.edu
Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlan (MEChA): MEChA is a national organization
that seeks to promote Chicano unity and empowerment through education and political
action. This campus chapter is involved with a variety of stuff from celebrating farm
worker organizers Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez to working with the Coalition of
lmakolee Workers to get tomato farmers higher wages and better treatment.
Email: guadalupel103@uchicago.edu
Listhost: mecha@lists.uchicago.edu
Website: http://mecha.uchicago.edu/home.html
Platypus: The Left is dead. Long live the Left! Or so says Platypus, a Marxist study group
that aims to provide a fresh start for revolutionary politics through a critical analysis of the
history of Left thought. They host reading groups and public intellectual events to provide
spaces for critical reflection.
Email: gregg@uchciago.edu
Listhost: platypus@lists.uchicago.edu
Website: www.platpus1917.org
Organization of Black Students brings together people of all races and ethnic backgrounds
to celebrate black history and the diverse cultures black students contribute to the
UChicago campus. They work to ensure the continuity and growth of Black educational,
cultural, social, and political institutions on campus as well as in the greater Chicago
community through their mentorship program, literary magazine, and regular meetings
and social/cultural events.
Website: http://obs1.uchicago.edu/
Jewish Action is a social justice group that champions pragmatic activism on campus,
reflecting Judaism's strong commitment to putting beliefs into practice. JA t5litievesthat a

well-rounded activism combines direct service with informed advocacy and so offers
opportunities for both volunteer projects and education.
Contact: barzel@uchicago.edu
Splash! Chicago: Splash! Is a yearly day long festival of teaching a learning. It focuses on
getting students from around Chicago who would not normally be exposed to the
prospects of higher education on to campus for a day of courses and other activities! This
not only gives opportunities for these students to learn but for UChicago students to teach!
Email: rtkraw@uchicago.edu
Listhost: splash-updates@lists.uchicago.edu
Website: http://uchicago-splash.mit.edu/
Student Global AIDS Campaign is a national student organization that advocates for
increased US funding to global AIDS programs, access to treatment for all who are
infected, and true debt relief for developing nations. Our campus chapter hosts advocacy
campaigns, events that promote awareness about global AIDS issues, and service
activities for people in our community living with AIDS.
Listhost: sgac@lists.uchicago.edu
Organization of Latin American Students strives to promote awareness within and outside
of the Latino community incorporating all facets of a culture rooted in the Indigenous,
African, and European traditions to encourage social cohesion. Their mission is to expand
the Latino community both on a collegiate and community plane by communicating the
political, social, cultural and ethnic diversity that exists in it.
Website: http://olas.uchicago.edu
UChicago STAND seeks to raise awareness about the dire situation in Darfur as well as
play a role in its resolution by pressuring the University of Chicago to adopt a targeted
divestment model.
Website: http://sites.google.com/site/uchicagostand/
Students for Human Rights strives to address and promote awareness of human rights
issues at the city-wide level in Chicago by working on campaigns concerning health care,
police brutality, and other human rights violations and bringing in speakers.
Website: http://shr.uchicago.edu/
Roosevelt Institution is a national network of student think tanks that provide the
organizational infrastructure to get student ideas into the public discourse.
Website: http://www.rooseveltcampusnetwork.org/chapter/ university-chicago
Project HEALTH - http://www.projecthealth.org/
Muslim Students Association - http://msa.uchicago.edu

This page 111as
put together by Luis Brennan and Eliot Fiend. Image from archive .111orkers/iberty.org .

65

THE

DEPOLITICIZATION

OF ACTIVISM

{a polemic on organ izi ng and pr ogre ssive politics , by Greg G ab rellas)
The history of can1pusactivisn1is the history cussionan1ongactivists,and n1ostare averse
of single-issues, which co1neand go without to publicdebate.But without politicaldiscusleaving a significant i,npact on students' po- sion and debate debate that addresses the
litical consciousnessor organiz.ation.Hardly n1ost pressing strategicquestions of the n,oany students remember the most successfuJ ment- t'here cannot be any setious attempt
student campaign of recent years: the "Boot to changethe world
the Bell" campaign initiated in sp1ing 2002
There is one organiz.ationthat can poten·
against ARAMARK's
c:arnpuscontract with tiallychange this situation and placestudent
TacoBell.The "Bootthe Bell"victory,students politicson more coherent footing.Graduate
hoped, would generate a wider nationalstu· Students United was founded in 2007 as a
dent n1ovementSon1eof the students who com111ittee
to begin disrussing and working
had participated in ''Boot the Bell" did con- to unionize graduate student workers and
tinue to organize,but they tu111ed
away from the student-body as a whole.Since then it has
can1pus-let alone national-politics and grown to a burgeoning can,pus organization
into
neighborhood
with a life of its own:
localism. !n spite of GSU has an explicit, purposefulreg~ar
mee~~gs,
~?dest V1cto
11es,_ac- oal: to trans.lormthe Uni'lJersitv to social and political
tiV1s
1n has re1nau1edg
'!I• •

~
events, and networks
depoliticized insofar be more re;potm'Ue
to its students. of stewards in many
as its goal has not 'Ibis, more than any number tf departments of the
been to spur political

,,.
,, h
h
Universityof Chicago.
consciousness ainong P~ogresSz
'lle . .zs~s,
as t e patenWhat makes GSU
students. Instead, ac- tzol to polittetz.e the student hoJy
. unique among stutivists have attempted
dent organizations?
to win limited can1pus-wide refom,s by us- Simple: accessto the University'sinnerworking conventional tacticssuch as directactions ings, the graduate student lecturers, instruc•
and coalition building.Allofthese ca1npaigns tors and teachingassistants upon which the
have sta1t.ed as a single issue, gradually Universitydepends for the College to funcformed a multi-groupcoalition, brieflycap- tion.When organized,graduate students can
tu red the student in,agination, and then dis- exert their collectivestrength to push forward
solved.Activismsee1ns to 1ise and full with changesin the University that were hitherto
the regularityof the businesscycle...
impossible, moving toward GSU'sexplicit,
-U nless we can break the cycle.
purposefi.11
goal: to transform the University
The question is less one of students' mo- to be more responsiveto its students. In the
tivation and commitment than it is one of process, GSUlUISthe potential to revitalize
strategy. For many, the purpose of stltdent campus activism and student politics. Alactivismshould simply be to builda con1mu- d1oughGSUitselfis politicallyneutral,insofar
nity of progressiveindividuals.Perhaps they as it is a representativebody of students and
hold this view perhaps because they do not anyone can work though GSUto advance a
actually believe that substantive change in politicalcause, progressivescan use CSUas
the Universityor the wider world is possible. a fonun to discuss politicalgoals and strateWhen the wider political world does become gies for students to pursue collectively.Inthis
an issue,activiststend to acceptthe p1iorities way the University of Chicagocampus could
of '11ottopics" and organizetheir can1paigns be fruitfuJlypoliticized,therebyenrichingour
around them. They do not consider whether intellectuallives as well as our activistprojand under what conditions localisrn and eds.
single-issues might tra11sce
nd their imn1eStudentunionizationis not die end of stu·
diacy and transform the world at large.As a dent politics-it is d1enecessary,but difficult,
consequence of this, there is littlepoliticaldis- beginning.
reprinted with permission from th e Fall 2009 GSUNews bulletin

66

RESEARCH WEBSITES:
KNOW YOUR SHIT.
About the U of C:
Adminet: l1ttp.//ad1ninet .tzchJ.cago.edu/index .sht1nl
This is the internal administ1~ation website where 1nariy thir1gs aI'e
posted like powerpoints, official policies and best of all,

Financial Statements:
http .//adminet.uchica,go .ed11/finance/financial_sta,tements/index .shtmJ.

Guidestar: http .//vVWW2.guidesta,r .org/
Fo1~more informatio11 011the university's 01'otl1er co1~poratio11S
fi11ancial matters you ca11get 990 tax forms off he1~e.
01~check out the Security and Exchange Commission's (SEO)

listings

for the university's

asset holdings:

http .//www.sec .gov/edgmjsea1'cl1edga1jcompa1zysea1·ch

University

.html

Org Chart: http .//www.uchicago .edu/about/01-gch&t/

This will tell you who's who and who answers to whom .

University

Board of Trustees (BOT): http .// trtzstees .tzcl1icago.edtz/

Proc1·astinate politically ! Google board members, dig up some dirt !
Oa11you count how many are OEOs?

Generally

good stuff to know:

Every block: http .// chicago .eve1yblock .com/
A great database to find out about goings -on the block level .
NND B : http .//www. nndb .com/
This web -app let 's you fi11dconnections between powerful people .
Who's on who's board?!

Chicago Geographical

Information

System:

http .//www.cityofchicago .org/city /en/depts/doit/provdrs/
gis .html
The city has a11i11teractive map to access all its information on land
holdings ! It's awesome , even if it 's actually part of a strategy to make
information public while preventirlg easy data analysis !
by Luis Brem1a11

''No education is politically
neutral."
- bell hooks in Teachin
to Trans ress:
Practice of Freedom

Education

as the

Race and Racism
The Angela Y. Davis Reader, edited by Joy James
This Bridge Called My Back, edited by Cherrie
Moraga and Gloria E. Anza ldua
Orienta/ism, Edward Said
The Cost of Privilege, Chip Smith
Racial Formation in the U.S., Winan t & Om i
Anarchism
Hegemony or Survival. Noam Chomsky
Days of War and Nights of Love, Crlmet hinc.
The Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord
Pacifism as Pathology, Ward Churchill
Anarchy, A Graphic Guide, Clifford Harper
One-Dimensional Man, Herbert Marcuse
Vegan With A Vengeance(cookbook), Moskowi tz
Anarcho-Syndica/ism, Rudo lf Rocker
Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau
Feminism
The Sexual Politics of Meat, Carol Adams
The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvolr
Feminist Theory, bell hooks
Under Western Eyes and Feminism Without Borders. Chandra Mohanty
Cunt, Inga Musclo and Betty Dodson
Philosophy
Monolingualism of the Other, Jacques Derrida

Auto/Biographies
Memoirs of a Revolutionist, Vera Figner
Cold War Fugitive, Gil Green
The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Alex Haley
Mountains Beyond Mountains, Tracy Kidder
Soon to be a Major Motion Picture, Abbie Hoffman
Radical History
Detroit, I Do Mind Dying, Georgakas & Surkin
War at Home, Brian Glick
Horizontalism, Maria Sitrin
A Promise and a Way of Life: White Anti-Racist
Activism, Becky Thompson
We Will Return In the Whirlwind, M. Ahmad
Fiction
Their Eyes Were Watching God, Z.N. Hurston
The Awakening, Kate Chopin
The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint Exupery
Howl, Allen Ginsberg
Catch-22, Joseph Heller
As the World Burns, D. Jensen and S. McMillan
Homage to Catalonia, George Orwell
The Golden Compass series , Philip Pullman
Black Boy. Richa rd Wrigh t
Current Struggles
Infection and Inequality, Paul Farmer
Endgame, Derrick Jensen
Cyber-Marx · Cycles and Circuits of Struggle in
No Logo. Naomi Klein
High-TechnologyCapitalism, Nick Dyer-Wit hetord
Zlnes/Pam phlets/Magazines
The History of Sexuality, Michel Foucault
Said the Pot to the Kettle ; Hot Pantz; Left Turn;
A Moral Equivalent of War, William James
Doris; Cometbus ; Earth First! Jour nal; Slingshot ;
Super Happy Anarcho Fun Pages ; Secret Files of
The Politics of Experience. A.O. Laing
Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, Captain Sissy ; Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack:
Jerry Mander
Memori es of Freedom
On the Genealogy of Morality, Friedrich Nietzc heAnimal Liberation, Peter Singer
...and this list is ust the be

Local (Hyde Park/W oodlawn/ Kenwood)
Locked Out Americans: A Memoir by Reverend
John R. Fry
Making the Second Ghetto - Arnold Hirsch
Work and Community in the Jungle - James
Barrett
A Raisin in the Sun - Lorraine Hansberry (play)
The Spook that Sat By The Door - Sam
Greenlee
Personal Politics - Sa ra Evans
The Adventures of Augie March - Saul Bellows
(fiction)
Herzog • Sa ul Be llows (fiction)

The Death and Life of Great American Cities Jane Jacobs

Black Power/White Control: The Struggle of the
Woodlawn Organization in Chicago- John Hall Fish
Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class
in the City - Mary Pattillo
Culture of Opportunity - Obama's Chicago: The
People, Politics, and Ideas of Hyde Park Rebecca Janowitz
Gang Leader for a Day - Sudhir Venkatesh

biblioteca popular
1921 s. blue island
revolution books
1103n ash/and
chicago underground /ibra
621 w belmont, 2nd floor
women & children first
5233 n clark
qulmby's
1854 w north ave
...and of course, the harold
• -:..UlW.~
washington & regenstein libraries/ •· 11:: ; :. •

this list, with some additions, taken from the 2008 NYU Disorientation zlne

'- :ru

68

:;l'.:

wbatflinbofucbicaJo
bo
.11ou
bream
of?
a wi,~li.stfromcumntanbpast,tubentsonw~att~eu ofc conibfie.
13. More. eonversat:on.s
about wh,'te
More. Co MMt1n,'ty 3ardenS .
2. More. live Mt.ts :c
pr:v:/e~
14. More. adM:n:strat:ve SUf',Port l'or
3. a ee.raP1iCS stud:o.
4. a ktt.er-de.s,jne.d
core curr:cult1M .
CaP7,PUSwor/:erS
15. ;M,ProVed n3htt.:Me transportat:on
5 . no llraP1ar/:.'
l(.o. More co nve.n,'e.nt_"4.X1/Sto ~t
(.o. /'airer hous:'1:)/d:n;"!J ,Pol:c:es
-:;.. a 24-hour d:ner
to the c:ty
1-=1,.
More. arts and creat:ve wr:t:"!J
8-- a student. l'are. Ctl! card
classes.
9. More. SU,P,Port l'or students
/iv:":}
o/'l'-CLV>1,PU
S
•~-printers all oVer cam,PUS.'
19. SoMe. amou nt ol' lree ,Pf-int:":}
10. St-tnn,'e.r, hqpp:er places to wor/:
money l'or students
11. More. bars t.v1°thMus:c Venues
20 . StOP CoMmer c,'al de.ve.lopMent
12. More nerd/less
concern about
on t.olSt s&e.et. .. .do :t Some.whef-e.
the ae.sthet:cs ol' ne.rdiness
else.'
21. More l'erl"orManc.e Sf' aceS
22 . a ./',-ee store.'
23. improved SCC Servt'ces ( /'as ter,
be.tier, n:c.er,
less bullshit)
24 . im,Pf-a.'ed Mental health Service.S
( that don't J:;cl(YCJL.t
out ol'
c.oun.sel,'"5 al'ter a fuarter)
25 . Mo!"e • home.wo,-f: that :nvolves
bei":J e":J~d t.v1'th -1/yde Par/:
and our Co l'>1mun,
'ty
21.o
. c heqper pr: c es at c ol'l'eeshops
2-=1,
. l'tU.ver pol: c e
.f "'-=, " , •.- ·, ' •
2~ . More. re.l:at5/e.bus Serv:ce. to and
·:.~••
l'rom CaP1f'US Ce.Sf' , :n w,'nt.er.')
29 . Mof-e. ve5an, ve.3etarian, and health;
'
••
l'ocxl opiionS in -1/utch
I :
30 . be.tier !"e.Sourees and l'o/ l'or
:y aduate student. te ac hi":J assi.stant.s
31. More. transparency about :we..stMent., trustee de.c ision.s, land
ownersh,',P, and adM;n,·strat:ve
de.e:s:on.s
32. trust students
with 1(50 Money
( no More Mo nth-l o"!] waiti"!J. per,'od
to 5et ,Paid bac/:l'or eoof::e..s)
1.

..

69

1

ease

r

..

o no

oo cose

All act ivity is
being monit ored.

THE

UNlVE

R SLTY Of

CHICAGO



1ncooperation with the

Initiative for
Comrnunity Protectiai

disorientati on 20 l O please copy & distrib11te freel)'

Item sets