UChicago Disorientation Guide 2013: An Alternative Resource for Incoming Students

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Current View

Title

UChicago Disorientation Guide 2013: An Alternative Resource for Incoming Students

Date

2013

Place

Chicago, Illinois

Source

https://issuu.com/uchicago_disorientation/docs/diso_13_ordered

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TABLE
INTRO

CONTENTS

OF

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_t)YCTlON

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Dear 1members

of the Class

~ by

A projector

cf 2017.

y passing small~ stm images., upside--dawn ,1 th,iough an c-pening.,
On the screent thes :a same images are larger- ·than-ifa,
lbeautifulhand
righl side up .. The film
projector is wnait .J lhoughl . of when I was standing at th~ lop 0fi lhe John Hancock
bulleting
downtown art an 0-Week
event when , firs, CaJ1le 1.0 the College . It was a party ;;, I @·1.e little
sandwiches and loaked out from one of the higltt-est van,age points in the city, ·lhe ccnv ,ocationa~
pomp still ringing iIn m~ head~ This was the image I was shown of UCrnicago., But I wondered,
wh':It hadn ~t made it through t!he _U nivers ty ~s offiicial p rQJector?
nsurprising!~, th ere are a lot of
things ab aul our south side campus you don'l see lrom ·mhe
· ·sop
lhe John Han cack;o
continuous

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2 O 13 editiian Joins DfsO guides betor ie n in oorn 1piling perspectives
you rrug1ht not otherwise
see during 0-Week ; they a re heterodox by des ign. and we contrmutors to th Is guide ,have found
them ro be a bsdh.rtei "i fundarnental
tta our 0M1 1 adjustm-eint to unh,ers ily life ~o being active
members o'f a CatnflUS community.. They will sh.aw our turreted* gabled iil.ns:ut1Ution in a difM!f'en t
li ght than its tlrochures have. offering a bit more shadow ta their iconic" sun-washed
quad .. This
1
guide exposes
lhe dis oi'!rrtedne.sst pasl and present,
of our wleciive
existence~
It does so \\ViU,.
he h~
that we might reco_gni2e the fractures
not siimpl¥ as imperfections.
but as injustices - and
olten systemic ones. As suet\. we believe that you a re both ·enUtled tc and responsflble for this
infor.matioin, these different perspectives;
m order for us la re .....
make our sch 001. we must,, as
students.; 1
rreimagine -relationships
ammigst ourse 1
tves. 'With our adm ioistrators; ·wi~h ou 1r neighbors,
with our campus emp ,!oyees. and with the lbllocks we shuffle between ~ onJ)I' !hrough . ou!f 011Nn
engagement can crur contrivied, illlamd- picked car.npcgs
, co mwnunity bece me one o rea,I carie and
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reliance .
S lhared awareness of UChicago' .s history .., \!'lie hope . wiH help us become criliicaJfy sensiti2ed 10
our own actions and to th(?Se .of !he univ9rsity.
t is ous especiaHy poHtic~
setting which
demands tnart we reflect on our own so c:ia~ 1identities: by cho ice or b~ cha 1
n1CSyou ha\fe cmne to
s:choo I in a neighborhood
an lhe south side of Ch icago .. Our Univen; ily is the moving spuH in
devel 'apments
lhat have craatedl barriers between jtsef;f and its surro 1undi.ng. communifes:
As Jane
Jacobs notes. sometimes a nejgJilborhoad gets Ule benefit of power through possessing
a
univer.sity., •but the citizens 0f such a ne~bortload
pay for 'their ~freet ;ffl of r,ower When lh 1e
day comes that th~ir i.nterests ru.n counter
to thbsa of PiiJpe · IEnstitution. They ere he pless to
'•
defeat rPapa in ttle government ·ctli ces up where die d'ecirsions i a re made. and lhersfors they Me
helpless also to teach him or influence
him *· Gen~ine reoip~ity
can-and
does-exist b1etween
gown and town but we have to seek ~ -orut and foster it. T h_iis guide see ks to motiiv~te and
fa cu
it.ale! 1his type ol community pa nh::ipaUon +
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This guide is not the Hdlywoad
epic that 'the
niversity
~ulid
Pf\oducei ies the view rrcm !he
slreet instead of the Civory> tawer .. 11•s not the Cecil 9. Cem jile extravaganza,
but ratt.E!f' the
harndheJd fiootage. sometimes a ittle shaky.. arid reflecting ,eaeh a u:thor··s r>ersona~ script.

.

So g 0 out and process it: a a for yourself~ Come back to this gu ide if you have q uestions-ar
1especialy if you lh nk ycu lhave· -answers '"

Natal~e Wr,;1tH and the DisO 2013

2

T eam

W~ARE

.HERE
and Surrounding

H·ist rory of H:v:de Park

Nef _ghborhoods

. H(Yde Park was ~ounded i n :1835 by Paul
·Cornell. Wit h the construclion
of UChioago in .
1890 and the Columb ian Exposition in 1893,.
Hyde Park boomed with 1hundreds of new
r esidential and comme,cial buildings. As a
spot for white clty :.dwellers, Hyde Park had over
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popular v~catlon
100 hote ·ls by the :l9 130s.. ·
In the .1940's .• Hyde Park and its surrou 1
nding
neighborhoods saw a demograph ic sh(ft
as the Great Migration brought Chicagots
.Af 1
r ican American population from 1.8% of
..~ _
th e total in 1990 ~o 8.2% in i940. Many
t!M r¥S'-'( lf~Jap)
of the hote ls on the South S~de ~,ecame te ·nemenrt housing
and many whites decj ded to pa.c .k up and ""flee" (UChicago
- d re-.11
- ~
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- - na
- - o- r N·_e- w Me
-~ ca
- - ~_or
- - a- w
1..e
,o~d
Ing •-·o Ar""
.. azc
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_h
. · Ile)
_ _ .•
d e·--b.a-•··
Hyde Park~s resJdents largel y found this change frighten .Eng, and r esponde ·d w ·ith
violence and restrictive covenants., which were lega illy-enforc ·eable agfieements wit h
~an-dlords to n •ot se :H or rent to people who didn .'t look like them.
To their chagrin .. in 19
the Supreme Co urt declared covenants
iHega~. so Hyde Park had to find ·a new w.ay to way to keep out the
.u b1
1ightff.
A group rof white businessmen 1tin 1949 formed the Hyde
r,f _..
Pa rk Kenwood Community Conference (HPKOC). The HPKCC
created block clubs with the goal of prevent ing false gossip. tracking ·zoning la·ws

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and buildlng

v olations, and ran their flagship

Wh istlestop .
program _which taught residents to recognize the so ,und of
a whistle as a cry for help .. UCh 1icago watched for tJhree
years, then decided that it had ·a role to play t 00, after the
witfe of a professor was attacked and .fiears cf losing
prospective students rose.
UChica 1go creat ed the South East Chicago
Commlssl ,on rn 19 52 to ~enforce codes and track cnme,._ Attomey Julian Levi was
hired to design the Urban Renewal Prograrn-as it was afficialJy named by.the
universrty-witlh govemment funding, razinl down entire str ~ps of worker housing to
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buiJd student dorm 1s, townhouses, classrooms and pa'1king garages, witho iut
allocating public housings Ipace for the displaced poor. The program wrenched · out
Hyde Park's jazz scene, closing down e'very jazz site, and
bulldozed throu ,gh the main commercial center on 55th street.
leavlng three ~new b usiness sites that excluded nearly au of
the old owners.
1

The Urban Renewal pr~gram (n_icknamed "'Urban
.... _..
,.,.._;..*
Removal"') became infamous for Levrs lack of regard for
..•.JI'·
- , .,,
. _--- . .
oommunlty partlcipatlon, ,and for its anti-poor and -arguabr :y
anti-black agend ,a. lihe program ' s work has left its legacy well ..H:yde Park has kept
its diversity. with a de -mograpt1:ic of 40 ..5% white people, 39"5% black people, 1.3.5¾
As ilan/Pa .cific islanders, 4 .,1% muJti-racia .l peop ·let 2.1% peop ,fe designated ...oth ier"
and .2% American lnd .lans ,. It al ,so has a llarge m~ddle class 1
popu1Jation (the averag 1
e
family income is $~0.578), reflecting wel~ the 1ine of ~he HPKCC: ·whites and
blacks, hand i1n hand against tile poor" ..
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Since the U niver :sity of Chicago was
founded in I
~he n1eighborha1ods
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4

around i~ Hyde Park and Y/oodlawn11
have changed immensely. The y,ear afcer
the University opened. the Columbia ,n
\/Vorld's Fair. in Jackson !Park tra1nsfo1imed

changed

the area, as mi l lions of visitors streamed
into
a,..ea to see rlle exihibits. the

suburbs

'nation , tents• on the Midway Plaisance,
and to visit the world's first. Ferris 'Whe~.

struggled to
get aoc-ess even ta
basic municipal
services
like garbage
collection
and
poUc ing.
This · decli 1ne
d'id
not
g~
unnoticed
by the University
of Chicago:

me

The next century would yield existential
transfo ·rmaDions for tJhe neighborhoods[I
much of which we~ in :stigated and gu ided
by the Un i1vers ity itself :...

drasticaHy:
first
experiencing
rada:1 suc cession from W hi'te to . black, and
then exper iencing ;a pre ·cipitous decJine in
1
medfan
family income
as middl 0.dass
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opened

ramllies .
IBy }960~ the

to

Afr ican""Amer1
ica.n

neig ,hborhood

1

most of i'ts money and
polit ical agenda on a revolutionary
· Urban
As :students, we inherit 'the com plicated
leg ,acy of Unive .rsity i:nfluence over
Ren~J
project
in
Hyde
Pa.irk., it
turned
its
a.ttention1
to
·'the
Hyde
Park
I K enwoo d I aventuaHy
Vvoadllawn .. An organiza1ion c-aUed the
'Vlfood l awn areL ~ile
th e· Univ 1erstty's
Southeas .t Chicago
Commission,.
the
presence
has allowed Hyde
Park to
IUn iversity~s
urban
dev ,e1opment.
be icome. a (relativ ely) ~riving mukiracial
subsidiary, started work on a plan to raze
and
(relatively)
•economically
div 1erse
a section of ~oodfawn
in1 order to bu1ild
neigh lbor-hood, it has also created friction
the ••south Campus Extension'". This plan
·with
neid,horing · aJ~east and
has
have displ laced several thousan~
occasionally
hampered
1:he abiflty
of . would
residents and ·isolated the neighborhood
'those communities
to th~ive.
from public parks and other resources To take 'Woodlawn as an example: the
there was even a plan at one pclint to run
neigh rborhood
whidh officiaHy stretdlnes
a 6-ia.ne highway along 62nd St. However.
fr ,om the Midway in the north to 67th St
the d.reat
of this r .edevelopment
plan
in the so uth · and ·the lakefront wesrr ~
galvanized
the . nelgh 1borh0od
into
King Drive
1has transror ·med radi 1cally
political
activi~
for which it is now
since the earl y 20dl cen.tury. In the Ii 940s,
ramous
(well..
among
.sdholars
1of
i£ was a priimarily whice nelghborllood;
:ir.s
lrlaving focused

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racial integrity
was ooded
into law by
what :a.re ca.tiled c rest1r 1ictive covenantsn. 1
By the _ '60s., these covenants were legally
unenforceable~ howev er . in practice, the
c:ity remained
(and remains) substantially
seg 1re;gated. Ove 1r timet the racial and
economic composition
of 'Woodlawn had
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c::ommu 1nity organizing~ anyway) ..
Tha
¥1'oodlawn 1
Organizatio

1n

(T,mW.O ..) was founde ad in 1960 out of
basement
0.f the first
P1
resbyter 1
ian
Church
at t;◄th & Kimbark under the
gurdance of Sau~ AHnsky., the l~gendary
1
community
organizer
(who incidentaUy
the
1

llad been an und ergraduate at UChicago).
It launched a campalgn ·Cjo prevent the

Co17poration, which was once a subsidiary

1

. of T ..'VV~O .. and ilis currend:,: one of the
!University
of Ch icago t'1om expanding _ rargest landowners im Woodlawnr
These
i1nto
w ·oodlawn.
Univers .ity
offic iars leaders
developed
· and
maintained
~ismiss .ed ~he group at first" but by 191
63., substantial
and
transformative
,.....

h"1ps
'Ui.nt.
_h
.iL.
LI
· ~ vars1ty
· - .
T ..W ..O ~ and the Universicy ha,d :t!gr-ceed -reurt1ons
.,,.I!!
u ,~_ n1
~hat ilt w ould stay north of 61st St. - and in
ad 1m .in~strators diro~gh 1 neg ,otiations
in
rewrn~ T ..~..O .. -wouldn~t comphu in about
the Sixties .. Almough the University scaled
that moderated ·expansion. The c.ampaign
bati:k ·its invoJvement in 'W'oodlawn for a
1ransformed
the
neighbo 1
r1iood,
while, the 1neighborhood
r .amai 1n 1s
devete>iPing loca .l un -e lector-al leadership
incredibly impac .ted by and subiect
Which conrlnues to , h~d sway in the
to decisions
that ar ·e made in the
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community ..
Bishop Arthur
Brazier, T ..W ..O.!.s first
president, rounded A,pos .tolic Church of
God at 6Jn:I & Dorohester; Le1on Finney,
i1ts first executive
directo r.,. runs the
1

VVoodlawn

Gentrifica .tion
&

Community

DeVielopment

A .dministration
building
on
Ellis
Avenue .
Currently~
develo 1
pment
decisions made by ~d with the support
of Uni~ersity administrators
are priming
the
ne~borhood
for
anotJner
transformation ..

M orc recently ·, the .niversity has tried co tak.c a more positive role in
Development
the development of Hyde Park, , primarily through commercial
developmen 1t on 53rrd Stl'eet. Hyde Park"s main oom.merciail cotri rdor .
However., 1controversy has arisen ove .F whether o.r not the changes planned by ·the
University \Viii be good, b3/ and ·1arge~ for the 11eighborh ood an d its 1iesiden1s-1especially those not affiliated wid1 the University ..
The m.ain deve .lo,pment initiati 1ve l.ed by the . niv ersity is 1the rede ·velopmenl of ·
Harper: Court at .S3rd Street between Harper Avenue and ·Lake Park Avenue, a $114
million projecl that is expec.ted to be completed by the end of 2013. Supported by the
1City ofChicag ·o in b 1oth oft11ese endeavors; the University has already rcop iencd. ..Harper
·Theater, and several ne·w businesses snch as. Clark e~,s 2,4-hour diner and K.ilwin "s (an i1ce
cl'\eam .and fudge shop based in Lincolni Park) have als ro opened. When complete~
Harper Court will include a l 30- ·room Hyatt h.otel, I 2 stories of office space that wi l:I
mo •stly be used by Univcrsily faculty 267 new apartments, and .30;000 sq .. ft 10.f retail
space~ Some of the new busin .esises include LA fitness, Starb11cks, Chipotle, Ja'GriU,
Park T .avem ~ Porlcchop, Ulta B.. eauty. an .d Sir & Madame (an upscale fashion bouti que).
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Community View ·s
Hyde Park reside ,n1s hav,e vojced
t'"
discontent with several aspects of the 53rd
stteet developm ,ent project,. such as the b.eavy
..
hand . ofth c University in · makin ,g decisions,
the ·decreL~e in alTordabJe h.ousing the impact .
on ~urrounding residential area~ and die
.
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.
increase in the cost of Iiving.
-~~ ., :'- •. :t ~ rs,; ""~ . •
The University has acknowledged th.at its dcvc ·lopmcnt plans arc intended
primarily to serve University .students and faculty~ .as '-Yell as make the neighborhood
more attractive for prospec ·tive stoden rts. "ll"s enligb 1
tened self-interest for us,:'~~aid
David Greene~ executive vice president of the University . ·'We"ve alway 's been ·very
competitive wl1en it comes to providin2 a .great intel~ectual community _ But we found
there
·',.,..[liJ~s
:s_ om
·_ _ eth
~n°
- *·s s~ mg
· ·.- " wh en
· ·· ·we_ Io· oked
.. 1·1ty
£""e
for
- nd_
__ __
q
_ _ 1
_~ m1_
__ _ at
_ _ the
___ q ua
_ o- f 1~
11c
_ _ _ s tudents
_ _ _ _a~
f'aculty who are used to tf,le kinds of amenities yo1u fin .din places New York , Bosto~ and
Palo Alto ..·H As a result, many community members hav e complained tha.t they we1e rto it
included -in the planning aod dlat lbc dcvclopmcnl is n-ot i.ntcndcd to serve the broader
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community ~
Yet many of the new developmJ.tnts are coming at the expense of l.ocal bu.sinesses
tha.t ba"re had a long presence in Hyde Park~ The Mo .bi) Gas station -.-nd car wash on
53rd street between Kenwood Av,eiirue and Kirn.bark Avenue are closing to make way
for a 12-story apartmc rnt tower ~and ·other btisincsscs such as Aparuncnt Flnders~
Kirnon ti SaJ0 1n , .Lake Beauty Sup ,ply t the T-shirt shop Pro 1p aganda, the c lothin :g ,store
Tina's Designs, and Atino's Pizza have also closed . Other business such Hyde Pack
- Cigars and the Original Pan ·cake House ha .ve ~oved to different nearby locations
There are also concerns tµ.at the developments will
the cost of living and
. incriease
.
will make Hyd ,e Park unaffordable for low -i'ncom e ho ruseholds ,. Average .rent prices in
Hyde Parle have already risen . in th e past fe"( years .. with . the number o f rent-hUf\dcned .
liesidenis incTeasmg by 15% in tl1e last 10 y·ear.s~ and the presence ormore upscale
businesses 0n 531td Stroot will cause rent ·prices to c limb even , higher ~ Even graduate
students ha ·ve eomplained that fent prices are too high~ and as a r-esu.lt many do not live
io lhe neighborhood.
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~s 10
-•
· ·
. _ Consid
_ ___ _ e..,
Thl•-ng:_
T~e ne,.v University -led developments in Hyde Parle may b[ing trendy new
bus ·i nesses to the neighborh .ood . But they may also cause the tr ansfor,na ·tion of Hyde
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tro1n a racially integrated, economi ,cally ·in·tegrated neighborhood

-.one of the tew such
ne ·ighborhoods in Chicago - into a predominantly ~bite, upper class neighborh 'ood ~As a
result. not only may Hyde Park lose some of it-s origi nal character, bu.t many l9wincome families in Hyde Parle will lhave to rel ,ocate to other neighborhoo4s tli1Bthave
higher crime rates and ·worse schools~ C ommcrc _ial dcve .io ,pmon1 is not a bad thing, but it
needs to happen with the input of community residents in 0 rder to create a. truly vibl'a:nt
1co ·mmunity that im ,proves the quality or life ~or everyDne~
So nexr time y ou 'l"e enjoying the newest amenities of 53rd street. , consider:
o
Whal sort o·rr'esponslbl llty d,es the Uni'Yersity have J• the
development of Hyde Pa :rk. and what sort of .ro,le ·should it play?
o Wh .al: inequities are created . or aggravated by g·entr1 ·n 1
catlon?
o 'Who be11ertts ,and who is harmed by the develop -ment on SJ~d ,?
a
Whal can the U .n1i'Yersity a1od the Hyde P-a.rk community -do to ensure
that development is eq,uitab ,le?
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Development in Woodlawn has al.so been occurring to a lesser extent. Beginning
in the l 990s., there was an c·ffort partially l cd by members of TWO ro_revitalize
Woodlawn tbrougih new housing ·constructio~ At the forefront of ~is -init~ti~e was
Columbia Pointe, a development that plaDDed 10 fill most of 63rd street from Kenwood
lo -Ingleside with single•fapJily townhouses , (but was only partiaUy comp leted). Durin ,g
lhe housing boom of the mid-2000~ Woodlaw1t 'became a hot .spot for new construction,
and by 2006, th .c average sales price had reached $250,000 .. M.orc UChicago students
a·nd staff moved into 1he neighJbarhoo ,d (concentrated near 61 t street), and there werte
concerns ·of increasing rents and displacement of community members.
New construction has largely stopped since 2008 due to the housing crisis, m1d
the average sales price ·has consistently been under $100,00.0 . There is evidence that the
neighborhood demographics have changed somewhat. The median ho 1u ,sehold income
has increased from $22,000 to $27 ,.000, and the w ·hite population has increased from
700 to 1.,700 residents. Meanwhile$ crime bas decJieased by nearly 50% since 2000.
However;. Woodlawn tcmains ·predominantly Afr i.can -Am erican and Jow-incom ,c,
es_pecially west of Cottage Gr-ove .
One recent controversy in Woodlawn is Woodlawn Park, the planned
redevelopment of Grove Park Seoti ,o~ 8 housing complex'7 which occupies Cottage
Grove _Avenue from 60th stree ·t to 63rd street. TI11e plan calls for mixe~income
units
from 61st to 63rd and retail from ·601h to 61.sl ~It has received S30 million ·in federal
fun .ding , and some cons ttuction has alr~ady taken place. However~ con.move.rs.yhas
arisen over anolh ·er part of the :plant which in-voilves ~onverting courtyard apartments a:t
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62nd and Rhodes

62nd :and Eberhart,

and 62nd and Vemon into section 8 housing ..As
such, some are worried that the develop ,ment will onl ·y move h,w-income housing
further away from the University ,and into an area that is already affected by
disproportionate levels -of poverty · and crime .

Police & s .afety
History oft lhe UCPD
When the University -of

Ch1icago Police Dep iartment was

initt:iaHy c1reate d by the University

only 1wo private detectives.

in the :1960 s it consisted

of

.

the UCP D ha S

Since then,

to employ 140 full-time

expanded

·

p·ollice

officers with an operat ing budget of $5,500,000
per year, 1making it the second la 1rgest private police force-after

the Vatican llThe

original boundaries af the police .patrol 0f the IUCPD·were 47th
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Street, 61st Street, and Cottage Grove ..H0wev er, in· 2001., the bo undaries were
extended
to 64th St~eet on the south an d 391th Street on the north, with sm,all
...
extensions to co'Ver U niversity --run charter schools. The U1CP'D now p atrols an area of
overthr iee square miles where 65 1 000 people live, and since CPD coverage lessened in
the area, the UCPD is th e m1ain pol it e gresenc ,e in their patrol ! area _
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The UICPD is no ·t required to re ·veal its policies

(unlike the CPD)., but has

openly admitted to racial profilin ·g ..No t only have bllack community residents
unaffiliated with the University been es_
peciaUy targeted, but black univer,s ity 5tudents
h ave also reported i ncide n ts of ra1
c ia I proifil in g. In pa rti cu Iar, blaelkst ud1e nts ha.ve been
frequently asked to show their st udents IDs when they are near campus and have
co11sequently fe It unwe Jcome ·. In addition, there have been a few incidents lnv.orving
_the UCPD in particu l ar ·that have ca used the s,tude ·nt community to questio -n its
pol'icies .. Fca
1r example, in 2010, Mauri 1
c~ IDa·wson, a black stud ,@ntwho was misbehaving
in the Regenstein, was asked by UCPD officef"s to show his ID, and W'as arrested when
he refused ..tn addltJ.on, this year, four Universirty stud 1
ents we -re arrested by ·the UCPD
durin ,g a pea rceful protest about the need fgr a Ulnive~ity-run
traum 1a -~enter.
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A Different

Per .s.pectiv 'e ·on 1the Role of the UCPD Today:

by Cameron Okeke
The University of Chicago Pol ice Department
(UCPD) is composed of some of
the most courageous po ,Hcemen and wome11 in the city of Chicago, but they are
human, nevertheless ... lde ,ntities are m istaken and liberties are taken in their aim of
protecting
us ..The question remains: what ex.actly·a ar,
e they cna ,rged to protect --us
fro .m? Who exactly tasks this private police force to protect us? Haw do we me iasure
their suc.-c
:ess? The ,se are ques-tlo ns that many students , struggle to answer, despit
,e
,
attending a university founded upon open discourse. In order to un de 1rstand one
possible explanation for controversies
regard 'ing the U CPD and the differing views of
safety att -he College, a couple thing .s must be clear. First, the Unh,ersity's .11anguard
must not be misconstrued !,as the Ch icag 10 PoHce Dep iartment (CPD); tlley differ in
responsibility and trranspariency. The latter i.s a public service paid for by the City of
Chicago to p1rot~ct all with in the city limits .. To make this e asy they h,ave white and
blue car1sand give very little special treatment to Chicago students .. Sec~nd, statistics
indicate that th@ average violent criim e rate from th .@l,ast s y·@a1rs raises from 113 to 273
when you inc .lud ,e the immediate areas around the South Kenwood-H 'yd e Park .area,
which means the inc .lusi 1on of '10 bl0 1c ks. n iorth (un!tU 371 h St re 1et) and 4 blocks south
(until 64th Street) accounts mc;,sreth ,an haff of the total crime in the UCPD patrol ar -ea.
Th@ sheer size of th@ UCPD is impressive, compris i ng of 143 police officers, ] arrn 1ed with
a 5.5 millio,i doUar budg ,et .. Statistically, we are in good hands, right? Well, controversy
has swirled around the UCP ·D ~s m _ethods of sec·ur-,ng the camp us, and ' mo reeve r, its
inability to have an open dialogue with civilians ..Thou 1
gh UCPD is a private po[i .ce force
ofth.e univers irty 1 it does police publ lic property~ removing unaffiliated
members of the
community from campus ..Charges oif 1
raci 1al pro ·fili 1
ng have been bro ught up against th e
CoHege' 's p1
01lice 1 but aU of these com 1pla ints almost always rema in in their infancy
(editor's not.e : we're not sure where thjs factoid comes from). Many students of dark rer
complextcns
have complained that UCPD targets them in order to prevent crime.
Undeniab~y there •s a range of opi .cnons on ho ·w sa fe UCPD n:'akes the ca 1rnpus .. l firmly
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believe thatth ie feeling of uneasiness
.
perc eive -d h aras5ment of students ..

[prompts

more extreme
'

measure :s1ike the

1

l't is h,ard to pinpoint where fear of the surrounding community co mes from, but it is
undeniabte that Hyide Par 'k is one of the safest "communities in the Southside of

Clhicago, due larg ely in part by the efforts the men and women of the UCPD ..StHll,
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. ..

students cannot be careless. One of the la1rgest breaches of security at the u~ivers ity is
uneducated fear of ub 1i1qiuitous "ot~er'. If we as a student body can for more
prote cti.on, then we must have a perceived t!hreat., but many of us are unaware to what
degree we 1are isolat ied fr 1om the community~ So as it stands now, UCPD is efficiently
stopping ,crime and keep ring hdangerous~, '"extraneous" indiv 1id -uars off our r;:.ampus, but
1at the expense of p rovok~ng hostility from community members put off by signs of
paranoia and distrust {Uke random police stops). So how do we fix this? W1e ·must raise
awaren iess of our surroundings, both on a personal and cammuna -11,evet Students
must be more thoroughl ly eduicated on t:he history of the Southside of Chicago~ Next
time you interact with the UCPD, think ab outtheir moti vations. Are the UCPD h1
ow
cops should act? Ai din~ certain civHians instead of persecuting them i.n respect of the
law? Or dce ·s th ·is stem ftom a great sense ·of privilege and coddling byth ie University
-for its stude rnts? Or do they ,just have ·.r-e~Hyawesame-~ooki"ng cars? Nlone of these pressing questions can be ans .wered with a Go ,ogle search, save from the last one; 0 n 1ly
irfthe stude ·nt body becomes aware of , what th ,e demand for more security means.

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For stiH anothe:rview 0 0 the role of the u ·cPD. see J0 1n ·Catlin's anicj ,e "I Was
Robbed ·in the M aa-0011: http:Jfchic ·agomaroon !com/2013Jo3/12/1055.58J.
A victim o·f crime recounts hi.s struggle with these q1u~stions of campus .
s ecurity and its eth;ca il imp l icati0ns ..
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W hat can I do to stay safe?
1

.
.
Jt is definitely
rea :s-on.abJe. to take safety pr:ecautions, just as ·you would in any J~rrge urban
a,rea .. However 1 it is equaHy important to avoi ·d racially r:,rofiling ..If you move to ,the other
s.ide of tile street when
you see an approaching
, black male. you could potentially avoid l
.
.
the unlikely possibility ·of personal harm - but you are also ~abeling the person a
pote:ntia ,I crrimina l and are therefore contributing to the -very problem of racial
1

stereotyping.

Instead, co,ns 'idertaking

the foUowing measures

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T

to protect you,setf!

It can actually lbe
easy to spot
sc,meone with a
concea red ~ea 1pon
by Jocking at his
or he ir clothing or

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two of where you
~eedt0 1go~

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C'.ONU!1:CUOUS

Street, Woodlawn

...
.

~
lffl1J ~

alidl!

travel !t io or fro 1m .
an off-campus
loc ,at ion at n ig h"t
use the Nlight Ride
Shuttl ies that can
drop you off

sc,~
,eets such as
ssth Street, 53ro

p&UdiJl:l
d'llt ~~

~

If you ne ,ed to

trave l on busy

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a block or

ti .. Ha

,/11,i.6',IA
in'II ~~ or 111.K...,.llaffl~

posture

within

a hidden handgun

Spotting

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p.~

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Avenue, orL .ake

Pa r1k Avenu e.

11.

.

...

Trans ortali0_n_EolJtics~

_

_

rl

.
- 1hle wli1
I tenyou lime and time again to "get out of Hyde Park and
.. ms u.
...., ways
Dunng your time. ere, PetlP_-ble - tms can be done ·rn a vari8~,i
,.,.
explore
1he
aty
as
much
as
pOSSI

90
Walking: have. furl with that Chicago is eXJpa.nstve,
and mos~ewrything is farther away than it ~ook.s4
1(tf you haWttime and are prepared for lhe weather, however, walking is lovely.)
Bildng: There ar~ ~ots of lovel,Y bike baits you can use; my favorite one runs up Lake Mlichigan. Please
abide by 1raffiGlaws
Car~: 17herers·traffic., Lots of it. Cabs iniout of· Hlyde Park can be super expensive. and parking in
Hyde Park is generafilya pain.
IMe1ra: A commulerraii . It runs on 1he hour, and is pretty isafated,as far as public ·nnsporta1tion g1
oes.
lf you -wan I something mCJreexpansive•. cheap and pollica H;yengaging ~he CTA~s your go-le .
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J

Crime and the CTA
Some people have more of an aversi~n to ·taldng public transit th.an ·othersi unfortunately.
particularly taking the green line. ·These aversions stem from a fear of crime rates on the CTA,

'

'

.

especiatty aroond low-income areas..Many of these fears are uinfounded and based upon dated
statistics.Five of the ·six stationswith lhe hlQhest crime ratestall alongthe red line* which people
generally prelerto use .. Funhermoref between 2009 and 20 12, the most aimes per slatron aIrea
happened in lhe Loop· 749 crimes happened in the Loop track,itself. while 217 crimeshappened
on he Rooseve1rt
station irn1hesouth loop. Petty ·theft 'took up ihe highest percentage of these
crimes. (Source: Alex Bordens. Chicago Tribune Graphics) While It is always Important to be
vigilant about your person and you1
r belongir1gst1precalJtionsabout-crime doesntl need to tum inlo
fear of tJhe:places where crime could potentially happen.
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CTA Over the Y e,ar,s
B-ecauseuanspodartion is by nat~re dynamic, the CTA tends to go through changes.Many of the
original elevated lines and branches sj1mpty don t exJst anymo1re. Up until 1946, Chicago R~pid
Transi l Company was the_head honcho of public transit When ·the CTA ulomatelytook Clver,i1
...
streamlinedthe entire system.removingexpress services~
! dosi~ngstationsi .and even d'ismantUng
miles of lrack. Anyone who wishes to complainabout lack of'•lfack lnlo Hyde Park (lhe Green Line
used to run au the way to Slony ls1andAvenue) can 1hankthis deasm ..To be lair, the rise of the
highways ~which prompted many Americans to move to the suburbs and decreased CTA
ridership.dtidrf t help.
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FutureProjects


Transporlation renova1·ions a re not a _thing the past. You' 11notice 1ha1t1he
red Hne ls not undergoing. its main route;· d~e to constn.rotlon,Roosevelt to S5th will see·no red
line service,and 63rd 1095th will see no ra iis a1alt The red line is tJhe1011ly
quick means of
ilransportation mira tot of people oo lhe far south side. Si m1ilatly, ChinatoVJ ,1is also le-ft out of the .
rail route.There are busesto accommodale ~e displaced riders. but are those an acceptable
altemative? The red line rehalbilita1iionis on ryone part ol a massi've capital program..The CTA
ptans to replace its flleelwtth brand new cars, redo lots of new stations and even expand el lines
again. Expansions -of th~s type are··usualli)'good 1Nngs~who doesn t lorv& easier access to publi c
transportation? The CTA's capital program is estimated to cost around $20 biHiorn.PJbout40o/ool
CT.Aannual revenue comes from oome from the $2.25 you pay every time you tap ,your Chicago
Cardi.That means CTA rider1S
will conmbule $8 bUfion to lhese projects. Butw,hich CTA riders ·w1H
end up paying the most?
· Recently·, the dai'ly
Who pi■,s few
urnHmited
cards almost doub!led
·lhttCTA?
~-:,,-w'•
.... ........,....__ ,c_
in price . Often 1heseprices
' _1!.
-f>-(~ ...-.-:l
· affect people unequallyi..One
reoenit CTA study (reported by
ti'i[; ~; -:.,o

Kevin O'Neil of ChicagoNlow)
.. ~~~
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found out that people lving in poverty mos.tty peid CTA fares in casnr leav"'g them unable to
access the free ·transfers that come with CTA cards . Since CTA cards can on~ be pun;hased at
train stations tots of people ar~ at a disadvantag1
e. The CTA passes they do buy are often
un~m1ttedday passes - which almosl doubled in prices firom lasl year __
In short minority and law1ncome residents are bearing the bna1t for these changes. Meanwhile~ most of the extensio1nswill
venture into 1hesuburbs , away _
from lhe peopte suffering lhe consequences.
. When we take rorms 0ftransportation , we must ast ourselves : wbo"s gelling us form point
a to poinl b? lMJo•s paying the most for these services? Who do these forms of transportation
primarily serve? Is lh is intentional? Does transportation a cli veryen courage or discourage the_
integration of dffferent neighbDrh~s?
Gelling out of Hyde Park-or even travelling around it-is so much-moire than expionng
dlfferen I places.Often ., it carries a pol ilicaI act in itself . However. no matter \IJhai any form of
transportation is better 1hanslaymg in 1he Hyde Park bubble· if you want to be an active 1
and
engaged member of the com1
m·un1ty
..Transportationis oonfusing,,but so are 1many other important
things in life~
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..

15
I 1

......
...

..

..,,.

A Ra dical Hi~tory
1

of ·Hyde Park

The g1-eatfo1·ce qfhistory c■omesfrom thefact that uie ca ,ny i.'t withi:n :us.,are un,vnsciouslyi controlled
by it in many ways JIand history is literally present in all tlw't we do ~ - James Baldwin
.
.
185os: Paul Cornell, a businessman
and abolitionist, bo 1u,ght 300 acres ~f land between

and , 55 111 streets .. Several houses were used as stops in the Un derground Railroad.
Dutch farmers · arrived in . present..,day Woodlawn.
1.861.: Hyde Park Townsl1ip established,
spanning 39 th to 6.3"-1 st~~eetsbut later extended to
138 th and as far west ,as State St.
51s

The Wate1r Tower
was rme of the
few buildings to
survive the Great

Fire

,

May 1-4, 1886: The Haymarket Riots began as a rally in ·'
support of the 8-hour work day. A bomb W8Sthrown
police
and the ensuing gunfire riesu.lted in .,deaths of 8 poli 1ce, and over
50 civilians were killed or wound ,ed ,..Eight anarchists were tried
for murder; four were exe .cuted although the prosecution
conceded none had thrown the bom ,b~

at

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1871: The Great Fire destroy a third of the cityJ!including the
.--. . . entire ,central busin~ss district. The south side ·expan ds q-ui cldy
as rich and poor alike leav~the city center.
1.8891 Hyde Park and Wood -lawn . are annexed to -the city of
Chicago as the Hyde Park To'Vmship disbands; , much of th .e
"south side" is cre ·ated :in th ,e process . ·
1892: The University of Chicago is fu ,unded~ Marion Talbot, first Dean of Women,
becomes one of nine female faculty ·members at UChicago and cham ·pions education fur
women ..
189 13: 27.5 million visitors and 20,.000
new residerits flock to Hyde .P ark .for the World's
Columbian Expositio ·n. In the subsequent building boom~ developers landscaped Jacks.on
P'ark., created the Midw~y, expanded the El east along 63·.,and constructed large
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apartments

and hotels.,

189 ,4: 30 ,00 employees of Pullman Palace Car Co~ on the south side strike in response to
wage reductions. 1:25 .,00 ,0 American Railway Union wo ,rl<Jersjoined the strike in solidarity .,
but thousands of U,S ·militacy ·personnel broke up the famous Pu llman Strike~

The University Se:nate voted to approve segregation of th e sexes in the classroom
until students~ third year. Objections poured . in and the debate continued until the policy
was changed .a few years later 191.0-1970:
New employment •0 pp ortunities in northern in 1d .ustry an 1d inexpe11 .sive, but
substandard 1 housing led to the migration of many Mriean A.mericans to Chicago (over
500,000
people by 1970), many of whom sett]ed . in Hyde Park area.
•919: During the Red Summer of 1919, race riots plagu ,ed Chicag ,ojl precip~tarted .by the
drowning of an African American .teen whose raft crio,ssed ·onto the white-o ,nly section of a
beach . at 29 th St. Seven days of shootin_.,gstarsons, and beatin .g.s (m ostly ethnic whites
1902:

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attacking African Americans
in the Black Belt) result ,ed in 38 de ·aths, 5 ,37 injuries, and
1000
residents wE:re left homeless ..A grand jury indicted 17 black people, bu't no whites ..
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9 21.: Georgiana
Simpson, one of the first African American women . to receive a PhD in
the US, earn 1ed her ·1doct~rate at U of C ..
:t.927: The Chicago Real Estate Board sent speakers around the south side urging ·white
homeowners to s~gn covenants promising not to sell or lease pro .petty' to non-whitt;!S ..
These so-called '~restrictive covenants' 1 contributed
greatly to the currr~nt racial
_ .se~egatio ,n in the Hyde Pal"k area b .efi)re ~eing declared unconstitutional
in the 4os.
1 933: Then-Preside
.nt Hutchins of U of C prr,oposed merging the university with
Northwestern
into "The Universities
of Chicagon due to the Depression.
Much student
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opposition on botl, campuses ultimately sh ·ut down the proposal. ,
:1.937: _In the Memorial
Day Massacre, the Chicago Police Dept .. opened

fi :re on a parade · of
unarmed striking steel workers and their families at the gate of th .e Republic Steel Comin
Sa 1uth Chicago .. Fifty people were shot, of wh ,om 1.0 later di ed, and hundre .ds were b ,eaten
with clubs. No polic,a were prosecuted ..
1 945:: When .t'he Quadrangle
Club refused membership -to tenured black professor Allis .on
Davis and . rumored pacifist Gordon Dupee, a ;g;ronp led b ,y Dean of Social Scie .nces Robert
Redfield sought to amend th .e Quad Club 's constitution to end discriminatory
membership
- practices. The amendments
were defeated 182 to 85., ]eading Redfield and others to resign ..
The n .ext day, 1.7 employees walked o·ut at lunch , protesting the club ;,s racism. "'\¥ithout
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fanfare , the Quad Clu .b opened its doors to women and minorities
1 949=

H yde Park- ,Kenwood CommunltY.'
Conference formed .. Over 50 area o·rganizations,
including - every-- local church ail_d te .mple ;,iPTAsJ'
and U of C faculty ,and stu .d ents 1 were
rep ,res jented at the gro . p's initial ·meeting .. The
HPKC C played a large role in the urban renewal
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soon after.

L M. P~·Ps llnh,ers:ity Pa1tk CondominiuYRS alo11,g 55 th
Strreutal"e one example of l9fios ·urban l"en.e'WW
·projects in Hyde Park (and the way tb.e buildings
interrupt non:h -south traffic along ~~ St. has been
cited as a way o segregate Hyde Par-kl

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projects that spanned the next couple decades.
1.950 s ·- :1960s: U.rban renewal of Hyde P ar~
i_n it"'
-1ed
---ed_ 1a_
_ __b:,J'
J u ·ch_ 1·cago
, r_e-a_m
_ u--_p illmth the1

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__

D·ewly-formed Sou h East Chicago Comm~ion
(SECC), which was designed . to remove '~light
an .d p ·revent ~'white flight.,, Blocks of decayed

housing and other buildings

were demolished
an .d redeyeloped,
tneaning the housing units
.
· primarily occupied by poorer black people and other minorities disappeared and the .
residents could no longer afforo to live in the area. The U of C's '\irban li@newal,,. effortcalled "'negro removal~' by some-also
resulted in the demolition
of a number of cultural
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on 55th St in , Hyde : Park and an artist.st colony at 57 th and Stony~ Hyde Park and
South Kenwood weiie the ·n established as avowedly ·middle-class
and 'reJuctantly

centers

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interracial" neigbborh _oods ~
1952: The UChicago Sigma Chi c'hapter
membership policy.
1

in protest

s first postindustrial
crisis occurred,,
comp ,anies began to close down and thousands lose jobs.
1955-196os:

; Chicago

disbands

of the frat"s ~whites only'

as ma}or m ,eatpacking

Alderman

a champi,qn of 1civil rights, served as
ni-- 1 ries
· argued
·
· ·c4vil rights, fair
---.
alderman of Hy de. Park . He
passiona t ely for
and open housin&. racial integration,. an d historic preseversation.
Known as "th e liberal conscience of Chicago~ and "the .lone Neg,o vote
on City Cou~cil (despite being white), he was for many ye ,ars the lone
-,~ alderman in opposition to Mayor Daley and the Dem oc.ratic machineo;
•'"
~:
:.i
: ~..} _-.};: :195 9: Under the ·threat of U or,(C)isbulldoz ing W'oodlawn., 1f-amed
ll955 i--l.975i , Leon Despres,

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organi?£r Saul Alinsky,. Rev ..Arthur Brazier of the Apostolic Church of
God,, and Leon Finney co-founded The Temporar:y W'oodlawn
Organization Oater renamed The W"oodlawn Organization , TWO), a
I
" n o~
fhrch
~
.... assoc1at
.... 1on
grassroots co al
-. "'
1tio
-c -u - -1es, . b: us1nesses,
an d- c1rv1c
u~ited against the U of C".s urban renewal plan . and working to emp ,ow-er Woodlawn
res idents toward ''black self-determination
.." They also fought against 'Slumlords,
e·xp loitative local me1"Chants11!scho ol overcrowding;
made efforts to get r esi 1dents
involved in the civil righ its movement;
and challenged Mayor Daley's politica]
machine by registering te ·ns of thousands. of black voters. . ·
I96os:
.Jeff Fo:rt and E~gene "Chief Bull" Hain;to n for,n the Blac:ks ·tone Rangers (Black P
Stone Nation) .. Unl .ik.e other gangs:, the group staned or ganizing in Woodlawn by 1965,
allying several gang~ into the tHRanger,Nation,, rcoalition. They ' have been credited with
keeping re1ative ~ace on the South Side in 67458, following the ·
assassination
of MLK, and atteillpting to make lasting peac :e to
decrease gang fighting ..They becam e politicized and got in ·volved
with the Black Panthers; by 69~ they were up 001at least 800 0
members on the South Side. They were also the first stFeet
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organization
to s et up clubs in other cities, includ ,ing Milwaukee,
Cleveland, and Gary by 1967. They worked closely fflth TWO.
Aug 11960: Norman . and Velma-Hill, bY :o civil rights activists
and leaders in th e NAACP Youth Council~ recruit young people of
· color,
well as some white U of ,C students, to protest
~-~ills
re.tu~
tu Rmn.huw
..
'
R
a"'
b
Be
ch
The
..
.
d
h
all
So yeill.ll's 111ater,.
to ,
segregati 0D at . .in ow -•··. a . · .. - · ' protestors VJS1te~ t · e · · comm.emora .te their · wot'k.
white beach for a .nonviolent wade-in. After two hours without
incide :nt~ a crowd of an ,gry white men .arriVied and pelted the prolestors with rocks · and
slurs . Velma was hit in the hea d, n!Quirlng sti .ches, but the protestors returned and
accessed the beach 1 this time under tlie protection of the C·PD;p
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of the student government and the lrocal cha .pter of the Congress of Racial
Equality occupied the area outside P·resident George ·Beadle's office to charge the 'U of C
with discriminatory
practices in managing its off-campus rental housing ..
ll963: UChicaga and '!WO ·reach an :agreement
res ,tricting University expansion of the
south cmnpus, stabilizing the relationship
between ~0/Wood.lawn
and the University~ _
The University agreed not to acquire property 01:" develop south of 61s,t 'street and TWO won
public housing ·along Stony lslan .d (on land leased fro m U of ,c for $1. a year) and on the
west side of Cottage G·rove, from the city (Grove P arc Plaza) ..
:1962.: Members

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May ·19 66: President Beadle cam .e under fire again,
this time for announcing that th 1e University would
release class ranks and other academic information to
the .Selective Service draft boards ..For s·ix days some
400 stu .dents waged a sit-in at the admin building
~hile another six students h.eld a weeklong sit-in and
h1.1:ngerstrike at the Quad ,Club.
May 1967: One year later, 120 students hosted
another anti~draft demonstration.., this time holding a
~~study-in" .at the admin building for several hours .. ·
Almost half of the students were suspended, tliough
· Leon Finney has been inVtived wtth T¥1O
and community development . m Woodlawn
many of their punishments
were not canied out.
l'oir more than.-four dl!cade, .
.
Nov 1.967: 11le University releases the (in)famous
Kalven Report, which declares lhe U of C"s ideological and .political neutrality ..
1967: The Women 'ts Radical Action Project (WRAP). the u·niversitys first women"s
]iberation group, formed to discuss politics, learn ,about self-defens~ and create art
through classe s,1coffeehouses11 and consciousness Aft-er tc-acbing at th e u of c. Pr1
ofenoc
raising sessions.
Marlene Dixon founded and led the .
Dwamut:r.,,1tk:Work:ra78 Patty. A .MilrXist
Nov ·. ·1.968: Members of SDS ,·(Stud .en .ts for a
feminist, Dbron was also an . advocate for ga~
libe.nmon and anti -racism
. De .mor;ratic Society) and the Hyde Park Area DTaft
Resisters~ Union demonstrated
at a civic dinner in
hon -or of newly appointed President Edward Levi , in
protest ofth 1e 1dinner's main speaker, McGeorge
Bundy ·, who was the ncational security adviser t io
Presid ents _Kenn 1edy aitd J ,ohnson ..
.
1.9_69: "When the univrersity announced irt would not
reappoint Professor Marle ·ne D .ixo~, 400 students
occ .up ied the admin building fo:r-over two weeks, citing
Dixon's leftist political views and he ,r status as 1on 1e of
few women on the faculty as reasons for her
t~rmination.
In Feb., the "chickenshit guerilla brigade'?
barricaded . a group of administrators
inside the Quad
Club, chanting "61!" in reference to the n ·umberof
students already _suspended for the protest. On Feb 24,
100 students
gathered at. the p .l'\eside :nt ~s .house to
~emand that the disciplinacy co mm.ittee accept a collective defensell By March, over 100
students were expelled or suspended.
In May, 6 ·o professors stood in sil ient vigil outside
th e Quad Clu.b in hopes of reducing the punish .ments;i to no avail .
~969: History professor Hanna Holborn Gray is appointed the first w 0,man president of
UChicago (a ·nd the first female p resident of any major research university in .the ·'US).
· 1 969-19 73: U of C students and other Hyde Parkera offer eounseling
and arranged
. abortions and late ·r performed undergr 0,und abortions themselVies under the name of the
Abortion Counseling Service of the Chicago Women's Liberation Unio ·n, later kno'Wll as
JANE. By the .1973 Roe u Wade decjg ,ion, JANE members arranged an estimated 11,000
abortions acr ioss the city ..
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.1.969: The University of Chicago Gay Liberation Front,
Chicago's first LGBTQ 1ibe :ration organization,
formed at
U of C .-The group held a 600 person dance party~ in
Pierce Tower, before being .absorbed into the larger
Chicago Gay Liberation Front ~
1973 ,: A group , of Hyde P·ark women established the Rape
Action Group H .otlin .e .
1.985 t ~omen of the U 0 f C cam ·pus organized the
After j'oinln.g tilie Cb~o
Gay Libe rartion
school ,s fi ·Fst sorority ~Alpha Omicron Pi.
Fmnt ,. U ol C ~tudents help-ed p lan and
marched in Ch i~ago ·s firSt Gay :rnde
:1986: Six public housing high-rises~ referred to as the
P~tade..
Lakefro~t Properties, were closed for renovation and the
families that lived . there were dispersed across the city and promised a home. Two
· buildings were remodeled and reopened five years later, .but the other four were
demolished, leading activists and public ho~ing residents to protest
1.988: Jeff Fort was convicted of plotting against the u·s
governm.ent for his involvement with Libyan Black
nationalists.
Fort was jailed, and the Black P .. Stone
· Nation splintered
into sever ,al different gangs with no
centralized leadership, a situation that persists and fuels
gang activity today.
1992: During the height of suburban sprawl~ the C7A
faced a large ,budget deficit and announced that it would
shut down what is now the Green Line due to low
ridership and . poor infrastructure.
T\vo years of
.
resistance
and action convinced the CTA to in ,vest an
unprecedented
snm of $300 million to rebuild ·the
existing railways5. The lin .e reopened in May of 1996,
~ .J eff Fon. fomnd cr o f the Blackstone
though its southeast en ,d had been shortened, from
f )tan_g ~ , is cur~tl_y iftca ~r ated in the
Stony Island to Cottag~ Grove.
, AD X Florence SUpermax Prisou .
1996: After a decade of campus organizing, , faculty'
(including Leora Aus lan .der, Lauren Berlant, and Eliza .beth HelsingeT) established the
Center for Ge,nder Studies. 'The Oenter's Lesbian an ,d Gay Studies P.roject was created a
year later .
ll998: The U of C added sexual oriientation
to its no ,n-discrimination
policy .. Gender
identity was ad ded reight years ,later ..
'
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rcurrent home of Blackstone B.ike l'Vorks., the 61 st St
Farmers' Market, and other nonprofit p,rojects, is born from the .ashes of a fire that
destroyed a complex u.sed for socia lly eonsci .ous art projects.
2004:
Sing]~ccupancy
gender -neutral bathrooms debuted a:ro,und campus ..
2001.:

The Experimental



Station,

~arthans, a black SSA student., was allegedly assault ed by two
UCPD officers , over 100 students a·n ,d community members held demonstrations.
2005: Hyde P ark;,s first Take Back the Night"- rally , focused on .ending sex11al assault, .
empowering peop1e to·feel safe in .their communities,
and solidarity with survivors
2004:

After Clemmie
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received . an anonymous
$100 million donation, leading to the creation of
Odyssey Scholarships for undergraduates.
2.007:
Graduate Students United (GSU) was founded as a committee to begin discussing
and wo rking to u·nionize graduate student workers.
2007:

UChicago

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The Inter-House
Council passes a resolution to implement gender-ne ·utral openhousing 0 ptions for undergrads ., to be available to first-years starting in the fall of 2009.
2007:

1

2008:

.Hyde Park Co-op Market

1

(in TI s current

l.ocation)

closes due to debt owed to

UofC ..
The U of C Office of Sustainability
opened,
Director for Bank of America Ilsa Flanagan.
2008:

hea ded by former

Sustainabili~

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The University purchases Harper Court (52 nd and Harp 1er) with plans f9r
redevelop- 1ment. The ·first. shops at Harper Court ope ·ned this summer.
·
aooB:

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.5710 1S. Woodlawn~ home of OMSA and the LGBTQ Programming Office, opens .
May 2009:
A satirical article in th 1e Maroo n prompts several U of C students (mostly
white men) to found the group Men In Power, aimed to provide a pre-professional
platform for men to "get them ahead" in business, la.w,. and health care careers .,,as well as
t'access to women and jobs" and to discuss issues of
reverse seXJsm.
Dawson" along with othetSi. s peab ab,ut
racial ·profil mg by the UCPD art a forum
st
2009:
The 61 St Garden was shut down by the U of C
f ollowi il i! his arrest.
in order t 0 build a temporary
parking lo~ for the .
construction of the new Chicago Theological Semina.JY
building, despite student and co,mmunity protests ..The
University" then invested $20,000
to set up a new
gard .en at 62 :0 4 and Dorchester ..
'
Oct 2009:
Stu.dent protest at a lecture by former
Israeli PM Ehud Olmert. About 25 protestors were
puled from the ·audience by the police. Pres. Zimmer
se ·nt out an email calling th .e ~isruptio ·n a ,cdisturbing
rupture, effectively shutting dO\VD the dissenters' right
to pro 'test~
201. .0: Mauriece Dawson., a black student, was ar~ed
.
in the A--Le~~l of the Reg for IC'crimiilal trespassH and "resisting arrest.~· After being told to
quiet d9WD; lib ,rarians called the police and Dawson was put in a chokehold and WJ'lestled
to the ground. ~e allegedly refused to sho w his ID, though witnesses say he wasn't asked
t9. The event resulted in a.series of open forums and incr,eased conversations about racism
on campu.st but little attempt to address a lo :ng history of racial profiling by the U CPD.
April 2.010: After years of lobbying by the Working Group onth ,e S1exual Assault Policy, a .
student referendu ·m and SG vote to reeva1\rate sexual assault policy, ]in particular to
·
change the policy that charges be addressed within the departm ent of the person accused ..
May 20:10: Undocumented
students,
organized by the UC Coalition for Immitgrant
Rights \, the Immigrant Youth Justice .League , and MEChA, rally ·on Bartlett Quad for
scholarships
and public support for immigration . reform.
·
2008:

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22.

and community
members protest the lack of an adult trauma
care center on the South Side at the University's new $700 million Center _for Care ~Four
protestors~ including one graduate stn ·dent, were arrested. A month later, an on - duty ,
plainclothes UCPD office.r posed as a protestor, marching during the rally and relaying
information
about the p rotest to~ . superior ~
·
Jan ,aary

2013:

Students

1

April 2013: Numerous anonymous
racist posts are created on '"Politically lncor~ect
UChicago Confessions~H a facebook page started by U of C students .. Student outrage
so ,me administrative
action, but the pa.ge was not shut down , under free speech

argumen ·ts ..

·
of a task force of transgender

Sept .2 ·0:1.3 .: Following the recommendations
experiences,
the ·university
.launched a new Preferred

led to

studentst

Name Policy .



Po'W'er at ·the U of C
At the Un iversity of Chicago, , power is offic ially d istribut~
amon13 three groups:
adminisbators,
faculty, and (!believe it or not) students,. , O"f co 1urse, President Zimmer .. the
t rustiees :., and co . held the bulk cf ~he power , bu~ 0f t1
en who answers ta wham or which
positiorn has what author ity are unclear ..With a little googlilng,. you can acciess the Universitys
A.rttcl es of Incorporation
and its Bvlaws., but if you don~t have the time to comb thr~ugh those
documen'ts ,r check. out this section to demyst ify some of the Un iversity's , am iorphous and
confu ,si·ng pow 'eli relations ~
·
1

I. The Administration
l"m guess i ng y1
ou have some familiarity with the US government ~so think of UChlcago ' s
administration ais a legislative and executive branch,. but with just
much bureaucracy . At
the t iop of the e:k'Jecutivesector is President Robert Zimmer ..According to the University's
ey·laws, Zimme r; as chief exeoutive controls " the ~'management of the physical pla n t and the
administration
of ,aubusin ,ess activities of' the University ..11 In real life, th i s means ,Zimm@r and
hi~ staff manage the university's investments ., appoint ilcaidemic and no~academ ic .smff
oversee everything f 1
rom Argonn 1e Nlationa[ labo r atory to t lhe lib r aries and l the Office of
·IM 1
ulticuJturat Student Atfairs~ and acl as an intermediate
between the Board ofT r ustees and
th 1
e fEH~ultv er student s. Don 't expect to see much of th i s guy ; Zimmer tends to be pretty ..
distant from undergrads .

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To , help with these lofty tasks, the Office of the President has a pretty extensive staff .. Here , ,
y,ou might reco :gnize some fa 1
miUar {and even :so,me fri,endiy] faces. Directly under Zlm 1
mer"s
1
puirview are a slew of VPs, Executive VPs,. Nat ional Lab1Directors~ the Studen't Ombudspersonj
and the Provost ~You can see the entire list of staff r~wi•th minimal d rescrip rtionsJ ron the Orffice
of th@ President's webs ite - W'h ich ~ encourage yrpu to ch :@ck out - but a few af the more
promine11t players are listed here :

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Thomas -Rosenbaum, P-ravost:, As the Un iversityts
chief academic eXiecu1tive, Rosenbaum oversees

th ,e Deans of all th 1e University's aca~emic
divis ,ions and gl"aduate schools ..IRosenlb-aum, Hk1
e
Zimmer, stays pretty distant - l' 1m not sure tve
·ever even seen him in p,erson .
Karen Waffien 1COlemian ..VP for Camp ,us Life ,and
Student •Serviires : KWC-is in charge of the Office of
Cam pus & :Stu .dent Life,. whlch yc\.(l l come in 1to
contact with on a daily bas is. It may seem Uke her
office oversees evervtfling non-academic, and
basically it does. U Olicago Dining ·, Stu dent
Hous ,iog, OMSA!!f A.thletics,. the Dean of RockefeHer
Chapel, the UCSC - they all fall under Wariren
Coleman's authority '~to nam e just a few (th 1ere's a ·
chart :on tJhe c&sL web~ite . showi 1ng its



organizationa ·t structure - it looks like a food l web) :
M li~hele Rasm 1ussen. Dean of Students in ,the
U1
niversity: Rasmuss,en starts working in a newly
appoi 1nted position this vear . She reports to Ka1ren
Warren Coleman and will be invo lved : in Cam 1pus
and Stu dent liirfe inri,ti atives and serve as an advocate fa ir students.
Ellie Daugherty, Assistant VP for Studen1 Ute and Associate 1
oea 1
n of the Collese for~Student Lffe and
1



Alumni ,Affairs : 'With one of the longest tiltles in the · unh,ersitv~ Daugherty is !heavily involved In C&Sll!
and s·he'H be on e of the ·n,0 re famUiar faces .vau"Usee a1m 1ong administrator~ (especially if you're
involved in student activism ....]1
Jo1hn Boyer,. Dean of t=he Colleg ·e: Though he's not known for his irnterest in sa,clal Justlce,i Boyer has a1
cult of personality am 0n1 students ..A r'fmowned historian with an impressive moustache, Dean Boy er
lead ls an annual south s·ide h1istory bike to ,ur an,d probabty kno1
ws mor ie about u of c history than
a i1vone else .
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The other ha !lf 1of th -e University"s
adm i_n istratlon., t/he Board l of Trustees, is comparatlve ·1v
simp ,l1
er than the -Offiice of the Presjdent ..1;n total,. the Boar ,d is comprised of 54 alumn i and
plutocrats .. in add ition to President Zimmer. Besides having more money than God and
putting their names on Unive'rsity buildings (seriou 1slv~ go to tru ,s·tees.uchicago ..edu and
jtJst c heck out who ,soime of these ·peopl 1
e arel, the tru ste res tuarVebroad Jegislativ 1e powers ..
111dharge of the Hgove·r 1na1nce and contra In of the university~ they add or alter the bylaws_,
appoint new pres id ents,, and o¥ersee the univ ·ersity's poHcies a nd projects. The Board
members serve on 11 permanent committees, including an Investment coimmittee, a
M ledical Center E,ce1
i;:urtive Committee (I wonder If Pritzker sits on thi :s committee?t
a-nd a,n
Exe curtive comm ittee, , which riec.ommends an aonual !budget for 1
eoa1
rd app rova1I and
nominates and ap1p 1
ro\res new trustees. The trus ,tee ,s are ina ,ocessible to students, and a !lot
of secrecy sumounds their meetings -the Student Gover ,nment·s Haisons to the !Board of
Trustees .sit in on on ily one 100mm ittee., hav ,e no voting pow@r, and by aU acoo u nts ar-e an
unwanted ·presence i.
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24

Wh io""son this board .? Here r:1rea few 1af the flnes.t /o lks:
• Andrew .Alper, Chair o ·f the Board: After getting his BA and MBA at
UChicago~ Alper wonked 1as an investment banke r at Gofdman Sachs
for 21 years. When Graduate Uai1son to the BOT Joe Bonni resigned
tn 2010 (aft ,er the University Secretary wouldn't a~cept ii proxy for
Bonni when he studied .abroad] Al[per stated that stude nt liatsons to
the board woutd ~ever haue a vote si·nce they aren't suffi 1ciently
obJective . mfyou Iive in ~I per House, th is guy is the namesake~
• Thomas J. Pritzk 1er: No 'discussion of power and weaJtl, rin ch ·icago
wou~ be complete without mentioning the Pritzker family. As the
E><ecutiveuhairman of the Hyatt Hotels Corporation twhich just
Qpened a l,ocaition in Hyde Park) and Chairman/CEO of his ramJlry
orgjll Thie Pritzker Organization, Thomas Pritzker is worth mor .e than
th 1e GOP of over .30 rounlries!
Hyatt's subpar reputation for worker
abl1Ses - 1includi ing dismh;sing long -term workers and reducing
benefits and pay .....
has spawned protests and global boycotts.
• Joseph Neubauer, Co•Vim:eChair of dle Board~ Another Booth p-ad, Neubauer is the O,arrman of
A IRAMARK Cosponrtion,. UChicagolis fiood services 1pr ,ovider. The litany of accusat ilons .. com 1plainits, and
criticisms of Aramark seems never -ending: fraud, over -billing, provid ilng poor W'ages and rm "nimaf
benefits to employe ,es, setting up monopolies on lhe campU5es they serve.,. and providing unhealthy
conditions and poor ,quality food (remember all those heallh code viotati ,on5 la$t y@ar?)1.
II. The FacuJty
WhHe ,admin holds a vast majority of the uni ·versity's power, therre are two governing bodies
consistin ig of just faculty that handle ac-ademlc l~su_es and set prog rams of study ..
• 'The COllle1 e COundl~ 40 m1embers of the Colle ,ge faculty, half of whom a/fe elected and half 0 f whom are
appointed by Zl 1
mrner., , on Dean 1Boyer' 's recommendation
and de ,gree re.qulrements for
1 set admissions
undergrads~ They determine 1rad,ng poUcies~set cur 1ricula, and ·also determine the requirements
fo1r thre
common core .
• 'The Univarsitv Sanata: Broader than the College Council., the !University Senate iis open to anv Professor .,.
Assistant Professor, or Associate Professor •in any of the Unl11ersitys d ivisions~ de 1partments, and schools ..
The CouncH of the Uni~erslty Senate, a S1..,member elected body (plus the President and Provost, as
non :..voting 1members). servies as the qsuprerne aca 1demic body of the University~"" Th is legislature siets
rules fo 1
r s.tudent conduct and generally Bas aH the legislative powers not given to the Board of Trustees
('which ls to sa 1
y fiew powers) .
1 11.The Stu:dents
Even though we're way at the bottom of the Univers ·it(s · power structure , students have a few
venue s for inv0 1lvement1: through Student Gover-nm 1ent (SG,J1..Each year., a three-persan executive
slate (consisting of the SG Pre ·s~dent and two VP ·s) is determin ed by a student electi ,0 1n~ These tl'lre ,e
oversee SG comm11tees and work W'ith a cabinet that Jncfudes a graduate and an unde ,rgradualE!
liaison to the Board of Trust ees and a community and government
!liaison. In addition to these
J)Ositions, SG includes two 17~member groups: the Graduate Council and the CoUege Council (not
the sam1e as the fa 1culty "s College Cou1
ncH). T1heGraduate Coun 1cil includ es at least one represent .ative
from each professi 0nal a:nd graduate divi '.Sion, and the co te ge council iincludes four representa ·cives
from each year and one chair ,person from any year (these are the peo 1
ple who plaster ttle quads
w ith posters and chalk driawings during their cam1Paignsl~ SG is responsible for hosting campus-w ide
events; administer 1ing its . Finance Comm ittee ..whi ,ch proviides RSOs ·w itl, funding; and ·:serving as a
1

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voice and

advocate fiar the studenrt body

1


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'

MOtJEY-..

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UChicaso "s ENDOWMENT=

$6~57 bilUon (as of
1

HEI..a hotel



2012)
lndu d 1ng the Medjcal Ce ter7
Cost to bu "ld the UCMC ~s CENTER fo r CARE &
DISC10VERY• ~ $10Q1million
Tota l eve nue fr o m r e S;fUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE::::
$2 miltio 1n (2012-13)
Est•mat-ed COST of ATT.elNOANCE** = $63,860
~th Un iversity health insuranc e"? $66.,500
Ayea r;,s ·wort
of TUITION**=
$45.,324
1

au1um n 20~ 2
· **20 13-14 f accord ing to the Bursar" for- a1full-time student ,n
•comp 1l1
eted

Whot do we do with our endowment?

fa.cl:s

ti- fi.9U.res ...

In t h,e past ,and/or

pres .ent , we've

~nvested

in

the above (questl ro nabte?) c•ompan~es~most
li kely via ou r 50+ external fund ma nagers 4!'t hat is.

1

Getting YOur Tui 1ti ·on Backl
Jim f•The Door" Dueh 1r
ThilS place Js expensive-exactly
:$167 ..87 per class for a fuH time ~tud@nt's quarte.r(2012 -2013
schoo~ year for 3 courses peT qua 1rter at 3 classes per week).. LuckHy, since the admissions
·go ,ds have blessed you with the abnity to be in Hyde Park, there ar ,e ziHi_ons of ways to
make yo 1ur time here worth every penny, in terms of XP and $$. Check out the
opportunrtl jes c:ountless students before you have milked, both regit and not..iso , l eg;t.
1

iOR .CSA and th .a RS0-Emejre
l f you want to 'host events on campus, in a way that nob 1od .y else seem ,s,t ,o. you shouid
start ~,n RSO! RSOs only need to appease the bureaucracy demons (ha ·ve 8 members
including you and meet OORSO"s obfuscate guidelines) ..!New RSOs are ·given some money
when they're in corporated, to get started.
On c e you"re up and running, each R.SO needs
t o apply, t o funding sourC1es to host events. pay for pizza , and print flye 1rs .,

·•.JII'

·

..

Ann .ual AIJocatjons is how RSOs can fund events that they've planned for th 1
e upcom ing
Academic Vear~ This can Include recurirtng event:s/meettngs a·nd new eve-nts , Annua l
A11ocatio .ns has the funds to 1cover a1bout 60% of RSO casts funded'from
the Student
Activiity Fee in your tuition, . but ,can,t be used for 1mat erial ilmprave ,ments .. Applications
to
AnnAl are typically due in late Aprn of each Aca~mlc
year .. The AnnAt committee ~s .
eio·mpos ,ed of the SGFC chair, an .SG represenitai"ive, and an ORCSA rep~sentative...
·
Protfps: AnnAI is ea.siierthan SGFC, though you need a more thought-out plan~ An 1nAI has
WAY
_ ___ more
_ _ _ m···one
_ _y than
_____ SGFC
_ _ _,- so
_ _ a__
p-p· 1_y- to_ AnnAI fo_r·-bio-a
_ DO .·e_r eve
_
_·nts.
1

1

Student Govemmeot Finance commfttee .(SC.FC) is ma ,de up of those jerks yo 1u vote 1d for
because their chalk ad looked the prettiest in front of Cobb. Well guess what, now they
have the ability · to a11ocate a massive fund of cash to your RSO for new -and upcoming
projects .. This can be used to purchase material goods · for your RSO: think projectors,
tsh ·i~ co 1pies of software, etc. Each week of ·tlhe quarter(indudf
1ng Summer) bud ,gets aire
due b 1y no ron Friday to y,olJr ORCSA advisor via email[II 1
and are defe11ded Tuesday at SGFC
meetings. Pcot;_
fQs:Apply 3 weeks ·before your event.. Have a 1marketing plan. Do ·n,,t say
yoo1're expecting a large communitylnon-Uofe
presence.
Co-spons .or with other
· RSOs. Tark about the '' 'broad range of student invol ·vement' you ex:pect.. SGFC is ro .Hing,
wh i ch mea115 you should apply earlier in th )e ·qu 1arter so the big pot o-f money is stiU there ·..
1

'

· Uncommon Fund is .an 185,000 (in the

school year)1 pot of go 1ld that a]lo i\rYS :all
stu ,dents (undergrad
and gra .d) to submit proposals for ANITHJNG .. This includes events ...
capital imp,-ovement, proj,ects,. or anything else you can jmagine! Finalists and winners are
determined
by a combinatiqn
of s)rudent votes and Student Govemm -enrt
committee.
Generally, Students submirt their proposal in the form 1of a youtube video, and
advertis e via social m ·edia .. Past funded p 1rojects incJude a community garden 11 giant chess,
puppies on the · quads, and kindergarten
on the quads~
·
2012 - 201 3

1

OM~ Alloca.!l,onsoffer support and funding to events by Student Or ganizations that
directly impact O'MSA ·1s •c .ons_tirtuants, enhanc e its mis .sio -n, and-add value ta the U11h1ersity
1

1

~ommunity.

Community 5-ervice Fund (CSEl is a funding body that allocates part of the Student Activities
Fee toward even ,ts that are focused on commu11ity service .. Any RSO can appryfurthis
funding even if they aren'l a CS-RSO .. CS:F·supp orts activities des igned to )improve . 'the
quality of !life of the broader community .. Once ~tour RSO has received this money., you can
wit!hdraw ·it out of your account .rus1ng rerimbursement requests, Including a racelpt, and
· d·etalUng the money you 1spent on an event or ~
p urchase for your RS04
1

1

½------ -------------- --------------- ---- --------------- ----------------------------

I

I

U ive_rsjt,
-

Arts

-

-u

.

m- -~·

Fetlnwship,s are designed to support students
u nde rta king 01r·iginat crieative plioj ects over the
summer . (Such projects m ight involve
adaptation,
choreography ·, scu lpture, painting,
drawing, multi-n,ediaii mus ·mccompositionr, ,
ARGs., script writ;ng, or transl lation-) 1 GeneraUy,
proJects ·shou[ .d be intended for production or
performance
during the foll owing academic
year and be handled by enrol1 ed
students .. Stipends are $1,.500 and often have
extended deadlines because of lack of
appncations!

and Cultura l Funds

The Smart Museum ..of Art., the Renaissance
. Sod ety., and th e Ori entaJ tnstitute a,ie always
free to students.. In a ddi t io I"'.',th e Art 1nstitute
and the Musif;!um of contemporary Art
downrtown also offer · free admission with
UCh ~cago ID: The CourtTheatert
th e Hyde Park
Arts Center, and the G1oodman th eater also
provide member.ship benefits and reduced
rates for students., The Hst of stuff we get into
for fi1i:ee or redLJced rates is always getting
1

')

1

1

1

1

longer at artspass~uchicago~edu.

student

F1ne Arts Fund provides s,man grants to
Un 1iversi ·ty of Chicago student organiza rtions and
individual students ..The Fund seeks student- .
initia 1t.ed projects that would not typically receive
supp 1prt from another orrgan iza1tion. Priority · is
giiven t.o onginial id.eas for the ae ·ation and
pre :sentathi)n of all s orts of visua 1! and performing
arts.- to proposalls thart bring ·the arts to more of

1

UChl9flBO Arts 1
Grants through ttie Arts
Council [,ooks for original tde .as fur the
creation an ,d presentation of the arts.
Proposa~s wUI be accepted only from

university-based or --affiUated 1
0rg:a niz atlo ns
or units~ faculty, departments
or centers, ,
registered Student organizations (RSO),
campus cultural institutions, and oth rer
organizations. rinvolved in campus tife. Grants
range between $t·J5.oo and :$7,500 .. Proposals
will be evaluated on the m ,ertt of excellence
of artistic p 1roj erct!I ; nno v at iQn.. collaboration,
whether · wftJh on or off campus gr 1
0 upsJ
re·as ibflity and Iogi stica r or-gain i%atiro•n, and
s-tud ent parti c ipa t ion~

1

the campus . comm 1unity, to pc,ograms that
leverage partrlerships among studenrt gfi'Oups,
academic depa 1rtments, a1nd/or cultural
organizations.
the SFAF w iiI 1assi st _in the
implEeme,ntation of imaginativ e prio :jects with
grants up to $1.,500 . (Students seeking support
for larger projects should inquir ,e about the
UC.hicago Arts ~ants.)
1

1

.QMSA 1
(Qffice of Multicu:ltur__al
Student Affairs)
murticul.tural

'-~Chic~· ·o A,rts Counof

proviides a shit ton of grants fo r

students,. inc luding the::

.Academic Support G'rant, which supports the · pursuit of academ 'icarly related activities,
intended to serve students who, due
financia .1 hardship, are not able to cover the cost of

to

activiiti@s or suppli@s that are nec ,essary for a fuH academic

experience

.•

&perge;ncvContingency fund,.

wh 1ich assists multiou[tura1 students whose ability ·to
program art the 1unwer1ity of Chicago has been impaired

continue their educationat
unexpected
"fiinancial emergency..

Grad TestPrepqrigtion

by an

·

CowseSchohJrshjI!~which

will assist mu :lrticultural studenrts in th 1e
pursuit: of graduate and professional degrees by offerin .g successful applicants with a. 2.51100% waiv ·e-r off the total cost of the prep · CJOurse..
1

3o
,.

Reseo11c1h ,nttlative GrantJI which supports scho1arly research on the multifa~eted nature
and/or imp 1act of race, ethnicity, and culture within the University of Chicago, higher

in general, or the city of Chicago.

edu<ation

Study Abroad Grant. which provildes a limited number of grants for students accepted to
Unlvers 'lty of Chic:a1go approved
study abroad programs .. The grant provide.s up to $1500 to
sbJdents who are fu~l ...time, und.ergraduate
students tn good ~cademic standing and who

demoniStrate

financial hardship ..

Career.Advancement

(fa rmerl:, CAPS, Career And Planning Services)
1

Many have fall ·en under the spell of the evil (former-)CAPS-pire,
and many more wiH fall iln Hle
future. , While it r.str-uethat Career Ad'Slanc.ement has been a force fer 1evil meanin~ess extemrs ,hrpiS in the
past. it.,s a Isa ;a pretty good piac e to look. far- empr oyment and initernsh ips.. It isn't why the university's

gotten

better though, that's all us ·folks ..

·
--

E te

.. ~- program prov ides paid"
internships
exclus:ivel y to U Chica.go
underg,aduales
during the , :;,ummer and dle
academi 1c year. Ov er · 11,i600 students
and 325
employers both within th m US ilnd abr 0·ad have
beneftttedl momthe pr,ogram ~nc:• its mc@ptJion in
1997 ., Read more about past Metcalf interns' hyped
up e~periences
a1nd explore ~n internship for
The . e substantive

1

1

1

yours eff at
ht,ms:/Jcoreeradvancemen t.uchl cago
. ..edu/jobs_. ·n tern ,.ship~-

PRISMGnants

Ih_e___,AfullT"l.■!"!l>I!

.,,,,U!'<l!llrn, ... r~

- ---

-

~

t-o•"lrli~

students
lo spend Mo ..
thr ice
an exciting
career
by
,obtaining a firsthand look at ev~rydar Hfe wtth alumni hl
diverse -fiieldls. Participants inteTa ct cllos e ty with their
~lumni
sponsoli and his or her co!l ,eagues
and are
encouraged
to ask questions throughout.
Externs:hips
,ar:e unpa 1id.. Read more about th ie AB ,G exter-nship
program here: httrn;//care:eradyonccmm
t.Jtdl(ca,1a...
e_dul[obs-·
aH0 1ws

ii rst and second year
days leamng
about

1

1
iintemsh1 "ps:-research{o ,bg:-e~terru:hlp1

aim to s upport the : educational gr, ·ars of the College . PR~SM also prov ~des effective career
counseling to students who may oth ,enivise as5ume t ·hat Care-er }\dvancement
is not a resouri"\ce for
th 1em. P1RIS;M serv ,es . students in nine majors : An thro pol,ogy;r Art Hlistory 1 Cinema and Medi a Studies,.
Comparative Human Developm 1ent, English, History, Phitosophy 1 PoHtk:al Science ., and. Psychology .. There are
two gran~ progm-ams connected to P IRJ'SM ! PRISM Research Grants, . funded b:1 the c.oHege, and Sefde1 Scholars
PRISM Grants. The S@id@IScholars grants three s:tudents seJected as Seide~ Scholars a $4000 stipend for .a
caree_r4elated,
ind 1ividual project that is itself non-.academic,
but informed by yaurr PRISM major. The grant anns
to ena 1ble students to spend ·~10 weeks ,over the summer exploring how they can connect academic p~ssions ·

with

a

1

pro'6essional occu patron ..

undergraduate
stu<lents
the funding
to work
intern
"n th 1e United
States.
Propasats are a1pprovE!!d based an budge~
back-up
pla in, and demonstrated
bene-fit of the
_u.rl"!ll
,.l'W'ller

..--rJ.rlllll-■

fi

offer

or

ex penience to hisJh er a c ade1r11ic and/or professi onaJ
go -alls.. R&g;onaJ[ and thematic. diversity of p rojects wiil
also b ,e taken into 1 account.
'The average grant
a1maum
iS $1,500,
but
can be- up to $3,,500
each .. Currenlt1v enrolled first through
third rear
undergraduate
students
who are ·interested
in eitharworking
or mtemln ,g in the US may apply.
\Nhen
app~·ymg. studen rts must h~ve a po siiti on 1in mind that
is either unpaid ·or supported
by a smaD stipend ..
Students must work at least 200 lhours during t .he
sum imer .. International
students are elhtible ~
1

1

I I

lnternatlol1al
Ex,perlen_s;;eGrants are the intematJona,
l'Jl ir1ror of the Summer ' Action
Grants: and functi 10n
largeJjt the same, 1except th 1ey must be for internships
and opportuni _ties outside , of the United States .. The
average grant arnou nt ,s $ 3,.soOt but• l!a ch p·ropcs al is
considered i nd ividuaUy for amounts up to $,5,,000. The
grant focus es on serving currently
en rol ll eel* first ...
through
f ourt'h-year
un.dergraduate
students
1

(includi"g

stude nts

graduating

in

Ju 1ne

and

intemation1al students)
who are interested -in e ither
work[ng 0 1r 'interning abroad. VVhen applying, students
must have a position in mind that is unpaid. Students
mus.t work at least 350 hours during the summer ..
Internal ion al st:u dents _a re eJ~ib[ 1e.

University

1

Policy:-

h
1<1g ts

Knowing v .ollt. .-

Joan Wang, Olivia Ortiz ·

the poUcies of the UnirVersity are important in knowing your rrghts as a stude~t ·
UChlcago's o'fficial l standard of policies and regulat ions can be found i'n th 1e Student Ma .nual
. (http~/stud@ntm
an ua l,JJchLiQlgp.~duD~ ,As ·you probably figured, howev er, if w~ were to d et ~
ai I every
singl e rul 1e found in that behemoth, we'd p,robablytrlplethe
size of this guide. ·so instead, let's run
through some of the most importa,nt poi 1nts and re.sources as a starting point in figuri111g
1out haw to
navigate the bureaucracy ·.

Understanding

1

1

1

the Student M 1anual
The contents of this manual do nat create a contract between any in·dividual

Important

Points from

111



and the
Univers.ity. 0 'The Unfversity does not want ''"ri'gid c0 nformity'' OF"'-'narrow appliattion'"' of
anything wrftte n in here. Keep this in m i nd as you go through the r1e5t of the manua l!.
.
.-..
The ~frr.cial sta itement of non-discrimination: ,..The University, therefore, does not discriminate
on the basis of race, cotoir, re l igi 011 1, se'(, sexua ll arie 1ntation, gender identit~, rna,ti ional or ethnic
01rigi n1, age., disabl :lfty~ or ·veteran statu~ and doe :s not discriminate against members of
1



1

1

protected clas ,s@s under the law ,..N
• The Univarslty ' COm1mits its intention to inte ·n,ena on the part of unlawful harassm ienrt.,which
- it defines , as "'v.e1rbal or physica il conduct that is so severe or perv rasivet.hat it has the f,)\Jrpose or
effect of unreas 0nabiy interfer,lng with a,n individual's wonk .performance or educational
program participation, or that creates an intim ridating, hostile, or offensive work or educationa f
·enviro 1nment. • Howeve ·r, the Univ ersirty makes an exceptiion ex ception iif~ 1) the behavior is not
deemed "objectiVtely unreasonable'' or 2) the harassm enrt occurred tn a academi~ ed u,cati ·anal .•
or researrch c10ntext, provided tJhatthe resear-ch was not abush,e or targeting a specific p 1erson or
group of people.
'• -Sexual haras·sment 1 as defined by lhe ,University. includes:·sexual assault, unwanted
touching. . comments,
e-mail ls, insulting sexual -pictures, and othe 1
r behavi 10rsthat are considered
unlawful harassment* !(*depending on the circumstances and context).
~ The University prefers to h·andte unJ,awfu.l haras_sthro ugh -a '"'strong emphasis on reso l rVin·g
1
carnplaints informally' {adViistng · and mediationJ , but this does N 0T prevent you from seeking
out formal actii1on from the Univ ,ersity.
• ..'No ,one lit the , Oni¥arsity may reprimand or cliscriminate aigainst arn indiY1idua
•I for haviing
initiated an inq 1uiry o r complaint in good faith"' ..
1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Important





~esources

Tit l e 9 Coordinator for S,tudenrts: Belinda 1Co~_e,z Vazquez (B•elinda@y~~i@_go ..e'™, (773)1-B:3-4971o)
Affirmative Action Officer (773-7tn-5671):
Ta ,sked with enforcing tJhe non-discriminat ·ion
pol .icy, as well as Sectio ,n 504 of the RehabUitation Act , of -i973, as amended" and the Americans
·
:with ID i sab iI iti es Act ..

32,



!Mediation:

One of the U niver ,slty's three ave11ues fur handlir191cases ,of unlawful harassment.
The complaint is to be brought to a Comp laint Advisor, where you can th ien ask for a mediated
· meeting with the accused,] in order to mutually c9me to a resolutio11. The ·aic:cused mu st be
willing1to participate, and mediation will not be 1e1sedto hand le sexual as sallJIt cases.
• Advising: Advising is provided by a Comp 1la,nt adviso r
·
1

1

oth er lmpo irtant Polic .les: de ry Act an ,d Title q
Dana Bolger flfom ~n~w-yo l}.rl x .org, has g ~rven a detailed outline regarding tlhe rights you are
afforded undlerth@federal
lawTitJe tx (abb 1reviated her:e, visit the website fo ,rthe e:.oce[lentfun
a rti cll.e):
1. Tit 1
le IX a l,andmark federal ctvi il right that prohibits sex disorimina ,tion in educartion 1
..
2. Title IX does n~t app~y to ~ermate students oniy.
3. Schools must be proactive in ensuring that your cal'.llpus·is rree of sex <liscri.mi1iartion1"
4 .. Schoo(s must have a1
n estalbtished procedur 1e for hand I ing complaints of sex discrimination,
sexual harassment -or sexual viole -nce ..
5. Schoo ls must t .ake i mmedl :ate action to ensure a complainant -victim can continue his or lhe,r
education free of on90 1ing sex discrimination, sexual harassment -or sexual v·olenc e.
6. Schools m1ay not retafi.ail:e against someone filing a com 1plaint and must keep a complainantvictim sa1fe from other retaliatory harassment or behavi ior.
·
7,.·Schoo.ls can issue ,a no contact direct ive under Title .JXto prevent the accused student firom
approaching or interacting wiith yuo ,..
B~In ca!iesof sexu2dvtolence, schools are pro_
hiblted fr-om ,1encouraging or al1owing mediation
(rather than a forim ,al hearing) of th@ complaint.
9 .. Sch00 1ls cannot discourage you from continuin 1
g your educatiori
1

111

1

1

1

Bias Response Team:
• The University of Ch1c.aig~defines Bias as is a pre-formed neg1ative opinion or .attitude toward a
group of persons who possess common
characteristics,
such as slkin color, or curtural




e>0perie-nces, such 1as re lliyi ,on 10r national orig -in.
A B1ias llnci1dent invotve acti ·ons committed ,against a person or property that air@ mortjvated, in
whole or in part 1 lby·a b·ias against race, religion, sexual orienta ition, 1ethnicity 11 nationa l origin,
ancestry, gender, gender identity, age, or disabil ltty .. Bias incidents that are ,addre5sed by the
uniViersirty Bias Response Team include actions th:at a1re motiv ,ated bY' bias but may not meet the ·
necessary elements r1equired to prove a hatecriime.
Bias Response Team (BRT) is made up of ad,:ninistrators who are available to support ,and guide
1

students

seeking assistance in determining how to handle a bias incid ,ent. Members . ,of the Bias
Response Team assist th@ Vi1
ce President in documenting and reporting incidents th 1at occur on
1

c1a1mpus.
-

CaH·834~HELP (4357) 24 hours a day., 7 days .a week ,.
• Vou wiU be [Put in contact w11th ai BRT Member~ Team Memb@rs ar@ on
caltJ 24 h10urs a day, 7 days a wee ·k. A BRT rmember w iH ptom 1ptly revi@'W
a II bia .s inc idle nt re ports_ Students
may ,also r@po rt a bias incident by
way of: Ta~k to y,ou r area Dean of Students

..
I l

!Email a BRT
1
member: ·
ht tp:1/csL.uc hi ca go .e
d u/stte s/d efaultlfiles
1

1

tg_df/BRT%20Roster.

. 2-012 -2013,pdf

. -·

When you attend The U 'niversity of Chi,cago you may do
t oken gcoll@g@ things', like pul lin g all-n ·i:ghrers not ta stud y, but
for your radio show eacb Monday morning (done with ·your
_-.
>
,...mli
·
roommate who nev@r folds their lau ·ndry} . Sometimes in all the
twisted exciteme ·nt and unease of s artin :g a n 1ew life with new
people and new expectations
we lose sight o~the most ·basic 1
evel"Yday things; this includ •es the e~loyees
of The ·u ·niver-sity
of Chicag 0.
Accord~
to the most recent publis ,hed data, these employees working behind the scenes
an .d:, m ore often:, righ in front of you are about 16_.
,940 strong +'This number excludes · d ining hall staff
- h ired by Aramark - b ut does ac ·count for adJninistrators
olice officers,. cleaning staff ,,
1 p:ruf?essors, p r
and @mploye@S of th ,e u ·niveEsity of Chicago .Medi<:'.al Center (an entity you,re sure to he ·ar about
th 1
rougho 1
ut this guide) ..·Note rhat academ ic staff, 1as of 2008j account for 14.~~
of 1that 16 940~ AH in
all , thesf! employees are represented
by various cam.pus unions ~am.ong them. Gl'aduate Students
United, , SEIU Local 73 ..and Local 743,.
From thes~ facts, ·it is im ,portant to understand
the daily experienc ·e rof a :n. employee ·orT .he
University of Chicag 0 as th rey rdeftly cook in our dining halls, 1talk to us on cold walks across the
Midway 1 lead ·seminars~ clean house lo·ungest and ·keep Mansueto in its seem ·ingly permanent .state of
spotlessness4 Yes, you are a student , but devotion to .studies should not exist in a l?ubble far-re 1mov ·ed
~mall
human experience . Ideally, an unde:rstandit11;g would :lead to action; the life of the mind ,
while enthralling,
wouldn't stop you from applying SOSC to real social interacti .ons.. And the ways
for you
ge i vol ,· d w ith worker so./idarity are many a - UChicago .. First off, check out S .0■-U . L,. ( 1or
'
Students Orsanizing United . with Labor).
--..-022111

1

UPP -O ·ll . ·
~

w.1.a. _

~~..Ai

A-:.11.P ..U
I



a~&

1

et

!!iii!iiii"

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

to

UChicago e·mplcwees arie crucial t·o our conimunity; in fact, they outnumber Underzrads at
lea~ ,t 310 L Oftentimes,
they~
1trea.ted . as a separate ·part or the ~ommunitythis is wrong ..As a
studentt it is important
to not only note t but al~ understand the ways in which your daily .actions
affect UChi.cago employees of all types . Efforts 10 understand and connect wit h employees 'Who have
been and are likely to sta.y at UChicago long after ·you gl"aduate are not only informative, but also
rewarding.
Ther ·e is the opponunity
iif not human neoessity) to tal lk 1:0 the peop '!e you wiU see whilst
running

to and from dassj coffee) and colle ,g;iat e camaraderie
,.
Through these open conversations
,.·you wil l challenge previous perceptions
and better :realize
just how essential .oft-overlr0oked employees ar e· fol' our daily campus experience. For instancei
UChi ,c:ago security guards - keeping us safe and smiling &om 5 p.m. to 3, a.m . - have had higher -u p
administrators call tlheir positions "easily replaceable ·)Jdu .e to the existence of "a-huge h iring pooL"
Th .ese threats serve as a me-ans for forcing sup-par working conditions
upon employees. In pa.rt,
these sub-par cond i tions refer to th e ract that security guards m ·ust stand outside for 1.0-hr shifts e\11n dur ing bi ter win tJer nights when temperatures can f. 11to -201° i::.
1

1

1

..

Cleaning staff, too face a similar experience. On ·weeke~ds, the Univenrity keeps three peopl .e
on staff during to clean all of South Campus. This is outrageous
~hen - in my dorm experience . ....
weekends are th 1e times when college restrooms, lounges,, ra .nd haUs most need -leaning ,. 1.t is
disgusting and ironic in ,a terrible (not ..Groun 1ds of Being) way that one member of our community
is forced to cl:ean up the mess (from V'omit to mounds of shampoo) left by another member of our
comm:w,ity. Yes, we're studentsj we're stressed; we've too b •usy to even keep u 1p with G .a.m .e of
Thrones, 1but so too are our University employees .. They have chil .d 1ren, other jobs, stress., an 1d
responsib 1iliities all of.which deserve to be observed and respected~
As a student at UChicago 1 you ..re expected to find fulfillment in challenge. Th .e Uruve'.l'·sicy
hol ds you to :this st~ndard in many ways.. employee-,vorker relations am iong them. If open to othersJ
every UChicago stude ·nt has the voice and . resou .rces necessary
to campaign for change., chaUenge
paradigmst andcon&ont misconceptions
. Th ,e time to initiate., investiga ,te , and eff-ect change is 11ow~
not only w·hen , ftlu atre forty and ·have a Ph.~D-;in Meta-Theory of Marxist Ethics or Algorithm~ in
1

Pure Mathematics.

(-Ulpdated
DisO G·uide

BESE · ·RCH WEBSITES:

- ~ow

u

from
2011)

v ·ouR SHIIT -

•t
0

:,
QJ

.c

Adminet:
h~tp://adm~net.ucbi~aa9o~
_e«Y.L~nq~~~~html
Th1is is the internal
administrati
on website
where
posted
lik .e power points.,
official
polici
es

Financial

~

..c
<t

are

1

...... lb...
t t p: l/

5

many things

1

Statements:

:..f in se rv. u · h · cagq
·'

Guide s1:a r:
ch icago

hjj:_g_;_/.L.~2.

fldJJLJ:~p_g..c..t..lugLst
at@men ts. -_ht
_

m.

g ui des ta r o_r,g/ Q_,:g__an
...iz~a.t~Q..D
.$L_3-.&.=i_t
77139/iun
.a

.Las;.px

i ve 1rs i t..Y-=

For more .info flmation on tne un .ivers ,ity s or ··other
corporations
finan 1cial matters
you can get 990 tax f0 1rms lhe re .•
II

1

Gene _ra1 ly
1

NN1BD
•~ h+
-~ . p- : //nndb.
-----~- - am
--~/ This web - app lets
you
Who• s on whos .e board?!

good

stuff

to

know:

find _connections
betwe ,en po-werful
Try mapping Presid ent Zimmer.

peop .le111

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Chicago
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i tLp rovd rs_Lg_is. ht ml. ·
The city has an interactive
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aamalysis!

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Theo ,ries '7 Rerspectives

Theories

-

Perspective.$
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l ,ntroductio

1
n: Being Part of a Diverse
Vincent e Perez & Cindy Ji

Com -munity

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At .any moment on campus (or ln our larger Chicago community),
yo 1u
share , the sidewal lk ·with students with vastly differ rent backgrounds
than yours, whos e way of per -ceiv _~ng and _naviga ·~ing the worl ·d a 1
roun ,d
them have been shaped by exper1ences you cant fully un rderstand .
People who have on iy known the countrysid le~ People 'Who have been 1
sexually abused from a young age or grew up with ·undocumented
family membersa People who went to board ·ing schools or alternatively, to unders erved school districts .. Peopl e who grew up o rn foo d
stamps or haven't b,e,en part ,of one c.ommunity
for more than a coupte
years. People of a partic 1
ufar race,. gender, or sex .uality wh10 have bee rn
repeatedly bullied for the ir identities-or
who, on th 1e other .hand, ha~
v.en t had to active~y consider fh em. The range of conJexts and stories
go es on .. And yo u wil ll co ime with your own ..
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Be i ng part of a diverse c ommu n ity means · you'll in e·v ita b ly lb u m 1
p
arms-and
arways have good reasons for doing so. O·ftentimes every ..
one in .a 1
n argument
can be right because th ·e disagree .mentor
wording
of the d.is~greement
mtght boil dow 1n· to personal experi"ences and _c·on,.,
texts .. W elcome thi 's .. An 1d intentionally
respect others 1 contexts ,, We
do ·n't choose 0 1ur skin colo r, our- parents,: or th ·e c-omm 1unity ' we were
b ,orn into, but they i1nevitably _shape us anct info rm our ch 1oices. If
some -one else•s beh :aviors or belie ,fs don't mak .e sense to you, ask
quest ions , I nvite conversations
that question your own behaviors and
values .. It can be a1beautifully productive
process~
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The foltowing sections offer an introduction
to the social theories and
perspectives
that m ight g·ive you a glim 1pse of wh .ere your diver-se
classmates
are coming from and why arm- -bum ,ping ·h·appens .,
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Theories rbPer.sp,,tive.r

CZass & Classism
Marley Lindsey

What a~e we talking ·about when we talk about class?
One of the trickiest .aspe ,cts of class is its ambiguity" .. Po ID
J after poll
over the past decade has demonstrated
a majority of Americans . ass .o ciate with the term ·"middle class", 1 These sorts of labels make it hard
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to comp ,re .hen d who is bu .rt most 'by classism-$100k

a year sounds

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like a forturie to myself as a single ,c,hild . To a fam ily of ,6 res iding in
New York, it is close to poverty ·. When we talk about classism in the
Un iversity, we have to talk about a serie .s of experiences . There is little
quantifiable
data of what it is like to experie .nce ctassism at elite universities ..All] have are the e.xperiences of myself, and other peop le who
have had difficulty" d ,ealing with finances h ere . Furth .er accounts can be
found on the UChicago Clas ,s Confess ions Pag .e on Fac ebook '"
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Wha .t is c]assism?
,Class ism is a child of Mancist thought. To quote the Communist
Manifesto2: "The history of all hitherto existing so .ciety is the history of
cla.ss strnggle. » The inte ·raction between the bourgeois (upper class)
and th ,e proletariat
(working class) ten .ds to be dictated in terms ,of cap.ital (money). In the present day, these interactions
are rarely ,direct classism is a force that ~ften permeates itself in structuralt
and per .

sonal leve ls. The manif e sta .tion of this hist~zy is stil l visible in the pre .sent day .. To be "working -class" o,r blue-collar tends to have · a series ·of
loaded . connota t ions, many re ·volving · ar ound a failure to achieve more .
Chuck Baro _ne of .Dickinson
College words it like this : ·
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"Su ,ecess honors those who , nia.ke it an~ failure stigma tizes tho ,se ·who fail, while libe:rals tend to focus on defi cienc:y , expressing pity and co :ncern for those unfortu nate enough to fail. Althoug .h cast in terms of individu als ,and equal opportu .nities , this ideology is classis t . lt
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Andrew Dugan; "Am e ricans Most .Like ly to Say They Belong to th ie Mi d dle
Class"'r Galluppoll. ,com , Nove11]tber 20 th ., 20 12 ~Accessed : September
6th, 2013 ..
2 Marx , Karl an ,d Engels,. Fred.rich,
The Communist
Manifesto ('Chipago :, Merlin
Pres .s , 1998) page 1.
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Tbeones& Perspectives
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casts working-class
people as _inferior and inco ·mpetent,
midd1 e-class people as superior, perhaps bless by
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God/

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This is part of a societal trend to view the working :-c lass individual
as inferior to the -"Llfe of the Mind,,~ For an example ·of these generally
unspoke :n sentiments,
here is the : description
of a pli.nnber .in an essay
~.ntitled t'The Disadvantages
of an Elite Education;,.~
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"Ther ,e he was, a short beefy guy with a goatee and
,a Red So .x cap and a thick Boston . accent, and I
su~denly le,arned that 1' didn~ have the slightest
idea what to say to1som ieone like him . So alien was
his experience to me, so unguessab
.le his V'alues:>
so mysterio us his very language,
that I ,cou"ldn 1.
succeed in engaging him in a few minutes of small
talk b·eforie he got down to work." 4
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How does classism. manjfest -at UChicago?
The ·working-class
individual,
in the eyes of most upper-class
students, is an ,alien thought to be below those who have gained access to
schools like , this one .. This ·is a structural .form of classism within society that is only · magnified,, by being at elite in .stitutions.
Ofteri jo~es ~
ex :changed about becoming sales clerks, or eve :~ pl~bers
...This remforces moments
of internaJi .zed opp _ression-students
,vhose parents
are working-class
have 1
often noted feeling shame abo~t such origins.
Strnctural
classism
also manifests
itself clos ,er to our· University.
The Office of College Aid promises to "meet a student's . demo .nstr ,ated
need throq.ghout their four years in the College~. It s,eeks to cre :ate a
perfe ,ct balatlce between your ·leg~ guardian,
yourself~ and the college,
in terms of paying your tuition .. Through this proces .s, the g oal is to
eliminate class as a c onsideration
..-R~gardless
of whether your mother
is ajanit or, or a tenured
collegiate professor,
the University wants to
make your presence here happen . .
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The reality is quite different. It includes
having to , jum .p through
every hurdle the College sets for you in order to ·receive y ·our aid-in
my
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Classism
into the Race and Gender Picture 11 Race..,
Gender, and Class 6 (1999) : 15 ..
4 'William
Deresiewicz~ ffThe Di~advantages
of an Elite Education"
on Amen•
canScholar_org~
summer
20 08 .. Accessed~
Septern.l~er 7th, 2013 .
3

Chuck

Baro ·ne,. "Bringing

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Theories & Perspect:ives

cas!!, it meant ~,ndin~ someone -who •knew ~~ ~amil;y well ., but was not
a fnend or another btased party• to ,c ·onf:rrm that neither my mother,
nor myself had bec in in contact with my father since I was born. It
means finding out in Ap ·ril that the · state ca _n . tax the room and board
part of your financial aid, and you are liable to pay it. It m .eans attemp~ng_ to fmd out whether . a H 0 u .se tn .p is worth sel~ing yrour Pride to
your Resident _Head, and telling th 1em _that yo~ can ·~ afford the $20 fee,
but woul d still like t o go .. These are -all examp les 10 f structural
classism-if
capital was unlim ited, n 10,ne of these woul d be concerns.
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Personal levels of classism can be even worse.- Rath~r than having
the ability to blame an ab .stract concept for your misfo .rtunes, the per~
petrat-0rs ai,e often your class .mates, and frie:rrds. My first year, friend :s
started a . conversation about h ow much the _y were expect ed to • pay. A
friend of mine said the school e?,qJected her parents to pay $30, 1000 a
year~ Without thinking I said, "$ ,3:0,00 0? That's · insane! ·who on earth
pays th .at? 1' to whic;:h she replied, ''Yeah, well, . maybe if you had a dad
you'd . be expected to pay more · too." This wa .s not spoken with the intent to hurt ,. She simply expressed a subconsciou :s ignorance in a very
poor manner ..
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And here's the clincher about personal fo1rms of classismbecause anyon 1e can claim iigno,rance ab out what is common economi 1c
practice; . any response has to de 1al with its perception .. If I had reacted
with anger toiwards my friend; pe ,ople may have perceived me as being
hostile, or even irrational. From their perspectives,
she mi ,ght have had
a factuallly v·aJiid _point , without recognitio n of the privileged context in
whieh .she exists . And because of that, ~heir analysis would see some thing wrong wit~ my emotional reaction, but nothing wrong with the
foirmulation of h.er statement. The confli ct between us came fr om our
own very different pasts and c-0 ntexts in terms of what we considered a
reasonable amount of m.aney 1 .due to what our ·parents co ·uld afford .
. This personal Classism -can be combat~d simply by perhaps taking ,a
step back and recognizing
that w e all come from different place ·s, and
th .at your · normal and my normal are not the same - and that no ·one,
except perhaps our radica1ly unequal . economic system ·- is to blame for
their own social class.
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'Tbe-ariesb Per~c.tives

PO"WER, OPPRESS ION, & RACISM
Vincente

What are power an 1d
ODD ress ron .r
,.

cruel .. o-r ·uniust

il')J

On a verv bas ic level. power is the abilitv to
exert force on . somethjng
and chanae it. such a.s
havinl! · authoritv over siblinas~ bein2 a srreat ·oub1ic

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man 7s abili v ·10
individ .uals b oth
lv and 1nenta.llv.
1allow ·ed the idea
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ont r ol
ohvsical -

But what
tl1a.t 011e

race was de .1ni iv elv superioi · to another to take
hol 1d and enforce centu.ries of human owners .hio? '
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Used ne1:r.atively, 1a.s
in slaverv. Dower ·b1e1comes 00 1r,T,essio n .. the
exe:rcise of authoritv · or
powe.r in a b11..1
.rdensome,.
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Althoue:h 00 101 ·es-sio_n ·can ·be authorized
by
individuals'\ it most
com .monlv l,.1efers to wide _sor iead and fur-reachin~
i.ns ances: laoanese · internme1 1t camos .. the
Tr ,ail of Tea ·rs. a11d com - ·
fort wo .men~ to name a
few. ln e,ach of these ex.am oles ,.. a minoritv _Q:r•ot10
·was o·oo ressed bv a mer e
d rom inant l!rouo in favor
of the , dominant ~uo"s
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SDeaker . and so on . As we
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seeming m
y sharP: rd:is.tinc-

man-

11er .,

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italce a dee ·oer look at extent to which humans are
imca cted bv their srocial,
econon1.ic ..an 1d ·nolit i,cal
context. it beco mes cle~r
that oower is a substantial and sometimes
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daunting force behind
lare:e-scale svst iems an d
1cl1ana:e. Letts consider
aower"s influe11ce on the
institution of slaverv~ The
enslaveme ,nt of .an entire
race of°individuals was
oossible onlv throuah

Pere ·z

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-d esires . Wh .en \Ve look at
oo ,nression. it becon1es
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.evident th at individual
a.cts of di scrimination.
su ,c.h as aeainst skin colo1"
or ee11der .. resulted in and
1eoresented a. svstem that
could onoress an entire
2rouo with the h elp of
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po ·we r ..

What is race, anyway?

At its coret the concep 1t of race is a social

tions function along a
spectrum .. Furtherm 0,re .,
when we talk about race ,
we r·efer to not only physical a:ttributes, buit also
cultural ones, hence th .e
ability to say that a non~
black person. Ha~
black , Thus race does
not re.fer. so.·le1y to physical markers, but al:so to
the cultural correlations
we associate with these
markers. which are u lti mately socially constructed ~These correla ,tio ns
b~come p rublematic
when soci~ty devel .ops a
mindset that categor izes
ce,rtain behaviors, abili ties, and lifestyle ,s as inferior and uses t his .mindset
to s_pecifically targ~t a!ld
oppress groups of individuals tiased on their
physica ·1 attributes and
perc 1eived race .
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Ho ·w rare nowP r nnd rnrconstruction based 0 n
ism c-onnected?
the correlation of physi Power in the svsten1
cal attributes to specific
_ of slave.rv manifested
in ·
b ehaviors , abilities and
two . distinct wavs .. Firs.tly .. lifestyles .. Ge_nomically,
it allowed th e· r,hvsical
there is no sharp distincatroc:itv of the slaverv of
tion ·between membe .rs of
an entire raoe throt,gh the
a s-eparate race; many 1

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Tbeories & Perweaives
isolated instances -of
discriminatio1il can be1come , widesore ,ad svst,em s. oeoole ,0 f color

to th · ex-

J.>svcholoaical atrocitv of
dehuma ·nizine- blacks an ,d
'Del'oetua.tinll white suDremacv_ the reoe-rcussio-ns of wh.ich we still
deal with todav ·. It allowed courts to .iustii)'
black individuals as
-,./~ths of a oerson. It
taurEht so 1ci etv to tolerate
the viole1,ce exerted on
black individuals. It allowed the crimes of some
blacks to become the
criminali 1zation of the entire race. No matter how
subtle or harn1less the ·
d.iscrimina.torv ,or onnres-

W1aV

ize oooress:ion

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tent that oeoole not onlv

sivre acts mav seem~-oc.:.
Dression functions witl1in

Travvo .n Martin ralJies are
deoicted bv oooular n11e-dia as violent and uncivil11"'z ed
. tltb11
- I ack. r ..
lO ls w h I..l e

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a laru ·er . uJtima't elv dehumanizing: svstem
which manifests :itself
throu .(!h n1ore subtle acts.
The distinctio11 be·1

tween racism and dis ·criminat1on is subtle but
imnortant. and ooints to
t h e ...
lffl .DOSS1 "'b"'t··
-l ltv o f"'
_ re.
"
R
.
ve_____
--rs-:-e- r~a c1sm
--. a:-c1-s,
-:-- .1s
__
__ ., ____
_m
_
the ooores :sion of mare.i11a:lized racial erouos

which is suooorted and
oeroetuated bv 1ndividuals .. institutional
svstems.
cu :ltural 111.oi◄ms and orac tic res. and social oract.ices,
all of which manifest
oow er .. In contrast . -discrimination invo~ves situations that mav be isolated to soecific i11dividuals
and does not have wide~
scale reoerc -ssions ,. Becaus~ , po -wer is the on]y
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have n 10 institutions
or
other D<JWer structures
to
o,ooress white i11divi-dua]s
:so,lelv based 0n their sl<in
color. Witho ,ut oowef.

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minorities . continue
tare:eted

bv oolicies

Stoo-and•Frisk

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to be
like

..where

·besrin to ie:nore the sie:ns.
but also be2in to subconsciouslv and accidentallv
ene-atre in racist beliavi .01~s

or attitudes.
While
seemin(llV harmless. acceotin£!. racial steireotvoe ,s
sustains 1·a cist cul tu r,a]
~

,norms. In the .oostslaverit era ..ra,cism takes

be stooned
and frisked without rea:sonable irroun ,ds that

more subtle forms crossina the street. comn'lentina hat African-

thev are com .mittine
crime., Without oower,
t)1e maioritv b~ack

Alnericanst low ·er oer fo 1rman ce on 10 tests
SUrlllests
d.ifferences between he ra ·es ..not insti-

Deoo~e

C1an

m1

'W.hite individuals

wh ,o
ransack a surfinl! competitio ·11in Califor'nia are '
not deoicted as uviolent,>
or ~'riotous,,. Witl1out
oower .. a b-]ack individual
at this -verv Universitv

was arrested for beine

"-to 0 loud '2 in a section of
the libra1ythat allowed
taJl<inR~
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·reroet1.1ated racism

allows , oeoole todav not
to auestion the disor ,onortionate am ,ount of African Am eric ·ans . and oth- ,
,er minorities in the c1~iminal iustiC'e svstem b~cause tJ1ev accent the ste reotvoe of the African
, American criminaL These
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stereotvoes and su 'btle
forn1s of racism normal-

tutional challenS?es and .
so on. These

mo ments
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mav s eem harmless at
firstt., but a closer look reveals iu :st how influential
th 1ev c:an be to both 1-ninorities and dominant
·
2rouos alike. The first •
steo towards creatina: .an
acceot1ng .. eg:a.1·
_1tar1a.n societv is ,educatin .e: oneself
on the individual Dower
that: one has to influence
soc ·ietv's lar ,eer oower
structures. While evervdav racism is more subtle. each one of ,our ac
tions can either undermine or suD0 10 rt . the
dominant oower structure of racism~ a.nd th e
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more we , do to educate
ourselves. the easier it
becomes to undermi1, .e it.



What defines cu 1lture,i exactly?
Our default m_ode ..of thinldn~ about cul'tt!re consists most~ .. . ·..·· . C·.
of food , cloU,1ng~ and /or hoJ1days- we think of

. ·
udon, saris, cel lebrations like Ramadan 8 ~d th{:' Lu -nar New Year,. but cu lture pervades ou 1r lives 1n far
.· •.
·. ·
.
d_eeper and ..more .complex ~ -s tl1an its se~1ingly
~ ~
.
cind . Ji
stmple man1festatrons . To give a more t ech 1
n1cal 1
'1efin11t1on cullure 1s t he .
_Y
product of a pe.rson 's accu rmu1atecl leam ed behavioral pattem 1s~ the sum of experience ,, beliefs., values. attitudes, relig~on~ rnotio~ of time, , roles~ con ·cepts of the un iw
verse, etc. C 1
ulture can b~ attached t~ a1sp~c~c eth~icify, .-~li~~n" .o~ region , but it ~n
also ~0 1
me from ~S 's obvio U5! group •~entities., _1nclud1ng S0':tal class,. level of ,~u~~t 1o n,
or gender~and from fonnal1ve experi ences that can 't be pinned down as easily, hke
the values learned from a specifi ic organization Qr the way on ,e "'s family does or ·does

u .~tu re ·

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Appropr·1at·1on ·...

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not eat together and exchange gifts..



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Why does th i s 1m ,atter?
-~
At this university7 you'll be i1
n-teracting with students who follow a particular diet
or set of 1rituals, who might have an arranged marriage ,or only partake 1ncertain · se~ual
acts, who may or may not have complex feelings abourt .the cultures they identify with ,
pethaps partly because . they fall beyond the bounds of the dominant elile coHege cul e
ture . Keep in mind that individua ~s choose to follo w a cultural practice. No matter how
relatively bizarre (relative to what? What's the 11orm and why js it the nor=1TI?)or how
self-admittedl .Y problemati 1c someone S culturar practice might be, it' s safer t o ask why
tJhat person chooses 1hat p ractice instead of joking about "'leavi_
ng, y ·pur culture," pretiending it doesn'l exist .at all, or feigni ng tolerance ~
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What constitutes
cultural appropriation?
All cuftures borrow from atl other cu l tures to an extent~ but when does borrowin,g becom re appropriati ,on? Think sports teams like the Redskins . 11hink cul t ural symbols used as fashion trends : bindis. headd :resses ., Geisha costumes. Think a celebrity ·or
fash ion des ,ig·ner coming out witJh a new product in anima1I1print and calling it aAftika .."
In eadh of the above examples ~ I) ~ cul~ural symbo l has been stripped from its cultura ll
significance or 2) someone fro m outside of a1cultu re takes assumed symbols und~r ·
the name of that culture an1d misrepresents it., It 's disrespectful ]to market a symbol as
fashionable when the person wearing it 1has little . understanding of the culture it comes
firom or does not commit to lifestyle, values 1 or attitudes of those 'who have ,earned
_
the right to do rn that symbol. In the Jatte~·case, there's an added ,ayer of a power play .
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!Because cultures that -are often a1
ppro pnated tend to be underre ,presen t ed, when
someone from 1the dominant society misrepresents that culture, :peopfe from that culture have little means to properly represe ·nt ·themselves to U,e sa :me wide audience~
Genui 1
ne curiosify f and a .desire to lea irn :about another culture is alwa~ welcom~
but
it's !becomes problema tic when culrure is wrestled from the peo ple who are p,art
rt
lby people who are not . Especia ll ,y when the _people who appropr iate make ,a 1
culture
~,coo I" whi l e the peopl e-who ,are part of the cufture are : considered ""exotic" or even
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uncivilized .."'

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Theories # Perspecti-ve$ _

SEXIS -M / <¼ENDER DISCllfTMI NATl ()N
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Hol"i'il ~Jo I111St1 ll

Il«,w 11,, W(~ll(~fi.11e~1,xis1rl?

.
. () 11<11 of tl1(i 1·n1tst ,~or111nit>n MO(• ial J1~qM111111-tt
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(~)11 111<~<4.ti
011 IKa..
t,vt~rn t)np's ~.tnatA:1
1nical srx art<l thl~i,~ 1>~1'M<,11ali~
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rt) 1.at i11clivi1l11,n l's; l)(J&l1avio1~, c.•l1a.ra(;t<~r, ov<~n t;tll -ur1tHa:n,l i1-1r1IJitio1'1s.'1-.llt¥i(' <"ODt1/l
11si,>ns 1~s,1 It. in ~on,l,~rl~HHf'tl h~"n'<1l)" ·1~:
\\ -(~11H1 n <-a.11~t ,Jri,·i:i~111c'11 <,a..u
't (~1'N ►Jl,, ,r,1u1t•u ;.1,.1~~ i1•·1'rt.tic·t11a.l,,
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I i rag, 11,r1cl fMJ o 11. '\V Ji• 11 ti 1<'H:<..
11ss1101 Jtti 0 ·11,s lK~c>111<~ w i~1(-1y :1t.•(•('lJtr( 1tl H.t1d i fl fl llf 11tia.l i()Vo1· ~•V(~1..ytl1i 11,g r1-on1 1(')lit· C(~t]l()ll)l("~
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Theories b Perspecti'Ves
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Theories b Perspectives

The

Gender

Binary

Anai ,s Ahmed

What is the gender binary?
The concept of the gender binary
1

refers
a the dich otomy draw n between
I~ pos·ts
that there are two sexes - the

mascul 1n~t y and femininity~

ma.le an 1
d _he fema e - and th.at with . the ·m are necessarily
assoc ia ted
o nly tw ,01 genders &- the mascu ine and the feminine,
and t hat th ese tw ·o
genders
are assoc·ated
w·th two differen
t gender roles.
Through this
wo r 1 dv iew, some th ings a re labeled
~ .·asc ul ine"
and others
'\feminine .,,., for
exa __ple.
~h ngs 1 " ke se ·w '"n g, sk ir ts,
and the coloc
p.in k have been
deemed fe :m· nine i n o_ r soc · ety , whe£eas things
like
war fa r e , · neckties,
a~d
he co or bl'ue have bee n deemed mascqline.
These assignments
are
1en ti r e l y ul ture-dependen
t - _.n Bang lade sh i cultu r e , for e Kamp l e, , men
commo l y wear skirt-like
garments,
whereas
in Americ~n culture
such a
t hing would be unheard o .
1

Why am I reading
You' 11

f ,. nd the

about

gender

it

binary

.

here?
co l or i ng many

In my Phys i cs 1~1 class,

t.he uni versity.

for

of

as:pects

example,

it

at

time

your

was aJ.?out 70--

30 in fav0 1ur of men, w e r eas the Tibetan
class
I took as par t of the
divinity
sc h o ol ~-a~ all-women.
In Breck ~n r id ge ou se, · the second
floo r
of the bu i l ding is fo r legal
y male "nd i v i duals , whereas the t hird
floor
is for lega ll y femal e o n esr regardless
of how the residents
of _
these
floors
may i de n tify
a s. In none of the dini g halls
can one f "nd
a gendez-neutral
ba tht oom, nor in maay o
. he s o u_heast
build ' ngs on
the quad,
nor in many of the
__orms,. meaning
in dividuals
who may not
fee -1 c_i
omfort .ab e wit h the ass umpti on of iden
it y of ge n dered restrooms
to have to go far j ust to use a restroom .
1

1

1

. On e of the hl ggesr. f laws of th e gende ,r binary
i s h at i
·-g·nor es ' th ,e ·
existence
~f p eople
living
as .some member of the t ansgender
spectr ·um
(tha't .is tn say, i dentifyin
g as transgender,
ge _.derqueer,
in~ ers ex,
Two-Spirit,
hi j 1ra ., vel sim . ) an d such in divid ,ua.ls spend much of their
li ve ,s. fighti
ng the assumpt ions
tha t the gender
binary
impos es on
us.
Although
bein g born wi th a p~nis often
means tha __ he possessor
_
is a man, you v1il 1 meet individuals
at. the uni.va rs
y who were ·born
with
a penis
and ide _tify
a:s ·wo·me • Likew i se, .you wi l l meet ·n _d •v !'}du als wh,o were born 'vii th a. vagi :ria and ident · fy as me n, or in div i duals
who re ·gard l ess of the i r · genita l s r, r chro m~somal al ,. gnment · d,en _-i f y a s
neither
IIH:!
,n or women, and in suc h cases
sticking
w- 'th the as sump ion s
the gender binary provides
can only lead to disrespec
ing someo n e's
identity
and very being.
1

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Theories b Fenpectives
I

LGBTQ Rights: More thai:i Marriage

Equality

Sar-a Rubinstein

Why is marriage equality curi-e~tly
the centerpiece
of m ·ai.nstream

• ference to the epidemi ic'"'.7
However, w .htl~ ,the AIDs crisis
LGBT related/ progreissiv ,e organitemporarily united the movement by
zations' push for • L.GBT righ'ts"'_. an d "impact[i'ng] gay men irrespective of
1econ :omic or social class"~ bringing ,.a lot
why is that pro blem .atic?:
of conservative, we .althy, whi e gays into
To explain this:1 I .need to give a
brief overvi ew of the history of the modthe m 1ovement"" also helped guarantee a
.sharp return to assimilation-based
poliern LGBT rights movement .in the United
tics in the following decades ..8 Since t'1eStates. The mov iement first gained mose white~ cisgender, relatively well-off
meotum ·in the 70s after the Stonewall
riots of 1.969, and originally took a. fairly · gay men (and to a certain extent, lesbia ,,,·ns) 0 n1y ha .d their siexual o .rientarad :i1cal appraach. -The Gay Libe'fation .
tlon keeping them fro .m being fully
Fro .nt (GL1F), one of the most prominent
within the dominant class in s ;ociety,
queeJ" organizations
of that time, "aimed
their disproportionately
peate ·r soto fight the cultural homo phobia alongsi1de racism, sexism, and militarism.,~s
1cial and economic power quickly allo ,wed them l:o dominalje the moveSoon, how ·ever, factions develo _p 1ed withment tb.rou,ih powerful and wealthy
in the b ·urgeoning LGBT mov ement and
assimllationist
organizati ons such as
more lassimilationist
g,roups, such as the
t ·he Gay and L~sbian Alliance Again .st
Gay Activists Alliance., which focused on
Defamation (GLAAD) ,an 1
d the Human
lobbyin ,g for lregislative reform and gay
Rights ~ampaign . (HRC).
rights exclusively., 6 These t iensions c on0 nce they began setti .ng th .e L,GBT
tinued into the 80s, ,at wh ,ich point the
rights agenda, th .at agenda became
AIDs crisis for a short period brought
overwhelming
focused ·upon the _ismuch of the LGB T movement back to its
SU1
e1s-suc: .h as the abi .lity to serve in
radi ,cal roots and made "gay and queer
the military and marri ,age equalil;ywor~ds, radicals.a ·nd incrementalists,
that separated white cisgender wellunited against the governm 1ent~l lndifoff gays and lesbians from their h e,t,erosexual white c:is well- 1off peers. In
11

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Benjamin
similationist
s

J. Shepard, ~;!TheQueer/Gay

As~

1

Split: The Suits vs. The Sluts"'~
Monthly Review 53 (2001): 51,
http://monthlyreview
..org/2001/05/0
l/th
e-queergay-assimilationist-~plit
6 Shepard,
"'TheQueer/Gay ·Assimilationist
Split,." 52
1

Shepard~ UThe Queer/Gay Assim .Uationist
Split" 55
8 Rebecca
Burns, t;Be·y ·ond Gay Marriagej·. In
These Times~ July 24, 2010,, - http:/ /inthesetimes.
,com/article/
13466/be
yond_gay _m·arriage/
1

so

,

other ·words~ these organizations
began .
"ignoring oth 1er social just:ice ist;ues to
prom .ate only a narrow political agenda
that concerns gays and lesbians experi·encing op 1pression through a.single vector - sexual 1orientation - and thus 1ex- ·
eluding from concern all the q·ueer and
tr ians people who simultaneously
experien ce sexual or'ientation ·-based oppression an .d other op :pressi :ons related to
their identities as people of colo r, workers,11immigrants, .gen .der nonconfo 1rmers, .
1

peop1e with disabilities,

and so forth~J ..9

1

1



This in turn causes the gener~I public
to remain

unaware of the wide range
1of other challenges faced by the qu eer
t:om1Dunity and start to develop a
view of ma1Tiage equality as a sort of
. one-size~fits all solution to all the
problems '.faced by LGBT individuals,
w 'hich detra ,cts from tb ,e lev el offinancia 1. and other resoun:es allocated towards fighting for these crucial hu--man rights issues.
·
Wha.t are lhes .e other LGBTQissues?
1

1

1

LGBT Q Youth Ho melessness
·Acc ording to a 2007 jo ·int report by
the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
and Natio nal Coalition for the HomelessJI
1

1

1

1

Theories b Perspectives
whole ..-i0 Part 1of t 'his o,verrepresen.tation
..stems from ·ramilial conflict over a
youth's sexua .l orientation
or gender
identity ....According to · one stud .y., 5 0
percent ofgay teens experienced a negative reaction from their pa~ ·ents whe ·n
they came out and 26 percentwere
kicked out of their hornes.-\ 11 Additional ly,.,'-another study found that mo ire than
one-third of yo 1uth who 1are homeless or ·
in the care of social services experienced
a violent physical assa .ult when they
came outn, S 0 teens may actualJy choose
homelessn .ess over staying in pa .rticularly abusive foster care or shelter envi-

1

20 ·-40% of all homeless youth in th ,e
U'nited States ar-e .LGBT ...which is vastly
disp ro portionate
to LGBT representation . within the youth population as a

a

ronment12

Once homeless, queer youth tend
to struggle · with numerous enormous
challenges _. Since they have to deal w ith
the .psycho 1logical stress of both being
_homel es.s and being LGB 'T in a discriminatory society, they ar ·e at significantly
higher :risk of deyel~ping mental health
problems . .13 Que ier homeless youth are
more likeJy to abus .e substancest 'three ·
times mo re likely ·to participate 1n. risky
sexual acts in e·xchange for getting basic
1

1

needs

(food., cloth'ing,

shelter) met., seven
times mo ·re likely to be vi ctims of a.
· crim 1e, and disprro ,portionately more like1

1

Nicho]as Ray, Lesbi 1an, gay .. bisexual and
transgender youth : An epidem ,ic ,of home1:ess.ness..New York: N.ational Gay and Lesbian Task Force Polb :y Institute and the Nati 1onal Coalition for the Ho 1meless 1(2006]: 1..
tJt.tp ://~'1\V 1tV•Jhet.a~l~(q_rc.e ..prg/do~yQl _o~4$l

. 10

Rick Mananzala and Dean Spade, The
Nonprioflt Ind .ustria.l Complex and Trans
'Resistance/" Sexu .alit.Y Research and Social
0

9

Policy 5 (2008):

tl;om _eJ~s~Y o,u tb ~pdf

60,

http://srlp.org/files/N

Ray_.An epidemic of homelessness, 2
12 Ray,. ~n epidemic
Of"homelessness., 2
13 Ray _.An epidemic of homelessness, 3
i1

PlCtransresistance

..p

df

51

I

I

.

-

Theories & Perspectives
more likely to have low-income jobs
· tha~ the general population ....are less
likely ro have high p 1aying jobs t hat1.
workers as a whole , have a greater sense
of dissatisfaction with their living stan •dards ....[a.nd) have J.ower levels of education . than the overall pop 1ulation'"j!t 7 UnS'Urpri s ingly, then, ''the 111a
·1ority of
LGBT people actu~tll y co nsider econo .mic discrimination
to be the No. 1
issue in their lives'ar.1:e
Since only 21 states proh ibit dis[ c.rimination based on sexual orientation
and only 16 states and Washl'ngton, D.C.
proh .ib ·it .d iscrimination based on s~xual
orientati ,on and gender identity, much of
the substan rtial quantities of 1economic
di.scrimination
~xperienced by LGBT
Americans is currentl :y completely legaLl.' Recent reports have shown that ....
as
many as tvvo out of five ._gay an ,d lesbian
woricJers 'have experien ,ced s9me form of
dis ,crimination 1Dn the job' ·with up to one
out of five of these having been 'fired for
their sexual orientation ,~ while for
, transgender people the situation is far
more dire .sinc.e ll'nin 1
e out of 10
tran.sgender
employees
have · e·ncountered •some form of harassment or mistreabnen~ at work wi t h almost h .alf of

Iy to ·be the victims of harassm ent, ,vi.o ,leniee, and ra ,pe ,within the j'uv ,en'ile a·n,d
criminal justice system than ,are their
straight homeless p,eers. 14 Unfortunately,
despite thes ,e facts demonstrating
homelessness' hugely detrimental
effect upon
. tbousa ,nds of LGBT teens, "hom ele ,ss
youth programs have been _grossly under
funded" contributing to a s·hortfall of
availa .ble spaces for y outh wh 0 need
support. In . 2004alone~ d.u e to this lac~
of funding, m -ore than 21500 youth were
denied access to a [transitional
livin 1g]
pr 1ogr.am for whi ch they were otherwise
qualified. Additionally, 4,200 y .o,uth were
- turned ..away from Basic Center Pro grams~ w :hich provide fami.ly re ·unificatlon services and emergency shelter"'.~ 5
1

1

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1

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Pove -rty in the 'LGBTQ commn~ity:
Even though popular m~ss media
1

tends to portray gay people as overs
wlt elmingly wJtite , wealthy /!and w ·ell ed•
uca t ed, in reality ',..LGBTAmericans are
more , likely to be _poor and less educated
than their peers,. and EOm e from com- ·
munities that have been historically,
e ·conomically
marginalized;'"
black, Latino. and Asian people are d ..sproportionately overrepresented
within th .e U~S.
queer coimmunity wh en compared with
the population as a _who l e ..16 Additional ly, uLGBT Ari1 ericans are 30 percent
1

I

1

1

·

1?

1·o n esj ~'Mar ,ria rge Is Great,, Bu t Many 'LGBT

P,eople of Color Need Job Saifety" •.
1a Lis:a Dettmer.
('Beyond Gay Marriage~.
Rae~, Povert,, ~a_nd Environm ent 17 (20 10]:
3 4 -~http://www.jstor.org/stab
'le / 41554 7.43
19 Tyl~r Gabrielski.,.
Marriage Doesn"t fix
Ev ·erything for LGBT Americans'', Cam ...
pusProgress, June 11. 2013,,
http:/ /cam ·p usprogre.ss.,org/ articles/ marria
1

1

1

1

Ray,An epidemic of homelessness ~3
· 1 s-Ray, And eplde ,mlc ,of homelessness, 4
16 Imara Jones, ~Marria .ge l's Gtr1eat,But -Many
LGBT People of Color Need Job Safety\ , Co/ ...
1
orline
April 11~ 2013 ,
14

s.

1

:h.ttp://colorlines.rom/archives/2013/04/j
,ob_bias_lgbt_;enda.html

·

11

ge_doesnt_fix_everythi:mLfor_1gbt
s.

_american

..

thos [e who encountered
difficulty on t ihe
job reporting extreme hardship~ such as
~ losing em .ployment
'due to gender-ide ·ntity discrimination'_.,,. As a.resul 4 In
some 1cities "the unemploym ent rate of
the transgender
oommunity can be ·u·p to
seven times higher than that of the municipality as a w ·hole~ ~_zuDespite these
1

~

Theories & Perspet:tiveJ
percent (90%) of those surv eyed reported expe ·riencing h.arassme·n~ m1istreatm .ent Dr -dm:scrimination on the jobi'';
•~over one-quarter
[2~%) reported that
they :had lost a job due to ·being
transge ·nder or gejnder non-conforming' "..
''16% said they had been compelled to
1

1

work in . the undergrouii d ec~n romy for
income (such as doing sex work or selldisturbing
statistics., the fight against
ing drugs)""~ and "19o/o reported ha .ving
queer job discrimination
an -d for ecom
been refused a h rome or apart,nent and
nomic jiustice generally has takien a
backseat to 1th .e pus 'h for marriage 1equa li- 11% reported being evicted because of
ty. In fact,.. the fight for .sam .e•sex marthelr gender id rentity/express
ion." Additionally, the surveyed trans* people exriage often drains resources which
perienced fo·ur times the rate of extreme
caold be devoted to assisting more
p·overty ·as the population as a who lie,.
marginalized
qu e,er communities.
For
;~41% live without ·ID that matc ·h the ·ir
example, one woman who worked at
gender id.entit:J,.,, ttl 9%.~.reported being
"the only freestanding communicy clinic
refused medical rcare due to rh .eir
in c ·aJ,ifor.nia providing health care specifically to t~ans. lesbian, . and bisexual
transgender
or gender non-co :nforming
status"', and "57 0/o ,experienced signifi women, notes that she was o·ften unable
cant ra·mily rejection". 22
·
to get funding fo r issues affecting p•o or
. Despite the trans"' community's
lesbians and transpeople from those
clear, overwhelming
need for support
same funders who were mo -re than .h ,ap• and solidarity,
mainstream LGB [T organiPY to fund ga .y marri .age"'. 21
zations like the Human Right C,ampaign
Trans' .issue ,s
have a reco:mid on trans* issues ~hat is
- A joint study conducted by the Naspotty at best Since ..transgend~r in.dltional Gay and Lesbian Task Force and
viduals ·are often able to g 1et married afthe National Center for Transgender
ter undergoing
sex reassignment,
and
Equality in 201-1 found that the situa•
th .ose w ·ho transiti [on within marriage
tion of transgender and . gender non"'
are generally still married within .th~
co ·nforming peop:le is more dire than
-·lly
- ·y.· 10-- ,t·--&e
eyes •Of the law, 1» HRC vi.ew.s marriage as
tba
___-- t- u---f- vt"'rt11
-- - -a-- · a--_.n
-- r-- s-- ub-- gro·
-- -up..a no ·n-issue for the trans* community
within . 1:he queer community ..The survey found that J' 41 % 10 1f resp [on .dents r eand thus does not advocate for them~ 23
ported attemp ·ting suicide compared to
1.6% of the general populationp, ~"Ninety 2
2 Jaime Grant, Lisa Mottet,
etaL 2~7
2a Juan Battle and Col.in Ashley ~~I nt e rsec 1

1

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1

1

1

~tone :s, '~Marriage Is Great, But ~any LGBT
People of Color Need lob Safety' .,
21 ·D e·tt~mer..u9 eyon
- d Gay
- M a- rr1
-u::r,s' " _
3 5.·
.a---it::t_..,
2

j

I

Hetef\onor1nativity,
and Black
Lesbian" Gay ..Bisex-ual, and T·ra 1nsgender
(LG .BT) Fa1n1iliesj" B.lack Women ~ Gender+
tionality,

Theories & Perspectives
Furthermore, the HRC has 1few
~ritics of~he marriage-centric
approach
transge ·n 1der 'board members and has
to queer politics say that 'because of the
-even In the recent past i.ncluded. o·pen- high prevalence of p.arentin :g among
ly transphobic leaders such as ExecuLGBT ·pe ople of -color and the e.conomic
tive Direct ior E'llzabeth Birch, who once ·
benefits ,and security that marriage
_stated that j·trans inclusion in ENDA (th 1e equa]itywould
afford same-sex families,
Employinent and No ·n Discrimination
marriage equality · for same-sex rouples
Act) ."'"would l1appen 'aver her 1dead
is a ra ,cial a .nd econo •mic justice lssue ..:"26
- body'u~ 24 More rece11tly~ th e H .RC beca1ne
Additionally, it is -important to point out
embroiled in fresl1 controversy whe ,n,. at
th .at, while the evidenc 1e shows that mar- ·
a d ,emonstration
for n1arri 1age equality
riage equality dispro portionately bene011 the :steps of the Su ·preme Court,-HRC
. fits m.iddle class and wealthier w .hite cis
staffers tried to malce a ransgen .der man
gay mean and . lesbians, individual varia. remove the Trat1s Pride flag beca11se
tion exists a ·nd thus this does not mean
"This [raJly] is al;)out marriage equality"
that no Jower income or non'i!iwhite
this is ·not about the tra11s commu .nity'•;
q·ue-er people care de .eply about and/0 1r
th ereby indicating the con'tinued presdesire marriage.
enc ·e of so1ne degree of bias an ,d tranThis is not a comprehensive list of
sp .hob ia witltin ·he org anizalion ..25
every issue a.ffe~ting queer/LGBT
peopl e nor a definiti ·ve guide to all
What this article l rs NOT sayln ,g:
LGBT issues, but rather a few highlightThis is not an argum ent th rat pursuing
ed examplres to get people thinking abo11t
marriag 1e equality is ubad· or doesn't'
Issues a·nd pro 'b 1lems besid~s marriage
benefit many people: My point is that
that affect the -queer community.
marriage equali'ty is not .a cure-all for
I'm one college student ....do not ta :ke the
th ,e hardships experienced
by queer
arguments
my cited ,sourc:es and I
make to be the deflnitive o·r unified
people in America and recei~s a
v.asdy disproportionate
level of attenvoice of the LGBT t:0 mmunity . Queer
tion and Fiese,urces 1 not th :at j:t~san en- peop 1
le h ,ave ju .st as varied and diverse
tirely worthless go ,al. Even very harsh
opinions as all other groups of people,
I and tl1,ere are certainly queer p 1
eople
who disagree with or have so .me crili""'
Famfllesi 2 (2008): 14~
cisms oif.some/all of what l' ve -argued.
http:/ /www.jstor.org/sta
·ble/10 ..5406/blac
Don't take my_word as · gosp ,el!
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-

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womegendfam :i.2 ..1 ..0001
24 Mo:nica Ro·berts, ..Why the T'l"ansge~der
Community Hates H-RC,l,f/TransGrlot. October ·B, 2007,
http:/ /transgriot.blogspotcom/2007
/10/
w 'hy-transgender-community-hates
:h-rc..html
25 Ibid-.
·

..

Battl ,e and ·Ashley, alntersectionalityJ
eronormativity,'"
14
26·

Het-

•·

A

e1sm

Ableism is discrimination,
intent rional or not ,
against individuals with physi rcal,sens .ory.,, co 1gnitive, or psy chiatric
d isabi I ities, fo] lowii ng the bet ief that

isabi I ity
Margaret Fink ·

1

1

·.

these jndividu ·als need to be fixed or
ca~'t live a ri ch and meani 1n1gful lite. Because disability status has been viewed
as a defect rather than a d imens;on of -difference, di .sabiJity has stilJ not been
widery re cognized as ~n aspect of divers ·ity ..
1

1

1

1

A central ] ab lei st idea a bo ·ut disabi 1ity · js t lh 1at it's an ind i·vjd ua I., persona I n affJ ic. ion" or tragedy. As you ~earn about able-bodied and able - minded priv~lege ,
resist the impulse to feel pity for the people on the receiving end 1of dis ,criminat~on and inaccessib]e spaces/e ·vents
as a disability rights slogan put it, . we
don't want symp ,athy , we want solidarity a.nd 1change: ✓'Piss on Pi~y/
0

If you ..r e able- lbodied, able -minded, you don t have to think and strategize
about whether you'll be a.bl e to get into, buildin .gs or bathroonns; wh -ether lhe
signage will have '3:raille., \i!\Jhetlher 'tliat Braille 'Will even b e correct ; whether
you' ·11be able to use the rows of technolo .gy .set up for 'you r peers; whether a
class lecture will be triggering; whether you will have a psychiatr i c episode in
· the mid 'dJe of midterms. llf you;re abl .e-b .odied, ab~ e-minded l, camp us and classes , a~e set up with you i.n mind. If you're able ·-bodied, abfe :.,
:min ,ded~ peo ,ple ·
look · you in the eye, but don't stare .. Y10 1u don't have 10 d1
eal wilh ir~itation, anger, or outri :ght dismissal when you do dai ~y in 1teractions differently. Y ou 1 re
· probably nort worried that your p,r ·ofesso irs or people
meet are going to
giv ·e you preferential treatment, discriminate against you, 1
consi 1
der you incapable of m aking decisions for yourself, or question your a·d lmissio :n to UChicago becau ·se of yrour di·s.abiJity~ Yo -u"r,e n ot systematic ra .JJy_m .ade to feel like
you're wo .rth less as a perrson because yoL1 move differently , _have a ·d~fferent
1

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1

1

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1

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yo-u

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get i nformat ion differerit[y,
have different moods,
have different sta rmina levels, have chronic pain .. Your successes are just successes , not "'inspir.ationa['-' or '\fdespite the fact ..
sensorium ., think

differently,

55

I I

hyde pa k/ '' ood 'awn/south shore
map or coo l ids - the index
F rm e rs Marke s
. 61st 5 reef Mar et (Sa . 9-2)
hur. 7- )
2. , yd P rK rim rs M rk.e
(Wed. 7-)
3 Sou h Shore ar e s
1

1

C o f f e e shops
, Back o y Cafe
5. Bea ie·s Coff~e & T a
6 & 7. Is ria C -rf e
8.. rd
orld Cafe
9 ..lit le Bla,ck Pearl
o alowe , G oun - s
1. Ex L1bris
2. Div Sc ool Cof eeshop
1

1

3. Al,d1
4 _Do in-ck·s

ts Cup

Boo stor ·s
6 Pow 11·s
800 Sto e
7. 57 h s re -t Books
a Seminary Cooperat ive
1

M ru se um 1

1

& C ul l u i I C
1

11

-,-h-at---

are o,#'.f th em ap·....
I-

_E- y

-~n

e
n

O

u

xs

J

c

-

-

e.
how d
_ ,o,

45 . Hyd Park Prod ce
46 . Firm s Fo d Bas
4-7. G een·s Foods
48. Am r Foods
49. Re-..,.,Food Ma k "t'
50. Sams Food Mar et

51 Harper

1


--&- a-f e
_W_
' - p-· ,/au__c _e ·s-

1

3. Classics Cafe
4 . Cobb Coffeeshop

5. - eg

Grocer y St ar . Open Produce
39. T e sur · Island
40 . Z es i & H· -·v th
4 . Bo ne S n e
42 A Nar,ural farve·st

1 ·

•---r"lll"II
w

· ·

Ih

s

n
0

Oper tiv

s

1y co~
.
. 8

- cn·.caso

oods

52 .. · oes ood 53. F eshw y Foods
54~H&D oceries
55. Latif G oc · i s
56. One S o.p ood
!Liq or
7. Sou t hshore p -11ry
1

1

8..Crandon Sup
59 . V illa8

I

arke

Food~

usse,rnGrocery l
19LDuSable A rrcan-A ~ er ic
History MusA 60& ryalid
20. Sou h Shore Cu tura l Cent r
B1k S hop s
9. Litt l · lac Pe,a I orks hop
4 r Backs one B ycle
or s
4. Experimen at St~ ion
6l s·k.
~ Cl'inic - S · 71st E of a t n
2 H de Par Art Ce te 62. DJs Bi e Doc ors
.
a1ssance Socie y
63.
e & T hin s
22. · useum o, Sc~ence & - dustry
64. TAT I Cyc
- o -3rd a lls
23_Ori ,a I s Ii @
C,:>m mu n it y G1a r dens
24. 5
use m
65 . 62nd
Dore es er Gard
25◄ , l ·c s a,ne Lib ary
66. T · qu·r Co mu i y
en
26, Court T ea re
7. Hyd Par Neighbo rhood Cl
Ga
l eg ens e, .pec1a~Col ec ions
68~55 th &
oo lawn Garden
Ho u.si ng Co- Op s
69. Brickyar Gardens
27. Baohaus
70. Good eish · rs G den
28. Bowers Ho se
7
geHc O an·cs Le r I g/
uc ~on Garde
291_Conca d House
72.. EC / ood f · n Co m ni y
den
30 ,. ym e o se
73..Gro 1ing Pow · J ck
P - k F · - /G d · n
31 Moomers
74. od·s it t i Ac
32_ Th~ oo ,s Collec t ive
75. S ell- 1 chcoc Uncommon Gar den , Pro ect
76. 6 · · 0 S. Dante Cam · n ty Garden
Com m un1i y C ent e r s
77. 7000 S. 'er ill Com u ·i y Garden
33. AK - ama Comm unit y Service Center
Nrew c m u i y 1
8 r en o enr8 soon in
34..Woo aw - Collaborative
Washin ton Park nd
72nd & gles,d.e
35. yde Park eig bo oo d Cu .
I

1

L

1

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11

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1

1

e

36. W *C.A.
ou i
Reso ce Ce te
7. 5710 0 SA/LGBT · S ud n Cen
1

oth e : 78. R~sou ce C n
9~ aw s · 1 ·

o-

e tre~llng
( -

d op - a )
·,·. t oy h - )

dtrteriil'ft>

for cool people

Theorie.1·b Perspectwe$.

....

a note

on blind

spots

Colin

Low

These days, one of the buzzwords in community and activist
circles
is in ·tersectionality.
Th ie ward i .s used ! .to remind us t ihat however
1

well- 1meaning

we might be about race or cla 1ss 1or g ender or sexuality
·
or culture
(the list goes on), those things do not operate·as
distinct
phenomena i .n our lives.
Rather,
th1ey inter~ect
in complex way·s
that
we can miss be cause we make assumpti0 1ns about what remains
common amon~ us~ Far example~
1

1

.. We ca 1n be considerate
about gender equality
and still
- forget
people who are non-white,
poor~ trans*
or non-binary.
• We can be pro-LGBTQ or against
racism and still
leave out people
who are poo 1r, trans*,
asexua .l, rural,
religi
·OUS1il culturally
different
or non-American.
• we can be sex-positive
-andl say things
that alienate
people with
di~a~ilities
or traumatic
triggers.
1

Des .pite my use of the third
personJ
it is vital
not to as.sume that
these people are ·to be found else where .. We are part . of the UChicago
community
You mi.ght find yoursel ·f aff ·ected by one or more of these
things~
You might find yourself
f~iling
to recognize
or remember one
1

a

or more of these things.
The hard lesson is to remain vigilant,
make
mi~takes,
learn
·from them_. a.nd never assume that you are som@how exempt.

Theorie1 b Per~ectives

.vii
.
Pr1 · . ..ege
Sumaya Bouadi

What is Privilege?
In a literal sense ·, pri, ,ilege refers to Ha special right or ad, 1..intage alJowed only to a sp ·ecific group of people." While dic:tiona1 ~i~s ,are tls ·eful, this
definition ~s not. Every single group has special rights a11d advantages. As a
tlle\\r stt1dent
at UChicago, you have the privile ,ge of attending one of the
t1:1ost elite colleges in the cot1.nt11'. Privilege in a sociial justf.ce sense does not
just refer to the fact that certain groups have special a.d, ..antages - e,:•ery
group has s pecial 1adva11tages - but to the .set of u11.eal'ned act,,antages or
lac 'k of suffering a person receives/do es not have to t1ndergo because · of
their perceived traits, such as being wl1it e, male ·1 stra ight, phJ.7sical]} - and
mentally health} ~, and ·so on ..
Basical".iy, privi~ege functions
as the unkrio,vn background
to e, 'er'yo ne's
life .. My privileges help define my context~ and sto p me from •experiencing
· some ne ,gative :siti1ations while allo,ving me to experience
son1e posit ive ·
ones .. However ·, the most imp ortant thing abo11t pri,·ilieg is tl1at it is., ttst1al ~
]y, the context and back ground nois~ ,of life . It is non .-ob, 1iou .s that ~·b1eing
white/male/ ·straight/cis has affected life in this. way, b ,e<:ause you .have al " ·a),.s been "\-vhite/n 1al e / trai ,ght/cis,, and t his ,,vo,r]d, and thi _s pri'.-:ilege be~
1c:omes your co11tCXt · o the extent that ):ot1 don't notice its ramifications ..
And ·the ran,iflcations
are non- ·lrivial.
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A b rief not e on Hche·cl( yo ur p rivilege" Please d.on ' t sa}" thi .s . The fact of the nriatter isl] no o.n •e ca.11 control their
conl~-xt,1and it is difficult to underst :and things tl1a one has never ~~peri1enced~ As my own 1contextual clisd ,ahner, I am female, str ·aigl1t, cis, a1'1dable.
so my own very w eak abilit)- ~to speak about straight privilege comes from
co11.versatio ·ns with ·non-straight friends. On my o'A~n, there is no amount of
enllghtenment
tl1.at w·ould tn11"yi allo~ , 1ne to uriderstan .d what straight privil ege means, becau se I ha,,e always been st1..aight, and I have never reall\·
1,no,vn what it 1rrieans to not be straight, .and the full extent of my own privileg re. So if someone seems to be coming fro m a p1i, 1ilegecl position, it is i.m p ortant to 1understa11d that they probably do not realize this fact - their ·
pr.ivile ·ge is the co ,ntext of their life .. Instead of critic izing , E~xplaining }l 0ur
llDint 1
of \tie,¥ an .ct the effects of their ·privilege tet1 d s to be a much m ,ore ef ...
fecti, re technique than sh1.1tting do,v11 th .e co1ri, ersalio11 b}' sa1ring, "check
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After all, allies are impor 1tant
\•\rillingness to co11U11unicate.

your privilege.

without

H

Theories b Persp,ectives
an d edt1cation can't happen
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Why · does it :matter?
Recognizing
my pri, 1 ilege allo\vs me to re co ,gnize m)' own self~ Byun- -c:-d
-·-~~ m-y
-·n__·v1·1e
-g e1
-_·I a- m_orhrJ-_ -sf
"".._an
1ng
_ p__ b1_e~tte··r ab
__ 111.e to_ u1n1
__ d
__erstand
__
__ __ b_
Je c-~1o ntext
___ 1·n
_
der
\.\"hich I exist and the fact rha.t other peop 1le do not exist in the same context
- therefore
others n-iay perc~i, 1 e a situation
ver} 1 differently
than I do and be
rigl1t b·ecat1se tl1 ey are seeing the situation
through very differe11t lens~s.
ThiSi 1..1nderstandtng helps build emp ,atl1y and commt111it1'·. By t1nderstanding
that the · 1·'-la)' . I see tlrie ,-vorld is deeply affe ·..ted b~.: the simplie biological facts
o,f n1}· existence and is not nece ·ssarily .accurate, I can be more empathetic
and tmderstanding
to others in n11~ commu11i"t) ..wilth different ·contexts and
b ,e .sympathetic
to; if not fully comprehendingT
of "th .eir stniggle while un ..,
derstanding
that my {)Wn "ontexl means that this is a strugg e can asil)'
ease o be a\.vare of.
l Jt.1.derstan .ding an .d bei11g-a,vare of pri\-ilege is .not ·abot.1t suddet1l; · nc1t
ha,iing privilege .. It is about undersran .di11.g yol1rself, the co11text 1n whi ch
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you exist, and t1si11g that 1..1nderstandi11g to be ki11der, .1nore e1npathetic,
and
lnore huma11 to thos
w..110 exist in different
contexts. and understanding
that ot1r context fundamental!,- · s.hapes ot1r \i\~orld view - but tl1at d oesntt
me .ai1 its the onl) 1 possible world view ..
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What ,are the types

of privilege?

Slnce. -I a,n, as menrioned

above~ a cis straigl1t fen1,1le. I am un abl 1e to S1)2ak
···\vitl1 great authority on all of~ the manifestations
of these privileges. so , ...
ather
than pro,.1iding a comprehenstve · list, 1 lVill attempt to give a fe\.vexan1 ples .~
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·wlrlte (Vinc ·ente Perez)
White privilege manifests itself,
perhaps
tl'1e m ,ost obvi .ously, i11 the
recent conte ·xt of tl1e TraY\ 1on Marti1ri sl1ooting and the o,-e ·rnrrned

hltman , beings .. White privilege
manifests in th __~ ability to forget
.about 011e's racel ,vl1ich leads to
col or blin .dness. H 0\vever vvellinte11tio11ed, a perso11 of color will

,Stop-ai1d-Frisk..
-__
on ...white males,
esp eciall)~Hispan.ic
and 1-\frica.n i'.\lnerican n1ales, l~ave a 'higher
chance ot· being seen as 1nore da11ge.J:ous, uneducated, 101 ~ criminal

ne 'v·er ·be able to go th t iough a da1 1
\vithout ·being pigeo11.-holed or im pa ·cted b)' their race .. For further

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than white males. Non ....
white fe ~
1nal 1es are more ofte11 ·~xoticizcd
and fettshizcd~ ratl1er than seen as
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reference

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and more e.xa1nples,

c:l1eck out the articles uThe Invisible
- BackpackH and HWhen Your {Brown)
Body is a White Wonder'land.
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TheDries b Perspectives

like to li.ve, or f ollo\t\,.ing the faith
yott belie , 1e i11 without vvor11-ing
that the leaders of lhe religiotis
co ,n11nt1nity Vvill de1101.1ncc you ..

Male
Male privilege again manifcst ·s i11
vario11s ways, from the wage gap ·to
the constant
attempts ·to regulat ,
female s,exuality. One of the more
prevalent issues CUITentl} l revolves
aro ,und rq.pet and fem ale sexuality.
Male privilege, au d the idea of the
heteroS~'l.lal
ma le gaz ,e defining
sexualit) ~- wo1nen are inherentll
·
sexual because · they are sex ob1ec:ts
for men - translates
in.to •everything
fr om the obJectification
of wom en1s bodies in advertising
(even
ll1ough \\romeo make up 86~6 of the
cons11.mer spending in the lJS) to a
14 --} -ear old girl be •ing co11sid~red
complictt
her se~u ·al abt1 .se b} r a
tea ·cher 'by a j1r1d.ge because shc ·,11.as
"1nature for he_r· age" Although 11ot
e en close · to ti compreherLr;;;i\. ~e list,
i t is iln ,porta11.t to tl1ink about how
we still police women's bodies a.nd
define ivomen by thc·m .
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Straight
A glaring example
of straight
privilege is the fact that there remain 30
states i11 the US ,vherc one can be
fired for being ga} ', and · \\,.here
v-.,,orkpLace •discrimination
is 11.ot on · l) l commonplace,
·but legalized.
In·
le'Ss ob,1ous .wa}·s, it can 1nanifest
in an inability to be openly aff ecti.onate with yo11r parrner out of
fear, 1or even recognize your part ner as a partner in p11blic, difficll1l ties in inovi11g or living ""'~her you
would like and finding an accepti11g
cornmttnity wh .ereve. r ) ' <)U would
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...

Up1Jer.:.c1ass privilege

Upper-Class
lfl(lST
clearl-,. ·

manife ,sts itself in the Americ ,an
m ·yth that it.if you V\~ork hard
enoug~
you 'V\ ·111nake it 1 t. s·uggesting that those who are 'Wealthy
caI'"'ned . it and those wh 0 are poor
-at ..~ necessaril}" ]azy ,_ In other
,-vords, upper-class individt1als are
able to ta _ke betlcr cure (J 1f their
h ealth bec~iuse <lf the lack of .forl 1d
deserts and tl1e abilit) ' to aft ~ord
- healtll)" food, as well as insurance,
meaning that nclt only can the),..
regular11, · visit docto~ for check'UPS, in the case of an emergency
,1
the')l ,are not . force •d tt> weigl1. betv-leen their health . and th eir in ...
come. They are able to live a comfortable existence and can ensure
that t.hiS 1c-xistence will be passed
·
on to their children ""~thout too
mucl1 fear abot1t the possibility
of
failing social I lasse .s.
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Os (Anais Ah1ned)
Cis privilege manif csts itself ,,,hen
doctors
and psychiatrists
allo\i\
neccssan -r· hea lth care for cis pec1ple
rcg,1rdless
0 f ho\-v r·hey may dresst
,vhcreas for trans* people doctors
may c·hoose to 'A1 ithhold -care rr·
thei· find the patient not feminine
(or 1nasculine. vel s .im.) en iough ..
Wherever cis people m .al " g,>t they
c·an rel~ · 011 finding a bathroom
tha t
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Theories rbPerspective.s '

n1atches with t]1eir gender \\rj_thottl
encountering
hostilit} 1 , and do n~Jt
need to vvait until they find a gender-n .eutral bathroom.
Cis people
- are rar ely asked what name rhey

Christian
n1any-f old Cl-1ris1ti.ru1
privilege 1nanif e~ts in . tl1e aib1ility to
p·ractice yo ·ur faith . in public with ~
out hieing consider ·ed a threat to
so ciet)·, , and without concer11s that
the actions of a radical metnber of
your group will define your O\.V11
identity, and that ·you will have _t,1
Agafilr1, though

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we ire born

witl1. if going b\" a differ. ent na .me or - ab •6-t1t the current state
of th .cir genitals, b1.1t tra11s* people
receive such q estions \vith nonchala .nce. Cis pri, 1ilege means never
l1a\"ing t{> go tl1rough the hassle of
changing a gender 111arker on legal
ide ·ntifici.ttion ..

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be apologize for
more unlike!]), to
infiltrate a pl~tce
fear of ''terrorist

them~ ,,.ou are
ha .,, an FBI agent
of ,vorship for
acti, 1 ity" or be
identified
entirely b} ' yo .ur faith in
the v,lorkplace. In a n1ore · b,mal
wayt )·ou . are able to take ti1ne off
work for religious 11olicla1rs - in fa t
it is like.I~' that yo11.will not be ex-

Able
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See HA.bleisirn & Disability.
Nole
that able pri, 1 ile ,ge is perhaps . the
tl(]OSt transient forn1 of pri~ileg ·eand yet one , of the 1nost O\'erloo .ked .. ,v·e don'r retaio able p 1rivilege into old agc we certain!} '
\rVeren't born wilth ·the ab1lity to
walk or read,. and there is rhc p,ossibilit)r fl1~t any~ da]/t we might develop or face. ·a. ph} "S~cal or mental
disability . .

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p~c .ted to w ,o ,rk during ~~our religious l1olidayr, and yot1r religious
dress is consi'der ,ed . ,ap _propriate
and ,~or .n by the majority of he
COllntry ..

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Yet again,, this _list is no\.vhere

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near c omprehensive~
It yoL1 re intere :sted, 1..esearch online, c)r-a11d this i.s the best .idea~t.alk to som .et)-ne who l1asn't had _
'Lhe san1e privileges as ~·ou!

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'Theories b .Perspectives
of orivileae.
whether
from beina white. ma:le .. heterosexual
..
· olhvsicallv a 1nd mentallv he ·alth. etc~ vou benefiC kn -owin,qlv or. unknowinQLV ..f'rom the svstematic
oooression of another arouo of people .. Yo u can·t get rld l of this
orivi Le-oe: it ,doesn't 1ao awav or become neaated bv be 1ina e>art of a different oocressed
orouc (Le ~ t;,eina aav ·doesn·t rid vou of whit ,e ·
orivileae .. it iust means vou don·t have heterosexual
crivileae) ..so what can yo 1u do7
As a oerson

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You can be an allv ,.
·Allies are , p 1eoD le who recoanize
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the
socie ...

-an

unearned
orivitea -@thev receive from
1:v·spatterns of iniustice and take dedicated
resoonsiblUtv
for chanaino
these 1
oatterns.
Octavia Shaw
You don·t become an alLv bv claiminc vou ' re
.aaainst a svstem of a oooression: it -recuires a -ction ~from callino out friends' ' iano ..
rant comments
to community
organizing
for social change ..and earnin 1g the trust
of those ·vou'r@ allvh1a with ..
K~eo i 1n mi ·n 1
d that as a member of the oooressrna QrouD~ vour socialization
affects vour cersoective
and Um its vour abilitv to see oooressive
forces as clearly
as memb ers of the oooressed crouD .. Th .is means be]no an allv reouires vou to
earnestlv
and con .tinuatl .v, Learn and seLf-e -ducate aibout svstems of oooression
and i·niustice~ Listen~ read~ ask auestrons.
Tall< to oeool e who h·ave -dlrecttv
ex 1
oerienced a. form of oooression
whe ·n oossible
whille understandina
that v·ou aren' .
.
entitled
to a1n exolanation of the ini 1ustic 1es and traumas they face~ espe 1cially because such too~cs can be triccerinc
1or frustratinc
..
You'll find vourself con 1tinual lv revisjna vour attitudes
and behavjors as an
all'l - th ,ere is al.wavs . more worik to be done_ A-LUes mm
·aht fall in 1to the traos of
(oerhaos unknowin ,alvl beUev~nCI thev know what's best for .an oooresse d arouo or
tak!na credit for an ocoressed arouo"s Liberation
orocess . Privilea ,e makes it easy
for alllies ta soeak ov ier oocre ·ssed croups ,and take credit for their ideas. This
doesn't mean that vou shouldn t ·contribute
thouahts
or a1sk auest i ons~ but rather
that vou should be conscious
of the manner in which vou do son would sugg 1e.st
first talkina to individuals
Whom vou've establrshed a1tr.ustlna reLatlonstllo
withl. You should be able to aiccect leadershiD ·from members of the oppressed
arouo and alwavs all-ow th 1
e m to soeak for themselves
..
Oon~t allow vourtieetinas
as . a member
of the . oooressino aro 1uo do :min ·at@
discussions of oooress 'ion. I cannot tell vou how mainv times I have heard me
dectar e that women·s drstrust of men hurts the ir feeLinas In discuss ions of sexlsm
or white oeoole bemoanin 0 the "demcn l:zation of w ·hite · Deoole~ ln antiracist
discussions .. Discussions
of oooression are not there to orovide emot i onal support to
the oooress i na Qro.ucs ..Thev are spaces for the oooressed
orouo to discuss OD- ·
oressio -n and how that affects them~ and ,allies are there to suooort ·t e ooore ·ssed
arouo Discussina
vour feetinas onlv derails the discussi ·on and DLaces the scot ,li 1aht back 0 1
n the oooressinQ arouo in a soace set aside foroo ,cressed arouos.
Mv last bit of advice is ta be honest and don ~t sit o-n vour doubts (exceot in
oublic oaither i ngs or me etings where you ,are an 1observer) - ask them of someone
you trust~
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Lear'1ing
A Campus
:12wn--Spirit,

Wl1ile Trans•

:

Sarvi.val
Gvide
for Transg;ende ,r, Gend ,erqueer,
and Gender-mon•Confbrming
S&ud.ents

Written by Neil Nory Kaplan-Kelly
(f&ciUtata.P.of Pronoun Hoed.own.and boud member of Queers&! A.saociates)
Please note: t.hw gu_ide is not e ompletely momp'.reh.ens
ive and all infoP.mation ta subject to change . All
.
mJst&aeso:rmac,curac1esare nmyown .
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Housing:

TJChleagQ 'Vl'&Sone of the earliest univ:e.rslt ies
1

or its

br,EMlket to

nave an Open . Houslng

PoJi c~ Tbts means tbat after rtrst yea,, alllstudents can choose who they uvewith, OP be ass11nec ·a
roommate regardless or gender as long &s theY' nques1 a Cexciudblgdesign.Med same-~ arieas" thoqh I
,am not sure ·what lhe poUey'WOulidbe If a trans -woma.11
elected to live in & fe.mue-o,ruy area of l\ouslftg).
rooms at Ralner bu t J'OUhave to
111equest
-a key fr om the front desk &n4 reiutn lit thiere. In ·t-erms ,of spaces for working out. Hency CNwn can
h less crowded than Ratn~ U' you want a more private
wo r k-ou .t space. Ir :rou wis h to pla,y
lntram~all spcrts through yinor house, tecbnlcally your legal sex &Nllies to wblch team/Wbich gender ratio
you ca.n pl&y on/with but in pra.etiice'fJpa.rtk:ipa,ton ha.a varied.
Going

Gym: There are Mfa.n_1Qyu l{encler-neutr&l

to tile

l oclter

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ia a Waa1e? : TIie Unlvers~ has a preferred
na.me pol icy · ror d&7sto-day academic
4 a C)!!:i.mriles
idooumen+e
le . roU-ci!liH
rt ,.a.;'lt.D~~
....
,::_...21i61'11.
-d.1'""'1 a- -,u\l.d , ,1'711h.._,l1
Ill
.
~ the on]""
. _J ne stufil.an
.
Qu. ...."-"""""• ..r
W.;,fftJCh;,-_a
- ~·
.'
.~
- ..ucr....
- - 111,IJ.\,~,.,
.e
Vlllll$.IA. t, y· QrUr
What•s

l°w',.!li

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J)refetred name wlll not be· on your dJploma unless you legally change ,our name and follorw the procedu r es

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set, by t.he registrar . .It 1s also poss Ible to have y'Our first le,ga! lnltffd a.s your legal na.me on au of your
offlclal leg"81documents at tbe 1Jnlveistr.rCe~r.
Joll Doe bec.omtcJ . Doe) and R is 1best ta cont.ant ·the .
:registrar
directly about ihls ir ,ou would Uke to exerdse tbls right.. ID , e,ms or~
name 1n nous:fn& :Lt
ii bee\ to e<m.tact your RA or RH directly about ensuring lh&i :the _name you Wish \o be eauid Is bemg
rasedfN>• the get-go1.
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Prcmoana: 1'llera· is no otficid vra., to put your )).referred 1rron0unprere~ence Into omcal ctNwl&tZonw
whlc~ unfbrtun&lelY,_puts the burden on :,0111and yolJlr· allies to 1ensure that your p~ono1UJ1s a.re
respected and used consistently . If you have any problemswitb ·peers. staff membeR 1n housing, ar
professors~ the Office or LGBTQLtfe•s staff can help, fac -~tate
co~ersations
so that _JOUP wJs.hes are
sU1>11orte<L
respected a.nd aff iltmed. It's an uphm trik but
trana-frtemd]y &"1Wd
respectcD.llortrans• folk as POS-Slb1e
.

,rest

assured. th.at queer spaces

try to l1a as

HeaJ ·t11.:_IJ-SHIPstudent healtJl insurance only coveN hormones, enunseltng, and eanoer so~eenings. It
does not cover ,~y
form. or surgical
transit1on
procedures
(°tap•~ or II.bottom sur.geey'll!t)~
Btuden ts and supportlve staff and faeultJ ba:ve leen fightl.ng
to ,cha -nge this po 1lioy for yeus but the
Untvers lty Administration bas yet to t,u«g1 (despite tbe fact that ma:ny or 01Urpear 1nBMtuLlons complet,el3'
cowr all medic~l tr&nsltion related services) " Students ba.ve ~eported miXed ~ews
of the staff' at the
Student, Healtb Services mterms of tbell' pbya1ea1health ca.re but some of the doctors ha.Vie oft,en
had ·the most pos ti-1ve wo~d""'of-mouth .reviews (I personal~ recommend Dr .. Helen·xenos and
R~becc& Pride, a norse m,ra.cttti0ne1\ they are warm. good llar,eoers and hotistlaUy-amded . cue
pra.etitimmrs) . .As for. menta.l health services. the Untversity
is severely lack.Ing m terms of
student satisfaction
witm the Student CoWlSelm.g Centert particularly in . rega,ds to semaJJ
usault counseling a.nd sens·ltlYitY 10 low,1nca1me~ LGE~ .and other margtn&lt.zed popul&tfona on. campus .. ·
However, I have peraonaijy had ,good experienaes with Dr. Tarto :rr~ Dr. Heck (who rims a trans sup~rt
group for the _,UGhica;go OommunttN), D~..UcPberrln (who le&ds .acomlrlg out suppoit group fc r mostly C-GB
folb . though some trans folks ala!Ji join). and most .rec.e,n.Hy,.Dr. Anaddappa (who bas expren.ed deslre to
een-e ·the LG'BTQ and. eupeciaUy T·comm.nnilyand. welllomes patients from our communitJ) . There an ~lso
maey counselors tlbro~ghou.tthe oity that work ·with -LGBTQpeopJe1. My Mt.viceis ta find the best therapist
for your needs. not just the.IP reputdlon for &ffwmJng queel'' 1arul trans• folks.

Ba Ulroom.s : As a great relief for first y,ears I Oolbbt he L~
Oente11 67 l 0, Hmel, ~ and the Beg
ban gender
neutral bathrooms~ However,.man:, otbel' buildings like Harper a.ntl the Reyoolds Club
la.ck 1
•nde14neu~
bat.brooms due to Ob:tcago,building codes. A tonger· but not , comp,ehenslVe list oe.n be
found on the Offb) of LGB'rQ Stucbmt LH'ies w,ebsite. .
1

Beacrareaa:
On Campus:
• ITDnoun
Hoedowru ProBo 1Gan QGl"OlJ.P
SUPPorted by ~he Offlce of UJB'TQ s,udeint Llfe.. ·1,s
purposs ta to be a. fun. cotnmuntty-buildin& and supportive diseusskm group for trans~ and allied
·:me,mbers of the UChicago Oommun.ly ..Sometimes lhere are baked foods .
• Queers _& Associaites : Q&A. iS tbe largest LIJBTQfocused org&Jnlzatio1n on campus. It seeks to be
a space foir si~udenls oocome together &nd hlk 'YOU\ LG!TQ issues and create a s&fe atmcs,pllere
for all 5e.xual orientat ,ion:sand gender identities .





Is another QGrou.pd.edtcatedto1s.ervmg Quee
r and t rans • people
color at ·uChJea,o . It provtdes a S&lie,rensttve, and l&QOlter-fmed space for Its members and bas.

some of the · best conversa t Ions:yo~ could ever rmd.
ASeJCnaJ.tt.e&
-:ASexuaUtea ts a. grourp deVoted to ·&rrtrmmg tne a.sexual community a.nd their allies on
UChicagG Campus . Tbey are ver, trans-tncluswe and . often &Ctuall)' bave·lea.
Tea Time a.nd Sex Chats: '1TSC is a student-run organizat lt11
1n t 'hu provides hoHstto and LGBTQ
ft'lendly s e%..ulon campus.
The Olotheslin.e
Project: the Clothe:sHne Project provides a vo1eB1 fo·r all members of t he
UChic,ago community who b-ave expePianced sexuaJ assault . thEJy .a.dvocat,e .~01r University policy
chang ·ei cliseourse ..aod for a safer campus. .
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o·r

Interiseetiion: Inlersectto,n

1

QWol.""llln : QWorum ls & QGtoup foi- queer4dentl.ried women and .have been vecy e.uaepting or trans
worn .en in the past rew years .
·
The Agend-t The Agenda Is a ne,vHghl~ted
soo.i&lgrau11fior queeP men.~n campus .

In ·tne Greater Chicago Area:
.
The Office of LG 'B~Q Student Life has a good ~ist on its website of Chtioa.goort1aniza.tilon1
dedicated tu the trans* community in the eity. I personally recommend:
o Boward Brown ·for lo•cost and LGBT &£firming he alth cape
o Affinicy
Comm.unity
Services
for an eduoolion~ I ~g
.and inspiPmg
8Xp8I'iencefop those seekms: 't,oW1ovtwith Jesbians and tr.armgendet"women of oofor -on the
south side
o Tra;nsformative
Justice Law Project of mm.ois~ a legal reso~ce ft>PlagaJ name.
change s I ni.oe,a and as &n amazing organlzat ion for social justice and mcarce -rat'ioo -reform
in the c~y
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~ ·Bqeri.enoe

On Cam.past

Lei me preface DV' sliory by sa.yhlg that l Jovs tbs UJllVSl'sity: 1 am the JJgppiest l haw sver been he.re
. because of th6 eduaationl .have neelved and the friends I have made hei-e I want to al-soP1JCD8t11Ze
that my
BXJJ&PientJe ls deeply rooted in my pPlvilete as a w:/Jilt_e,
tnmsmascunne, well-to-do, mostly able-bod.Jed,
.
aJtiZe!JJ
. 1 eannot and do not speak f Ol' azu,one ath 1eP than myseU: It Ja aJ80 W()J;ltlJ
ar:knowled#nit, that 1 have
elJosen to be an.atlvocate on , aampus and that reaJJy is a ahokle..Th6nJ Is·aa shameJn rDr:rismt on school or
tlattng '"'piayt!Jt UJe oboe eta. DO no, evrer Wnk you S/Jall/d /JetkJtnl 1mmerhJngmo'te when Yol-' ue aJreadY
doi nl/t what you oan.
I e:uneto the Un1verslt.r to be an inleBectu.al and wu mle?ested In sluden· act.Imm wt linltlaQv ·wanted to
t &eus om.'being a studen ,t on}y. IM~ead . l fo1Undmyself ·In a vr.,ry eompUcated pl ace + I love bow much this
school focuses on . heory
I find that we sometimes ·forget
to listen to ouP own lived experienoes . This
often .me&n'S that c reat!ng change &nd a.dvooa;t·ng f ov &ffirmattv-e tr&JJSform&1ilon
of studani life and
experience ca.n be ineredlbly sl.ow and there Is nmetllnes a huge disconnect betwr&en the adnl'mistraitiolla,
faoulty~ and stu.denJls.[ love the, complexity of this lrninPslty ·uut it h.&slea to me to have ·10 defend MY
identity and expnsslon or reyself us tng eocial and qu.eel' theory · mstead otjust my being me. l -ha.ve been
forced to rmonftant , myself and my Umitationa. I have ha.d to hold ,aeying frien dis wba
feel a.Iona and
,._
unsupported by those .around them. l have ha.ti to educate and speak out against ignorant and ha.tefW
actions tow&rds my co~unity a.mi communities I a.ai in solidarily With. But I have also .kissed a beau ti ful ·
woman . I ba.ve la~ed . until ffv,a l'UD . out of breath. I ha:ve eaten fee ore&m at one am after a1 night ,of"
d&ncling.I f&ve the compJuity of this place beoa.use it lets me read Max Weber and clack Halberstam 1n the
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same n ght. I ·1oveithis university beoa use it has wo1J.ght me lo a oo:nsc'ilOusness ~ is multiple~ a:,ered,
and I am m.ooo than I have eve, theugbt I cat.;lldbre~ This lJni.ve 1.sity he.s made me a., bsltel' man fFiend,
partner 1 and le&der~ It is a very special place . But there 'is always more work to be done. Tha.t is my
ch&ll.enge to you. Ee ,ep the work and the c,ommunity vibrant.
If there is any piece of adVice , I can give to students W'hocomeafter me~ I would sa.:vthis!

learn
ooalitJ.Ons. and

I mean really listen . Li!Stentng
1S wllat
creates
community . And those thmg; are s~ needed 1n our lives. I love ;the com,lexity orthis )dace
&nd It hu led me lo s0me or lbe most humlllb\& intrig\lmg, frustratinl. and j0J1\li moments ot.·-~
--· .
my lite. The queer and trans community on this eamJ)us Is very· wide spread and has ID&fllT ·
forms of inta-rests and avenues
of expression. . This me·ans tbat I here ts conf110ton some lev'1s,
but moFe imp0 1rt&ntly t Hi is vsrry easy to find out tha.l someone you assume Ii. badl no conneclion
to queer life is ,actually inoredibly steeped m it. People snrpris e you~ Evecyone here has a sbory ..
Don!t. forget to tty t:o listen for it.

to liSwn.

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Frustrating

Incidents

at UChicag10 .

During your time ail the Ur.,iversity of Chicago~ you or someone you know may
experience fru ·strating or u pse~ng incide nts of prejudice against you 1
or someone you
know. While many of ttlese experiences are extremely personal and individualized,
we will attemp t to provide a tim ,eline o·fthe moire public lnclden .ts , and the University
response to lh 1
em in °'7der to contexluanze the world in which y,ou are aboul to , ente :r,
arnd proVride you wilh information and riesources for possible responses
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Spring 2010- Maurice Dawson
In February 2 1010, UCPD off1ea ,rs arrested Mau 1
r ice Dawson,. a black undergraduate 1
on lhe A-level of ·the · Regenstein Li lbrary for criminal trespass a 1
nd resisting arrest.
They arrest ed ·the student 101n the requesls of a library employee~ ·who called the UCPD
with a noise complaint. A UCPD officer requested that Dawson leave the buildi ng, and
show his student ID .. When Dawson questioned 11herequestJ he was put in a
chokeh .old and subseq 1
uently arrested. T1ha l,ncl~nt upset the student body for muldple
reasons .~Firsttyj noise is ~llowed on the A-tevel - as ~ou will learn t the . A-level i's
0 1ccasionally very loud. S.eoondl y:.,arresting and placing a universily stude:nl in a
chokehold for !laughing too loudly seemed to be an _overreaction. Thirdly 1 and most
importantly, many stude ,nls bel ieved that Dawson's race played a key factor .in thi 'S
incid ,ent, from lhe 1
early ·suspicion of the lib rary employee t a the overreaction by t he
UCPD starting a campus-wide
di ,scussion on race and the UCPD's raci ·al profil ling m
Even now, tbe UCPO diSipropClrtionate l ty asks Latino and African ...Affierican students
far their lDs -.
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,

Sprin _
g 2012- DU ·and Alpha Delt
Dur~ng May 2012, two fraternities came under fire for r1acist inciden its .. The first one
occurred on1May 8th , when first- ·year students mowed the tawn at Alpha Delt wearing
overs ·ized sombreros and blasting La1tin music in a rather blatant display of
stereotypical

and racist caricature~

Response:

De ·spite a meeting with the Bias Response 'Team and others afte ,r the
!incident was re1
por1ec;tto Dean Artt lhe fraternity did not apologize . Howev 1er, th 1e
national Alpha Delt leadership was notified and the local Alpha Dell cha 1
pter leaders
we,,e req 1u ired to attend a mealing with members of tlhe Bias Response Team ~
ORCSA. and lhe .ass istan ·t vice-president for .student Hfe.
On May 21 ·st. D·u · presented a party with the theme:. aconquistadores
and Aztec
Hoes' \ with lhe tag11ine~bring ·an unlimited need ta conquer, spread disease. and .
enslave nalives .1.1
Responi.se: Sluden!s in.valved in Latin organizatianst
such as 1MEChA and OLAS
emailed DU with 1in 24 !hours with their compl :aints. By ·that night DU issued an a 1pology
over email lo the students and publicly over f acebook.. Whe ·n confronted with lh e fact
that many felt the apology was ~nslincere t D U _commltted to an 0;pen forum and a
meeting with members OMSA ts student advisory board and Lati 1n RSOs.
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·

Sumrrier 2012
Buik!Jlng a Response : Over the summer .; OLAS worked w ith Coilege Programm ing in
order to elim 1fnale a racially-tinged
question about "two African-Amert .can men wa l king
towards y0u" during Orientation Week .. They .met with Nicole Woods i the Provoslt and .
pro1posed 1
new ,scenarios. which were enacted in the Chicago Life Me 1etin !QlSfiom
2012-2013. one of which touched in the ina iden t with DU., They a 1lso reviewed the
..demographic survey, push ing for a broader ,. more inc lushfe su,vey .
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Fall 2012
Around 61h or 71h week ,of the FaU Quarter DU hung a Confederate -flag out their
wind ,ow , facing the OMSA offices ,. teadin .g to OBS contacting th1e Bias R 'es ,pon 1se
Team and various members of ·the sch 1
ool administrations~
Response : Meelings between DU leadership and the school ad lministration occurred,
as w ,el l as a re-evaluation of the effectiveness
of ,SORT . a required RS0 leadership
lraining :, in order to inch.Kie cultura l training . OBS also pushed for st-udy ab road
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programs

south of the equator

·

Wi 1
ntar 2013
On January 27th j ttlere was a protest at the LI Chicago Medical Center pushing for the
creation of a trauma center on the South Sidei ieading .to the ar rests of 4 p ·eop ie .,
inaluiding .1 stud ,ent ..Toussaint Losier ~an African-American
s tudent who was involved
·in the response to ,the . arrest of Maurice Dawson.
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S,p 1
ring 2013
In Spring Quarter~ the Polttically · Incorrect

Mlaroon Confessions

foilcwting the . lead of more be!n ign anonymous

pag re launched,

submission pages such as UChlcago

CrushesA Within .a day of its launch, outcry emerged from a portion of the sludent
co immunity. regarding the anonymous submission .s. which ranged from racist to sex ist
to d0 wnright threatening.
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Re ·spo nse: Students formed the coaliti 1on CCC (Concerned with Ca~pus Climate),
and worked with the O IRCSA to generate a s1alemenJ -of vatues, as well as Pfioducing
a document·of reoommende[f Administrative refo nns, laid out in the document be!low.
The Blackness at UChicago Tumblr wa ,s also created in response, in order lo provi 1de
a forum to 1voice the experlen ·ces of blac 1k students at UChl~o.
as well as the
Class Confessions pageil which aimed to apen up ·a dialogue in tthe
... UChicago
University about soci ral class .
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SttJ 1delilt

Reco 1mmend ations
1

for

Actl

Administrative

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n ...Junell 2013 1

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Short-Term
As a col/,e1
clive of concerned

students,, werecommend that the 1University.,. .,
1.
EslalbHsh procedure fair· issuing a Public St ,atemen 1t to ensure thart they
respond to incidents in a Ume l y and evenly distributed nianner. ·
2. Conduct a Climate •Sludy , evaluating the admin istrative capacf.ty ·10 address the
area~ of .tolerance and in clus)on. Set p1rocedure for per iodic se -lf-assessments to
t rack our prog l"iess and initiate an ott,e ,r Provost s In iti aUve on Minority Issues (the last
annual report was in 2004-5).
·3. Ou ·r primary objedive in the study is to prov 1tde lhe Universily of ·Chicago with
i,nformation 1 analysis and stralegi c initiatives relating to campus ctimate. W 1orking in
1
00HaboraUon with Karen Warren Coleman"s Advisory Council on Oiv :ersily and
11nclusian. as well a1s with other campus ,committeesf our goal is to foster a ouJlu ire of
i'ndlusiveness ior an enri .ched ed ucational and W01rk environment.. Thi's work should
result in lon ,g-term 1strate .gi.c planning directed by · a newly fonned full-time Ch ·ief
D htersey · Offioe 1r.
4. D es1gr1 far-reaching program 1mlng on cross-cultural competency (0 1rienlatlon
Wee :~, Housing~ SORT Pfiocess). This wo uld con ·tinue lhe work of the Coal i tio n that
fo r med post-Alpha Delt .inc:klenrt regardiing ref:crim of 0-Week programming ..
5. lncrea 1se support to 5710 and othe .t university sponsored service based offices
(Office of Student Disab ~·lity Services , Reso _urces for Sexual : V _iolence Prevent ·9'n)
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Stu 1dent Coun :sel in g S,ervices ,).
6 .. Reexamines lh e Dean-on-CaH

.
and Blas Response Team systems lo ensure-they
are accessible .. 1
known of. and ,effective (knowledgeable abaut bias and responsive
to reports). This inolludes creating a definitive hierarchy of response and giving
students access to the BRT member ..s official reports whi1e. respecting anonymity ..
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Long Term

As a col lective of concem "ed students,

W1'e reoommend

.that the Unive_rsityu.

1. Exam ines and re--e-valuates how it approaches and incorporates diversity in criticaJ
.areas of stu~ent Ufe inoluding b ut nol Hmited' to Ath1letics, Career Advanoement r
Housing & Dining 1t Admissions & .Aid t Community Service and Engagemen~
the
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Office of the Reg istrar e 'tc ..

2 . Expands support to preexisli 1ng entities lhat promote divers i ty -(OMSA. cu~tura~
registe ,red student organ~ations,
LGBTQllA student setV1oest disability ·.student
se,vices., sexual assauU survtvo ·r servlce ·s, el .c ..)

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3 ., Expand the presence of minority narratives and perspectives
in academia th 1rough
the renewal of the African-American
Studies major: increasing 1the number of minority
facufrty members and listing of courses focused on the African-America11. AsianAmerican, Latino-Americant
and Native American experience; and exte nd Study
Abroad opportunH .ies south of the eq 1uator ·In Latin AmeriCqt Africa and South East
Asia,.
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4 .. Call upon adminis1rati011 to submit a report explaining the role of eaoh adm inistrator
and explaining the policy of administralive
response to bias events
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Navig lating
student

cam .pus as a low-inc

the

,ome

- LL .

In dorms/house
culture
As a low - income student 1 adapting
to the culture of the Univers:ity ' and . the
ho use system may DDt come . as ea~ily. Expensive house trips to restaura 1~ts and
other sites are a no1rmal occurrence . Howeve 'r. discomfort
doesn"'t have to define
your experie~c.e. There are a few things you can . do to create a more welco ming
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space foT yourse ,Jf.
a . .Advocate fo r ·more balanced tri .ps : Hous@ trips can b·ecome expensive,
but: houses should work to ·war ,ds creat'ing environments
in which
'
studen ts of a'II inco 'mes feel welcome .. Tell yaur RH and RA that you
would like there to be more inex:p _ensiv •e house outings. Suggest some
yuurselfl Sp 1ending money doesn~t have · to be the only way to have
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fan~
~,~--~
~ - ....., -..:-""""'~
... --.-~-::~~~

· . b. · Facilitate discussions : If you. are ooming from
~ ~~~.:,~-----a low-income backgr- ound .. there will often be as .pects of · ·your
--~~~,.$~:."..~:.,:~
,
. experiences
th ie some
students
at UChicago
won"'t
~...... - •",._,~•
©,c;,
- u_n derst _an ,d .. Fa 1cilitate
.
.
~ ..~ .:.;:.::.;J;.":-.
,
a 1d1scuss ·1on abou cla s_s ln your
......__,...,..,.,
·~
~
:&\ · · dorm. ~How d oes class ~Jay a role in our school? How ca,n
~~
~rn
--~
...
t ~._--:._~;,.)
.. CSf' we make tt a molie welcoming space fior everyone?
i;
Food
~,~

~~,

....."!/ft""-,..._.'-.:

~

........_.""'

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Saturday nigltts ! Dining halls aren!l't open~ but this doesn,t mean you have to
spen .d money at a restaurant .. Gather friends t0 1gether to rcook a meal ~ Also,
ke 1ep track of your nex dollars to save some for Saturday ev ·enirigs ·.
1n RSOs

Wi.th regards to activities in RSOs,. never be afraid to indicate J 'OU ca ,n ~t afford
something .. If you want to participate
ln an activity, but mon .ey is an obstacle,
advocate · for mote fundin 1g · for lo·w-inrome students
for certain , activltles o;Sports
and Greek organizations can ofte ·n ·be an expe .nsive investment.
Textbooks

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or

The Office
Multicultu:ral
Affairs has : library with CORE books and othe ·r
selections, which students c~n che .ck out .. 'Email omsa ®ut;:hi,ago.ed .y_ fo ·r more
information_
Always ] loo ·k for alternative
places to p ,urchase
books.
Compare
prices online,
rathe:r than just buying
the first: textb0iok
available
at t 'he
bookstore_
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· Resources
available
1. Chicago Acade :mic Ach 1ie :veme.nt Program:
1CAAP is a yea :r-long pro .gram
begins with a residential
summer academy for 50 incoming freshmen~
program is gea!"ed towards low-inco ime and first-generation
c·ollege s.tud 1ents
is intended
to 1give these students
a head starim: in . beca ,ming acquainre .d

that

This
and
with

college and the city at large. Lear .n more at caap&uchicago~edu;o
2. Questbridg .e: guestbr .idge is a national
organization
that
helps
low ....
income
students
gain admission
to top colleges with full sch .ola~ships4 The University
of
c ·hL&ago is a ·partner college and heze i.s growing . community of Quest ~cholars
on,ampus .. As par _t of the ouest Scholars network, stude ·nts join a campus
chapter,
whi.ch
offers
social
outings
and
community.
Go
to
Ques~scholarsn .etwork.org to .learn about the UChicago chapter ..
3. Socioeconomic Diversity Alliance: A .newly formed glioup (not yet an RSO) , SDA is
inten .ded to advQcate for more resourc ·es for Jow:...income students,
such as
mentoring ·programs,
a support group, a.nd a des:ignated
advisor. Tro get :more
involved,email
._· ·chi
· o.e-du_
4!' Office of Multi rcultural Student
Affairs: Even though OMSA isn"''t necessarily
designated as a place for I.ow-income and first•g 1eneration c·ollege students:11 some
of their resources
cater to that au.dience ~ Their office offers grants for students
if
needed fo~ study abroad, res 1earch ., and other aca~ emic related ventures . . To leam 1
more, check out omsa ..uch _icago ..edu .
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.

FEELIING G00 D
1

MIND
Life here has it's highs and its ~:ows, and 1t1s pretty 1common to feel out of sorts,
·whether th.at mea 1ns feeHn .g anxious before as.sessm ients, being .seaso nally affect ied
by winter, or c~ronircallly dealing with me ·ntal he ,a[th fissues.. On and off campus~
there are pl ·aces you can go and people ··you car, ta 1lk to to take steps to feeling good.
1

good place to start if you don't know what you want l:n.Jt know you want to feer
be'tte ·r is th ie Student Coun .seli1ng ·Service. The so; o,n campus provide a resource for
any studen.t and any spo 1uset partner, or _child of student who has [paid . the Student

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Life Fee (see belo ·w ·if your program of study ·do esn't include this automatfca 1Uy)..
They offer short-term (generaHy max 10 sessions at a time) services,, ·which include
'
but aren ..t limited to, indivkhual or couples therap ,y, support groups, psychiatric
evaluation,
medication
'.management,
substan ice ,assessment and treatment,
an
Ac ·ademic Skills Assessment
IProg-ram (a no -d·rug way to work on concentration.
time
management
, good study a nd test taking habits, etc..), and referrals. T h:fs p lace ils
goo d,.,but it also can be very frustrating ~nd has I.imitations~ Because il 'is part of the
University there is sometimes
weird bureau cracy and depending
on 1the situat:ion ..,
sometim res st iudents are forced to take leave -of-absences
c1g:ainst their wilshes
becaus ·e the s chool/scs doesn•t know how to handle what is happenin 1g whHe the
student i'S enro~l -e ·d ,. Thes-e are ra~e cases, but they do happ 1en. Know you rli treatmentjJ
talk to people (most folks are surprisingly open about their mental h ealth), and ask
l~ots of question 1s.
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Th 'ls might

seem

list 'but reaUy, you can go in and talk to
anything. , For ex;ample - reasolils UofC stu dents have gone · to .

like an . overwhelming

someone for j ust a~out
t-he SCS:
Dealing with a break ...u·p

1

the Dissertation
Anxrety

Self-harm

support

group

Chronic mental Hlness
. FeeHng bl 'ue
and m.any mof" 1e! -

tnsc m ·nia
.Dia gnosing

depressi 'on
T'he comrng out support group
Eating disorders -·
Psychiatric medication ·prescriptions
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the S·tudent Life Fee:
Ciriaduate School o.f Business Evening.,
Weekend ., E..xecut'ive Programs
S'tudents without

Financia ·11ythe U of C treats services for any
mental health prob]ems
the same way they
SSA Evenfn 1g Program
treat any other sick ·ness, and the UShip plan's
Mas ·ter of Liberal Arts Program
insurance
benefits
for
outpatient
Dr proforma status
psychotherapy
treatments
are only pr,ovide d
'
. if they give a r,eferral or prior approval t 0 the service; if not ther-e ''S a ts ,o ded uctible
that comes <:JUtof pocket
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,,

Dealing with mental health takes many form ·s, not just go -ing to ta 'lk to s omeone 01r
taking medication. Yoga; meditat:ion 1 aciupunctur ·ei, being outsid 1e iin the , sun,all he1p
:keep you . f eelin .g good~ Rockefe 1Her Chapel offers meditation
1everyday at 8 am, .
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Weqnesdays

at 6 - pm, and yoga dt 5:30 pm on Tues~ays

and 4 pm at Bond

You ha 1ve autonomy in your treatmenti-Th .ere rare alyvays 0ption 1s for medic iation and
serv[ces .. It's okay to no~ like your therapist, not every one is righ 1t fur ·y 'O.U and what
yo u are .looking for . They unders ·tcand this so voiCl! ;any concerns you have and make
sure to try out a few !before ·you commit.
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~re som ie IJmttatlons to the UniversityJs 1mental health ·provis 1ions. The
therapy is meant to be aicute and sh ort~term.. A1thougti they w ·[U always see
students in an -emerg 1ency,. therapy tre ·atment plans g,enerally only last for a
maxim .um of one quarter
long . The ·suppo ·rt groups, too, are also Jtmi'te d in
nature. Take~ for instance, the sexual assault surviv 1or support group. Fts sc.ope is
'
slx w ·oment and it only takes pl ,a .ce during Winter Quarter.
'
There ar ,e lots of frustrations
and limltatlons of s ervice s at the u·csc, ask around for
tips and stories wilf oome fl0 1oding out. Listen and [ear .n and ask f01r help if you don~t
know what to do 1.
There

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Addictio 1
n

If you're unhap py w ith your relationship w·ith substan ce use, there are ·many pla ~es·
to tum for help ..Generally, addiction services ~re not provided through the school,
though scs ca1n connect you with resources. If you want to k1
eep the school out af
your business entire l y (a perfectly ·viable option). ther e are lots of resour ~es around
campus . A.good l list of recove ·ry groups (AA, NA~ SMART re,covery, Gamblers
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etc.) can be fou 1nd by Googl 'ing •'U·Chicago Substance
Addictio 1
n Re co ,very Support Group -s/'
Anonymous,

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Abuse and

BODY

the Hfe of the ·mind
is domlnant at the U of c, the Ute of tihe body can be
..
just as active and .suited to anyone's plans. Ratner and Henry Cr1own have reaUy
excenent faciJitie ,s where . y'ou can check out a ba ·sketbaH 0 1r use~ treadmiH (with a
persona I TV!), but they ea rn get crow ·ded sometimes .; If you prefer a saHtary 'Workout,.
each dorm has . its own exercise roo m with w ·eights and cardio equipment. Rartnier
also offers FitChiicago Wellness Classes, which happen 1 daily and are free to an
students.
Your UiC: ID giv ,es you a1
ccess . to profe~sional yog ·a, cardio klckboxin ·g, or
wa ·ter a·erobics instructors among othe ·rs (I highly recommend checki ·ng 0 ut zu ·mba
class -- it's one 0 1f the best things at UChicago) .
Although

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For mo ire regular

activity ., there . are several IM sports offered each quarter ... Team 1s
normally form arou rnd Houses, but if you'd prefer to play with a group of friends,
the ,re's nothing stoppjng you rrom formtng your own team. Thie Universrty offers
everything hom flag fo iotbaH to broombaU, which you won't regret playi 1ng .. in
a1dd ition to a ton of indi~idual sp ,orts ... Are you th@ best eudhre or spades play@~ you
kno 'w? Why not m·ake it official and bring home an l_1
M trophy? There are · also a ton of .
athletics RSO~s that can teach you a martial art or improve your ba 1
d111
.inton sk;Hs, and
if yo •u 1re the type of masoohist who enjoys . getting up at 4amt the crew team, a dub
sport th.at competes all ov ·@r the country, recruits li1@w memb ,ers as soon as the
:arca:dem[c year starts .. Don't forget to check out the university's
DIil athletics 1 either.
Games migh~ lbe less w ,eH attended
than at your high sch0 ol, but th 1ey're always
eniterta in ing; .and ·you'll probably b •efriend molie student ..athJetes than you realize.
1

1

1

'

PROTIPS

Mrak.ing your dlining hall swipes cou 1nt-:
You•ve he .ard horror stories of all kinds about the eat ing habits first -years de ·ve[op
a1nd you td rather not rcontribute to the lore ..You•re be st :bet: ha 1finess the power of
hab 1 t.. Be co rnscious of your eating patterns at the begiinnh , g of each qua rter, and lby
third week eating healthy will be a second nature part of Y'?ur routine and wi:11come
naturally even on the craziest 0 f day .s. ·
1

1

Som 1e tips for setting healthy habits:
-Eat three mea 1Js a day. If you just know y.o ,u will not get to 'the dining ~all before ,
.
your 9:30 AM class, bring a tupperware
to the dining hall at: dinner time the night
before .. Mix some cereal and yogurt and transfer · it from a1bowl to ·your contai 1ne .r

and into y'our backpack at your ·house table to give you r groggy ' morining self no
excuse not to e·at a Httt.e something.
(Yogurt
ec1sHy keeps a rday without

ref\ri·geration) .
~lf you are going to have salad for a meal, be su~@ to add a good amount of protem
so that you don't get too hungry before the ·ne .xt m e·d)l time~ There are alwc11ys Jots of
grea rt rotating pro te in o pt i(?ns at the salad bar, from garbanzo !beans to tuna ta
1

1

tofu.
ZZZZZs: Try to sleep r every

night, at least 6 h1ours .. If that~s not right for you, that's

okay. just listen to your body .. Rest is unbelie _vablry important at this place an rd while
there a1
re times ft s eems like there is no • way to get everything done AND sle •ep,
1

I

1

remember to ~ke bre iaks. Em,ai'I profs for a·n extension. They care about the quality
of work a1nd when you are , stressed and haven't slept in two days and are racing
against the clock, your work is not goin g to be at its best.
1

SPIRIT
Taking care of your mind and body, no matter what that means o r how you feel It, rs
cruciat. , Ther-e are also pra-=:eson ca1mpus and around chicago t.o explore spiritua ltity,
1

means yoga, running, a eating a l"itual w ith th 1e da 'ily· crosswo :rd,
discover-mng a pa'Ssion., or explorjng
a ne .w reHgfon. Here are srome on campus
optco :ns to check out.:
o Twen 1
ty Minutes StiH, da ily meditation
for twenty
minutes~ takes p1ace every
weekday at 8 am throughout
the acade 1mic year.
o Sa ·matha
meditati ron ta lkes place on Wednesday
evenings at G pm an·d Friday

whether

that

mornings

1

at 8 am ..

classes take plac ·e on Mondays

medrtation

Mindfulness
3 pm.

o

Yoga takes place Tu1esdays
.
agarn at (,:45 pm in the Ch ;ancel~

o

Zen H1udd lhist meditation c.1n
1d dhar,ma talks take ·place -every Wedn esd~y at 5 pm ,on

Restorative

at

pm and Wednesday

o

1

during the academic

at

t~ 1rm at 5:30 , pm and
1

the Chancel.
o
o

Gent[e : yoga everyThurs

day

1

at ◄

pm in Bond Chapet

and Muslim stude 1nts say daiJy prayers · in the Hindu and M1us.Um prayer
rooms in the lnterr eligious Center.
Muslim families gath 1er weekly for adu rlt and chiJdren ' s educationa .[ programs.
Thurs ;days at 4 pm. ·
Hindu
.

1

o

SPIRITUAL

LIFE

\1i'h en I can1ie to U Ch i cage, . I a..~un1~d th.at: re! igion ·w ,Du ](.11
b~ Jargt'!IJ c'Xeluded anti
loo~ed do1\Vllon in a school cu :__
ture d "ut~_prid res itsr:'lf on secu ~a-rity., athe ism and ·a ~science
vs. reiiginn' ~ wny <)f thinkjng. Bu .t soo ,n 11fter pee li ng off J'USt the to .p 1ay-ers of otu
5

ins.ritut1on' ·s brand:,, I came to see UChica ,gn -as a·n exceptio oaUy religiously · rich place; there .
1

ar~ dozen .s: a.nd do2ens of communities
of faith hidden in plain . sigh ·r all o,,.e.r the pace.
1\ftcr a few years here. I really think Hyd e Parle is a hub of rndical 1cligwous ac nriqr·. When I
say '; .radical religious activit}·~' ' l"m th.inking of ·practices that ·confront
diffi cult ques ·cions
he:a~ ,m, unafraid to reexamine tradition and also unafraid bu embrace · tra rdirion . Re ligiuus
co ·nmuni.ties are hy defini 1 :ion lo ving cnmmunitics . In my firs ;1 ear, I found thn ev,ery
1

1

1

...

.

~

,vcnr ~>-Qu.akcc Muslim Jewish Htndu Budclhis and muttwa s
tactically jnclusive and l was wela•med with open arms ..Even in more 1:mditional spaces
where you thwnk you n1ib--ht nnt bcl~lng, Y'<)U might be surprise.d at ho,v wdcomc,J
y ·ou arcp
Thar said, if prayer makes you uncomfortable;, then so1ue religiou~ . comm.unities on
c·a.mpus 'wiH ·be unc(>im1fortab~e f(lr f(~U .. .But, regardlc:s.'i of your ibeliefs;p,I kntlW that
b·e,oominx okay with people around •-.you 1a)king about G od wilf give you access ro ~o many
incredible place 's and p e,c)P le.
·
Ir you are alreadr in a community of faith,. 1th ,erc nee rnainy many £e.sources for you to
c.ontinue yuur practL e whic ·h 1~m sure ynu"ve already he;urd about .. The Offi -e of Sphritu-al
Life in the ba,sement of Rockefdlel' is h 1elpful anJ £esou~cefut
Don .,t be <li scourag ,cd if you
don' .find what y n u'ti . l<lnk.in.g for right a,vay~l rt u oik. me t\Vi<·, years o find a C<)mmunlt")' of
fait1h at UChica_go 1 felt fulfy a part of.
efle are S( ,me c oinmunities / <1ppo rtunitics of faith I ha vc found fulfilling and
w«)ndcrful that I wish I had expJored during mJ fir~t weeks a.,_UChlc~~>-:
• Twenty Minu1es Still At 8::tm in the · ~ncntary of RockefcHer, each day of the wc:ek
(l'\tfun ,uay--1~-ridaJl) fc~ cure~ a di ffcr<..~t pTactice 1
uf meditation ! Zen,. mllJldf;u]nc~s
meditation .. yo ,ga~ and An.anda Sangha (,vhjch in.:vnlves chanting) . Y,,u wil.l be
absolutely
fine if )~)u,ve never practic~d mc€.lit~ti nn befllflr:--if )"1)U ha ~e always
wantt...~ tf)11 this .is a goc>d place= to start ·and w,,rth '\Vaking up c::a1·Jrfur ,~
rcligjo1J.Lc.;
gathering

1

1

r

1

1

1

1

·•

jU Chicago,. A 'fle'\.V Jeffls11 student..~~ community wl1i1cf1 has an 2p-a.rtmcn:t
headquarters < ff-cam pus at j House 1 they ·hosr. J<...mwish
cul tu Tai ,events and creative
spiritua~ practices from DIY _..hab ats 1:0 Torah Yob:.-a. "!JlWw.iu ...hi<=;~(.(t.



Bond Chapel/ _D iv School Weekly Wor ·ship/Div
· Schoo l Lunch .. 1. think Bond
Cha .pe~ is one of the lovellicst p:lac .e .s in Hyde Pnrk to meditate ,or pray priv:atcly. AL~o,
each \~ 1wnesdaj' at 11:30, a :new · prayer .leader leads a ,d_jfferent kind . itif worship
from
his ut · her tradition~ These wor-sh :ip flicssinns arc alwa)'S follrf,wcJ by Div Scho,,l
tunch,t:s,jwlnu:.rch>1r $5 }1<,ucan en·ior a really n ice h .im,e-cookc:d _m .eal and listen t(l a
talk fron1 a pr-o fc s st lf":, sch o!ar ~ or spiritual .leader. (Y ·ou d n 't have · u · g<l ?io the _
'41l r bjp t go ro the llill ncl,; it s . arcs M r und noon io Swift "
Hall). .
1

1

Yot.a 'This is an(,th~t gem ,,f Ro .ckcfcUer Chape~. M -crcdith Ha~rty
teaches a slow-pac:t!d, pt!aceful clas i!ii. Spirit. ch icagc>..edu/event
has the weekly
schedules ..



R.estora1ive



Soul . U ·moja Gospel Choir . . U Chicago~s Premier Gospcl choir~ the) \ ha·vc a free
1
cooa:.~ in C:-shop on the Friday of evc....:..ry
1(t•h ,vt.--ek that will rcinvigt>tatc
yo ur ~irit ..
1

1

These: are::a few fa.ith c'l-pp<'l
·r-tu·ni tie:s, th er-e are pro hal 1ly /JM11d.1t~
. lr more. If you want
about spiritual 1ifre at U Chi ca.~•, email ·n-ie: J..~Kl~~' ln(!fh .:tchi~ttQ. .cclu.
--Grace

lS

I "!

t1l

talk .

..

.S ex u a1 -Heal
Johnsoni

Sofia

and

t -h

1

Joan Wang~ Olivia

Ortiz

. Lauren

Daurizio

Let's ta Ik a bo 1u t sex.

~x 1s ,grea t'_..
sex is r"isH;Y"+
Sex has lots of different 1deflnltions.
S (~X i s a11 a<•I «>fJl ru v r 1y,, n f , ,u h u ra Il i Ii ~-Y*
Sex has many ways of bei.ng miscons.::ru 1ed,
Cl'I..... ' •

For too many people, sex i·s considered sha 1m ,efiut

For too m.any people:, this creates an ·unequal - and oil .en gender 1ed r~ationshlp wi.th sex.
We can change that~
1

11
'

A S1ex

positivity
consensual

and encourages

-ad voe ate 5

shame.

of

ho~ often

Once

start
bodies.

we

s:.ane
and miost

wantT

to. our
i~portantly.
we then e,,;pect

p~ ·ople

.

the

alil
and

and experimentation.

pleasure

mo·vement , is a . social
and ph .i losophical
these
at ti tude s .. Th@ sex ""po ,s i ti ve movement
and safer sex as part of its campaign~~

Regardless
of

sexual

ti"ve

educati~n

sex

1

pleasurable.
sex-posi

ve

R1ena1 ssanceR
(2008)
,by At lena
Gabosctl
def i nes
as i.an attitud
1e ·towards
human sexuality
t 1ha 1t r 1egards
. s exual
activities
as
f ·undamen~alty
healthy

P,os ·I t i

chooses
to have
sex
it
is
turning
sex
into
a m1atter
of

one

We

become

unable
to respect
(and ac:cept) 1 the

doesn ..t ·necessa 1 rily
other
pe 1op'le* s · choices

··Sex
1positivity
respect
for

un .able

The

movement

that

adv ·oc-a t.·e s

sex


not

a matter

sha ·me..

w@

do

with
themt.
them and give them what we
same trea _tment
fr 0m ether· ·
to

communicate

-

1

also
sex.
First
and
foremost~
seK is a choice,
an option.
Respecting
an individual
t s choices
about
sex can easily
equate
to respecting
their
individuality
or personal
worth . Many people
don~t
see
it
that
way, which leads
to horrifying
consequences
something
w~ like
to
call
~,ape
culture.'
S~x

positivity

is

the

first

1 ... _Consent:

step

to

What

mean
about

rectifying

is

ii

1

t ,.
.,

s~xual

activity,.

this

phenomenon.

Consent

~ti onships
1

can mean a lat

of

things
for
different
1consent
can become less
you know the other
person
the con~ent
you need
in a

.. Im a familiar
relationshipr
verbal
and more intuitive
, simply
because
very well.
A wink and a nudge ~ight
be all
tang-term
rela~ionship.
In a B~SM- style · relationship.
re

but

conse"t

for

a

scene

. 1 nvol vi .ng

pre - discussion
else
is
potential
·1 s. 0n board .

harnful

potentially

planning~

and

ly

harmful,

Be ·i ,ng
and you

might

need
a lot
of
sm1acked ~
or
anyth i ng
know the other
person

activities
t 1 ed up..
need

to

1

~ parti
c ularly
in ' the
early
st~ges
of
any
~elationship~
cons~nt
is the ONLY consent
because
you cannot
expect
someone
you donJt
know that
well
to
intuitively
know when you do or don·t
want
sex.
And
even
in
long - term
relationships,
actively
seeking
consent
is extremely
important;
just
because
your partner
has wanted
to do something
in the past
does
not necessarily
mean they want to

However
verbal

do it

again.

Consent
1s
important
because
if
you
c are
about
yo u r par tner's
'fee 1 ; ngs • wou Id !,'01u make them do s ometh 1 ng they
1
t10 n ~ t · w ctn t to
do? .If
1t involves
more th an one perso nf you ask everyone
if
they
wanna
do
it .. And it,. s so much sex:i er- when you KNOW fror sure ,1 that
the other
person
i s lov i ng what you·re
doing .
.
There
i1s no blurry
line
for
consent.
If
you ask th •e perrson
if
they
want
to
have
s@x , whatever
their
answer
is . that ~s their
ans ·wer.
There
i s no ...no means yes~
or
fll
know w:hat
she
really
wan ·tedu
becau :se you., re not
·1n anyone
el s ,e ~ s h ea,d. You can" t pretend
to
kn row what
another
person
"'"real ly
wants
If
they · t,ave
n ot ·g1ven
p

1

0

;o

an active,
make sure
consent
person

sober~ s i gn of
to a s k for it .

consent

or

1f you are

uns ure of anyth1ng ~

sexy ~ ~ow co ul d it be l a me ta want to know if
likes
what you ' re do1ng? Part of the problem
is the
1s

11,·

the

other
structu
re

-

of
s exua 1 en cou n te·r s .. Nen a re e 2<:p
e cted
to pursue..
women deny .. men
p u rs ue harder.
women give
in 1. an d al..legedly
every .one is
happy .. Two
things
are
wrpng
here.
M@n are
not
slaves
to , their
desires.
and
should
l@arn
to respect
a. "'rio~
that
is
g i ven
to1 .them . A.t the
s ame
ti 11e. w.omen •· s desires
are
completely
left
out
of
th1 s picture
,. and
what
she wants
i s not even given
a moment 's thought.
1

0

.....
U, 1

>,
RI
~

>..
111-

ra
LU

..

Ask

you

'·Are

t i me the

okay

a ct·v1t

w1th

y , lo catio

t -his?Ml

n~

S•>

every

or mood

c hanges .
Mak e it
a ques. t _i ,on ~ i n s teadl
of
KI
want
yo u to
do thfs ~") ask .• ul'-J e
thought
a bout
you doing
this ,~ rwhat
do you think ?ff
.
Don't
think
anything
is
implied~
Just
because
you i nv i te someone
into
0 oweH you
your
bed does
not . mean they

•..-1

....



1

1

I

I

a1 certain

amount

of
I

sex.

Just

-

accept
amount of
things.

they

because

a certain
to other

, n ta,ed daes not mean -Chey ,Howe~· you
Consenting
o one th1ng does not t r ansfe r

1101 n you

and

sex~

w·i th
any
you
suspect
that
the
other
person
is
intoxicated
act i-., i ty ~
substa n,ce.
cons ent
CANNOT be
1-egal ly
giv en
for
sexual
Never
open
you~s@lf
up
to
the
ri sk of
committ~ng
a crime · and
damaging another
person
for yo r own desires
.
B~ understanding
if
the other
person
says
that
they
don t fe el
]f

1

1

co.mfortablle

doing

do~ ~t want
r - -·-·- -

~

· --- -----~- - ..

1

. ·-

- . ·-

-

. - .

Check out t ine
Un1 vers --ty
Po I i c y ...Know
\' o u r· R i g h t s ~~
to
find
out
more
about
III

the Unive~s1ty~s
harassment
and
assault
pol1,ie5.

unlaw f ul

·~Re so rces
sec ti on
to

Vi c ti ,ns"'"

sexual

and the

for

1

find

ways

to

act1on ~

talc

4.

Mak .ing

do w1l l irrepa

to
. .

someth i ng.

Debunking

rably

Title

IX

someone

damage . the

of

the

Education
Requi

r en1~nt s

of

something

. sex:uat

they

relationship.

3.

pro hi b ·i ts

1

basis
assault.

tlo

Know

Your

Rights

di sc ·ri m·i nat. ion
on 1 the
sexual
harassment
and
y funded
program
(ie.

sex,
including
in any federal
the University
of Chicago).
This means that
the
University.
if
it
kn ows about
a case
of sexuil
harassment
or assault
and chooses
to i gnore
it,
ca n be held legally
responsible.

My ·th .S



Girls
who lose
th ,efr
vtrg ·,nity
are
~sluts'"
wnf le guys
need to J.ose th ,etrs
before
a certatn
age
to
b~ ''normal"' ~ This · double · standard
is
a
vestige
of a patriarchal
culture
that
s~es
sex
as
a means
of
c lai 11ing male ownership,
making
virginal
girls
i nnoc ·entn
and ,.;pure "
(whatev 1
er that [ts su ,pp osed
to mean),
and sees
virginal
guys
in ntfed ·
4i l

1

gf proving
their
masculin
ity
{a so a quest ion able
term).
We could go
into
a whole h i story
lesson
here about the origins
of our p~rcept1on
of
vi r g i n i t y
but
s;u ff i c e i t -to
say
that
th i s myth
i s st i l l
pervas ive
in our
popular
med ia and a dan,:erous
one
to h old . It· s
never
alright
to slut-shame~
or virgin-shane.

Yo·u c ian tell
if
a girl
lost
her v1rg1nitty
by z·ooktng
at her
nymen.. Vi r gi ni ty is a social
c-cnst ruet.
a1nd th ere 1 s n 0 phys 1 cal
evidence
to be found tf you~re try · ng to discern
whether
a woman is
a virg i 1n or not .. .If you want to ,k ow,. y ·ou have to ask her .

Penis-in-vagfna
sex 1s the only
reaZ
sex.
This
is
c1e ,arly
ot
true.
because
it
leaves
out
gay couplesr
trans
people.
and lots
df
otherways of 4'ihavi ng sex .. Having
s.ex is whatever
you def il n@ it as.
with
whoever
YC!'U·.re doing
it
with
not
neces -sari ly
th ie standard
heteronormative
defin i tion~
'.I

1

1

:Ii+

!I



My

sex

·rs

okay

but

pe iople
who do X,
don·t
enjoy
a certain

y or

Z

are

really

fucked

you
ae ·t1v1ty
does not mean
the people who do are fifuck ed upQ or strange or anything
less than
you · . The re · are
man .Y ways
to
hav e s.ex ~ and as long
as th e people
up.

J ust

because

1

1

Z are pertect~y
okay with
or them as people ~

doing Xt Y and
with the activity


1t,

there's

noth1ng

wron1

only ___
ha pp ens
to
st ra 'Igh t women (1<.eep 1 111 m1 n d
which
groups
are
v·i'c t imize ·d 11,ore?).
This
go es
along
with
the myth that
rape culture
discriminates
agai~st
men. (I t
does:,
in
the
sense
that . i t assumes
all
men to
be animalist
i c--see
below) . This myth not only marginalizes
sexual
ajsault
as - a ~women's
i ssueH . but
makes
it
even
more difficult
for
mate
su rvi vo rs
to reach out for help.
not least
due to a lack
of resources.
While
around
90% of all
se}(ual
assault
vic .tim ,s in the
us a.re
Tema1e ~ keep in m1nd that
thi s is
an
issue
that
touches
3
DI
everyone~
regardless
of
gender
1 dent1f1cat
1 on
or
sexual
Sexu .a l
i ntersectionality

,ass au Z t
-

::I

orientation


.
Fals ie a·ccusations
assault
as a Ha_y

'<

of rape-accusers
use seJ<iua z harassment
or
to ~get
a ,t- the accuser:/.
0 r exaggerate
claims _ first
speaking
out
about
· sexua l
harassm1ent
or
assault
is
a. couliageous
enough
a ,ct
that
no one should
ever
UI
••..
use this • myth . to
make
it
even
harder.
S@condr
-statistically
speaki'n ;g. research
shows that
only
2" of sexua l assault
c;a.ses
i n the
United
States
have been false ~ Compare
this
to the
estimated
54% of
cases
that
go unreported,
and
that
93% of
accused
rapists
1

fl

aw ,ay

walk

...

The

wearing
sexually

free ,.
1
v1c:t1m

uas

a tight

violated
say ·~ or wear

~,:
asking
'for
it:'~L
A-l l egedly.
by
o r being
?11rtat1ous~
a person

skirt~
~ This
that

complet ,ely
EVER _just ;fi es

what

they

1s

fal ·se.

can

___
,1s

drunk

ask to

no~hing

"

be
you

1ng yout
Being
sexually
assaulted
is
never
your fault.
and nothing
you
coul d
co~trol
about
yoursel
·f caus ,ed it..
The agency
is
c0 1mpletely
on the
attacker.
They CHOSE to do this.
not you.
·
Boys
wi J l
b .e bays"" _ '-!gh .~ T his
myth
implies
- that
men are
111indless
animals
that
can
only
listen
to · theirmost
basic
des ii r-es
without
any
thought
given
to
lo :gic
oi'r
se\f ...co .ntrol
,, taking
away
their
agency
in
their
decisions
and
thus
absolving
them
of
do.

-

anyone

There
attacki

being

111



responsibil1ty

5.
Tips
for
Sexual
Assault

for

do.

Allies
of
· Surv1vors

can

commit
sexual
assault
and
. an y.body
can
be
sexual ty
assaulted~
regar dles s
of
g_ender
identification~
body
parts~
or
sexual
o ientation.
If
someone
reveals
to you that
they
have
been sexually
assaulted.
here
are
a
few tips
~o keep
in mind:
1.
Bel iaeve their
story!
No - matt ,er what _ Don· t que ·stion
them[!,
··Are
you sure?"
because
if
they·re
telling
you something
. that
traumatic
and potentially
embarrassing
then YES they re sure .
Anybody

i l

2~

F~r

were
plight.
'It

J: •.

natter
don· t ask "hat
they
we·re weari
riut
late.
Such practices
only
invalidate
And NEVER ask how much _they
were drinking
~
i s up to the
surv 1'vor t io de c i de to r~ por t
charges.
The un ·iversity
is
making
strides
that

II

•1
press
·se><tJa1l

assault
po 1l 1 cy,,
negative
at itudes,
4. .
Respe ct the 1 r space.

.necessary
~Hey,

baby .!

"Gorgeous

. Give

it

but

them plenty

a.nid

st i 11
the1 r

of time

spear-headed

w·1111 ngness

the
to

if

as ,s au 1lt

the

by

to

or

improve
people

keep

ar
its

with

qui et

if

_o heal.

0

qoamn. look
4

1

1

th ey
survivor's

1ng

at that

ass.h

6.Street

....

~~vou• r e prettier

when

you

smile~··

Unfortunately"
this
is stilt
a commo-n
form of casual
courtship
. Let's
make
something
clear : it is not courtship
~
There is nothing
flirtatious
about catc ·alling
someone
on the street
.
Street
harass11ent
-is
obfec -ti ·fying
and
pr@datiory
t
and
it· s j ust
another
link
in a long c.hain of gender-based
inequality.
In her
book
Pass in€ ,By: Gender and Public
Hrarassme ·nt
(1995) ~ Caro 11
B,rioaks
Gardner
writes
~ ...Publi ic harassment
is that
g,roup
of abuses;;,
harryings~
and
ann~yances
characteristic
of
public
places
and
uniquely
facilitated
by · communi i,cation
in public.
P'lJblic
harassment
includes
pinching~
slapping~
hitting
, shouted
remarks~
vulgarityr
t nsults ~ sly innuendo,
ogling,,
and sta lk ing. Public
harassment
is on
a continuum
o'f possible
even 'ts ~ beginning
wh ren customary
civi"lity
among strangers
is
abrogat~d
and
ending
with
the
transitjon
to
v · olent
c:r 1me: ass au 1 t _., rap 1e,, or murder .· · ' This .def i n1 ti on is pretty
straightfor~ard
and underscores
two main parts
of the p r oblem.
-T lhc harasse ,d is
often
·a p ,ass ,erby.
h ,as little
means -o ,f d@fense
or
ag ncy~
There
are
no consequen ces
to
th ie aet~
unless
th -e vie .tin
_choo ses to defend
h1 ·111 or
herself
outrignt
(Whic •h c an be d.ang rerous
and ' further
provoke
the
,attacker)
or
report
t lhe · incident
t0 1 th e
authorities
(with
inconsistent
success
rates)
. Ttie harasser
has th e
power.
-Street
harassment
distills
·t lhe
.victim
down
to
his
or
her
ap1Peara -n,ce.
This
is
especia'!llly
damag i ng for .women,. W 1lose wort ·h is
t 1 ed to
the i r appe.ar ance
much
more
than
men• s.
( he recent
case
study
on
Harvard
Business
Schoo\
is
a good
example
of
this
phenomeno n.)
SeKual
gestures
or words
towards
a woman passerby
only
entrenches
th1s pattern
further.
Moreover,.
street
harassment
is not
only detrimental
to women-it makes people
distrust
men who might b~
generally
friendly
to others~
and it perpetuates
the stereotype
that
1

~•r~a

1

fuck

.. ,..

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

men are primarily
When people

l1b1do-dr1ven.
catcall,
what
do they

really

· want?

~ou to

want

They

pleasure

want

them . They

you

to

krnow that

you are

fo 1r them ·. · j j ust
by going
,about
you~
day..
And yo -u
don•t·have
the ·power
to change
lheir
mentalityr
It's
an exchange
0 f
power. more than anyth1ng else ~ Your body is redu ce d to an object
fo 1r the1rvi 1
ew11ng
plea -sure.
· nstead
of
be in g treated
as a human
being
with
fee11ngs
and agency ~
A
lot
~f
disc us sion
about
consent
can
also
apply
to
street
harassment _ The street
is a pu blic
space.
and peopl~
dese ~ve to feel
safe
Halking
down it.
just
as they
deserve
to feel
safe
in moments
of intima 1.cy.
Once
dominance
has
been established
in the
form
of
a
catcall.
that
sec~rity
is taken away.
The
problem
is ~ just.
like
co 1
nsent , our
culture
st i 1.1 has
a problem
acceptin
·g the
imp ortance
of
this
issue .. D1scussirons
about
how we
perceive
people
·on the street
are stilll
aw :kward .. We encounter
the
same
(false)
claims
of
hypersensitivity
. . People
argue
that
it's
on

'putting

a

s -ow

1

1

imposs 1 ble
to
r 11 1rt
with
someone 11 ke th f s, please

in a pu bli c space
to ~isp\ay
their
sexual

1s much more important

safe

,are

colld

with

situation,,
with

other
their

important

one

encounter
r1 gh't to feel

tha n their

non-right

OKAY TO FLIRT WITH PEOPLE
where
they
come
with
t,h·e in-tentf.on
p eop .le.
Here
body language
is , k~y : if
1

g@stures

facia

or

and back
o ff ~ If
they .tell
you
politetyt
back off . No matter
what,
other
intimate
maneuver
. seinsitivit
most

you

prowess .

PLACES WHEN/WHEREITtS
In
a social
interacting

all
these
gui deli n •es .. It
remi ·ndl_ them 1 that
a person 1• s

·l

expressions.,
t ·ak~
not
interested,

t he

of
they
hint

they're
however
when _it comes to fl1rting
or any
.y is
a ke ,y issue.
Po .ssibly
the

here.

.

a p hysi ca 1l/sexual
c1or1pliment4!
A·sk ttiem
how the1r
day is . Ask them (this
is UChicago after
all)
1f they*ve
re ad
any
g0 1od books
recent
1.y . Give
tllem
some th i ng
that
they
can
respo nd t ,o _ What
can
y ,ou
pos :s i bly
say
to
, .· .
•.:damn.
baby?"
If
they
tell
yoUi they
just
~!-'want to .stay
in
their
thoughts,
, te ,t the 1
m.
If they choose~
they might want to approach
you again
on thei~
ow~ terms.
Fi na .l ly t .
PLEASE
don· t
think
y ,ou
are
ent it lea
to
anyth1 nis just
bec .ause
you
respectfully
interacted
w1th
someone~
One
.Also

ll

of the
talking

d.o,n't

stat' .t

off

most i mportant
about
consent

~1th

1

1

ta keaway points
when
is that
no one is

owed sex~ T 'he desire
fol"' sex
is
neal thy ..
'There
is
nothing
·wron ·g with
wanting
to
explore
sex.
However,.
it
is often
a sha.red

I

I

La



■-

..
act~

and

every

person

invo lve d i s

i n control

of

their

own

agency _ To

th at -they
want
to have
sex w i th y 'ou r , or to as ·sume th at you rr
sexual
needs
are
more 'import ant
than
the ii r own"
is
t 0 deny
your
partner
agency.
To d~ny that
agency is to deny that
pe~son
h umanity ~
The~e
are
lots
of
great
campaigns
and
such
that
are
creattng
moment um i n changing
st r ee _ cul u re . A 11 of
_he se ~ -·----..~-- ------·---------- . ----------,
The Clothesline
f
resources
h-.ave p l a1c 1es wh~ere yea.ii can p 1 a.n your -own
1
events
to raise
awareness
and empowerment:
Projact
an art
an4
awarene s event
at
-~ollaback
Uof C t h a t se eks to
- The Street
Harassment
Project
give ~urv1vo so~
- Take Ba_ck The Ni 1ght
s exual
assault
a
- Helping Our e@n Girls~
Inc.
. voice.
as .s ume

1

1

! ~- ...
'Iii

As. a tways ,, we

have

immense

to

fabr1c

power

.. -

..

-.6.------•-•.,,,,
.._._w ■
1, a;

...

_

_.

a-I

I• •

_ __



a

long way to go .. but as 1nd1v1duals
we have
co 1 te ,ct 1 ve ,ly
make
last i ng chan ,ges
in ,our
social

.

Reso urces

for Victi1D ·s

Sof1a Jo hnson,

Joan Wang. Olivia

1

1

A

.. , .

list of resources

Drt.fz

.su:rvivors and a,ue.s ..

for se,tual assAult or .se.11.ualharassment

SeX11al Assault Deans ...on-Call: 773 - 702 ...8181 or 834~HELP. Y•ou can a.sk: the
police or hospital
lo contact: th e dean on call for you.. Students
who use
834-HELP will n ot : have to give. names .. She will then assist victims . of
1

1

s·exual assault.

Couns ·eling
and _
c ouns 1eling for rap _e and incest

Student

Resource

Service:

siur-vivors is covered

1

773 ..7102 ...geoo. Free
by the Student Health

F,ee_

ancare: · 7'73 - 7 02-4156
or 773 ~702-1915.
Pr ·ovides ong ,o·ing follow-up h ealth care and services, including services
for w rome ·n wh 0 have chosen not . to seek care immediate ly after an

.Student

Care

Center's

Wo

1

1

1

-ass :ault ..

SexuaJ V\glence
Pre ,vention
fRSVP}: 773 ~702 w7200. Sexual
info-,ma1ion,. preven ·tion and education
servic ·es, resowc es, and

Resou,,r~ :e~J:or

Assault
referral~

1

Student
Group sfEv ,ents
RACK (Risk Aw ,are Cons ,ensa~l
Kink): u .Chlc:ago's BDSM education
group.

..

Pho enix Survivor Allian .ce: Newly
1

for~ed

survivors

RSO to provide

..

suppoFt

for

.._

...., "' • •--

~

Tea Ttn:te and Sex Chats: peer ....
le~

sex ed beyond

use a condom.

11

-

UChicago ~sexualitea:
RS 0 for
peo pl e who identify as ase ·xual,
and their allies.
1

1

if

1

,No _n .-University
Re_so~rces
Chicago
P 0-lice/ Amb 1olance: 911
U of C P olice: 773 ...702-8181,
or 123 from campus phon es
U of C Medical Center: Mitchell Emergency Room: 773 - 702 6250. They
1

1

1

9

off er sexual assau lt co ·unseling,
.assault evid ence co llect ion
1

immediate

care an ,d treatment,

sexual

1

,g to S: National

,Associa ·tio n of Working Women: (800) 522-0 '.925 .. An .
advocacy o :rganization
for working women .. Their job 1-problem hotline
provid .es advice and sup ,port for women in all fields dealing with sexual
harassme ,nt.
Rape -Victim Advocates:
(312) 663 -6303 .. Immediate
medical advocacy,
services t ,0 local emergency rooms ..
EEOC National: (800) 669 - EEOC .. The Equal Employment
Opportunity
Commission is the national clearing .house for sexua l harassm ent
complaints.
A ~harge must be fi l ed with in 180 days o~ the alleged . act~ or
within 30 0 days , if' there is a state or llocal fair-emplo yment - practi .ce
agency that enforces a simila .r law ~
£e ·minist Majority · Foundation ·: (703) 522-2501)
.
'Illino .is D epartment
o ·f Human Rights: ,(312) 814-6200.
If you want to file
a. charge with the departm ,ent ~you ·must do so wi.thi.n 180 days of the date
the harassment
took place ..
South East Chicago _Commission
Victim Assistance
Program. ': 773-324 16926. Tra"ined pr-0 fe.ssionals
help victims of sexual assa.ult understand
the
relevant provisions
and procedures
of the criminal justice system and, if
requested,
will accompany
the victim during poi1ce interrogation
. or in
court.
YMCA Metropolitan
c ·hicag 0: (3 1 2) 372 - 6-600 ext .. 273 Individual
counseling :,: immediate
support,
group counseling.
1cour ·t advoca c y,
information
and referral services, all services are free or char g e.
Chlcago Rape Crisi .s Hotline: 1(88 .8) 293 ...2080. Open 24 hours . a day ,.
:For Male ·,Survivors ,: In add.ition to the resources
above. check 0 ·\.1t
www .malesurvivor.org,
an rd ~ww. •Iin6 ..org.
1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

-··

I

I I

-

Shit you should totally know about
!Did i y·ou ·know ttle University wHI gi ve you an emergency loan of 250$ if you're in an emergency
situation and need QUiek cash? H.goes to your B1ursar bill, and needs to be 1paid back by 30
days,. but ifs belter than no t being a lble to fly home to see your dying grandmother,,
1

.

1

.

Most quad buildings
and most sci rence
campu 1s buildings are
connected via
tun -nels/breezewaysl
I
fs possible 'lo walk
from
. w ,alker all ! ·the
way to Cobb and ·the
hosp ital all the way to
BSLC, wiHl 'th ie riight
k.eycard accesit. With

Harper and The Reg have up to date
issues of the most prolific maga~nesltm talk ing The ·A,t/antic(f The New
Yorker, Wlre ,d, ~tc ~ .And · if lhere ."s any
that they're missing; you can requ 1
es ,t 1
it
on ltine and they wiH totally sta,,.
stoc~in g itr

1

the right class
sc hedu1e (plus lunch
in Stuart Cafe and
studying in Harper) ~
you never- h,ave to go
outskie between
classes.

Cholles has the best
pizza in Hyde Park. Far
a late night post-studying
snack, Au Bon Pain in the
Hospital is open
24lll
Just go 'the MitcheU
entrance and flash your
ID.

Campus printing isi expensivet unintuitive, and al l-arou :nd terrib1e. Your first
experience with it should NOT be 5 minu ites befooe that paper 1is due .. Put
some cash on a card and pr int a practice page at the first opportunity so
you'U know what the fuck you're doing at crunch time ..

There are rea11y·expensive baby grand pianos in the Logan ,center! And all you
have todo to gel aooess to them is show . perlormance experience to the .Mus ic
deoartment. Thevre incrediblv under usedr
·

Farmers Mark&PHPP>TI" The
farmers market runs Thursdays 7am1pm in Harold Washington Park . by
53rd an ,d sou ·lh shore anq Saturday
mornings on 61st and Blackstone .
Everyth ing is ,cheaper , fresher, and
loically · g1rown .. ·

Just for being a U Ch icago
student , you get tons of
sonware .ior
1

free! · http ,s :l/ aos~ers ..uchi~
a.
~e~h.iipag~ :_php? io::=20254arrld
http / I ~Qftw~ r~t;lli ~cp u nt. u ch wcag
~ .edu/ ..

,,.

The lob lby of.the ,Gordon Center
for lntegraUve Sder1i0e {acfioss
57th from the BSLC) is stocked
with toots ie rolls/pops every
morning, though the . dlamned
tour groups get lo them qulckl 'y.

The Library tlas al least 100 pounds of porn
for anyone to check ,out .. tnterlibra ·ry Loan lets
you get everything you want: movies~ music,.
BOOKS~ etc. ·from other institutions via the
internet . Also your card'H get you access not
only ·to other Chicago 'libraries but most maJ 1
0r
1

1

Vou can create extra email
addriasses through
~11P_$_:/f.~.
ra~tµ~t) i cago ~edu/cm a
illctliaS:~land use ttlem to gel
un imiited Amaz .on Prime
subscriptions!
Ju .st don't pick ·
helpdesk@uc-hicagof
because
you WILL get tons ol
panicked law students wh0 1
can't get their exam software ·
worldng.
9

libraries in America,, plus borrowing pnivireges
at Ivy League schoolsm Ive used my ID to1gel
into NY U·s or Columb ,ia's libraries to
nap/charge my phone whenever I'm rn NY . .1

1

The re's a firee food
listhost that emails you
whenever an event te,
1

acourring1 that has free
food ~ lt'"s gen ,erany
possible - lo live 0 n RSO
e¥ents and lle ictures atone
throughout the ·
week.. The weekend is
harder. of course~.. The
Usthost is https ://Ii ~ts. _uchi _c;ag9 ~ ~tj u/
web
/info/freefood/
- w
-•w-~~
--~~~ !
1

~f you're a science major, the besl way to get a1job in
- resear 1ch is to ·walk diredly up to a profess .or and ask them
for a job ~ Ta hel p with your pitch, ifs worth being interested
and knowJng whal tJhe professor doest Wittl work-study ,
anybody that employs you gelts 55% of th~ir salary
reimbursed
by ·the govemment
so hinng you is insanely
1

cheap ..

lrs pretty easy to get onto the roof 1of

You can 1request bagged lunches
fr·om the cHning h,aH if you can't be
there ·: tihey"II give you a made-toorder sandwioh , cook .ies, fruitt and
som e water, you jiust need ta ·gat your
RH to say okay to U., It reeeaally hetps
when yau h,ave classes strai .ght fr-om
1

1

most UChicago BuHding 1s (and
basements!)
My favorite campus secrets
are the Ida Noyes Pool and Harper
Tower. Go ex_iplore, and be 1curiousi IH's a
great way to get to know campus if you
can avoid . getting suspended.

9-5:30.
Observ 'atory [Jl
s Observation
deck and te~scope are
open la the public on Wednesdays-go
star-gaze and take
advantage. it also makes a g ,reat date! Also .. if you email
the adminis1rator of the BSLC greenhouse, she wiH gilve you
a tour..
UChi 1
cago has a VPN that
lets yau use access
Ryerson

privHege .s to databases like
JSTOR

and Pulbmed

off-

camp1US! h_~~ _:l/~vP~.
- -~ e;tl_ic
ag_g.~~!J/

I I

If you work for- tha university,
don't go to the sec . . You get
much fas ,ter ,and better
m1edical care if you contact
the hospita 1I proper and tell
them you're staff_ If you ha ·ve
non-university ins ,uranice. get
a primary care doctor in the

DCAM .

Chicago & Transportation
What's : the CTA?

The Chicago Transit Authority is• our city" :s pubHc bus and train . system. It is great for
north and . west ~outes from The Loop., but is severely la cking going So11tl1..,Southeast
and Southwest. For example driving to Bridgeport takes about 12 minutes in a c~m-from
Hyde Park., but because 110 ~ses 011 tl1e south side go diago 11ally it takes about 4S
minutes on the CT A ..
The '~L,, is th ·e way 10 go 10 get to big ne:ighborhoods north of Mu.seum Campus tastil but
th e Red and Green line are not always the most co nvenien't depending on where y ou
live s Here :is a list of a.11th .e WHys to get in and out . 0 f .HP...
1

1

1

1

r ,..-- ,..
I

Bus mutes that go to/from/aro
(2, 4 , 6, l71 ~ 172)

,und Hycle Park:

Weck . day commu~c time bus, if y ·ou can
catch it, tl1is is the ·best thing to get you out of
Hyde Park and in.to The Loop/River
' orthE

#2:

••

:

~

,.. •

I

I

,.

.,



... 1

1-



--

--

I

,.

I

•I,..

I

I

I

t •

I



I

Water SOON

.

OOWNTO\.YN

I

HV('lePa,k

3~

x-~

-

Ct1 rt..·~-,.
,q,J1 Si.;Ho
I

O:..Jna,trct SiJ,'





••

·-

·-·.

Oetting Around
Efficieo .t \vays to get to various
neighborhoods without a bicycle:
Loop : red or green line~2~ 4. 6~ shuttles,~
Near North Side; 2 or red lime
Pil~,,:n: Green li11.eto pink line, green line · to _
18~55 to 1h1c 8 •
Wicker Park : Green 1·ine 101blue line.

#4
South



Ii
j

I

i-m

~

~

53rd



~

54th

:c

~

19'

fl)

E. Hyd 1a Park
Blvd~

0.:

--•

'1:1
C

....

UI

=

w

cic

59th

60th
#1.71

,still under construction along the Dan Ryan!! the Red •Line n.ow
follows the green liine tracks on a 24-hour .. train service between Howard in
Andersonv ~lle on the NoI1h Side and Ashland/63rd in Woodlawn. Stops at Garfield,. and
- 51st ,
When
it's
running
aga i·n
normally
it· won "t
s:lop
at
51st.
Red line : Currently

1

Green Line: The Green Line route ·services between t'hc Harlem/Lake s'tation in Forest
Park1 IL and Oak. Park, 'IL to ·the Cottage Grove stop at 63rd right by Sou:tl.1 Canipus .
Currently the 01,een line is s]ightly · affected by the Red Liµe _n-1nniog on the same tracks ..
Stops at 6311d, Garfield" 5.Sth, and 5lst +

-Meb'a: 3 dolla .rs a ride~ Really fast ro The Loop bu'l it doe.~n trt run all the tim ,e.
1

SNdent shuttJ ,es
The
igh ·_ Ride Pros@m has shuttles that run every 20-30 min11tes throughout
the
evening~ Run time from ·Sunday through Wednesday i 5pm to 4am .. and from Thltfflday
-~-g ,mYh
~ - 5nrn
Transloc_ . a-pp- for route info ..
&11 Sa1u
_ _. _ r day
__ 1'!-ttu n- s_ fi"r 0_~
r-·• to
__ 6am
.
• See
_
th ro

Safe~

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The green line is not as dangerous as you . may be told - university students tak e it all the
lime. I even :saw Arley D. at 63rd and Cottage (true slory1)
Jr you're neivous, just make sure dlat you,,.re paying · attention to your surroundittgs ..
Don .'t fiddl 1e unn~ssarily
·with your phone at stops, know where yo u ' re going,, take a
buddy i :f you•re lrav 1
eHng at nigh.tt e,ven. on the n ,o -rth side.
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Use tlil transportat:ion a.ims.
fr you or a friend has a smartphonc~ they can rca _ny help yo~ get around .~ ,Before y rOU
leave ·~ use Go°'gle Maps; it has the p-recise tran.qit times .and offers pre.tty d ecen ·t
suggestions.
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Transloc for the S;tudent shuttles -~ 171, and ·172
Transit ,stvp offers alerts and arrival times for buses and L trains .

BIKES ,

by Zoe KN

Thinking

about

getting · a b ik e ? Good thought. ! You
de1mitely sho ,ul d if you are committed
to _riding ·
a bik .e around Hyd .e Park :and Chicago .
1

. Things to , keep in mind~ will you need to lift
your bike u .p stairs or • onto a ,eta bus r.ack? Wi 11
you be comfortable
locking 1t outside at night? Do you . prefer to ride · fast or
slow? Do you want to ride your bike in the winter? Check 0 ut the 1different
types of ·bikes to 1see what is b 1est fo r you . .
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Beach

cruise1r .

Pros

...'Easy to --ide

Cons
...He ,avy., ge n erally too
heavy to lift up stairs or
onto a CTA bike rack ·
Unwieldy to lock at a
campus bike rack
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- You can wear -anything
- Heavy/large
frame= stabili.ty i.n the wmter
...Fenders
Great fo:r flat rid .es (like all of Chicago!)
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Final thoughts:
·Pr et ty bikes that make The Po i nt feel like .a Mal"bu
'boardwalk 7 these b ,ig but unless yo µ aren't going to ·be riding more than ,
occasionally
in the early fall or late spring and plan on keeping yo~ bike
par~ed in a not super central locatio~
a be~ ch cruiser will just annoy you
with it's ,cumber.som.e
frameM
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Freak/used
road bike
All hail the glor io11s used steel frame roa d bike! Your best friend . in Hyde
Park and ,on c:ampus, this buddy hits a sweet - spot between its ease to ride ~
lock up, and it's lowered chance of ge t ting stolen compared
to new sh inier
wheels ,.
Fixed-gear
bikes
These b.ike :s ran~e grea t ly in price and while you can find some £or cheap~
. thesr do stick out more with flashy col ors or monoc ·hroma.tic frames against
the rusty Schwinn
Collegiates
outside
of the Reyn olds Club .. But, if ·you
know how to r ide · them, they are loads of fun around campus and . are easy to
carry anywhere
in :side. Be aware with your fi.xie! Both Chicago and Illinuis
ha"Va ordinances
-requi .rin :g biltes to have brakes~ Make s.11
r e you h ave at least
a lever attached
to a caliper
stop on the front wh eel or else you could get 1a
.
ticket.
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~

Places

to find

a bic)icle

you will be a 'ble to find a great 11sed ride for
under $200 includi n g a lock .. A new bike stands ou t like a sore thumb and
isnJt w,orth the extr ·a cash . Get your bike previously
loved and p~ss . it on
when you are done to an underi~la.ssperson
0 n Market ,p 1
laoe.
Pro·tip:

Go used . Most p]aces

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• Working

Bikes.
Pilsen at 24 th Place and W ,estern Ave.
Fantastic
selectio ·n of :freak bikes ~ They will le you t e-St ride all day and help
yo ·u fin d something
perfect for you. Check · out their ·web .site fo,r .their selling
r
hours, they are also a great place to voltinteer
and l ea ,rn how to p ·ut b1ike s
together ..It's als.o a fun bike r i,de ba ck to ca~pus ~
• Blackstone
Bicycle W orks. Woodlawn .at 61 st a :nd Blacltstone.
Small
selection
of used bikes ~ They
sell on 1Saturday
m -ornings
an ,d
oocasitonally ha",e sales on campus . Because it ~.s a s mall selection, i.t' s hit -;or ..
miss ~nd there are better options elsewh .ere if you ar.e up for a <30 min
excursion
out of Hyde Park. Your dolla.rs support
Woodlawn kids learning
bicycle mechan ics, so it 's d efinitely the place to go for tune-ups a.nd flats ..
• Recycles.
UChicago campus.
Th ,e on campus
bike share
program
is good if you only want a bike
occasionally .. Si gn up £or free and check bikes in and out from lots , -of campus
locations,. but you ~ve to bring it ·ha .ck to whex@ y·ou checked it out . Maka
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sure you ask when they are due back as you can ,get slapped
Recycles als ,o shuts down in -the winter.

·Divvy

Bikes.

Chicago bike sharing

with

a late fine ~

system .

· ewly installed
city ·-wide bike share . You can get a longer mem ·bership
or
just a day pass, all th .at"s neede ·d is a credit car rd to sign up. Make sure you
check them ·•nto s.tations every 30 minutes. you do ·n't _need to bring them
back to where you took them. just to another station around the city you can
reach in h ,alf an hour .. This is a new p ~ g am and
it will b ,e intere ting to
see how it works in Hyde P ·ark.
• Blue City Cycles .. Bridgeport
at 32 nd and H~]sted .
These great folks focus on new bikes but also h .ave a decent used selecti on~
The prices are a little bit steepe ,r but they also do fantastic
frame rep 1air if
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rour ride gets bange d up .. Bonus! There is a fat c.at who lives there · namt,d
1

at Jackalope
next door., learn
happening
in Bridgep ,ort, ,and if y-ou,re over .21 ~ detour
at Maria 1·s befo re heading home .
Vanya~

Grab

about the . cool t.hings
up the 1:>Iock and stop

a coffee
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Protip : Atten .d Critical
Mase.
Around
6pm on the
last
Friday
of
ea ,~~ month
thousands
of ~yclists ,co,nverg~ o_n Daley , PJa~a Lo~p . A
po]1t1cal statementt
a revolution,
a goofy good time,. or othe ·rwise,._ this 2-3
hr bike ride tours mobocratically
through
hits and swaths
of the whole

Windy City .
L0 CK IT ()R L0 S,E IT
No mat .ter what you ride o · when
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you .iride it, you've

got to g,et a goo4 lock for
your bike and learn to lock it prope :rly~ Doing so will not only re duce the
c·hance of your bike getting stol~n but also m "akes a huge difference
at the ·
crowded bike racks outside of the Reg .. Slip t.he lock through t ·he front or
b 1ack wheel AND , the fram.et clo se it up, and gjve it a good tu 1g. It should be
snug against the pole/tree/rack
so _hat no one can com .e . in with clippers on
the underside
,of the lock,.
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Lock your 'b +ke in lit locations, , preferably
where there are other bikes loc ·ked.
up. Don't · lock your bike to parking
meters or s hort poles as the)' can he
Jifted over .. D-oin't lock your bike to campus
railings
as faciliti ,es takes
pleasure
cutting
your Joe.ks ~nd taking your bjke . There isn JJt a fee when
·facilitates
takes your ride, b ·u't you are in the hole at least 35 buckaTioos

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b,ecause

loc :k is now in pieces

of the lock
l1eaving you unable to file a claim at Krypto 1nite .. Benches and light posts on
. campus
are technically _no·bike
zones, but the racks get crowded
and I've ·
ne ,ver he ·ard of a bik -e _getting
moved on the quad. Avoi d ha -n .dicap railings
and :ramps and you should be Dka)r .:
your

and they

thrq,w away

most

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If your bike 1disappears
fro 1m wh .ere you ·parked it!" call facilities , at least th.r.ee
times to see if they have it .. Go to th eir bike rack at El]is and 56 th and see if
it is there.
Pick it up ASAP ' as they give the bikes to Black ,stone after a
while. If Facilities doesn't have it~ file a police report. Your bike might turn
up, prob .ably 11:ot. You have a greater chance of ge:tting it back if yo u register
it with campus
security.
They offer it o ·n the quad a couple of times a year or
you can call 773 702 6008 to register yo -ur 'bike anytime ..
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Tip: Use

your

b'ike W'it ·h Chic a go p u blic tra~spo~'"t a tion

.Safety ~
Wear a helmet,,
Get a front and back b ike light
Don "'t ~ide on the ,si dewa]k
illegal and yo ,u willl get a
fine). ·
Use your ar 'ms as turn si.gnals
Don t ride with headphones
in
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to go lota

of ·plaeee .!

Check your tires regularly ..
Don,,t s ·hoal (cut bikers orf without

~ __
(it is
hefty

warning
at , stops).
Say '~On your left" wh .eri passing
Pass on the left.

.
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..

Have fun ~
.,,

at th _e U of C -

Partying
■y

·

J a• I• Ke ll es

Frat Prarties:: Fra parties are an tmportant asset to party Ufe,on camp u s, even fe r peop le
'Who wou ld die bet:ore going Grieek . The frat houses , Iinf ng University and Wcod!awn are
great places to look if you want huge pa rti es with 101-sof booze and dancing1 esp 1
eciaUy 'if
you a-re, <21 or looldng to meet new people -. An event
1

worth

noting

is Bar Nig ht at Alpha Delt. a weekly
1

cash bar that

happens on Wednesd ,ay nights . Frat
parties at U of Care often free and generally more
we!lcoming than yourd find at other school ·s.

i



Word : Fracke-t (n); a clheap,
di~s-,b1
e coat
often thrift e d used

Vocab

'to avo1id the stress of leavillilg nicer
01.1te rv1e a r in a watet"nity
c:oat r o om

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Apartment Parties : The majority of pa 1rties at the U of C appen in off -campus
aparbm~ents.. Am apartment party can be as big as a m1u h:i...u n it,, open-house
rag er, or as
_ smatl as an invite ...on~y potluck. so make sure to check Facebook
for info before you
show up. B recause apartment
parties are funded by
indn1iduals, they often run out of booze, so feel fre re
Voeab Word: Party o'Cfock {n):.
to BYOB. No matter what you dof r,ever for:9 et that
th~ time when the party
a~u•Hy starts. Most parties at
you are partying 1in someone's
hom ie. Don't tra.sh
the U of C are called fqr
things . :Don't steal. Be chill .
10 :~30pm,. but Party o'Clock isn"'t
Dorm Parties: Partying happens in the dorm.,
until 11pm or 1 ·1 :30pm ..
but t hese part ·es are usua lHy small due o necessary
size and noise constra ri nU ~ Many houses have rrules
abo iut w ~at constitutes
a party" and some houses require · that y·ou registe ·r your party
befo re the gue :sts arriv~, so make sure to check with your RA b'efore sending out
invites. Ma st RAs and RHs a r e Ia~d back . about safe, , ow-key d orm ...to om driink ing ,, but
sm 1oking ~nside is a major abo ,o . If you warnt to li•ght up--cig -arette ,s or o'dherwise-irts
generally okay to do so in front of the donni , so long a.s.you are >i 1.5 feet from the door.
The Point; A summertime
treat, tlie Po int is
Vocab Wo 1rd: Prega 1me (.v}: To
Hyde Park's favoirite outdoo ,r party spot _This
party befo.,.e ~ party. A dorm is
·.scef"! re pa~' located on the Illa ke at me
a great p 1]ace ·tc pregame with a
easternmos
end ?f 55 th · stre,et,.. boasts ample
sm a11group o ·f friends.
green space, oozy firi:e pi ts,, a:ndg _iant Ii m restion e
sta "rs . Rules fike No Sw·imminrg and No Open 1
Con ta iin ers are oiften overl 100 leed, but the pal'ik 11s closing time of 11 pm is non -negotiable . Prepare "t0 1pay ar hefty t_icket if you refiuse ta vacate.
Bars : If yiou are 21 or ''21"' Hyde Park has a limi ed ootenjoy 'ab le se~ection of
bars to affeL Here's a rundown of the most [popular ;
-Woodlawn Tap {aka J 1immy ''~): The most popular U o·f C bar .- Only ever ca.U it
Jimmy ' s. Cheap drinks. Chea er food. Great place to se·e someorne from your Hum
c~~ss reave with that random
person mom your house ~
...The Cove : Fifty ...percent Hyde Parkers, firfty, percent U of C students * Sports bar
atmosphere.
Lorts of space for b ig ,groups. Also c eap ~
The Pub: Members,s ·only ber in the basement
of Ida Noyes . o~ed
by the U of
C. Great beer sel ection~ Food from the Medic i Bakery ~ Hosts \-veekl:y' events like wing
night and trivia . Hard on fa ke lDs.
-Seven Ten Lanes: Food f billliards, and bowling on 55,h and EU1
i~+ l'v ,e never met
anyone who has ever been there, but . it seems f un in iheory .
-Other bars : the F2lcon lnnr Bar louie~ Chant
.
Summer Brreeze -: Summer -Bree ·zel he IU of C's end-of-year eX1ravaganzal boasts
a dayt ime c·arnival, a nightt ime mu sic festival , and panies al1 throughout . Homework is
igncried. open con rtainer 1rules are r ef aX!ed, and giant day lon 1
9 part ies like B01nanza
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-.

~udents
across a wide llariety of soda I groups . Come prepared
for maxlmum funtll
_ but keep safety in mind
alcohol pofsoning 1is one of the fastest ways to ruin a good
day.
unite

Safety

.

Som 1e quick thoughts
For infu about
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sexual

on party safety. This list is by no means comprehensive.
assau lt rresouirces.,. 'SOb 1dety , and addiction
treatment,
see pages

XX)(X, XXXX, and XXXXr 1respectively m
-Be wary of "~punches'' and ·"jung e jui ·ces'~ sented from
in doubt BYOB 0 r stick to beer
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unco ,vered

containe ·rs.. If

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...:when you ,go to · he

le 1ave 1you r drink with som -eone you trust
-Keep an eye out for the people you cam ,e wirli. 11Y0'..U p l an on lleav ing w1th
someone who is not the p er-son you came with ..-llet · the origina~ group - ·now
-Jn the event _of alcohol p01soning . or a suspecte d drug overd0se,. don tt take
risks~ If you have to ask , MShould thils person be aken to the hospital?g the answer i s
a lmost always YES. Someone•s
life is not 1
a th lng wo 1rd, risking ..
-_Use your d i scretion. ff sommihing
seems ·.,not right~ n biust your instinct and
don't b.e afraid :to ask someone,
"'Ane you alright?ii
athroom.,

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Throwing

a Party
.
Throwing
an off campus party is easie ·r if you know some basic rues of thumb:
1. The 2am rule: Parties. at the U o · C ,, fo r the most part,, end a round 2a im~. ,1you
wa 1nt your party to rur, longer, tum off your stereo around this time 1. !est the U CPD pay
you. a v msit. If he cops do show up~ don't fire •~ You aren ~t in trouble wnl11t:he law ·~ it s just
ti m 1e to c:alUit a1 igh t
2 . The Ru·le o f Good Vibes: Whether you' 1
re throwrng a rager or a potluck,, ,a
drug-fueled
bender or a sober game night~ good vwbres shoutd always be the M .O .
Lookout for yo ,ur guests. ~s someone getting belligerent?
Is someon ie crying in the
bathroom? Pay attention . Your job as a party host •s to keep everyone leel ling safe and
happy.
3. The Booze Formu l a .: How ~uch boOiZe youir party needs is, always a crapsho
but I like th is formula ; 2: drinks p er per-son for the first hour of the party. and one drink
fer every nour after that . If your party g 1e1Js going around 11 :30, that ..s around 4 dr inks
per person . ~djust as necessary accoridin rg . the party habits of your 9uests. Tht:s formuta
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accounts for the fact that some peop le imbib~ more heavily than others ~
4~ The Law of the Friend ly Neighb or::. Let -your neighbors
know · a day in advance
that yo1.J"llbe hC?Sing som e people at you r place . H you are feeling especially amica lble,
invite your neighbors . Tn ~s wi,I reduce your ris .- of - oise compllainl1:s~
Drugs : This guide does not condo e or deno ·unc:e the use of ill icit substances~ If
you choose ·to partake of drugs~ ae1 alway ,s wirtn safety aind good tiim.es in min 1d _
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ON GETTINt

'

Some social justice

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organ

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American

Civil Liberties Union a:t the Universi~
o·f
Chicago: ACL :UafC aim .~ to foster awareness
and education
of the individual rights and libertiest and the threats
to them,
·of the pers -ons on and aro ,und t lhe University ca1ffip US ~ It . is a
chapter of the na tiona l ACLU..
·
Contact: ~-g~-~-l;:>
_Q~F..~.f@.U!?t~
1.~:~b i,.ggg:q._~q~ or a cl 1
u .uchica1Qo.edu
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Gender, Activism, Learning, and Service: ·GALS is an
aca ,demi c discussion
group that hol ds weekly workshops
.
centered
arourid a quarterly
theme dealing ·with ·var.ious . ·
_ issues of women's r ·ightst gender iden-tity, -an .d feminism~ We
also do various service pr'□jects around Chica .go that be -nefit ,
. women.
.
Conta 1ct : Po~cQ_~
_
g_~
I~IdQb_lc.~g q_~gr.g
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Orga .nizat ion f or Stu 1dents with Dis 1
abi .lities: OSD's .
Ojsabi.Jity Matters
Conversation
-Group is a regulair forum
an d support
group for stud len ·ts with disa 1bi'lnties. lt' ,s i·ntehded
·to -L
build community
and provide stu dents with 1a sense t ,hat
they are a- membe r of~ pol liticaJ minority facing acces ,s
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barriers
arld unjust stigma. rather. than 11broken 1' or
pa 1
tho 1logical individualst in.conv -eniences to the smooth
operation
o·f University life~ These meet ings are : a place to
vent, strategize,
and buHd relati onsh 1ips ~A Disability Matters
Conversation Group meets every Tuesda y,, beginning 10/ 11
4 ..~3Q-5:r30pm @5710,
2n -d floor conference · room~
Contact: .osduchicago.org
[ther ·e's a1contact f orm on the
"Stud ·ents" section 1
o ·f the website]
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Pho ienix S ·urvivor Al .li-ance: p SA is an advocacy and infornial
peer support
group for survivors
of . sexual _
,assault.
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Contact:

p.t1oe..ni~§_y_c.v.ivo_r:_9!Ji~-□-c~@gm9~com
.,,.,,.

1

G INV0 LVE □
izatians to get you started ...
_elaty :J>Lt!!
: The Left is dead. Long live the Left! 0 r - so - says
Platypus, a Marxist study group that · aims to provide a fresh
start for revolutionary
politics through a critical analysis of
t lhe history of Left thought4 They host l read.i ·n g groups and
public · intelle -cltuaJ events to provi 1de spa 1c ·es for crjti ·cal
reflect -ion.
·
Contact : uof rc@; ·la .. us 191 7 4or
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Students
for .Correctional
Reform INow S CoRN is a
student~run
O·rganization
devoted to inqreasjng
campus and
co .mmunity aware ,ness about the US epide ,mic of 1
mass
incarce 1
rati ·on and many retated iss -ues through direct
servi ce~ speakin 1
g ·events, visits to correctional
institutions.
a.nd work with - Chicago organizations.
ThiEi year we will be
tutoring formerl 'Y incarcerate
d ad1ults on the West Side,
volunteering
at -the Cook County JuvenHe Temporary
Detention Ce 1
nter. att .en _ding t lheatre even ·ts at juv ·enUe
detention facilities .,1touring corr ,ectional -fa ·cilities in Illinois, · .
h.o d ,ing a few speakin .g1events ! on campus, a 1
nd iricrea 1s ing
involvemen ·t · in1the city~\Nide c9rr ectional reform n,ovement .
Com 1rnit 0 1n a projec _
t-by-project
_basjs_
Canta ct : Ju Iia n n a Esta II [@s~a ~-I~.S.
-~11rna H.c9m)
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Students ·tor Justice in Palestine : SJP is dedicated
to
· raising t;-1wareness about the iniustices concerning 1the
occupati'on of the Palestinian peopl~ .
apvocate for
_democratic
-and nonviolent
pri 1
nciples to prom iote ju ·stice
human rig 1hts, e•quality, liberty, and sel 1
f-determinatio
1
n.
Contact: Sarni Kishawi (§_kk@uchicag_o_.!3tj
_&j
]
11!]..-~~

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[ARTS

·~

ArtShould:

]

ArtSh -ou 1ld is a student-founded
an d stu dent-run
arts arid com 1
munity serv 1
ice organiza .ti ·on on campus that
provides free after-school
l visua~ art class es in five different .
Chicago Public Sch 0 -ols in Hyde Park and Was1 hii ngt□ 1n Park.
Contact: ~~artshouldteam(C!!gmai
l.com ·
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P.erfQrrn
.~_0~9-.A
J~ I for l;ff~-~~JV@.__Cj'(jc
_~g~ -~~~I9.!1~PAECE
community

service

is a

RS□

dedicate ,d to raising community
members'
awar -eness of social iustice and poljtical issues
throug :h the performanc
,e arts~ Perf orman -ce p jeces a~e
created by the local youth we mentor.
·
Contact : pa~ce ..Q.hica ·o@ .·1mqU. ,q~Qll1or Safiya Johnson
(sci oh nso 1n @!.lchi ca go. ed u J
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South Side .Scribblers .: SSS has b -een teaching creative
writing in Hyde Park since 1994~ Our program mission is to
get kids exe,ited about being creative, excited about Writing.
and excited about creati ·ve writing! Volunteers
instruct
creative writing activities to groups of students
ranging
from 2nd grade to 6th grade in loica1 Hyde Park e lementary
s1
chools ., after school pr o·grams .
Contact : Kathleen 0 'Shea (kaoshe ·<;1@!J~
1
chicago.e du] 1
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[ E~UCAT1QN & MENTORl~G

.

]

~eighborQq_od ~Schools ~.P_r~g_ram: NSP is ari employment
opportunity
offered mostly to ·work-study eligible UChicago
undergrad s that sends these stude 1nts to p,ublic schools
throughout the South Side . to he lp s~ppl~men 1t th e school
environme 1
n·t~.NSP stude 1
nts can serve as tutors, tea 1cher's
.assi .sta 1
nts, p itch in w·ith administrative
work~ a 1nd work
alongside student teachers after school or during the
school day&
·
Contact: nsJJinfo~ u chi ca QQ~_~q ~').
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South Side Free Music Pro. 'ram: Teaching music to kids in
Washin gton Park~ Woodlawn,
and Hyde Park.
· .
Cont act: s 10 u~~b?idef ree rri lJsj cp ro g ram@g ma iI.-com ·
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S lash!: Spr .ash! Chicago is dedic ated to o/ffer in _g exerting
learning opportun ·ities to hi gh school students
in Chicago
and teach 1ing opportunities
UChica 1go ~tudent ,s. We want to
1

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make interest ing, eng 1aging Classes ..
Contact: ' sp J!!_
sh ~gbtg~yo _@-~rn~jtcorn

STR l\l__E
Healt _h _Mentorin _.: STRIVE pr rovides \ntensive ione1

1

on-one academrc tuto ring , me ·ntoring, peer
disease management
education
to minority
Chicago nving with sickle cell dis .ease .
Contact: : ......,._
str ·i, verTlentor .s@ · rnaif .con1

supportl
and
teenagers
in

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Stud le .nts Teachin _ At Ra · School: STARS run 1s an English as-a-Seoontj-Language
after-school
tutoring
pr ogr8m at Ray
Schoo l (57th/Kimbark,
right .by campus! .]. We pair ·
UChicag ro students with ESL students from grades 1 -6 to
act as both mentors
a nd tutors th _roughout the year[s].
STARS is the only ESL tutoring RS□ on campus.
Contact: : Am aury Mich .el [~Jmt~□-~J1~-~ -G.b J.9.~~g_q_.~d~_) an d Paya ll
C1howdha -ry f 1Jch.ow dh8ey @~chica _·□ Fedu]
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Women j a :nd Yout :h SuJ>porting l Each Dth ,er : WY .SE is an
RSO that p8irs temple UChicago students
with rTlidd le·
sc ·hool gir ls from Litt l e Village. UChic ago mentors . ta l k with
stud rehts about issues such as conflict r~solutionJ se .xual
decisian 1making and neighbo -rhood v 1olence. Thr□ 1ugh the ·
space WYSE createsl
UC h icago students
have the
opportu -nity to help these girls develop thei r soci ral-emotional
ski llls as t .hey navigate the traumas
and l drama ·s of m id,dle
scho a l . App 1Hcations a1re ac ,cepted in the Fa1II.
·
Contact : Anna Z i ff (c!_ziff@uchica1go.edu]
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Woodlawn After School Kids Program : WASKP tut or ,s
local K-1
6 students once each we e k throughout
th e sch 1ool
1

year . We
museums
su ,mn,er

Contact:

al ·s ;o organize field tr,p·s for the kids to movies,
f and the Mi •dway ice skat ing rink as well as
1

Breez ·e
Ezra Karger 1(~q_Cger@uchic •ago -edu]
1



EN 'VIRONMENT
Sto · Fun din · Climate Ch .an · e UChica ~ .CJ:SFCC for :med i1
n
·faU 20 ,12 to 1
run a Fo·ssil l Fre )e campaign at the U of
C~ We're the ones fighting fa ir -the Un ·iv·ersity to immed .iately
freeze any new investment
in fossil fuel comp 1aniesJ and
divest from direc ,t owne 1
rsh ip and 1
any commingled
funds
that jnclude fossi .l fuel publ .ic equities and corporate
bonds
withir, 5 years~
-01
ngoing campaigns: Foss .ii fue ll divestment
[ob viously]
·contact: Jonny s .ehrens ··01nathan .b ehrens@uct]llcago.ed
_~J
and Kylah J 1ohnston [J<yJg_hc~i~meiLc om)
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UCh ·ica · o Climate Action Network: We are a coalition of
s tu 1
d -e nts dedicated to ending the consu 1
mption of fqssil fuels
as soon as Jpolitically feasibl~a UCAN ·was part of the city wide Clean Power Coalition th ·at succ ,essfuUy ca _mpaigned t io
shut down Chicago-'s two -coal-fired .power plants in 2012 .and is an acti 'Ve member
of the Chicago v· □ uth Climate
Coalition.
- Ongoing ca~paigns:
Fos .sil fue i divestment
·wi .th SFCC
Contact: Jonny B e lh rens [i91JEthEtn~.J1ce n s ~ uc h ic a 19 09~ d~LJ.l
and Kylah Johnston
(kylahrsi@gmail. 1
com]
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HEALTH & HEALTHCARE

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GlobeMed: Gl1obeMed at UChicag ,o 'Works t ;owa 1
rd global
health equ ·ity. We partner with ASPAT-Peru
to advo _cate for
high 1
quality tuberculo sis car 1
e and 1
educationE We sp read
awarene .ss about g flobal he 1
aith throug lh pan ,el di ·scussions
an 1d community
events.
.
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uchicago@globem~d.grg

C1
ontact:

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Health l ea .ds: H e.alth Leads is -a na 1
tional nonpro fit
organization
dedic .ated t 0 cha 1nging 1how we deliver health
ca .re .. He -alth Leads Chicag 0 mobilizes UChicag 1
0 volunteers
to c -onn ect patient ,s and their fami dies with the b!asi 1c .
resou 1
rces they need to b e healthy~
Contact: Anisha! Ganguly (agang u ly@uc-hjcag □ ~edu]
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· Peer Health Exchange: PHE erlvisions
a future where all
students _have access to the knowledge and skills they need
ta m ake ed 1ucat ed health c lh -oices ,. W 1e do this b1y training
coll lege student volunteers t,□- teach a1comprehensive,
fa ict based l health education curricu lum in Chicago Pubtic
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Schools ..
Canta -ct : _uchicago@peerhea

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1lthe~_9h.?11ng _~ ,-~Q.c g

St -udents for Health E . uit ,: SHE is a student group t lhat
w·orks to fight healthcare i1nequa llity and close the · heB lthcare
g ap □~ th ·e S ouths idle of Chicago. -'We partner , with F-earless
Leading by the Yo uth [FLY] to pres~ur 1
e the Univ 1ers i'ty 1
of
Chicago Medical Center to reopen 1t heir level -one trauma
cente r [t he 1
only one ·□ n the Southside) and . ho ,ld the UCMC .
a ccouritable
for its commitment
to the surro 1unding1
community ..
Ongoing campa ·igns: Tr ·auma center campaign
Contact : Patr ick Oe xter, 1Q~trickhdexte _r @gm~iLpo _
1r.n
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I IMMIGRATION&

=: =.

RACE

Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlcln:
M.E .Ch .A. is a
-. student org 1
aniz ,a ·tion that pro 1motes social justice ,_high er
educati _on, cu lture, afld ._
his t ory by hos t ing various events and
campaigns
related to the Chicano community ., M I.E.Ch M
A at
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UChicag 0 is a c.hapter 1□f th 1
e n.ational organization
.
sa ·me name . .
Co .ntact : mec h adeuchicago @gmail.80~

of the

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0 rg 1anization of Black :S·tud ents : OBS at ·u1Chica1go provides
an 0 rganizational
frame .work to a.d-dress issues of concern
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to the Black community
0 n camp ·us ~,nd at 1
.arge. It is both a
support group and a ,n organization
dledicate 1
d to the pursuit
· of multi ,cultu~al 1
ex 1
pression,
understanding,
a,nd awareness .
Canta -ct : gragevine@uchicago,.edu
or Ashlev :Seym 1□ ur
l[aaseymour@uch
icago.edu]
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Q~~g ~.r-.~~~~iQn.
..-.Qf..-~~t~_.P__
!\ro~ri~-~n.·_$~~~~~~: DLAS ~ nd eav ·o rs
to promote awaren -ess~ with 1in·-and b eyond the La·tino/a
com 1mun ity, ·t ha 1t i·ncorpo 1
rates all! f acets of ou -r c 1ul-tur e
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:ioo

rooted in- lndigeno 1us. Afr 1icanj 1and European ancestry ~It i1s
our , mission to promote
political, socia -I1, culturaJ"' and 1
eth 1nic
aiw areness that fu ·rthers . the progression
oft .he , Latino/ a
community on both a collegiate and a community
plane~
Con .ta lct: olasuchica
o12@grna ·il.com
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Univers 1i . · of ·Chi rca - o Coalition for IITlmi -·rant Ri · hts ':
UCCIR is a group of Un:iversity of Chicag 1
0 studentsl
facu~y,
an 1d staff., as well as community
members d:e dicated 'to
p olitical radvocacy, educat ion, and direct service with
regards _t9 the irn1nigran .t po ._
pulatio n 1
.
Co ,ntact: _
io_f9_.JJ:P_~_i,_r_fg?_g_r.fl_~ _il_~GPJJ1
...
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[ JtjURNALISM

Bl~ckli __tlt _l
M a _. azine is a bimonthly, on .line, student-run
n:ewspaper
u.nder the umbr 1
e'fia of the Organizatio ·n -of ~ lack
Stude 1
nts l~It is a pub lication de •si gned for students
1of co llo 1r to
express their voices a-nd ad ·dress issues more pertinent
to
p-eaple of color~ Visit blackligh1tmagazine.tumb lr.c□ m~
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South Side W eeklV [formerly the Chica go Weekly] ~s a
newsprin t magazine p ,roduced by UChicago students fo ,r
and about the South S_
ide □'f Chi 1
caga ~Its local focus an1d
co 1mmunity-oriented
coverage makes for a refresh ing r iead.
Viisit ----.southsideweekly~c□
. _______
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I LABOR

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Students Dr 1anized and United with Labor: SOUL i:s th 1e
UChic ,ago chapter of United Students
Against Sweatsh 1ops
(USA .SJ. We a 1
re . committed to supp iorting the struggles
of
work ing p1eopte everywhere
fo r workersf
r ights and
eco 1nom 1ic ju ·stice. Recognizing that l our p,ower ·_
as st 1udents is
on campus, we work to nlake bur university more
a-ccauntable
to its workers, whether
they are on ca ·mpus,
making University of -Chicago appare l! a ,cross th e ·world, or
anywhere . in between4
Contact: souLuchicago@gmaiLc
:om or Mjriam Shestack,
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shestack~.JJ_gl]j_C_fill □~ e du

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roRGAN1Z1NG =

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Solid -arity INet work: SSN connects the ILJrniversi'ty
comrn ,unity to Hyde Park a'nd Wo 1
odlavvn~ In both activism ·

Southside

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and civic participation,
SSN mainta ,ins strong reiations ·hips
with its allies~ builds awareness on campu~. and engages
our administration
with a number · of campaigns.
Ongoi -ng campaign ·s: llmpro ive Fin1ancial Aid; UCPD ·Refor 1
m
Contact: Emma 1IL a8o ·unty, ~-l~l;)9uoty~~cbfG _§ _g _
9_~
~q_lJ
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University of Chic ,ago Organizing for Action: OFA at
UChicaga is a student-led initiative to help promote a1nd pass
progressive
le.g1islati on. It provides an outlet for LJ1
Chica go
stu dents to advocat e t ·or reforms on i.m .migrati 1□n1 marriag e
eq1ual1rty,cllimate change policy, Qun violence prev .entionl an1d
health care, and is associated with national □FA.
- Contact: .ot ·a .u chicag .o@g1m~il:__c;;o[rl
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Welcome

to the end ...

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lt1 : ot ftinb --o · uc ictt o
bo · ou .bt!ettm o ?
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a wish listfrom cu.rrel'l.t& past students on what the UofC could be...
su.pporl for campus workers

1.

more administrative

2.

mo.re conversations about white prLV~ege

3. some amount

effree

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pri.ntingfor a[( shtdents
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4. improved She.dent Health Services (faster. better, nicer, less bullshit)
5. more ·convenient ways to get to downtown and the rest

of th.ecity

6. a medical center that supports trauma care on the South Side
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7. more transparency about investments, trustee decisions, ·_landownership,
_J

• L. .... t·
· .. _
an .a--' aanilntsLfa
ive d
-_eclSLons

8. better resources & pay for graduate student tead1i.ng assistants
9.
10.

fewer police ·
improved mental health services(th.at donl kickyou out

ofcounseling

after aquarter)
11.

more bars with music venues

12.

sunnier, happier places to work

13. more support for students living offecampus
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14. more "homework,, that involves being engaged With the Hyde ,
P ark/W oodlawn{W ashington Park/Sou.th.sidecommu.nlt:y

.

Social Justice

Glossary

of Terms

ableistn: a syste111 of ~nherent discrim.ination ~gainst people with
disabilities in favor of peo ple who are not disabled. Might 111anife$tas
eniployers assuntlng that disable d persons are not qualified for .a jo h,
or lack of accessibility or -resources for disabled pers ons~
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binary gender systen:i: a culturally defined code of acceptable
behaviors whi .ch teach that there~
men an .d woinen, who are n1asc,1li ·ne
and feminine, !~d that there is nothing outside this system. The problem.
that occurs when we talk about gend .er is that everything _is set in the
binary system, but the geitder issues that we are talking about exist in a
m.ulti-gender systeJD and do not neatly fit into a binary system.
cisgender:

(lee "basic sexuality & gender tenns")

citizenship: legal n1e111bership in a political conununity that grants
legal rights to political participation and protection by the state. in the
U.S. specifically (as 'With soine other nations), this relationship of citizen ·
v.s. non-citizen creates an underclass of individuals of varying statuses
with fewer rights, o,r without the ability to exercise their human rights.

class: a large ~oup of people who occupy a similar economic position in
the wider society based on inco .me, wealth, property ownership,
education, skills, or authority in the econol11ic sphere . class effects
people both on an econotnic level and aJ'l emotional level ..
class ally: a person froin the inore privilege ,d classes who's attitudes and
behaviors are anti-classist; who is cominitted to increasing their own
understanding
of the is.slles re lated to classism, and is actjvely working
towards elinrlnating classism on many levels ..
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class continu1UD: there are no hard and fast divisions between class
groups. inconie, wealth, ..and occupational status are 0n specua, and niost
of us move a little up -or down the spectra during our lifetime$ ,"
immigrants can change class status from. there country of origin to their ,
new country. sollle people grow up in own class a·nd live as ad .ults in
another. class operates along a continuum or hierarchy.
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class ide1ltity: a label for one category of class experience, s uch as
ruling class , owning class ID.iddle 1class working class, poor.
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cla _ss privilege:

fruits of the inany tangible 0 r intangible unearned
advantages of °higher" class status, such as personal contacts w-ith
e1I1ployers,1good childhood he~thcare.
inherited n1oney, speaking the
same dialect and a~oent as people 'Mth institutional
poweF. .
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classislll.: the systeinatic assignment of characteristics if worth or ab'ilifJ'
based on social class., it includes individu;al attitudes and behaviors;
systems of ·policies and . practices that are set up ·to benefit the upper
classes at the expense of the lower c:;lasses (resulting in drastic inconie
and wealth ine(luality); the rational that supports these systeJDS and this
unequal valuing; and the culture that perpetrates theIIL

ethnicity: a social construct that divides people into smaller social
groups based on characteristics
such as shared sense of group ·
1Dei11bership values, behavioral patt~
language, political and
econoi:nic inte ,rests, history and ancestral geographical base.
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gentrification
: the proc ,ess of renewal, rebuilding and inc~easing
property values accotnpanying the influx of middle class or afflu~nt
people into deteriora~g
neighborhoods that dis :places prio~ usually
poorer residents ,. Gentrification
often leads if?lower-incoD1e
.
oonununities
no longer being able to affo :rd to Jive in the areas they have
histo ·rically lived in. In the pas~ and to~
..gentrifiers have included
'(usually white) ~sts,
hipsters, affluent gay men~ and young
p rofessionala Gentrification
prhnarily ,affects/displaces low-incom.e
conununities,
especially
conununities
of color. - ·
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gender: a social and culttiral expres ;sion of biological sex based on
sociaJly-co nstructed ideas of traditional gender roles. Gender identity
refers to a person's self-conception of being inale, fenlal~ trans, etc
1

(see '!basic sexuality & gender tenns")

gender

expression:

gender

non-conforn1ing:

ge• ,derqueer:

(see -basic sexuality & gender ter.ms")

(see abasic sexuality

& gender terms")

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hegetnonic

~sc~li~ty:
socially and historically constructed
what inen ought -to be, in a way a structure th .at Jinks power to
Jnasculinity.

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heterosexism

·

idea of

·

.: the assu111ption that eve ·ryone is heterosexual

(or should
be). Also, an ideological;,; ·social and cul~al
syste111 that :institutionalizes
. heteronor:mative
behavior such that people .are co 111pelled and assUined
to be hete ·roseDJ.al, and persecuted for all non-hetero norJDative for111-s .of
.
,., re la ;tton
· shi
...
1"'d
·.entity,
_~ ps, OT Olm.ntl11111:ya
beh avtor,
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institutional
racisxn: the net;,NDrk of institutional
structures, policies .1
and practices that create advantages and benefits for White people, and
discrixnination, opp ressio~ and disadvantage for peop ,le of :marginalized
racial groups.
·
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int:ernaliz ,ed dassis1n:
the ·1acceptance and justification of classiSin by
1'11Urkingclass~nd poor people ..exa[Dples include ,: fee]ings of inferiority to
highe ·r-class peo ·ple; disdain or shaine about traditio~I
panerns of class
in •one s fatnily and denial of heritage; feelings of superiority to people
lower on the class spectru111 than o:n.eself; hostil•ty or blaine towards
1

or poor people; and beliefs that classist institutions

other w-orking-class
L-..
are 1ta:rr.

.

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internali _zed iacisn:1: the personal conscious
acceptance by p eople of color 0f the dominant
· · v1ews:r
..
stereo ·types, an d· b.1ases.
Eurocentr1c
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or subcoDScious
societies racist or

interse~donality:
_a theoretical ·tool that addresses 111ultiple discrinlinations and helps understand how d ·ifferent sets of identities
ilnpact on access to rights and opportunities.
Intersectionality
is an
analytical. tool ~r studying, , understanding
and . responding to the ·ways in
which gender intersects with other identities -and how these intersectio -ns
..
. an d·. prI""vii
contr1...bu
_ te to UD1que
expenences
Qf op press1on
. ege. It starts
froxn the pretnise that people live n1ultiple" . layered i.dentities derived
fro1t1social relations, histoiy and the operation of structures of power. Intersection.al an.al-yisisaims to reveal ~ulti .ple identities .t exposing the
diffe ·rent types of discriininati ,on and disa .dvantage that occur as a
· cons ·equence of the COinbination of identities. It aitns to address the
.
-L y, c la
manner
.1"'n which
.·. iacism.,.
·patrtarc.1:.a.
. ss oppression. an~d-""0 t h-_-er sys te~ tns
of discritnination
create inequalities
that structure th .e :relative ·p·ositions
of all folks. Intersectional
analysis pas .its that we ·should not underst-and .
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the coxnbin:ing of identities as additively increasing 0 neJs burden b~t
·instead ..as pro ducing substantively dist'i'nct expe .riences. It is therefo ,re an
indispensablie ~ethodology for developnient .and .human .rights work ..
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i11teTsex: (see ~'basic sexuality&. gender terms,.)

nationality:

the status of .belonging to a particular -nation by birth or
nat ·urali~~on~ a p e·rson can have niore than one nationa1ity or be
nationle ·ss.
·
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oppression: the power and affects of dolTiination~ J1te tern1 oppress.ion
is primarily used to describe how a certain group )(or an individua1) is
being kept down by unjust use of force, authority, _or societal nor01s .
When this is institu 'tionalized formally or info .rrnally in a society; it is
referred to as "systei:na J~ic of institutional oppressio ·n.~ O ,pp resslon is often
covert (hidden) and is lllost coDlll1.0 nly felt and •expres .sed by a
widespread, if unconscious .,aSSUillption that a certain woup of people are
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inferior. _Different kinds of oppression often intersect and build off each ·
. may m
. cl
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o th er . S.u ch. op 1press1on
.•· u d 1
e racism.
sex.1sm.,
1h eterosensn1,,
anttsexnitisrn, ableisrn, ageism, etc.
ft'91Wl11

t ·_arc hy: sys'1elµic........
"" .. ·
1·ize
pa:rt
soae.. tal
-- structures .·tha
. t 1nstttutiona
physical, social and .econontic powerover woIDen..

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in al
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people of color (POC): a term of self-identification
used to refer to
peoples and ethnicities whose ancesual origins are from. Africa, Asia. the
1

Americas, or the Middle East. The ter111_people of color is often ·used
instead of the tern---,llliliority ·(soon to be factually inaccurate, as people of
color will soon constitute a niajority of the US). The terin also etnpha ·sizes
cqmm.on experiences of cultural discrinlination,
colonialism and
·
-im.periali ,sn1, racial discrimination,
·and ·racial oppression.

·prejudice:

a set of 'negative personal beliefs about a soc;:ialgroup that
leads individua1 .s to -prejudge -people fro~ that g,;oup, or the gr<>up in
general~ regartµess of indivjdual difference an10 :ng n1ember f that target ·
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pri~ege
.::unearned social power accorded by the ·form.al and infu n.nal
institutioµs of society to all :meinbers o.f a dom.inant group (such as white
privilege, male privilege; class privilege., etc). Privilege is usually invisible
to those w~o have it because they are taught not t~ see it~ b -ut it ·
1

over those who do not have it

puts them at an advantage

nevertheless

queer: (see "basic sexuality & gender terntS")
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race:

a social

construction

based on the false belief that physical
characteristi CSdetermine one's abi(itiest, behavior, 0pinions, beliefs etc.
'Racial categories are produced socio-politic ally-via power relatio ,ns and
.social practices. Therefore, e~ .though race is 0011,1nonly unde ·rstood as
a •social constru .ct," this system of categorizations
continu~~ to be
perpetuated
bywhite privilege and intemalized
racism amorig people of
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color ..

raciSD1,: ·the systelllatic subordination
of 111e~bers of marginalized ra .cial
groups who have relatively li'f:tlesocial power by members of a dominant
racial grioup. this subordination
is supported. by the actions of
·
individuals,. cultural norms and values,. and iast.itutional structures and
practices of s0\;iety~

·sexisnt:

sexi ~
rm is.a fortn of oppression that ·perpetuates the systen1 of
patriarchy. ""1ere men or masculine spectrum people hold power and
privilege and ·whei'e woinen land fe1ninine-spectru1D
people are
subordinared

to inenfll

·
.

transgender:

(see "basic sexuality .& ·gend er terms")
1

transJDan/ft:rlt~ (see ''basic sexuaJ lity _& gender terDJs"')
..

transsexual:

-

-

..

(see ·"basic sexuality & gender terrns ")

transwoDlan/1nJtf:

(see "basic sexuality & gender teriiis•)

-whit:~privilege:

the unquestio ·ned and uneanted set of advantage~,
entitleinen~
benefits, and choice .&·bestowed on peop 1le because they a·re
white. generally xnost white people wh 0 experience such privilege do so
·
f tt.
..
WI "'th
- ,Out b.
-·etng CODSClOUSO
1

-

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uc,.. l\ ~

·=--~~b-~-,ia~-~--·-te--"
-r~-that-ref
ers

-- . -... 111"'"'.:."".----:t--ra_n_s_g_e_nd_
' - -=-er

1

fO p&Dp1a,_w_h
_o_. _-:,..
__

broadly

deYiat -e .from 1he ir assigned gender or the binary gender
·system~
including
intersex : people. transsexua
ls. cross-dressers
~ tronsve -strtes,
genderqueer
people,
drag qu-e--ens/kings, two-splrlt
people., and others;
traNS people do not necessarily
chO~~
10 alfe r their bodies hormonally
a1
nd/or surgicaHy .and may or may not identify as FTM/MTF
1

1

-

.-

yranese ,xual

-

..- -

o~

older

.

te

rm wnic:h originated
.

__

typ1collv referring
t~
.sexual ~reassignment
surgery (SRS)

communitieS,

in medico 1Vpsych01oOicot

_ ...d~ ._I.dual whO seek .s ,or has had
an '" "'

gender
non-conforr11ing
- individuals
whose
_dif f·eren Jrom ttie social _exp~a
-iions based

gender

is

expression

on their assigned

s-ex

gend ,erq 1ueer - a tsr~
d
• • •· use - by some "' d,. .,-:- • wveen Qende 1rs or .- - ,
•n _,vldUOJs woo id 'e . tP · identify QS f as netfhor man nor woman•
- - -.n , ,.y as
- rans or P~rsue Physical
Ch
. ~ may o, may not
~
anges
.
belhA•

-

-

cisgender
- individuals
who identilV wifhm or as their lilrthassigned
gender
ond present
with a congruent
gender
expression
(i ..e. a non- ·trans person)
--

1ronsman/FTM
- _a transperson
assigned
female
identif_ies o ,n the mg~ spec .~m/has
_male gender

ot

. -

-

birth who
identity

queer
(adj,. _) ·umbrella t,erm used by individuals
to d .escribe the i r
sexual identity and/or
gender
-identity
that does not fit ·fhe binarie ·s
of gay/straight/bi
or ma1 ·etfema l e. or anyone
whose sexual
orient aJi.on or · gender · idenifity doesn't match society ·•s expectations;
oriig1nated
as o dero gafory
·wor ,d and is being reclaimed
a 1nd u~d
as a statement
o-f empowerment
by some peopt ·e and l h.as different
meanings
to different
people ·

I

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a

i.

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I

-

-

I
I

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-

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II

heterononn iatfve - a way of looking at the world with the
ass 1
u1mp1io 1
n 1that everyone
is het~osexual
and looks at the
wor ·1d1 in a heterosexual
way

I

I

• I
i

-

g ·ender expression
- how ' one expresses
,oneselft
In Jerms of dress
<;.1nd/0 r b 1ehaviors
that society charoc1ert.zes
0s "''masc 1
unne" or
·~feminine.~• may o ·lso be androgynous
or somefhin~
etse a lt ogether
1

1

1

to be on ally · to LGB , queer1 and trans folks ;?
_
There's
too much info out there to ·print here ....check out these links!
How lhOmaphobia affects -straight peopl 1e: gsan ·etwark ~.orglfiles/resourceslstraightAIIy...pdf
·Tne Cisgender privHege checkUst: q .ueersunited.blogspot .com/2008/QB/cisgender-privlliegeoheckRsl..hfml
· - so you wanna be an a,ny?: mnomedenimp. wo ,rdpre~.com/2010/05111/guest-post~o-youwan ,na-be-an-ally-huhl
Wont

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these are n ro'f the
sole or
authoritative
·
deflnffions of these
useful terms (duh} .

a. br1ef g Jossaryof terms Iin case you skirrmed the SJ glossary too fast
& missed these race.-spedfic gems)
borrowed from1HlampshlreCoHege •s Dis.orientation zine
& reprinrted (and updated) from UChicagoDisO 2,010

,.

RACE: a social consmud:ian created by E~ropean Wh:ltes based on
the fals•e beHef that biological or physical characteris t ics dete_rm
1
ine
one•s abiliitiies.behaviort opinions , belief, etc. Racial categories are
produced sodo -politicali~ via potNer relations and social pradices .
Thefefore. even ~hvugh race is c<>mmon
l'Y understood as a "'so c.ial
construct.,'' this system of caitegorizat ion continues to be perpetuated
by white privilege and inteirnaliizedracism among people of color ..
1

--

ETHNICITY: a social construct
ha t div ides pe o pile into s1
maJII
er

.. soc+al groups . based
on dlaracteliist ics sudh ·as snared
sense of group membership,
values.,
behavtora l
patterns.
language, po~itica & economic
NATi ONAL ITV! the startusof
inrterests. history,, and ancestral
belongng
to a par f cular
geog~apllica t base.
nation
by .
birth
or

membership m a
poiilkai community that . grants legal
rights to po liticaI participation and
protecti on by the state . l_
n the US natu:ralwzation.A person can
specifically (as with same other
have
m0 re
than1 one
nc1rtions)
i lh is relations hip o · cit izen vs
natl onality or be nation-tess .
non--cmrtize
n . creates· an underclass of
indiwduats · of varying sta ·tuses with WHITE
PRIVILEGE:
the
fewer rights. or without. the ability to unquestioned & unearnerl set
exercise thei r ~hum~ rights.
of advantages. entitl eme nls.

CITIZENSHIP:
legal

1

1

1

I NSTif UTtONAL
1

RACISM;

the

of

network

institutional
structures.,
poJjdes. and p ractlces that cr:eate
adv~ges
& bene~lts tor white peop!et

and discrimination, oppression, &
disadvantage for
p1eop~
from
marg1inaJizedracial gro.ups.

lt-JTERNALIZEDRACISM:. the

IRACtSM :

ttle
sysle matic
subardinatian of members o·f
marg inalized racial groups whr0

have relatively Iittle social power
by· members of a domjinanl racial
gfioup.

This

subordinalioo
s~pported _ by the ad ions

of

benefits 1 a choices bestowed .
individuaJs, cl.dtural no11m
s &
·on_people solely because they
v1
aJues,1and i stitution a11structures
are whne~ Generally most and pra~ice of society..

people who e"PCrience such
1

prhll lege do so wit hout being
PREJUDICE: a set of negatir.te
conscious of it See pgs .
I
personal beliefs~ about a sociaJ
for e~amp\es of other types of ·
1

privilege~

gPoup that leads incfrvid1JaIs to

.

p1iejudge people from that group 1
or the
group
in general,
1

conscious or subconscious
acceptance of the dominant society's racist or Eurocentric views~!
stereotypes .. and biases of one's own ethnic or racial group by people of
personaJ

colorr~H manifests itself insidiously through patterns of thinlkingm
1feel~ngl
and behaving that may resu II in ·feeli 1n~ of i'1feriority or self-haired ,
hostllity or violence toward other people of fJoJor, fe,ellirtg~ of superiority
over people of the· same or other marginalized raciaJ groups, placing
higher value
or targeting1J members of a group who appear more
"white . and beNefs·that racist instiMions are fair.

individual
differences among members · of

regardless ·

1

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I

.

.

of

that tar-getgroup:

1

ont

is

I



tf ·~ou.

~

-

sf:tLL ~a.kl: "-"Olre..
... he.ire o...,re.a...

fe,u.,of

a •

ou.r su.99esl:tol-\.S~

·read:


The University

of Chicago's Articles
(available
here)
- - -·- ·- - - .

Incorporation
'

•· The Kalvel).

of

Report, which outJines the
adherence
to "political
(written
in 1.967 by a faculty
available
p.~~)

University's

neutrality"
committee;

w

P 1Wlo1Friere,



Jane Jacobs~ TI"ie Death and Life of Great
Ameftc ,an Cities (with a section on ·the
'Wbldy City & more speoitlca.lly
HP 1)

1

• ~ebeooa Janowitz., Peop]e 1 Politics, and
]deas ofJl:yde Park


Edwaridl Said, Ori ,entaJ1sm.



~~

~c_

~ Y.

Dayts Reader~ edited

1



by

Joy Jam.es



The Revlsion ,arfes I a
docum ,entary on
education reform and the
Texas State Boc 1rd of Ed.



UCh ica ,go on iTune 1
sU
{see the litte,rv sec l ion 1}

• and so many more that you .probably
q.on't have time fior (oh, 'HUM)

NPR's tw 1
0-part "Th :ls Ameri 1can Life" ser ies on
Harper H·i1gh Sch1001



Free UChlcago podcasts (& some videos)
iTunes IU

01
n

listen to that pan iel you missed, the
p,rofressar whose class you couldn't get into, the
latks ...Hamantash 1D@bate ~.. th@ list g0 1@s on
1



-

UChicago has a n1umber of talented musi 1cal
groups · (Unl¥erslty Symp hony Orchest ,ra.,, Motet
Chair, Wind Ensemble., ai cappella groups, etc ..)
that have_ (often freel con ,certs! See
m1usic_.uch1cago.edu
1

Paris is Burning, a 1990
documentary
chronicl ing .
the ball culture of NYC ·
and the African.
American .. Latino, gay ..
and trans-gender
com 1mu 1nities Jnvo l v 1ed in 'it
1

·



Causas ~--a 7-part

Un1natural

documentary
series
exploring 11aciar and socioeconomic
disparities in
· he rolth (av□ Ucble 0 1
nfneJ 1

I

Peda@ftV of ·the Oppressed



-


'

1

-1 11 •



~

--

.-

, ..

••-.-.a.-..

w

-

..



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1



.

00
FiND

ouR

AUactMty ·is
being monitored.
1

PDF

TH E ·u 'N I V E R S I T ·y O .F

In cocp@ratlcn """

the

..
-,
HI
-.
AG
Q
·1nr·iativefor
C . C ·.· ·.-· .. ·
Protectim
Community

1

20 ·:L!,
__.Q \\-

.·~

disorientation

¾
20 ·10~ .

..!I.I.. please oopy & distribute freely

I l

Item sets